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"TUR" 2003 Obituary


TURCHIARO  TURINECK  TURNBULL  TURNER 

TURCHIARO o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-09-08 published
FIRTH, Zena
Died peacefully at her home on Friday, September 5, 2003, at the age of 86 years. Beloved wife of 66 years to Bill; loving Mother to Marion, (Sam TURCHIARO,) Mark and the late Robert (Bob) cherished Grandmother to Dean, Neal, Marcel, Sean, Amanda, Matthew and Mackenzie, and their mother Lynn, and Great-Grandmother to Ty and Tucker. Dear sister of Tina WRIGHT of England. Zena and Bill and their children emigrated to Canada from England in 1957. Zena pursued a career as a teacher, and was Principal of Bishop Strachan Junior School from 1970 to 1980. Her gentle humour and sensitivity brought out the best in everyone. She touched many lives. The family will receive Friends at the Humphrey Funeral Home - A.W. Miles Chapel, 1403 Bayview Avenue (South of Eglinton Avenue East) from 5-8 p.m. on Sunday and Monday. Mass of Christian Burial at Holy Rosary Church, 354 St. Clair Avenue West, on Tuesday at 1: 30 o'clock. Interment Mount Pleasant Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, donations to the Hospital for Sick Children Foundation, 555 University Ave., Toronto, M5G 1X8.

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TURINECK o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-07-02 published
HILLSON
-In loving memory of Maxwell Alexander "Bud" Hillson, who passed away at the age of 77 years. Husband of the late Katherine "Kay" (TURINECK,) July 4, 1999.
You had a smile for everyone
You had a heart of gold
You left the sweetest memories
This world could ever hold
No one knows how much we miss you
No one knows the bitter pain
We have suffered since we lost you
Life has never been the same
Those we love don't go away
They walk beside us every day
Unseen, unheard but always near
Still loved, still missed and very dear.
A father's legacy is not riches
possessions or worldly goods
It's the way he lived,
the lives he touched, the promises he kept
It's the man he was
Your life, Dad was a job well done
and now you have left us to be with Mom.
Loving father of Bernadine, husband Phillip HARRIS of Ottawa, Maxine, husband Ronald ALBERTS of London, Edward of Little Current, Roseanne of Calgary and Kevin of Little Current. Remembered by brothers Maxime, wife Shirley, Randolph wife Helen. By sisters Marie, husband Gene ARMOUR, Agnes CARDINAL, Rita DUNDON, Judith, husband Wifred GUAY, Georgina GAGNON and Dorothy MASSON.

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TURNBULL o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-05-07 published
Mary CHAMBERS McQUAY
In loving memory of Mary Chambers McQUAY, April 9, 1916 to May 3, 2003.
Mary McQuay, a resident of Mindemoya, died at her residence on Saturday, May 3, 2003 at the age of 87 years. She was born in Peterborough, daughter of the late George and Mabel (FOLEY) TURNBULL.
Mary graduated as a Registered Nurse in 1942 and worked in hospitals in Kingston, where she met Jack McQUAY, who was an intern at the same hospital. They married in 1944, and lived in Kingston before moving to Mindemoya in 1947. Jack began his medical practice in Mindemoya and Mary assisted for many years running the office. Mary had a warm, friendly manner and enjoyed socializing with her many Friends. She will be remembered for her dedication to her family and to her community. Mary participated in and supported many community activities over the years. She was accomplished in sewing, knitting and baking, and often contributed her home-made items to bazaars and bake sales. She volunteered for the Red Cross, the Mindemoya Hospital Auxiliary, Meals on Wheels, and the ambulance service. She enjoyed gardening, and participated in the Mindemoya Horticultural Society flower shows in years past. She was active in the local Women's Institute. An enthusiastic member of the Mindemoya Curling Club, she continued curling until she was well into her 80s, while in the summer she enjoyed golfing. She was an avid bridge player in the local bridge club. She was a member of St. Francis of Assisi Anglican Church, where she sang in the choir for many years, and participated in the life of the parish through the Anglican Church Women's group. Always interested in crafts, she created many beautiful pieces in pottery and paper tole crafts.
Dearly loved and loving wife of Dr. Jack McQUAY. Loved mother of Marilyn (husband Martin CHILTON) of Kingston, Paul (fiancée Marion CARROLL) of Fort McMurray, Alta, Janice McQUAY of Toronto and Mindemoya and Betty McQUAY of Toronto. Also survived by Athena McQUAY of Edmonton. Proud grandmother of Peter McQUAY, Jane HOEKSTRA (husband Terry,) Stephen McQUAY and Jim CHILTON and great grandchildren Ethan, Sydney and Liam. Dear sister of Reta CONRAN, Gladys MITCHELL (husband Charlie,) Bruce TURNBULL (wife Alice,) Norma RAYCRAFT (husband Glen,) Billie McNEIL and brother-in-law Earl HARMAN. Also survived by many nieces and nephews. Predeceased by sisters and brothers Marjorie McLEOD, Walter (Bud) TURNBULL, Ted TURNBULL, Gwen HARMAN and sister-in-law and brothers-in-law Marie TURNBULL, Alan McLEOD, Harold CONRAN and Gene McNEIL. Friends called the Saint Francis of Assisi Church in Mindemoya on Monday, May 5, 2003. The funeral service was held on Tuesday, May 6, 2003 with Reverend Canon Bain Peever officiating. Interment in Mindemoya Cemetery. Culgin Funeral Home

