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"STR" 2003 Obituary


STRAHL  STRAIN  STRAPP  STRATTON  STRAUSS  STRAW  STRICKLAND  STROGRE  STROHBACH 

STRAHL o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-20 published
Andre HAMER
By Nancy Hamer STRAHL, Art McDONALD and Patty CARSON
Thursday, March 20, 2003 - Page A24
Husband, father, family man, scientist, traveller. Born January 17, 1968, in Oshawa, Ontario Died February 2 in Ottawa, of colon cancer, age 35.
Andre came from a family where education came naturally. He was raised in a stimulating environment, by loving parents who fostered his natural curiosity and provided him with ample learning opportunities by 17, Kant and Nietzsche were his bedtime favourites. Andre was very proud of his Belgian ancestry and visited his family's homeland many times. He and his sister loved to travel and shared this love during the teenage years -- from visiting the top of the Alps to the dismantling of the Berlin Wall.
He studied at the University of Toronto, and later earned an M.Sc. and PhD in experimental physics from Queen's University in Kingston where he met his future wife, Rosalie McKENNA. A mutual friend thought they would be perfect for each other (because they both loved old movies) and arranged for them to meet. It was February 9th -- and it was love at first sight. The clincher came when Andre said "Get it, got it, good!" and Rosalie immediately recognized the line from an old Danny Kaye movie. For Valentine's Day, Rosalie sent Andre a single red rose.
When they were married, their reception was held in the grand "train" room in Ottawa's Museum of Science and Technology. It was perfect. In the background was man's testament to our quest for knowledge and in the foreground (like an old movie with Doris Day singing Que sera, sera) were two young lovers alighting from the train, beginning life's journey.
That life journey soon included fatherhood. Andre was patient and loving with Patrick and Michael. He read to the boys each day, passing on his love of reading.
Andre loved science and he was particularly good at experimental science. Everything he did was done to completion, starting with innovative concepts and continuing to the finished product that did its intended job 100 per cent -- nothing less. He was regarded as one of the very best young particle astrophysicists in the world. He played a central role in the success of the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory, thus contributing directly to our current knowledge of the universe. Andre developed the central calibration device for the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory experiment for his doctoral thesis at Queen's University, carried out major analyses essential for Sudbury Neutrino Observatory's success as a post-doctoral fellow at Los Alamos National Laboratory in New Mexico and presented the major results from Sudbury Neutrino Observatory at the American Physical Society meetings in April, 2002. His legacy in science continues as his contributions are used every day by his colleagues at Sudbury Neutrino Observatory.
Andre lived by his personal motto "L'espoir fait vivre" (hope gives life). He loved to listen to his mother's inspiring stories of Grandmother Lea's use of this motto during their fight to survive the Second World War. Throughout his difficult struggle with cancer, Andre maintained a balance between his intellectual pursuits and caring for his spiritual and physical self. Two days before his untimely death, he was reading articles that summarized our current knowledge of the universe from its most microscopic regions to its farthest distances. Later on, he watched an inspirational video about nature with his son. He and his son Patrick talked about how they would climb mountains and build bridges over the rivers.
On February 7, his family (including some from Belgium), Friends old and new, and colleagues (from as far away as New Mexico), gathered to mourn the passing of a gentle soul and a great scientist. His coffin was adorned with a single red rose. On March 8, his third son, Andre Luc McKenna HAMER, was born.
Nancy is Andre's sister, Art his thesis advisor, Patty his sister-in-law.

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STRAIN o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-02-19 published
STRAIN
-In loving memory of a dear brother and uncle, Harold, who passed away March 1, 1980.
He meant so much to us
But nothing we can say
Can tell the sadness in our hearts
As we think of him each day.
He always was true and tender
He lived his life for those he loved
And those he loved, remember.
-Sadly missed by Gary, Elva, David, Jim and Karen.

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STRAIN o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-08-20 published
Lottie Mae McDONALD
In loving memory of Lottie Mae McDONALD, July 29, 1922 to August 14, 2003.
Lottie Mae McDONALD, a resident of Meadowview Apartments, Mindemoya, passed away at her residence on Thursday, August 14, 2003 at the age of 81 years. She was born in Gordon Township daughter of the late William and Sarah (STRAIN) SCOTT. Lottie Mae had been very active in her community, having been a member of the Horticultural Society, The Agricultural Society and a School Board Trustee for 18 years. She had many hobbies, including gardening, knitting, sewing, and quilting. Well known and respected in her community, she will be sadly missed by all who knew her. A loving mother, grandmother, sister and friend, many fond memories will be cherished. She was predeceased by her husband Jack McDONALD in 1984. Loving and loved mother of John and his wife Anita of Sioux Lookout, Peter and his wife Nancy of Kenora, Carey of Orillia, Penny and husband Milford of Barrie, Paul and his wife Christine of Sudbury and Adam and his wife Kathy of Mindemoya. Proud grandmother of Bonnie, Jason, Jacqueline, Sean, Jane, Casey, Scott, Lindsay, Ben, Kaitlyn and T.J. Dear sister of Beatrice BEANGE, Ted SCOTT (predeceased,) Margie BLACKBURN, Maria McDERMID, John SCOTT and Fred SCOTT. Friends called the Salem Missionary Church, Spring Bay, on Friday, August 15, 2003. The funeral service was conducted at the Church on Saturday, August 16, 2003 with pastor Al WILKINSON officiating. Interment in Providence Bay Cemetery. Culgin Funeral Home.

