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"VAL" 2003 Obituary


VALCHEV  VALE  VALENTIN  VALENTINE  VALIQUETTE  VALPY 

VALCHEV o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-10-16 published
Sludge truck driver dies
By Jeff GRAY/GREY, Thursday, October 16, 2003 - Page A20
A driver hauling Toronto sewage sludge to Michigan died yesterday after being partly buried while unloading his truck.
Police say Jovan SAROVIC, 38, of Kitchener, Ontario, was unloading his tractor trailer around 6: 30 a.m. yesterday at the Carleton Farms Landfill in Michigan, southwest of Detroit's airport.
Detective Corporal Michael CZINSKI of the Sumpter Township Police said Mr. SAROVIC was trying to dump his load of sludge into a trench about 4.5 metres deep.
While he was standing behind the vehicle, the truck's doors apparently flew open prematurely, knocking him into the trench and dumping about a quarter of the truck's load of 35 tonnes of sludge on top of him.
Michael VALCHEV, Mr. SAROVIC's employer, said it was too early to say what caused the accident. "The first priority is to do what the family would like us to do."

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VALE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-07-23 published
FRANCK, Florence (née VALE)
Died peacefully at Eden Manor on July 18, 2003, following a long illness at the age of 94. She was the widow of the well known Toronto artist Albert J. FRANCK, and a noted painted and writer in her own right. Friends of Florie who may wish to honour her memory are asked to send a donation to Nellie's Hostels for Women.

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VALENTIN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-05-12 published
THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON, Katherine (Kae) PLAUNT
Died peacefully at York Extendicare, Sudbury, on May 9, 2003 in her 90th year, with her children at her side. Cherished daughter of the late Mildred and W.B. PLAUNT. Predeceased by her loving husband, Dr. R. MacKay THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON in 1981. Dearly remembered by her children: Andy (Mandy TAILOR/TAYLOR) of Toronto, Kathie THOMAS (Richard,) Judy MAKI (Tom) and Robin (Mary Lou McKINLEY) of Sudbury. Adored Nana to Allen DAY (Erin CAMERON), Andy DAY (Carla GIUSTO), Kathy, Jodi, Alex, Nikki, Fraser, Michael, Jamie, Scott and great-grandmother to Alexander. Beloved sister of Marian MAHAFFY (Guy, predeceased,) Bill PLAUNT, predeceased (Agnes,) Helen VOLLANS (Maurice, predeceased,) Donald PLAUNT, predeceased, Royal Canadian Air Force, World War 2 and Jean BENNESS, predeceased (Barry, predeceased.) Loving sister-in-law to George WRIGHT of Hanover, Ruth LAWS of Almonte, Murray THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON of Ottawa and Muriel VALENTIN of Stuttgart, Germany. Auntie Kae will be fondly remembered by many nieces and nephews and their families in the PLAUNT and THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON clans.
Born in Renfrew on April 29, 1914, she moved to Sudbury in 1924 where her father established his lumber business. She attended Central Public and Sudbury High School, Branksome Hall and graduated from the School of Nursing, University of Toronto, in 1937. After working in Toronto in public health, she returned to Sudbury the following year where she met and married Mac.
Kae loved to golf and curl, and took an avid interest in her family's history. She was very talented in the traditional arts, enjoying knitting, quilting and cooking. As an active community volunteer, she belonged to the Imperial Order of the Daughters of the Empire where she was Regent and to the Salvation Army as an organizer for the annual fund raising drive and board member. She loved to travel with her husband and Friends, but her favourite place in the world was Lake Pogamasing where her parents established a family camp in 1941 and where she spent every summer with her family. She loved to entertain her Friends and her children's Friends, especially at Pog. We were blessed to have a mother and grandmother who stressed the importance of family, community and responsibility. She loved to bring people together and do things for them, to share her interests and her talents, she was kind and considerate to all she met, and along with Dad taught us how to dance and have fun.
Special thanks from the family to Dr. Reg KUSNIERCZYK and his staff, the Walford staff and Dr. ROCH and staff on the fifth floor of York Extendicare for their devoted and caring attention to Mother.
In lieu of flowers, the family would appreciate donations to Young Men's Christian Association Sudbury.
Memorial service in the R.J. Barnard Chapel, Jackson and Barnard Funeral Home, 233 Larch Street, Sudbury, Tuesday, May 13th, 2003 at 11: 30 a.m. Cremation followed by interment at Lake Pogamasing. Friends may call 6-9 p.m. Monday, or gather in the chapel after 11 a.m. Tuesday.

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VALENTINE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-06 published
The day the music didn't die
Beloved Toronto trumpeter credited with helping preserve a unique form of New Orleans jazz
By Sarah LAMBERT Thursday, March 6, 2003 - Page R9
Toronto -- The tightly knit world of New Orleans traditional jazz has lost one of its greats with the death, last month, of Cliff (Kid) BASTIEN, leader of Toronto's treasured Happy Pals.
The trumpeter is credited as having nothing less than single-handedly kept alive the unique, raw, New Orleans style of jazz, through his leadership and mentorship of hundreds of musicians.