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TURNBULL o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-12-17 published
John BATEMAN McQUAY
In loving memory of John BATEMAN McQUAY, October 11, 1921 to December 12, 2003.
John Bateman McQUAY, a resident of Mindemoya, died peacefully on Friday, December 12, 2003, in Mindemoya Hospital, at the age of 82 years.
He was born in Portage La Prairie, Manitoba, son of the late Doctor Russell and Gladys (SAUNDERS) McQUAY. The family moved to Mindemoya in 1934, where Russell set up a medical practice. Following his father's footsteps, John graduated as a medical doctor from the Faculty of Medicine at Queen's University in 1944. He married Mary TURNBULL in the same year, and interned in Kingston. In 1947 they moved to Mindemoya, where he joined his father's medical practice. He quickly became known and loved as "Doctor Jack". After his father became disabled in 1949, Doctor Jack served as the only doctor in the area until 1970, when other doctors began to arrive. He continued faithfully serving the community in full-time practice until 1991, easing into retirement over the next decade. Doctor Jack loved his vocation as family practitioner, and was dedicated to his patients. He worked long hours, making hospital rounds in the morning, seeing patients in the afternoon and sometimes in the evening, and calmly handling emergencies at any hour of the day or night. For many years he held a weekly clinic in West Bay. He often visited patients in their homes, and in the days before ambulance service, even brought patients to the hospital himself. He was a skilled physician who performed many kinds of surgery, but his greatest enjoyment was delivering babies, and he estimated he delivered over 2000 babies in his career. He also served as coroner for Manitoulin and the North Shore for 20 years. In 1991 the College of Family Physicians of Canada presented him with a Special Recognition Award for his outstanding service.
Doctor Jack will also be remembered for his dedication to his community. As Chair of the Board of Central Manitoulin High School, he worked to establish the Manitoulin Secondary School, serving all of the Island. As founding member of the Manitoulin Centennial Board, he helped set up the Manor in Little Current. He served as President of the Mindemoya Area Chamber of Commerce in the 1960s. He was a founding member of the Central Manitoulin Lions Club, and later received the Lions' Melvin Jones Fellow award for dedicated humanitarian services. He was a modest person, but he greatly appreciated this recognition. He was also a founding member of the Mindemoya Curling Club. In 1994, the Carnarvon Township named him as Citizen of the Year, and in September 2003, in ill health, he was particularly pleased when Central Manitoulin Township presented him with its Senior of the Year award. He and his wife Mary were members of St. Francis of Assisi Anglican Church. For relaxation, Jack and Mary very much enjoyed curling, playing bridge, and golfing. He loved playing the piano, and his other hobbies included photography, stamp collecting, gardening, swimming and sailing on Lake Mindemoya, and rug hooking. Doctor Jack was devoted to his family, who will remember his encouragement and loving support. Dearly loved and loving husband of Mary McQUAY (predeceased.) Loved father of Marilyn (husband Martin CHILTON) of Kingston, Paul (wife Marion CARROLL) of Fort McMurray, Alta, Janice McQUAY of Mindemoya and Betty McQUAY of Toronto. Also survived by Athena McQUAY of Edmonton. Proud grandfather of Peter McQUAY, Jane HOEKSTRA (husband Terry), Stephen McQUAY and Jim CHILTON and great grandchildren Ethan, Sydney and Liam. Dear brother of Mary Alice THACKER of Ottawa, Ann GAGE (husband James) of Hartford, Conn., Thomas McQUAY, wife Barbara of Mindemoya. Predeceased by sister Margaret KYDD and her husband Gordon, and brother-in-law Doug THACKER. Also survived by many nieces and nephews.
Friends called the St. Francis of Assisi Church, Mindemoya on Tuesday, December 16. The funeral service will be conducted at the church on Wednesday, December 17, 2003 at 2 p.m. with Reverend Canon Bain Peever officiating. Culgin Funeral Home

