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"TRA" 2003 Obituary


TRACEY  TRACY  TRAINOR  TRALLA  TRAYNER 

TRACEY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-01-27 published
Jet pilot helped hold North American Air Defence Command fort
Career military man proud how command handled Russian false alarm
By Randy RAY Special to The Globe and Mail Monday, January 27, 2003, Page R7
Lieutenant-General Robert MORTON became interested in flying as a youngster in the Ottawa Valley community of Almonte, where he often spent long hours gluing photographs of aircraft into his scrapbook.
"He wanted to be a fighter pilot, he was always talking about airplanes," recalled his wife Pat. "Later in life, he once told me: 'I can't believe they are paying me to fly.' He loved it so much."
Gen. MORTON, who received his pilot's wings in 1960 and went on to become deputy commander-in-chief of the North American Air Defence Command in Colorado, died on December 7 in Ottawa. He was 65.
He attended Almonte High School, which, despite having 360 students, turned out a handful of Canadian Armed Forces air-force generals, including Major-General B.R. CAMPBELL and Don STEWARD/STEWART/STUART and Murray RAMSBOTTOM, both brigadier-generals. They jokingly referred to themselves as the Almonte Mafia.
Prior to graduation, Gen. MORTON toyed with the idea of becoming a pharmacist but opted for a career in the military, which would pay his way through university and cater to his interest in flying. After Grade 13, he joined the air force and spent two years at Royal Roads Military College in Victoria, before finishing his studies at the Royal Military College in Kingston. It was the beginning of a 37-year career. He learned to fly during the summers and received his wings when he graduated from Royal Military College with a B.Sc.
"He was bright, energetic and full of life," recalls Gen. RAMSBOTTOM, retired and living in Cumberland, Ontario "In our high-school days, I'd say his interest in flying was not all apparent. We were more interested in basketball, academics and socializing."
After pilot training, Gen. MORTON was posted to France where until 1963 he served as a fighter pilot with 421 Fighter Squadron in Grostenquin, flying CF-86 Sabres, the Korean War-era jet.
During his career, he flew many different types of aircraft, including the CF-101 Voodoo twin-engine interceptor, the T-39 Saberliner and the T-33 Shooting star, which was Canada's main advanced fighter trainer for decades. He also flew the CF-104 Starfighter, a tricky supersonic plane nicknamed the "widow maker" by German pilots.
He returned to Ottawa in 1963 and was assigned to air-force headquarters, holding several administrative jobs. From 1966 to 1968, he was a flying instructor in Gimli, Manitoba His first posting to Colorado Springs was in 1968 as a major, his second in 1978 as colonel and his third as lieutenant-general in 1989. In between, he held a number of posts, including commander of the North American Air Defence Command base at North Bay, Ontario, chief of staff operations of Fourth Allied Tactical Air Force in Hiedelberg, Germany, and base operations officer and flight commander, 416 Squadron at Canadian Forces Base in Chatham, New Brunswick.
He was promoted to the rank of brigadier-general in 1982, major-general in 1984 and lieutenant-general in 1989.
During one of his stints with North American Air Defence Command, which was established to protect Canada and the United States from surprise attacks, Gen. MORTON was command director inside Cheyenne Mountain, the bunker carved out of a Colorado mountain that was designed to withstand a direct hit from a nuclear warhead.
On a number of occasions during his career, there were false alarms, including a burst of solar energy during the Soviet invasion of Afghanistan that set off radar stations in Alaska and across the Canadian Arctic. This put North American Air Defence Command and Strategic Air Command systems on a heightened state of alert while the command and control network worked quickly to assure it was not a real attack.
"This was a significant thing when you consider the consequences of a bad decision," said Gen. MORTON's son Bruce. "In the post-event analysis, after the mountain had made the ultimate decision that it was not an attack and our forces were ordered to stand down, my father, his people and North American Air Defence Command, were proud that they had all done their jobs properly."
While working with North American Air Defence Command, Gen. MORTON knew the Soviet Union tested North American defences by sending flights along the Arctic and Labrador coasts. On one such trip, he ordered CF-18 fighters into the air to photograph the Canadian fighter shadowing the Soviet plane, proving to the North American public that the defence system had a real job to do.
Gen. MORTON retired in 1992 to become a member of the Air Command Advisory Council, a body set up to advise Canada's air-force leadership. He also served as honorary national president of the Air Force Association of Canada from 1994 to 1999 and under his leadership it grew to 20,000 members from 12,000, said executive director Bob TRACEY. The association is a lobby group with the goal of improving Canada's military.
Mr. TRACEY, who worked for Gen. MORTON in Colorado, remembers his former boss as a commander who understood the needs and wants of his troops. "He could get an awful lot of work out of people with him."
Gen. MORTON, a devoted family man, met his wife in Grade 5; they started going steady at age 15, and married at 23. They had two children, Bruce and Jennie. Gen. MORTON also leaves his father Stanley.
Robert MORTON, air force officer; born in Almonte, Ontario, March 23, 1937; died in Ottawa, December 7, 2002.