Saddened fans and musicians filed into the city's Grossman's Tavern all week last month to pay tribute to Mr. BASTIEN at the long-time home of the Happy Pals, where the walls are lined with photos of his fans and musicians. It was a send-off worthy of New Orleans, birthplace of the kind of jazz Mr. BASTIEN played with his seven-piece bands, the Camelia Jazz Band and later the Happy Pals, during the 30 or so years he played at the Toronto landmark.
"He was never late. Never, never ever, said Christine LOUIE, whose family inherited Mr. BASTIEN's Saturday-afternoon gig when Al GROSSMAN sold the bar in 1975.
So it was with sinking hearts on February 8 that his loyal audience and band members watched the minute hand tick past 4 o'clock, waiting for him to arrive, brass trumpet in hand.
When he was found later that afternoon still sitting in his armchair, apparently looking up a new song in his hymn book, the Happy Pals played on and raised a glass in tribute to their leader who died as he lived, surrounded by music. He was 65 years old.
Noonie SHEARS, a long-time friend and leader of the traditional impromptu parade that would inevitably snake through Grossman's as Saturday afternoon wound down, said she thought Mr. BASTIEN was looking up I'll Fly Away, the old gospel song recently dusted off in the movie O Brother, Where Art Thou?
The band played it for the first time at Mr. BASTIEN's official memorial at Grossman's the Saturday following his death.
Born in 1937 in London's East End, Mr. BASTIEN emigrated to Canada in 1962 after a stint in New Orleans. It was there that he heard trumpeter (Kid) Thomas VALENTINE play and, experiencing a kind of epiphany, Mr. BASTIEN followed him from club to club and studied his style. It ultimately inspired a lifelong ambition to keep alive New Orleans-style traditional jazz.
A purist who drew a distinction between his chosen genre of music and the more popularized Dixieland Jazz, Mr. BASTIEN once said: "Had I never heard that music, I wouldn't have become a musician. I wouldn't play anything else."
I Like Bananas, Caledonia, All of Me and Louisiana Vie en Rose were just a few of his standards. But, as Happy Pals' trombonist Roberta TEVLIN explained, Mr. BASTIEN wasn't content to simply recycle the old chestnuts.
"Cliff kept adding songs. I've probably played 1,000 different tunes with him. He was particularly notorious for finding songs outside the standard jazz list, said Ms. TEVLIN, who joined the band 20 years ago, along with her saxophonist husband, Patrick.
Bob Dylan, Creedence Clearwater Revival, Western Swing numbers, Nigerian folk songs and Dean Martin could all tumble out during a set, said drummer Chuck CLARKE.
Mr. BASTIEN's Friends and peers point out that he was known for three primary qualities: His love of music, his scorn for fame or publicity and his mentoring of local musicians.
During the memorial at Grossman's, Downchild Blues Band headman Donny WALSH arrived from Florida to sit in with his harmonica, as he had done regularly with Mr. BASTIEN in the 1970s. Juno-nominated bluesman Michael PICKETT was there, as well as jazz singer Laura HUBERT, formerly of the Leslie Spit Treeo, pianist Peter HILL, The Nationals and many more.
From the worldwide New Orleans jazz community, among those who came to pay their respects were saxophonist Jean-Pierre ALESSI of France, trumpeter Roger (Kid Dutch) UITHOVEN of Orlando, Florida, clarinetist Kjeld BRANDT from Denmark and Toronto's Brian TOWERS, Jan SHAW and Joe VAN ROSSEM.
"I cannot imagine the Toronto traditional jazz scene without Cliff BASTIEN and his raw, emotional New Orleans-style jazz, Mr. TOWERS wrote in a notice posted on the Internet shortly after he learned of the death of his friend.
"He was probably the most popular and influential figure on the Toronto traditional jazz scene. He taught many others to play their instruments in the style and introduced thousands to the joys of New Orleans traditional jazz.
"We went to Grossman's after our own gig and Jan and I played some hymns with the Happy Pals. A sadder and more emotional scene I have rarely seen."
Toronto musician Joanne MacKELL, leader of the Paradise Rangers, wonders how things might have been if she had not met Mr. BASTIEN when she was just starting out.
"Though I was young and inexperienced, Kid would always invite me up to sing, Ms. MacKELL said, recalling how the band took her under its wing when she discovered them in the early 1970s.
"Kid didn't care about money or popular opinion. He filled Grossman's Tavern every Saturday for some 30 years because he played great music with honesty and integrity and he inspired me to try and do the same."
Until just last year, Mr. BASTIEN, who feared flying, avoided the lure of the road, taking only an annual sojourn to New Orleans for the French Quarter Festival. Finally, in the fall of 2002, he accepted an invitation to tour Scandinavia with the Danish/Swedish band New Orleans Delight, playing with George BERRY on tenor sax. A new Compact Disk is due to be released this spring.
His official recordings are few, numbering about a dozen, as Mr. BASTIEN preferred to play to an audience. Though, as Ms. TEVLIN pointed out: "There are bootleg tapes all over the place."
His legacy, the band says, is keeping the New Orleans style of jazz alive.