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TURNER o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-02-26 published
Mary-Ann Elizabeth DAWSON
In loving memory of Mary-Ann Elizabeth DAWSON. A graduate of Ontario Ladies College, B. A. in Sociology, University of Toronto, Director of Social Assistance, Community Services and Housing Department, York Region. Peacefully with her family by her side on Friday, February 21, 2003 at the age of 52. Mary-Ann, beloved wife of Patrick. Loving mother of Tracy ATKINS and loving step-mother of Tammy BOUCHARD and her husband Michael, Julie and Matthew. Proud grandmother of Shelby. Loving daughter of Alma McDOUGALL and the late Lauchlan McDOUGALL of Gore Bay. Dear sister of Ross McDOUGALL and his wife Deone and Connie TURNER. Dear sister-in-law of Michael and Elizabeth DAWSON. Loving aunt of Kyle, Neil, Nicole, Cole, Peter and Katie. Mary-Ann will be deeply missed by many Friends and family. A funeral service takes place on Wednesday, February 26 at the Aurora United Church. Arrangements entrusted to the Thompson Funeral Home, Aurora. 905-727-5421. A memorial service will be held in the spring in Gore Bay followed by an interment at the Gordon Cemetery, Manitoulin Island.

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TURNER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-02-24 published
DAWSON, Mary-Ann Elizabeth
Graduate of Ontario Ladies College, B.A. in Sociology University of Toronto, Director of Social Assistance, Community Services and Housing Department York Region. Peacefully with her family by her side on Friday, February 21, 2003 at the age of 52. Mary-Ann, beloved wife of Patrick. Loving mother of Tracy ATKINS and loving step-mother of Tammy BOUCHARD and her husband Michael, Julie and Matthew. Proud grandmother of Shelby. Loving daughter of Alma McDOUGALL and the late Lauchlan McDOUGALL of Gore Bay. Dear sister of Ross McDOUGALL and his wife Deone and Connie TURNER. Dear sister-in-law of Michael and Elizabeth DAWSON. Loving aunt of Kyle, Neil, Nicole, Cole, Peter and Katie. Mary-Ann will be deeply missed by many Friends and family. Visitation will be held on Tuesday from 2-3 and 7-9 p.m. at the Thompson Funeral Home, 29 Victoria Street, Aurora, 905-727-5421. A Funeral Service will be held on Wednesday at 1 p.m. at the Aurora United Church, 15186 Yonge Street, Aurora. A Memorial Service will be held in the spring in Gore Bay followed by an interment a the Gordon Cemetery, Manitoulin Island. Memorial donations may be made to the York Region Breast Cancer Society or Sunnybrook Cancer Clinic.

