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"VON" 2003 Obituary


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VON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-28 published
Manfred Friedrich WIRTH (November 17, 1913 - March 21, 2003)
Manfred died suddenly but peacefully exactly 1 year after his beloved Lisl. He leaves behind sadly grieving son Alfred, daughter Elizabeth (Lou FAUTEUX,) grandchildren Elizabeth and Susan WIRTH (Ali POURAZIM,) and Eric BRAND (Anita) as well as sister Beate FLUECK- WIRTH, sister-in-law Marianne MAYO and many devoted Friends & relatives around the world. Manfred was born in Vienna, Austria to Hofrat Dr. Alfred Ludwig WIRTH and Beate Karola, née PETRINI VON MONTEFERRI, and graduated with a PhD in law prior to his 23rd birthday. He was a director of the Austrian Steel Company (VOEST) before emigrating to Canada post-war, and started his Canadian working life at Algoma Steel Corporation in Sault Ste Marie, Ontario. In 1958 he founded Wirth Limited (now Wirth Steel), building the company into a major international trader. Since 1993 and until his death, he was President and Chief Executive Officer of MF Wirth Rail Corp. Manfred loved the arts, especially opera and the visual arts. He was also a history buff, and a generous donor to McGill University, the University of Alberta and Wilfred Laurier University as well as Arts Knowlton and other Canadian institutions. He was a member of various clubs and societies, a recipient of the Order of Austria, and a keen skier, swimmer and golfer. A private farewell with immediate family has taken place; a memorial service to celebrate his long and eventful life will be held in Montreal at St.Andrew's-Dominion-Douglas Church, 687 Roslyn Ave. Westmount, Quebec on Monday May 26, 2003 at 2: 00 P.M. Anyone desiring to make a donation in Manfred's memory may wish to consider McGill University: Designation Faculty of Music, 3605 de la Montagne, Montreal H3G 2M1, the Foundation of the University Women's Club Montreal Inc, 3529 Atwater Avenue, Montreal H3H 1Y2, or a charity of your choice. Condolences may be sent to 24 Somerville Avenue, Montreal, Quebec H3Z 1J2

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VON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-08-01 published
STOPPS, Evelyn (SCROGGIE)
After a short illness, died at St. Joseph's Health Centre on July 30th, aged 80. Evelyn was born in Chatham, Ontario to George E. SCROGGIE and the former Clarice Louis VON GUNTEN. Later Evelyn won several scholarships at Westdale Collegiate Institute in Hamilton enabling her to attend the University of Toronto, Victoria College, for her B.A. degree after which she moved to the University of Saskatchewan where she obtained an M.A in Physiology. Returning to Ontario she obtained an M.D. in 1952 from the University of Toronto, being one of only nine women in a class of 176.
In 1954 she married another physician, Jim STOPPS. The next few years were devoted to raising a family of three girls. Winnie is now an architect living in Boston. Jennie is an interior designer in Toronto and Susan is a jeweller and silversmith also living in Toronto. Evelyn developed a family practice in Bloor West Village in Toronto while also working at Women's College Hospital and The University of Toronto Health Centre. Evelyn died a much-loved doctor, wife, mother and grandma. Her great joys were her patients, her family (now including four grandchildren Max, Katy, Hannah and Nicholas) and the world of nature. Funeral arrangements are private and include a family gathering of remembrance at the cottage.