"Kid Thomas VALENTINE was one of the greats, and when he was gone, Kid BASTIEN carried on. Kid BASTIEN was one of the greats, and now Kid's gone. So who's going to carry the music on now? We will, said saxophonist Mr. TEVLIN on behalf of the Happy Pals, who intend to continue the Saturday-afternoon tradition at Grossman's.
In another side to his life, Mr. BASTIEN was an accomplished commercial artist whose hand-crafted signs, woodwork and acid-etched glass can be seen in many local pubs, including Toronto's Wheat Sheaf Tavern. His work can be found across Ontario, Quebec, British Columbia and California, as well as in Europe.
Mr. BASTIEN's wish was to be buried in New Orleans.

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VALENTINE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-14 published
Pamela Joan VALENTINE (née HOBKINSON)
She will no longer be seen happily driving her yellow Volkswagon convertible around the Saanich Peninsula on Vancouver Island. Pam died peacefully of a brain tumour on March 11th, 2003 in Island View Place Care facility in Saanichton after an illness of several months which first became evident while on holiday in France. Pam was born in Harrogate, England, in 1923 but spent her childhood in Lytham-St.-Annes where her parents, Frank and Nora Hobkinson managed a spa and swim- ming pool. She became a Junior Champion swimmer. She graduated from the physiotherapy school in Manchester and after a period with the Royal Air Force Rehabilitation Unit in Chessington, near London, she joined the 31st British General (military) Hospital with the Allied forces in Klagenfurt, Austria in 1946. There she met Howard (always known to her as Val), a medical officer in the same hospital. On discharge from the Forces, they were married in 1948. Their first home was in Leicester, England, where they both worked at the Leicester General Hospital. Pam as a physiotherapist and Howard as a paediatric registrar. In 1951 they settled in Market Deeping in Lincolnshire where Pam became a familiar sight driving her 1920 Standard 12 to and from her work as a physiotherapist at the Stamford Hospital. Nicola (Nicki) was born in 1952. In 1953 Pam and Howard emigrated to Canada where, after some false-starts, they settled in Saint Thomas, Ontario, where their second daughter, Robin, was born. Pam initiated a physiotherapy department at the local hospital. Howard practiced as a paediatrician. Their next move was to London, Ontario, where Pam worked for many years at the Crippled Childrens' Centre (now the Thames Valley Childrens' Centre). She became Department head where she was much loved and admired for her tactful management skills and her encouragement of junior colleagues. In 1985 both Pam and Howard (as Professor of Paediatrics at the University of Western Ontario) retired. In 1986 they moved to the Saanich Peninsula on Vancouver Island where Pam made a wonderful home looking out over the Gulf Island toward Mount Baker. Pam, never idle, took courses in the University of Victoria, gaining, in her 77th year a B.A. in Women's Studies, an achievement of which she was immensely proud. Pam and Howard were insatiable travellers: The Caribbean, much of Europe, Australia, East and North Africa, China and, furthest afield, the Marquesa Islands. Pam was always cheerful, vital, interested in all aspects of life: a loving wife to Howard, a devoted mother to Nicki and Robin, a very dear grandmother to Tanya, Alison and Andrea and a much loved mother-in-law to Paul and Andrew. She was so happy that all her family live nearby. The family members are most grateful to the superb, devoted and loving care given to Pam in her last weeks by the staff of the Island View Place Care facility, Saanichton. For those she has left behind there will be a void in their hearts but a bounty of wonderful memories. At Pam's request there is to be no formal funeral service, but a celebration of her life will be held at her home, Treetops House. Memorial donations may be made to the Scholarship Fund of the Canadian Federation of University Women, Saanich Peninsula, Box 20062, Monk's Letter Box, Sidney, British Columbia V8L 5C9. First Memorial Funeral Services (250) 658-5244.

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VALIQUETTE o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-10-29 published
Edward MARYCH
Unexpectedly on Tuesday, October 21, 2003 at the Manitoulin Health Centre age 66 years.
Fondly known on the Manitoulin as "Eddie the Pilot." He was a bush pilot here in the North in his early years and then flew for Air Canada for 28 years. Retiring to enjoy the family cottage in Sheguiandah, planning to make it home, thus moving from Holland Landing.
Beloved husband of Deanna (née VALIQUETTE,) cherished father of Philip and wife Barb of Hanmer, Nicholas and wife Terry of Stroud, Paula and wife Wendy of London. Special grandfather of Elliot, Jason, Zackary, and Joshua. Predeceased by grand_son Robert.
Will always be remembered by cousin Lydia KIT and family and in-laws Clayton (predeceased) and Betty, Aubrey and Doreen, Norris and Linda, Dennis and Sandra, Irene and Leora (predeceased). Loved by many nieces and nephews.
Visitation was from 2 - 4 and 7 - 9 on Friday, October 24. Funeral service was on Saturday, October 25 at 11 am at St. Bernard's Catholic Church. Dan LAROUCHE officiating. Island Funeral Home.

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VALPY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-01-25 published
'Death has never fazed me'
Joyful teenager taught children and parents how to live with cancer
By Michael VALPY Saturday, January 25, 2003, Page F11
Cory MAESTRELLO didn't just have cancer, he was a philosopher of cancer. This week he left life celebrated, something he would have considered appropriate for every young person inflicted with his disease.