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TRACEY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-09-19 published
SCOTT, Lewis Clayton - August 16, 1909 - September 17, 2003
Died peacefully at Southlake Village Nursing Home, age 94, after a full and distinguished life as a sportsman. In an era when shooting, fishing, hunting and riding were the epitome of sportsmanship, Scott excelled at all.
Born on August 16, 1909 in Vermillion, South Dakota, Lew came to Toronto at an early age with his family. One of his first employers was the Toronto Carpet Company (where he met his future wife Alice PARKER.) He then moved on to the brokerage business with Barrett Sye and Co. as well as in the Toronto Grain Exchange. He established L.C. Scott Construction Company in the 1940's which operated in Canada, the United States and England. After World War 2, the company built a large number of schools and hospitals in Southern Ontario as well as some of the post war homes that were built in New Toronto and North York.
Lew had a lifelong passion for horses. During a family stint in California when he was a youngster, he first galloped racehorses at Hollywood Park and when he grew too big, switched to exercising polo ponies. After his business career was established, he acquired property in Markham - Wyndstone Farm - from which he bred and raised thoroughbred racehorses, steeplechasers and sport horses as well as bird dogs and prize- winning Shorthorn cattle.
Lew was an equestrian sportsman of international stature. He competed in steeplechasing and timber racing in Canada and the United States winning a number of prestigious trophies including the Prince of Wales trophy three times. He played polo in Canada, the United States, England and Barbados and competed at horse shows across Ontario. He was a keen foxhunter and served as the whipper-in for the Toronto and North York Hunt for 20 years prior to becoming a Master of Foxhounds in 1972, a position he held until 1990.
He raised bird dogs and competed with them all over North America in the 40's and the 50's. He was a top fly fisherman and enjoyed duck and pheasant hunting. Both he and his wife Alice were crack shots and long time members of the Toronto Gun Club. As a young man, he was a member of the Argonaut Rowing Club.
At one time, a member or director of the Toronto and North York Hunt, the Canadian Hunter Society, the Canadian Equestrian Team, the Canadian Thoroughbred Horse Society, the Toronto Polo Club and several U.S. polo clubs, the Cowdray Polo Club, United Kingdom Canadian director of the Master of Foxhounds Association of America, the Goodwood Club and the Argonaut Rowing Club. He was also an accomplished pilot who loved flying and had owned several planes.
In 1989, after 54 years of marriage, he lost his beloved wife Alice whose charm, hospitality and hard work was the foundation of the family and the basis which allowed Lew's energetic pursuit of his interests.
Predeceased also by his only son Lewis Christian (Skipper). Leaves daughters Alice FERRIER (Glen) and Susan Jane ANSTEY (Michael VAN EVERY,) granddaughters Jennifer ANSTEY, Elizabeth TRACEY, Janet Louise GAYFORD, Mary FRALEIGH and Margaret Ann SPROULE. Great grandchildren Owen TRACEY, Will FRALEIGH, Jamie FRALEIGH and Tom FRALEIGH.
He will be remembered for his enthusiasm, toughness, loyalty and keen interest in the people and things around him.
If desired, donations in his memory may be made to Think First Canada (for injury prevention in sports and recreation), Med-West Medical Centre, Suite 2-227, 750 Dundas St. West, Toronto, Ontario M6J 3S3 or to the Royal Agricultural Winter Fair Endowment Fund.
A Private family service was held. Arrangements entrusted to the Thompson Funeral Home, 29 Victoria Street, Aurora (905-727-5421).