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VON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-11-25 published
In praise of humble, decent princess
By Anthony REINHART, Tuesday, November 25, 2003 - Page A12
She took many a meal at Swiss Chalet, where she had her own booth and the wait staff called her Candy Lady. Louise LIEVEN, you see, always had a handful of Werther's Originals for the people she loved, and in her world, that meant just about everyone.
Others called her Mom, since Mrs. LIEVEN was always ready with a wise word or a $20 bill for a neighbour in need.
Few ever called her by her official title -- Her Serene Highness Princess Louise Marie -- but then, neither did she. Mrs. LIEVEN, who died a week ago at 90, knew more than most about hardship and humility, and to her mind, deeds carried more weight than words.
Her impact on those close to her was evident yesterday, when about 100 people crammed a Toronto funeral chapel to pay tribute to the Latvian-born woman who came by her title through marriage to her "Prince Johnny" -- Charles Jean Christophe LIEVEN -- in Toronto in the late 1970s.
"She embraced people without regard for their racial or ethnic background," Mrs. LIEVEN's niece, Laila EBERHARDT, told the gathered crowd, many of them neighbours from the East York high-rise where she died last week.
Mrs. LIEVEN's appreciation for decency was hard won.
Born in 1913 to a wealthy family, the young Louise VON DZIENGEL enjoyed a privileged upbringing in Riga, the Baltic nation's capital, and counted young Prince John LIEVEN among many Friends. She married another man, however, and as the winds of war blew across Europe, gave birth to a daughter in March, 1940.
Everything changed three months later, when Stalin's Red Army rolled into Latvia, made it a Soviet republic, and began deporting the upper classes to Russia -- people like the VON DZIENGELs and the LIEVENs, who shared a Germanic background and Christian faith.
Louise's father sought refuge in Germany, while her mother and aunt stayed behind to mind the family assets. Her father soon died of a heart attack, while her mother and aunt were shipped to Siberia.
Fearing for the life of her child, she left her husband and fled with the baby to Sweden -- only to lose her little girl to pneumonia months later.
"Louise was alone, in a foreign land, without any means of supporting herself," Ms. EBERHARDT told the congregation yesterday. "But Louise was a survivor."
As the war raged, she continued to drift farther from her Eastern European home, to Denmark, then to Spain, Argentina and Mexico in the years that followed. She was working alone as a seamstress in Mexico City when her mother, released after 15 years in a Siberian prison camp, joined her.
When her mother died, Louise "was looking to reconnect and reach out to people dear to her," and that's when she learned, from a friend in Germany, that John LIEVEN was living in Toronto.
She contacted him and learned he, too, had his first marriage blown in separate directions by the Second World War. The prince visited Mexico and the rest was history: the pair, well into their 60s by then, fell madly in love. They settled in Toronto, where John was a salesman for a food distributor.
Mrs. LIEVEN lost her prince in December, 1996, after a series of strokes. But she did not lose her love of people.
That much was apparent at yesterday's funeral, where 10 people shared their thoughts of Mrs. LIEVEN.
One neighbour spoke of the coffee parties she organized for the building's seniors last winter, and how she'd always kiss him on both cheeks, one for him, the other for his wife. Another recalled how she bought Christmas gifts for three young boys whose father had died. A woman, widowed around the same time as Mrs. LIEVEN, talked about how they'd meet each afternoon for mutual support: "We'd have a little drink and we'd settle all the world's problems," she said.
And Sandy SRIPATHY, her neighbour across the hall, talked through tears about the lady she called Mom.
A few weeks ago, Mrs. LIEVEN confided that she might not make it to Christmas, as she was feeling ill.
She told Mrs. SRIPATHY to watch her door, and to check on her if the newspaper was still hanging from the knob by late morning.
Last Tuesday, Mrs. SRIPATHY watched the princess fetch her paper as usual, but later that day, she learned that her neighbour had died.
After a brief reception upstairs, the guests filed from the funeral home, but not before making one last stop: at a crystal candy bowl, perched by the door.

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VON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-06 published
Died This Day -- Nils VON SCHOULTZ, 1838
Saturday, December 6, 2003 - Page F10
Revolutionary and soldier born in Finland; led rebel forces in Battle of Windmill near Prescott, Ontario, one month previously hanged at Fort Henry with eight others; gallant to the last, his will provided 400 pounds for the widows and orphans of Canadian militiamen killed in the fighting.

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