He was a month short of his 18th birthday. He believed cancer was a gift that had enriched his life.
He died remembered for his infectious enthusiasm, his joy, his grin, his insights into living with a terminal illness, the love he showed to other sufferers, his toughness and his inclination to do impromptu Riverdance imitations in hospital elevators.
On Tuesday afternoon, lying in a hospital bed in Sudbury, Ontario, with pneumonia, he told his father Art: "I'm going to beat this." He was dead a few hours later.
His Sudbury high school, St. Benedict Catholic Secondary School, cancelled exams, declared a "Cory Day" and allowed its students to go home.
The lead singer of a student band in which he had once played composed a song for him. Students from high schools across the city turned up to sign a Cory poster in St. Benedict's chapel.
CJOH-Television, the Canadian Television Network outlet in Ottawa, broadcast a 3½-minute tribute to him on its 6 o'clock news, part of a documentary-in-the-making of his life that now will never be completed. The station's vice-president of news and public affairs, Max KEEPING, was to attend Cory's funeral mass today.
Many members of the Ottawa Senators hockey team planned to attend a memorial service for him at Ottawa's Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario.
Parents of other children with cancer being treated at the hospital were devastated by the news that he had died, said palliative care nurse Marilyn CASSIDY. " There have been so many families calling."
Cory had befriended and counselled them. He had taught them, parents and children, how to live with cancer and the process of dying.
Interviewed last November for a Globe and Mail Focus article on how to live life at the edge of death, he said: "Death has never fazed me. The only thing that's fazed me is not getting the chance to live this life . . . and I've lived more in two years [with cancer] than most people will live in their entire life, and I appreciate that."
Cory MAESTRELLO, the son of a retired mine worker, revelled in living for his last two years.
"I feel there's a path out there for me," he said. "Be it by God or whatever the higher power is, I always feel there's a path set out for me."
He visited with dying children in the hospital, even after doctors told him that he himself was beyond treatment. He spoke at dead children's memorial services.
He approached Mr. KEEPING last year and asked if he could appear on CJOH's annual fundraising telethon for the hospital. Mr. KEEPING agreed.
Cory was on air for an hour, talking about what it was like to have cancer and showing photographs of Serge, his closest friend at the hospital, who had died. Mr. KEEPING called his presence "compelling."
Cory said excitedly afterward: "Working on the telethon was a blast. The words that I said helped people. It's given me the tools to help people. I don't care if I die tomorrow."
He talked to his Globe and Mail interviewer about the joy he felt with life. "Your very best day is probably my worst day," he said.
He talked about the importance of each day. "I always let everyone know I love them," he said, "just in case I don't get the chance to. I've got to say everything that I need to say today. I may not be here tomorrow to say it."
Said Ms. CASSIDY: " You sometimes found yourself asking if he was too good to be true. He was the real thing, big-time. He was a very special kid" -- a hero to other youngsters with cancer, she said, who faced his own adversity with inner strength and inner ability.
Cory and Max KEEPING became Friends after the CJOH telethon. The station executive took him to Senators' games and introduced him to the players. People introduced to Cory rarely, if ever, forgot him.
He had a delightful, buzzy energy, with an intelligence that measured off the Richter scale, said Nic BATTIGELLI, one of Cory's St. Benedict teachers who gave a eulogy for him at his funeral.
He was charming, and attractive to girls -- frequently girls older than himself. Mr. BATTIGELLI recalled him taking a beautiful Grade 13 student to an event while he was still in Grade 9.
Mr. KEEPING recalled taking Cory to a party for his 30th anniversary as a television broadcaster just before Christmas (Cory was living at the children's hospital's Ronald McDonald House; he went home to Sudbury at Christmas and never returned).
At 2 a.m., Mr. KEEPING suggested to Cory that it was maybe time to to leave. Cory replied that there were still two people at the party, and as long as someone was partying, he wanted to party.
Mr. KEEPING said: "I feel so good that even in six months this kid could teach me how important today is . . . that what's important is what you do with today. He turned on a light and, I know I shouldn't say this, but the light's gone out. It's sad for me. But how enriched I've been -- and I said that on air."
Mr. BATTIGELLI and Cory had developed a bond even before the boy was diagnosed with cancer. Cory wanted to become a teacher, and told Mr. BATTIGELLI shortly after he met him: "You're the teacher I want to be."
Mr. BATTIGELLI said Cory, as a 14-year-old Grade 9 student, asked to join an anti-violence peer-meditation program the teacher ran at the school, and later asked to accompany Mr. BATTIGELLI on a similar conflict resolution project he had started in a nearby first nations community. He said Cory was superb at it.
"He just was a kid who was not a kid," Mr. BATTIGELLI said. "I think God has truly picked up an angel. God sends us signposts. I think he will be my guardian angel for the rest of my teaching career."
St. Benedict principal Teresa STEWARD/STEWART/STUART, when she cancelled exams this week, said: "This is a time for Cory."

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VALPY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-04-07 published
Canada's Catholic leader, CARTER dies at 91
By Michael VALPY Religion And Ethics Reporter Monday, April 7, 2003 - Page A1
Three weeks ago, John TURNER met Gerald Emmett CARTER for their annual St. Patrick's Day drink. The former prime minister held the glass for his friend of 50 years while he sipped his Irish whisky through a straw.