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TURNER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-04-07 published
Canada's Catholic leader, CARTER dies at 91
By Michael VALPY Religion And Ethics Reporter Monday, April 7, 2003 - Page A1
Three weeks ago, John TURNER met Gerald Emmett CARTER for their annual St. Patrick's Day drink. The former prime minister held the glass for his friend of 50 years while he sipped his Irish whisky through a straw.
When the retired cardinal archbishop of Toronto died yesterday morning at the age of 91, a reputation as richly coloured as the scarlet of his soutane died with him.
Canadian Roman Catholicism will probably never see his like again: a prince of the church who, while never unmindful of the meek and the poor, made no bones about being comfortable rubbing elbows with fellow princes of politics and business.
He was the close friend of prime ministers and premiers. He enjoyed socializing in the corridors of power with people like Conrad BLACK, Hilary and Galen WESTON and Fredrik EATON. He displayed an unabashed fondness for Progressive Conservative Party gatherings. ("I think at one Christmas party, I was the only Liberal there," Mr. TURNER said in an interview.)
Yet academics and religious and business leaders also spoke yesterday of a man with an acute understanding of Canada and its history.
They described an intense, intellectual democrat who believed he should speak out forcefully on the moral and political issues of the day and who welcomed debate with those who disagreed with him. And they talked of a cleric who profoundly understood the nature of the church and who welcomed ecumenism and Canada's emerging pluralism.
"He felt the institution of religion should have a public voice and he was not shy about exercising it," said Michael HIGGINS, principal of St. Jerome's University in Waterloo and co-author of My Father's Business, the 1990 biography of Cardinal CARTER.
"Whenever he spoke, his voice was strong, clear, public, undiluted and welcomed by political leaders even when they disagreed with him. It is an unfortunate circumstance that the marginalization of religious debate occurred at the same time as he was eclipsed by a stroke, retirement and age, at a time when his church needed him. He embodied a certain kind of churchman we probably won't see again."
Cardinal CARTER suffered a stroke in 1981 and retired in 1990.
Cardinal Aloysius AMBROZIC, his successor as archbishop of Toronto, said Cardinal CARTER "wanted to know what the movers and shakers were doing."
Cardinal AMBROZIC described him as a man totally engaged with his church and with his society -- an advocate for the poor, for immigrants and for the homeless.
"What I admired about him, what I found so instructive about him, was his sense of responsibility for the church and for society at large. He was very much a man of Vatican 2 [the church's 1962-65 ecumenical council] and he knew what the Catholic Church was about."
There was also, said Cardinal AMBROZIC, "his own personal style. He had panache."
The priest who rose from a working-class Montreal background to become the most powerful cleric in Canada met Mr. TURNER when the former prime minister was a young lawyer in Montreal doing legal work for the church. "He was a great human being who understood the balance between the religious and secular worlds," Mr. TURNER said.
"He loved tennis, and he had a wicked serve."
Former prime minister Pierre TRUDEAU consulted him on the Constitution in the early 1980s and became a close friend. At the celebration of Cardinal CARTER's 75th birthday in 1987, instructions were given that an entire pew was to be reserved for Mr. TRUDEAU in Toronto's St. Michael's Cathedral.
Mr. TRUDEAU delayed his arrival until just before the cardinal entered the church. "All eyes were trained on TRUDEAU until Cardinal CARTER arrived," said Dr. HIGGINS. "It was symbolic of the close relationship they had."
Toronto's Anglican Archbishop, Terence FINLAY, who first met Cardinal CARTER when they were both bishops in London, Ontario, in the 1970s, said the Roman Catholic Church in Canada had lost a great leader.
"He enabled us to bring our churches closer together. I certainly counted on him as a friend and colleague. He had an impressive understanding of Canada's history and political situations. He knew who we were."

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TURNER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-08-02 published
DAVIS, Curtiss Gridley
Born August 31, 1916 in Rochester, New York died after a long and courageous battle, on July 31, 2003 at the Guelph General Hospital. He was a resident for the past year at St. Joseph's Health Centre, Guelph. Predeceased by his first wife Grace TURNER. Lovingly remembered and missed by his wife Audrey LIVERNOIS. Dearly loved father of Natasha VAN BENTUM (Henri) and Bruce Gridley DAVIS (Janet WRIGHT,) of Vancouver. Stepfather of John LIVERNOIS of Guelph, and Laurie STATHER of Belleville; dear brother of Joyce LOVETT (Bob) of Kitchener and Jim DAVIS (Mary) of Maple grandfather of Rachel DAVIS, Celine and Jacob RICHMOND, Nicole STATHER, Michael STATHER (Tabitha), Ryan STATHER, and Ali and Becky LIVERNOIS; and great grandfather of four. Fondly remembered by many nieces, nephews, family and Friends. During World War 2, he served with the Toronto Scottish Regiment in England and Europe. He will be remembered for his thirst for knowledge and as a gifted writer and reader. A memorial service will be held on Wednesday, August 6, 2003, at 1: 30 p.m. at Knox Presbyterian Church, 20 Quebec Street, Guelph, with the Reverend Thomas KAY officiating. In lieu of flowers memorial contributions may be made to Knox Church, or to the charity of your choice. (Arrangements entrusted to Wall-Custance Funeral Home and Chapel, 206 Norfolk Street, Guelph (416) 822-0051 or www.wallcustance.com).