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TRACY o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-09-10 published
Marguerite Esther LOCHEAD
In loving memory of Marguerite Esther LOCHEAD, July 11, 1919 - September 2, 2003.
Marguerite Esther LOCHEAD, a resident of Mindemoya, passed away at the Mindemoya Hospital, Mindemoya on Tuesday, September 2, 2003 at the age of 84 years. She was born in Dalhousie Township daughter of the late Hugh and Marion (PARK) LOCHEAD. Marguerite was a teacher for 35 years, teaching in such places as Copper Cliff, Gatchell and Little Current before retiring to Mindemoya. She became very active in the Mindemoya United Church. She had many hobbies, including gardening, knitting and art especially painting with oils. Well-known and respected in her community, she will be sadly missed by all who knew her. A loving sister, aunt, great aunt and friend, many fond memories will be cherished. Marguerite is survived by her sister Marion "Betty" SLOSS of Spring Bay and brother Alex LOCHEAD and wife Mary of London. Predeceased by a brother Alex LOCHEAD and wife Mary of London. Predeceased by a brother Charles and brother-in-law Elwood SLOSS. Dear and loving aunt of Jim SLOSS, Susan GRENON, Mary Lynn McQUARRIE, Bill LOCHEAD, Charles LOCHEAD, Marian LOCHEAD, James LOCHEAD and Phyllis SPARKS. Also survived by 11 great nieces and nephews. Friends called at the Mindemoya United Church, Mindemoya on Friday, September 5, 2003 from 2 - 4 pm and 7 - 9 pm. The funeral service was conducted at the Church on Saturday September 6, 2003 at 11 am with Reverend Mary Jo ECKERT TRACY officiating. Interment in Mindemoya Cemetery.
also linked as linked as LOCKHEAD

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TRACY o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-09-17 published
John Carson BRYAN
In loving memory of John Carson BRYAN, July 24, 1918 to September 8, 2003.
John C. BRYAN, a resident of Providence Bay, passed away peacefully at the Manitoulin Lodge Nursing Home, Gore Bay on Monday, September 8, 2003 at the age of 85 years.
He was born in Spring Bay, son of the late Robert H. and Mabel (HEWITT) BRYAN.
John was an avid reader with a great desire for knowledge. His hobbies included home remodeling and he enjoyed building projects he designed. He had a major role in the design and construction of the Manitoulin District Cenotaph. He was a Chief Petty Officer in the Royal Canadian Navy during World War II. He later worked for the National Research Council of the Canadian Government as an electrical design engineer. In 1964, he and his family moved to the San Francisco, California area where he worked for General Electric as an electrical engineer. He retired in 1978 and returned to Providence Bay to enjoy his great love of family and Manitoulin. He and Phyllis traveled extensively during their retirement. John was also a member of Royal Canadian Legion Br. #177 Little Current, Manitoulin and North Shore Naval Veterans Association. He will be greatly missed by his family, Friends and comrades.
Beloved husband of Phyllis (MacINNIS) BRYAN of Providence Bay. Dearly loved father of Wayne BRYAN of Winnipeg, J. Marlene JEWELL and husband William of Ithaca, New York and Gregory BRYAN and wife Stephanie of Los Angeles. Proud grandfather of Jeffrey and Erica. Dear brother of Gordon BRYAN (wife Betty deceased.) Predeceased by sister Idena MORGAN and husband Reginald and brother Roy BRYAN and his wife Jean. Also survived by many nieces and nephews. Friends called the Providence Bay United Church on Friday, September 12, 2003. The funeral service was conducted from the church on Saturday, September 13, 2003 with Reverend Mary Jo ECKERT TRACY officiating. Cremation to follow.