When the retired cardinal archbishop of Toronto died yesterday morning at the age of 91, a reputation as richly coloured as the scarlet of his soutane died with him.
Canadian Roman Catholicism will probably never see his like again: a prince of the church who, while never unmindful of the meek and the poor, made no bones about being comfortable rubbing elbows with fellow princes of politics and business.
He was the close friend of prime ministers and premiers. He enjoyed socializing in the corridors of power with people like Conrad BLACK, Hilary and Galen WESTON and Fredrik EATON. He displayed an unabashed fondness for Progressive Conservative Party gatherings. ("I think at one Christmas party, I was the only Liberal there," Mr. TURNER said in an interview.)
Yet academics and religious and business leaders also spoke yesterday of a man with an acute understanding of Canada and its history.
They described an intense, intellectual democrat who believed he should speak out forcefully on the moral and political issues of the day and who welcomed debate with those who disagreed with him. And they talked of a cleric who profoundly understood the nature of the church and who welcomed ecumenism and Canada's emerging pluralism.
"He felt the institution of religion should have a public voice and he was not shy about exercising it," said Michael HIGGINS, principal of St. Jerome's University in Waterloo and co-author of My Father's Business, the 1990 biography of Cardinal CARTER.
"Whenever he spoke, his voice was strong, clear, public, undiluted and welcomed by political leaders even when they disagreed with him. It is an unfortunate circumstance that the marginalization of religious debate occurred at the same time as he was eclipsed by a stroke, retirement and age, at a time when his church needed him. He embodied a certain kind of churchman we probably won't see again."
Cardinal CARTER suffered a stroke in 1981 and retired in 1990.
Cardinal Aloysius AMBROZIC, his successor as archbishop of Toronto, said Cardinal CARTER "wanted to know what the movers and shakers were doing."
Cardinal AMBROZIC described him as a man totally engaged with his church and with his society -- an advocate for the poor, for immigrants and for the homeless.
"What I admired about him, what I found so instructive about him, was his sense of responsibility for the church and for society at large. He was very much a man of Vatican 2 [the church's 1962-65 ecumenical council] and he knew what the Catholic Church was about."
There was also, said Cardinal AMBROZIC, "his own personal style. He had panache."
The priest who rose from a working-class Montreal background to become the most powerful cleric in Canada met Mr. TURNER when the former prime minister was a young lawyer in Montreal doing legal work for the church. "He was a great human being who understood the balance between the religious and secular worlds," Mr. TURNER said.
"He loved tennis, and he had a wicked serve."
Former prime minister Pierre TRUDEAU consulted him on the Constitution in the early 1980s and became a close friend. At the celebration of Cardinal CARTER's 75th birthday in 1987, instructions were given that an entire pew was to be reserved for Mr. TRUDEAU in Toronto's St. Michael's Cathedral.
Mr. TRUDEAU delayed his arrival until just before the cardinal entered the church. "All eyes were trained on TRUDEAU until Cardinal CARTER arrived," said Dr. HIGGINS. "It was symbolic of the close relationship they had."
Toronto's Anglican Archbishop, Terence FINLAY, who first met Cardinal CARTER when they were both bishops in London, Ontario, in the 1970s, said the Roman Catholic Church in Canada had lost a great leader.
"He enabled us to bring our churches closer together. I certainly counted on him as a friend and colleague. He had an impressive understanding of Canada's history and political situations. He knew who we were."

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VALPY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-04-07 published
Cardinal felt at ease with politics, power
Corporate Friends, conservative image concealed complexities, contradictions
By Michael VALPY Monday, April 7, 2003 - Page A9
Gerald Emmett CARTER presided over the Roman Catholic Church in Toronto for 12 years with panache, deftness, wit and worldliness too much worldliness, some of his critics thought.
The retired cardinal archbishop, who died at 91 yesterday morning after a brief illness, chummed with the powerful of business and politics and became the most influential cleric in Canada.
He was a personal friend of Pope John Paul 2nd. His weight was felt in Vatican circles and his administrative expertise -- and connections with the elite world of corporate finance -- were valued by the church's governing Curia.
He raised millions of dollars for charity through his annual cardinal's dinner, pressed governments for social housing and worked energetically to improve race relations in a city being transformed from a WASPy bastion into a multicultural and multiracial metropolis. His was the largest and wealthiest English-speaking diocese in Canada.
In the North American church's tumultuous years after the 1961-65 Second Vatican Council, the most significant reassessment of the Catholic Church since the 16th century, Cardinal CARTER was branded a conservative by many Catholic liberals. It was a superficial label for a complex and astute pastoral theologian and a man whose intelligence was described as commanding.
The conservative label, for one thing, did not take into account Cardinal CARTER's publicly tepid response to Pope Paul 6th's reaffirmation of the church's opposition to birth control.
Or that he once said Catholics were "not required to agree with [the Pope's] every word or act." Said the cardinal: To think that a good Catholic is obliged to agree with the Pope on everything "would, at the very least, make for a very dull church."