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TURNER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-08-06 published
DAVIS, Curtiss Gridley
Born August 31, 1916 in Rochester, New York died after a long and courageous battle, on July 31, 2003 at the Guelph General Hospital. He was a resident for the past year at St. Joseph's Health Centre, Guelph. Predeceased by his first wife Grace TURNER. Lovingly remembered and missed by his wife Audrey LIVERNOIS. Dearly loved father of Natasha VAN BENTUM (Henri) and Bruce Gridley DAVIS (Janet WRIGHT,) of Vancouver. Stepfather of John LIVERNOIS of Guelph, and Laurie STATHER of Belleville; dear brother of Joyce LOVETT (Bob) of Kitchener and Jim DAVIS (Mary) of Maple grandfather of Rachel Davis, Celine and Jacob RICHMOND, Nicole STATHER, Michael STATHER (Tabitha), Ryan STATHER, and Ali and Becky LIVERNOIS; and great grandfather of four. Fondly remembered by many nieces, nephews, family and Friends. During World War 2, he served with the Toronto Scottish Regiment in England and Europe. He will be remembered for his thirst for knowledge and as a gifted writer and reader. A memorial service will be held on Wednesday, August 6, 2003, at 1: 30 p.m. at Knox Presbyterian Church, 20 Quebec Street, Guelph, with the Reverend Thomas KAY officiating. In lieu of flowers memorial contributions may be made to Knox Church, or to the charity of your choice. (Arrangements entrusted to Wall-Custance Funeral Home and Chapel, 206 Norfolk Street, Guelph (416) 822-0051 or www.wallcustance.com).