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TRACY o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-12-10 published
John Ellsworth SEABROOK
In loving memory of John Ellsworth SEABROOK July 18, 1923 to November 30, 2003.
John Ellsworth SEABROOK, known as "Jack" passed away suddenly at 80 years, on November 30, 2003.
He was born in Chatsworth, July 18, 1923 and made his home in Mindemoya, Manitoulin Island, since 1931. He leaves to remember him, his beloved wife Marion. His cherished kids: Cathy, Deb, John, Diana, Mark and Vanda. Their spouses: David, Cheryl, Keith and Michelle. His treasured grandchildren: Brent, Brady, Logan, Meg, Kate, Sarah, Jenny, Ben, Philip, A.J., Josh, Lyric, Jasmine, Morgan and Jessie. His one beautiful great grandchild Teigan. His sisters: Ella (Peggy) HAHN and Lois CHALLINOR. Predeceased Maxine PRINGLE and Fern SEABROOK. His brother, Archie. Predeceased Bill. His sisters-in-law: Joanne
SMITH, Millie SEABROOK and Aletha SEABROOK. Predeceased Lorene STANLEY. His brothers-in-law: Jim HAHN, Jim SMITH and George STANLEY. Predeceased Hugh PRINGLE. His nieces and nephews: Clay, Susan, Bill, Beth, Robert, Paul, David, Charlie, John, Geoff, Mark, Kevin and Tara. Predeceased Lynn. All will miss him dearly. He was an original. He realized his own dreams of becoming a machinist, a master mechanic, a carpenter, the developer of the Brookwood Brae Golf Course, windmill designer, gentleman farmer (all animals at his farm died of old age) and curator and creator of Jack's Agriculture Museum. We all knew and loved him and he became our example to follow our dreams. His colourful, warm character shone at auctions, plays, card games, and church committees. He was the crank shaft and spark plug of our family. He loved Massey Harris tractors, Triumph motorcycles, Blue Jay games, yellow wooden shoes, novels by Louis L'Amour, movies with John Wayne, grape juice and certo (for arthritis), raisin pie and ice cream - and us!
"Everyday you're breathin' is a good day." This philosophy was reflected in his love for his wife, his kids, his grandkids, his Friends and his community. His love will shine in those he's left behind. Friends called the Mindemoya United Church on Wednesday, December 3, 2003. Funeral service was held on Thursday, December 4, 2003 with Reverend Mary Jo ECKERT TRACY officiating. Cremation to follow. Culgin Funeral Home

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TRACY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-21 published
ROBINSON, May Elizabeth (Tracy) née TRACY- GOULD
Born November 18, 1914 Newcastle (Miramachi City), New Brunswick, died March 17, 2003 at Crofton Manor, Vancouver, British Columbia. Predeceased by her husband James Emerson (Robbie), the love of her life. She is survived by her three daughters, Susan (Mike NICHOLS), Zora (Alf SIMON), and Alice (Allan HALLDORSON), her grandchildren Jesse and Tracy, her brother Perley TRACY- GOULD (Hester) and sister Zora KEDDIE (Ray) and their families. Tracy graduated as a nurse from the Montreal General Hospital and joined the Canadian Army as an operating room nurse in 1939. She served from 1939-1945 following the troops through Europe. She met Robbie in Italy and they were married in the town hall of Brussels, Belgium on April 10, 1945. While raising her three daughters she was active in her community. In Winnipeg this included the Winnipeg Symphony Orchestra, Deer Lodge Veterans Hospital, the Children's Hospital Book Market and working in the canteen in her local community centre. In Toronto she worked in the gift shop of the North York General Hospital and has been a generous donor to the foundation. In White Rock she worked at the Peace Arch Hospital's Superfluidy Shop. She belonged to and worked with a hospital guild in every city she lived in and remained a member of the Royal Canadian Military Institute until her death. She was an active member of the Nursing Sisters Association of Canada, contributing in many ways over the years. Her hobbies included baking for her family, Friends and charities, travelling, gardening and corresponding with old Friends. Tracy had a real love of life, with a wry sense of humour and a smile that could win anyone's heart. It was such a pleasure to share time with her; she will be sadly missed by family and Friends. Cremation has taken place. A Memorial Service will be held and details will be announced at a later date. In lieu of flowers donations may be made to: Ghurka Benevolent Fund or the Heart and Stroke Foundation or a charity of your choice.

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TRAINOR o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-09-10 published
Honourable Justice Richard G. TRAINOR
In loving memory of Honourable Justice Richard G. TRAINOR who passed away Friday morning, September 5, 2003 at the Sudbury Regional Hospital-Memorial site at the age of 73 years.
Beloved husband of Jacqueline (SAINT_DENIS) TRAINOR of Spring Bay. Loving father of Patricia Ann of Toronto, Trez (friend Marc) of Montreal, Martin (wife Kathy) of Truro, N.S., Jackie (husband Barry ELLIOT/ELLIOTT) of Lyons Head, Suzy (husband Tim QUETTON) of Montreal and Jennifer of Dartmouth, N.S. Cherished grandfather of Shane, Nick, Richard, Abby, Shaun, Michael, Brenna, Maddy, Spencer and Laura. Dear son of Martin and Bertha TRAINOR, both predeceased. Dear brother of Moyra KAISER of Rhode Island, predeceased by Therese and Jane. Richard served as an Ontario Superior Court Justice since 1979. A private family memorial mass was held on Manitoulin Island. Jackson and Barnard Funeral Home.