But he strained ecumenical good fellowship in Ontario by relentlessly and, eventually, successfully -- prodding the provincial government to legislate full financing for the Roman Catholic separate school system. He intervened in the Newfoundland constitutional referendum on ending public financing of denominational schools.
He publicly defended his church's rules for an all-male, celibate priesthood. He wrote a pastoral letter calling Dr. Henry MORGENTALER's abortion clinic an "abomination" and calling on Christians to oppose its operations. But he also ordered his priests to stop distributing literature of militant anti-abortion groups.
When the Canadian Conference of Catholic Bishops swung to the left in its criticisms of the national government's fiscal policies, Cardinal CARTER bluntly took the opposite direction.
And he objected to the conference's decision in 1984 to study a plan to give women and girls a more prominent role in the church and attracted noise and notoriety three years later when he ordered a suburban Toronto church not to allow a teenaged girl to be an altar server at mass.
Cardinal CARTER, a Montreal typesetter's son who made his mark as an academic and teacher before climbing the church's ranks, looked stern in public, gave arid homilies and was known to intimidate his priests.
But he was mischievous and funny in private, played a superb game of tennis and was a sought-after dinner guest in the homes of Toronto's business and political elite.
He was, among other things, credited with converting Conrad BLACK to Catholicism, and his name often appeared in the press alongside those of political leaders such as former Ontario premier William DAVIS, prompting Globe and Mail columnist Orland FRENCH to write: "His presence at glittering Tory functions is overly noticeable and it would be fair to speculate that he discussed with the Premier the advantages of extending funding to separate schools."
Born in Montreal in 1912, Cardinal CARTER was a priest for nearly 66 years and a bishop for 40 years. His brother Alexander, who died last year at 93, had retired as bishop of the Ontario diocese of Sault Ste. Marie. Two sisters were nuns, one of them the head of her order.
Cardinal CARTER was educated at the Grand Seminary of Montreal and the University of Montreal. He spent the first 25 years of his priesthood working in various educational fields in the province of Quebec.
In 1939, he founded St. Joseph's Teaching College in Montreal and was its principal until 1961. For 15 years, he was English commissioner for the Montreal Catholic School Commission. He was a professor of catechetics -- the formation of faith -- for 25 years.
He was installed as the first auxiliary bishop in the diocese of London, Ontario, in 1961 and became the eighth bishop of London in 1964.
In 1971, he headed the International Committee for English in the Liturgy, which was responsible for translating Latin texts for the mass and the sacraments.
In 1977, he was elected a member of the Permanent Council of the Synod of Bishops in Rome, which sets the topics for the International Synod of Bishops in Rome every two or three years.
Pope John Paul named him a cardinal, one of only four in Canada, in May of 1979, a year after he became archbishop of Toronto.
From the moment he was installed as archbishop, promising to serve all who "would like to see Toronto as something more than an asphalt jungle," Cardinal CARTER put his job in the spotlight and, very often, himself in the hot seat. He tackled controversial issues with a candour that won him arrows and acclaim from politicians, minority groups, the church laity and sometimes fellow clergy.
At the same time, he was loyal to the Pope and to the official teachings of the church, declaring in 1979 that the time had come to end the dissent within the church that had followed Vatican 2 and turn the 1980s into a time of reaffirmation of faith.
"We have had enough of confusion, enough of confrontation, enough of dissent. We are the believers. Those who go looking for dissent are not Catholic."
His ties with the Pope were personal. John Paul, as archbishop of Krakow, had visited Cardinal CARTER in London, Ontario, and had him stay as a houseguest in Poland. Cardinal CARTER, in turn, was host to the Pope at his Rosedale home when the pontiff visited Toronto in 1984.
His funeral will be held at 10: 30 a.m. Thursday in St. Michael's Cathedral, Toronto.

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VALPY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-04-10 published
The Globe was his church'
The editor-in-chief was mentor to journalists, defender of social policies, respected by those criticized in print, and described as a man with a 'warm human touch'
By Michael VALPY Thursday, April 10, 2003 - Page R11
In his two decades as editor-in-chief of The Globe and Mail, former senator Richard (Dic) James DOYLE wielded a journalistic influence in Canadian public life matched only by that of George BROWN, the newspaper's founder.
He died yesterday in Toronto, one month past his 80th birthday. His wife of 50 years, Florence, passed away on March 20.
Senator DOYLE -- editor from 1963 to 1983 -- gave the newspaper a boldly independent voice, loosening up its then lock-step support for the Progressive Conservative Party.
Under his direction, the newspaper would praise a government one day and lambaste it the next. He was a passionate defender of civil liberties, intensely engaged in the development of Canada's social policies throughout the 1960s and 1970s and as much concerned with the powerless in Canadian society as the powerful.
"In the time I've been editor," he once said, "we've not supported any party in office. I think we make whomever we support uncomfortable. We're the kind of friend you could do without."
He once said he felt more intellectually comfortable with Pierre TRUDEAU than all the prime ministers he knew, and one of his favourite editorial cartoons was one he suggested after overhearing his daughter Judith talking to a friend in her bedroom. It showed two teenage girls sitting on a bed under a poster of Mr. TRUDEAU. One girl says to the other: "He's not 50 like your father's 50."