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TURNER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-10-31 published
The dean of Canadian sociology
The first chair of a new University of Toronto department trained a generation of scholars
By Carol COOPER, Special to the Globe and Mail Friday, October 31, 2003 - Page R13
In 1938, with a doctorate in political science and anxious to achieve his dream of becoming a professor, Samuel Delbert CLARK reluctantly took the only position available to him at the University of Toronto, as its first full-time lecturer in sociology.
In doing so, S.D. CLARK became one of the country's early anglophone sociologists. During his career, his immense intellect, painstaking scholarship and prolific writing brought credibility and respect to the fledgling discipline. At a time when Canadian universities had few sociology departments, Prof. CLARK trained a generation of sociologists who spread out across the country, establishing sociology departments in other centres. And as an administrator at U of T, Prof. CLARK brought leading sociologists to the school.
The first sociologist born, raised and trained here, Prof. S. D. CLARK has died at the age of 93.
Incorporating the staples theory of his mentor, leading Canadian political economist Harold INNIS, the work of American historian F. J. TURNER, and sociologists Carl DAWSON and E. C. HUGHES of McGill University, among others, Prof. CLARK developed his own approach.
He studied social change on Canada's economic frontiers such as the fur trade, Western wheat farming, and the lumber and mining industries. He traced the development of those communities as the residents there, far from the cultural and financial institutions that controlled their lives and contending with distance and poverty, took their communities through a period of simultaneous disorganization and reorganization. From the struggle emerged new organizations and religious sects, such as the Co-operative Commonwealth Federation and the Social Credit Party.
Reflecting his university training in history, sociology and political science, Prof. CLARK brought a multifaceted approach to his research.
"He looked at things that were happening in Canada almost uniquely and tried to understand them and not to reduce it to some simplistic international generalization," said William MICHELSON, the S. D. Clark professor of sociology at the University of Toronto. "He really wanted to look into a multiplicity of factors."
Not everyone liked Prof. CLARK's approach to sociology, but nor did Prof. CLARK favour the Chicago School approach then taught at McGill University. Although he later altered his research methods, Prof. CLARK at first viewed the American approach dimly, seeing it as one of doorbell-ringing in order to ask stupid questions, one that scientifically quantified what happened in the present without exploring the past. Instead, he pored over archival material, studying the development of Canadian society from a historical perspective.
Books by Prof. CLARK, such as The Social Development of Canada, drew fire from historians, who challenged his theory and said sociology and history were incompatible. But the publications brought attention to the new discipline.
Born to a farming family on February 24, 1910, in Lloydminster, Alberta., Samuel Delbert CLARK was the second of five children. The family of Northern Irish descent had been established in Ontario since 1840 until it moved West in 1905.
Showing an early aptitude for school and a strong interest in history, Prof. CLARK graduated from the University of Saskatchewan with an honours B.A. in history and political science and an M.A. in history. Brushing aside suggestions that he become a high-school teacher and politician, Prof. CLARK aimed instead for a university position.
He entered University of Toronto in 1931 to do a doctorate in political science and economic history. While the studies proved dry and disappointing, it was there that he first met Harold INNIS, read the works of Marx, Engels and North American left-wingers, and attended meetings of the radical League for Social Reconstruction. Disillusioned with his studies and short of funds, Prof. CLARK accepted a Saskatchewan Imperial Order of the Daughters of the Empire scholarship and headed for the London School of Economics in 1932. At the school, he received his first exposure to sociology, including the works of Prof. DAWSON at McGill.
After leaving London in 1933, Prof. CLARK arrived in Montreal, again strapped for cash. Hoping to collect a debt from a friend, who was then studying at McGill, Prof. CLARK stopped by his house. With the friend not home, Prof. CLARK then visited Prof. DAWSON, who offered him a research fellowship. After working on a project studying Canadian-American relations for two years and receiving an M.A. in sociology, Prof. CLARK returned to Toronto to continue his doctorate in political science.
In 1937 he accepted an appointment to teach political science and sociology at the University of Manitoba and stayed a year before returning once again to University of Toronto to complete his thesis and begin his career there.
As a proponent of a more British style of sociology, Prof. CLARK was favoured for the job over another Chicago-trained candidate, setting the academic direction for the school. Sociology was then run as a section under the department of anthropology, to be transferred a year later to the department of political economy. Except for occasional leaves, Prof. CLARK remained a fixture on campus, impeccably dressed in a woollen suit and sporting a pipe, until his retirement in 1976.
Shy and quiet, Prof. CLARK constantly cleared his throat and jingled the change in his pocket while lecturing.
"He never cracked a joke.... It was serious scholarship. You had to ask serious questions," recalled retired York University sociology professor Edward MANN, an early undergraduate student and later a doctoral student of Prof. CLARK. " Their [ INNIS and CLARK] religion was scholarship."
In that vein, Prof. CLARK never talked to the press about daily issues, saying it cheapened the discipline. And he practised rigorous scholarship.
"He had a tremendous amount of integrity," said Lorne TEPPERMAN, a University of Toronto sociology professor and former student of Prof. CLARK. " This was a guy who knew what he stood for, what he believed in. He was uncompromising. He had very high standards for himself and other people."
During the fifties, Prof. CLARK, an admirer of Lester PEARSON, exchanged his membership in the Co-Operative Commonwealth Federation for that of the Liberal Party, the one endorsed by his wife, Rosemary. A graduate in economics from Columbia University, she edited all his works. By the sixties, Prof. CLARK had begun to study social change and urbanization, writing The Suburban Society and later, The New Urban Poor. Despite altering his research methods, dropping his historical research and adopting the American style of conducting questionnaires to collect data, he stopped short of tabulating them, arguing in The Suburban Society that "to lay claim to scientific precision... would be to falsify the competence of sociology."
And the man who studied social change became buffeted by it. While the sociology section had remained small during the forties and fifties, it ballooned during the sixties, becoming an independent department in 1963 with Prof. CLARK as its appointed head.
A capable administrator, Prof. CLARK brought feistiness to the job. "He was a very honest man," said Prof. TEPPERMAN. "He wasn't afraid on an argument, he wasn't afraid of a fight. If he liked you, he really liked you and if he didn't like you, he really didn't like you."
With the huge increase in sociology-department enrolment but small number of sociology graduates, Prof. CLARK looked outside the country to fill teaching positions. Most either came from the United States, or had been trained there.
While some scholars hailed Prof. CLARK for having eschewed American-style sociology and maintaining a Canadian approach, the young and sometimes radical newcomers with a markedly different approach regarded him as an oddball and an anachronism. And as an older, white, staunch Liberal Party-supporting male at the centre of an old-boy network, he represented everything they were fighting against. Accustomed to a more democratic academic culture at other schools, the new staff agitated for a greater say in the running of the department. When Prof. CLARK resisted, he was pushed out, and the chair became an elected position. He remained at the university until his retirement in 1976.
Outside of the university, throughout his career, Prof. CLARK served as an editor of The Canadian Journal of Economics and Political Science, and as president of the Royal Society of Canada. In addition, he was appointed an Officer in the Order of Canada.
Despite the recognition he received, Prof. CLARK always felt that his older brother who took over the farm was the family success, according to his son, Edmund. And he enjoyed such simple pleasures as hockey. Once, while attending a dinner party at Claude BISSELL's house, then the president of U of T, Prof. CLARK asked where the television was and sat down to watch the hockey game. When questioned later, Prof. CLARK replied, "Anyone stupid enough to hold a party on a hockey night deserved to have the guests watch television in the den."
S.D. CLARK died on September 18. He leaves his wife, Rosemary, sons Edmund and Samuel, nine grandchildren and a sister, Grace. His daughter Ellen predeceased him.

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