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TRALLA o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-07-18 published
NIITENBERG, Arvo (Executive Vice President of Operations for Ontario Hydro and more recently Minister of Energy of Estonia)
Died on July 16, 2003. Beloved son of Magda. Husband of Vaige. Loving father of Linda, and her husband Allan, Anita, and her husband Erik. Dear grandfather of Karina and Kristian. Brother of the Late Tiina TRALLA. Funeral service will be held at St. Andrew's Estonian Evangelical Lutheran Church, 383 Jarvis St. on Saturday, July 19, 2003 at 11 am. Murray E. Newbigging Funeral Directors. If desired, donations may be made to the Heart and Stroke Foundation of Ontario.

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TRAYNER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-08-20 published
Ex-politician and war hero FLYNN dies
Was chairman of Metropolitan Toronto
By James RUSK Municipal Affairs Reporter Wednesday, August 20, 2003 - Page A17
Dennis FLYNN, a war hero who parachuted into France on D-Day and eventually rose to be chairman of Metropolitan Toronto, died yesterday morning as he was preparing to observe an army reserve exercise at Canadian Forces Base Petawawa.
Mr. FLYNN, 79, who had been in poor health in recent years, collapsed, apparently of a heart attack, at his hotel in Pembroke, and was pronounced dead at Pembroke General Hospital, the Canadian Armed Forces said in a statement.
Mr. FLYNN was mayor of Etobicoke from 1972 to 1984, the longest-serving mayor of the Toronto suburb, and was chairman of Metropolitan Toronto from 1984 to 1988. He continued to serve on Metro Council until the 1997 amalgamation that created the new City of Toronto.
He served on the Toronto Police Services Board and was awarded the Order of Canada in 2001.
Major Tim LOURIE, public-relations director of the exercise, said Mr. FLYNN travelled to Pembroke on Monday to observe a reserve exercise in which the Toronto Scottish Regiment (the Queen Mother's Own,) of which Mr. FLYNN was the honorary lieutenant-colonel, was participating.
"Unfortunately, he didn't even get out to see us here," Major LOURIE said. The regiment received the call that he had collapsed in the hotel just before a group of honorary colonels was heading out to observe the exercise.
Mr. FLYNN, was born in County Cork, Ireland, in 1923. When he was two years old he migrated with his family to the Kensington section of Toronto, long a melting pot for immigrants.
In 1938, at age 15, he joined the Toronto Scottish and volunteered for active service at the outbreak of the Second World War. In 1942, he joined the joint Canadian-American unit that came to be known as the Devil's Brigade, and in 1943, he transferred to the 1st Canadian Parachute Regiment.
He jumped into Normandy on D-Day, June 6, 1944, where he was wounded by German fire. After recovery, he rejoined the regiment, jumped into Germany on March 24, 1945, in Operation Varsity, the crossing of the Rhine River, and was wounded again when part of his leg was shattered by machine-gun fire as he escorted two German prisoners across the Rhine.
As a result of the wound, Mr. FLYNN walked with a cane for the rest of his life. "One of his most self-deprecating comments, when talking to young soldiers, was that he had made only three jumps. One was for practice, one was on D-Day, and the third and last was across the Rhine," commented Lieutenant-Colonel Mike TRAYNER, commanding officer of the Toronto Scottish.
After the war, he joined the City of Toronto's clerk's department, and rose to be protocol officer. He failed in his first run for mayor of Etobicoke in 1969, but upset the incumbent, Doug LACEY, in 1972.
In 1984, he was elected chairman of Metropolitan Toronto, replacing Paul GODFREY, now president of the Toronto Blue Jays, who was then leaving Toronto politics to become publisher of the Toronto Sun. His career as Metro chairman ended in 1988, when he lost to Alan TONKS, now a member of parliament.

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