His views, although stamped on the editorial page, were never imposed on his reporters. He was concerned with a story's news value -- not the fallout -- and he expected his staff to act with the same concern.
He wanted The Globe to be a writer's newspaper and gave his writers autonomy, even when their views went against his own philosophies. He had a special place in his heart for columnists who expressed contradictory opinions.
The young writers invited to attend the buffet lunches he gave regularly for prime ministers, premiers and cabinet ministers, bank presidents and giants of the arts were treated to superb tutorials in the life of their nation that left an indelible mark on their minds.
Warm, funny, theatrical and gregarious, he was a mentor and model for many of Canada's best-known journalists -- among them, the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation's Michael ENRIGHT and Don NEWMAN, former Globe and Maclean's managing editor Geoffrey STEVENS, his successor as Globe editor Norman WEBSTER, and former foreign correspondent, dance critic and now master of the University of Toronto's Massey College, John FRASER.
"He was absolutely fearless," Mr. STEVENS said yesterday. "He did tough stuff. He did important stuff. And he refused to bow to pressure from business, from politicians and for that matter from journalists. I didn't always agree with him, but I always, always respected what he said."
Mr. FRASER said: "He was an editor who made young journalists' dreams come true. Like many who came under his spell at The Globe and Mail, I will go to my grave grateful for the horizons he opened up to me."
George BAIN, for years The Globe's Ottawa columnist, recalled the only time Senator DOYLE actually complained about something Mr. BAIN had written was when he filed an end-piece to a royal tour and suggested that the institution wasn't appropriate to the Canadian circumstances.
"Dic, as a devoted monarchist, was moved to say, 'Did you have to?' The fact is I felt I did -- and he, despite strong feelings, didn't say, 'You can't.' "
When Prime Minister Brian MULRONEY appointed him to the Senate in 1985, he decided to sit as a Conservative out of courtesy.
Mr. MULRONEY described him yesterday as "a marvellous man, rigorous, thoughtful, with a disciplined approach to life and a very warm human touch to everything he did.
"When he cut people up, including me, there was no malice to it, no ad hominem attack, he was never bitter or partisan in any way.'The full impact of Senator DOYLE's presence as editor was probably first felt by The Globe's readers on March 20, 1964, when a front-page editorial appeared under the heading, Bill of Wrongs.
It was prompted by legislation proposed by Ontario's Conservative attorney-general, Frederick CASS, which empowered the Ontario Police Commission to summon any person for questioning in secret deprive him of legal advice; and keep him in prison indefinitely if he refused to answer.
"For the public good," the editorial stated, the Ontario Government "proposes to trample upon the Magna Carta, Habeas Corpus, the Canadian Bill of Rights and the Rule of Law.
"Are we in... the Canada of 1964 -- or in the Germany of 1934?
"This legislation is supposed to be directed against organized crime. In fact, it is directed against every man and woman in the province."
Soon after, Mr. CASS resigned.
Senator DOYLE's skills as a writer were particularly evident on an election night when the paper would present an editorial on the results between editions. Alastair LAWRIE, now retired as an editorial writer, recalled that once the results were known, Senator DOYLE would stand in silent thought for maybe a minute and a half and then start to dictate. In a matter of a few minutes, he would complete a reasoned editorial that scarcely required the addition of a comma.
Senator DOYLE preferred to work in anonymity, only accepting honorary degrees and later the seat in the Senate near the end of his newspaper career.
He sat on no boards, belonged to no important clubs, almost never appeared on television or radio, didn't sign petitions and seldom gave speeches. When he met a politician, there were usually witnesses.
He didn't hold a driver's licence and for years arrived at the old Globe office on King Street by streetcar. When The Globe moved to its present office on Front Street, Senator DOYLE took a taxi.
Retired Ottawa Citizen publisher Clark DAVEY, a former managing editor of The Globe and a close friend of Senator DOYLE, suspected "he didn't trust his Irish temper [to drive] and that was probably to the common good."
Mr. DAVEY said Senator DOYLE's low public profile "was part of his own protection against conflicts on his own part. The Globe was his church. Journalism was his religion.
"I think that Dic, in the context of his time, probably had a greater influence on Canadian journalism than any other single individual," Mr. DAVEY said.
"It was Dic's execution that made the Report on Business what it became and is. He was the moving force from within The Globe often unseen -- in the whole question of conflicts of interest as they affected journalists.
"He was really the wellspring of that kind of thinking and, of course, what The Globe did affected very directly what a lot of other organizations did."
Born in Toronto on March 10, 1923, Dic DOYLE seemed destined to get ink on his hands. He said in 1985 that he had decided on a newspaper career at age 7 and joined the Chatham Daily News as a sports reporter after he graduated from Chatham Collegiate Institute. He was promoted to sports editor, city editor and then news editor.
During the Second World War, he enlisted in the Royal Canadian Air Force and served with the 115 (Bomber) Squadron (Royal Air Force) at Ely, near Cambridge in England. He was discharged at the end of the war with the rank of flying officer.
He was 23 and felt that life was passing him by, so rather than attending university, as other returning air-force officers were doing, he returned to the Chatham paper. It was a decision he said he later regretted.
He came to The Globe in 1951, initially as a copy editor, the only job available. His first byline appeared in The Globe in December of 1952 over a story about milk bottles.
In the same year, he also wrote a book called The Royal Story, a labour of love that proved to be a standard treatment of the monarchy, and which he was the first to acknowledge, replowed already well-tilled soil.
(The Royal family had a special status at The Globe under Senator DOYLE. One former senior editor, the legendary Martin LYNCH, told of being taken off the front-page layout after he replaced a picture of Princess Margaret, which appeared in early editions, with a photograph of a prize-winning pig.
When The Globe decided to publish a weekly supplement in 1957, Senator DOYLE became its first editor, with a staff that had no experience in the weekly field. The paper was laid out on the carpet of the managing editor's office after he had gone home.
It shrunk over the years because, Mr. DOYLE said, it was ahead of its time. It died in 1971.
From there, in 1959, he became managing editor of the newspaper and then editor in 1963. He stepped aside in 1983 to take on the role of editor emeritus and to write a column -- an experience, he said two years later, that left him chastened. "The guy [columnist] out there has his problems."
Former Globe publisher A. Roy MEGARRY, said, "In my opinion, no one -- including the seven publishers that Dic has served with during his time at the paper -- had made a more positive and lasting impression on The Globe than he has."
Likely among the greatest tributes paid to him as an editor came from the Kent Commission established by the federal government in 1980 to investigate the ownership of Canada's daily newspapers after the Ottawa Journal and the Winnipeg Tribune folded in virtually simultaneous moves by the Thomson and Southam chains.
In its report, the commission credited Senator DOYLE with "adhering to an ideal of press freedom that often tends to get lost in the management of newspapers....
"To a great extent, the editor-in-chief of The Globe belongs to a breed which unfortunately is on its way to extinction.
"The Globe and Mail testifies to the influence that continues to be exerted by a newspaper with a clearly defined idea of its role and substantial editorial resources. It is read by almost three-quarters of the country's most important decision-makers in all parts of Canada and at all levels of government. More than 90 per cent of media executives read it regularly and it tends to set the pace for other news organizations."
The Globe and Mail was bought by Thomson Newspapers in 1980. Senator DOYLE made no secret of the fact that he would have preferred having the newspaper bought by R. Howard Webster, who owned it before it became part of the Financial Post chain. However, in 1985 he said that Thomson was the best alternative among the others in the field.
When Prime Minister MULRONEY named him to the Senate, he became the first active Globe journalist to receive such an appointment since George BROWN in 1873. As an editor and a columnist, Senator DOYLE had often preached Senate reform and had opposed patronage appointments.
His acceptance prompted a flow of letters to the editor that favoured and disapproved of the appointment in about equal measure.Senator DOYLE is survived by his children Judith and Sean and his granddaughter Kaelan MYERSCOUGH. Funeral arrangements have not been announced.

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VALPY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-09 published
Part of Globe history passes with DALGLEISH
Ex-publisher's wife dies on the same day as their son
By Michael VALPY, Tuesday, December 9, 2003 - Page A17
Delsya DALGLEISH was a beautiful South African ballet dancer. She gave her name to one of the world's best-known brands of toilet paper. She married a legendary Globe and Mail editor and publisher, and, when she died at 92, it was on the same day in the same hospital as her son, Peter.
The deaths last Thursday were coincidental. Mr. DALGLEISH, 68, died in the afternoon of a cancer that had been diagnosed a short time earlier. Ms. DALGLEISH, who had been in a nursing home, died of old age later the same day. She was not aware her son had predeceased her, as had his two brothers several years earlier.
Born Delsya GRIFFITHS in Wales, she was raised in South Africa and had an established London stage career when she met Oakley DALGLEISH, a 22-year-old Canadian student at the London School of Economics. They married almost immediately. He was appointed editor-in-chief of The Globe 15 years later and publisher 10 years after that.
The DALGLEISHes were a glamorous and adventurous couple, travelling the world and partying throughout Europe and North America with the powerful and celebrated.
Ensconced members of what passed for Toronto café society in the 1940s and 1950s (Steak Oakley was on the menu of Winston's restaurant on Bay Street for years), they and their companions in full evening dress would sometimes go into The Globe's newsroom late in the evening for a nightcap in the editor's office.
Ms. DALGLEISH, in clinging gowns, would twirl gaily around the floor, eliciting whistles from copy editors toiling beneath green eyeshades.
Her husband Oakley, a handsome, elegantly dressed man, had lost his left eye as the result of a freak childhood accident involving a fire truck, and from his earliest adult days he wore a jet-black eye patch. The look was dashing, and was noticed by an advertising executive at a New York cocktail party who gave birth to the Hathaway shirt man.
The same executive, after being introduced to, and charmed by, Delsya DALGLEISH, bestowed her name (with his own spelling) on a toilet-paper account, Kimberley-Clark's Delsey "bathroom tissue."
Mr. DALGLEISH died at age 53 in 1963. Ms. DALGLEISH was appointed to The Globe's board of directors by her husband's successor, Montreal businessman R. Howard WEBSTER, and was consulted by Mr. WEBSTER on how the newspaper should be run.

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