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STRAIN o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-11-19 published
STRAIN
-In loving memory of a dear father and grandfather, David, who passed away November 22, 1982.
Your smile has gone forever, and your
hand we cannot touch
We have so many memories
Of you Dad, we loved so much.
--Sadly missed by son Garry, Elva, David, Jim and Karen.

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STRAPP o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-08-06 published
Reverend Jackson W. STRAPP
In loving memory of Jackson STRAPP who passed away at the Sault Area Hospital on Saturday, July 19, 2003 at the age of 77 years. Beloved husband of Marion (WEDGE) and father of their four sons Bruce, Bryan, David and Craig. Loving son of the Reverend Howard and Mrs. Fannie STRAPP. Dear brother of Keith (predeceased) and sister-in-law Carolyn (McKINNON.) Friends and family joined in the memorial service at Sault Sainte Marie on July 23 with the Reverend Phil MILLER officiating.

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STRATTON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-06 published
ADDISON, Grace Lorraine
On February 23, 2003 in her 86th year from renal failure at Joseph Brant Memorial Hospital in Burlington, Ontario. Dear wife of the late William Kellock (Bill) ADDISON. Dearly beloved wife of the late Gilbert Arthur STRATTON. Loving and much loved mother of Douglas Wymark STRATTON of Toronto. Cremation has taken place with burial at St. Jude's Cemetery, Oakville, Ontario. To honour her memory, donations to the charity of your choice in the name of 'Amazing' Grace Addison would be sincerely appreciated.

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STRAUSS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-04-19 published
BABITS, George Joseph B.A.Sc., C.A.
It is with profound sadness that the family announces the passing of a beloved husband, father and grandfather. In his 68th year, George died peacefully on April 15, 2003, surrounded by his loving family, following a courageous and inspiring 3-year battle with kidney cancer. Having overcome an initial 4-month prognosis, he never gave up the fight.
George will live forever in the hearts of his beloved wife and soul mate of 42 years, Katherine, his devoted sons George (Wendy), Thomas (Trisha) and Christopher (Jennifer). His grandchildren Monica, George Matthew, Paul and John will all miss their dear ''Papa.'' The family regrets that he will miss the births of his twin grandchildren due in less than two weeks. Also mourned by his brother Pal, sister Anna and many nephews and nieces in Hungary, as well as his many Friends in Canada and around the world. George was predeceased by his parents and his brother Laszlo.
Born in Debrecen, Hungary, George was a champion weightlifter in his youth, winning numerous regional and national titles. While attending the University of Sopron, he left for Canada as a refugee during the 1956 Revolution. He completed his degree in geological engineering at the University of Toronto, and went on to become a Chartered Accountant. George began his career at the accounting firm Ernst and Ernst, followed by more than 27 years at Imperial Oil Ltd., where he had the opportunity to combine his scientific knowledge with his financial acumen. After retiring from Imperial in 1991, he continued to work in his own accounting practice until his death. Throughout his life, he generously volunteered for numerous organizations, including many in the Canadian-Hungarian community. His sense of charity seemed to know no bounds. He always gave of his time, energy, knowledge and expertise, freely to those in need.
George's greatest passion was his family and his legacy will live on, because it was as a husband and father that he had his greatest success. His love and devotion to his family was boundless, and he has left his children with a great appreciation for the importance of family, education and respect for others. He was the greatest role model that his sons could have possibly asked for, and he will forever be in their hearts. Father we love you.
Many thanks to the fine medical professionals who helped George in his battle and treated him with exceptional care and respect: Doctors BUKOWSKI and COHEN of the Cleveland Clinic, Doctors TSIHLIAS and Waddel of the University Health Network, Doctors KUGLER and STRAUSS of Gottingen, Germany and their pioneering vaccine therapy program, and Doctors BJARNASON and SMITH and the team at the Toronto Sunnybrook Regional Cancer Centre.
The family will receive Friends at the R.S. Kane Funeral Home (6150 Yonge Street, at Goulding, south of Steeles), on Tuesday, April 22, 2003 from 7: 30-9:00 p.m. The funeral mass will be held on Wednesday, April 23, 2003, at 11: 00 a.m. at St. Elizabeth of Hungary Roman Catholic Church (432 Sheppard Ave. E.). Donations to the Sunnybrook Foundation Fund #9182 To Support Kidney Cancer Research (In Memory of George J. Babits) c/o Dr. Georg Bjarnason, 2075 Bayview Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5, would be appreciated. Messages of Condolence may be placed at www.rskane.ca.
''Szivunkben Orokke elni fogsz!''

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STRAUSS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-05-10 published
Programmer was a 'people person'
Computer consultant advised clients not only on technology, but on the psychology that made the technology work for the company
Harvey GELLMAN was the first person in Canada to get a PhD based in computer studies.
By Marina STRAUSS Saturday, May 10, 2003 - Page F11
He broke new ground in the computer field long before most Canadians even knew what a software program was, or that computers would so profoundly change their way of communicating and doing business.
Known as the dean of computer consulting, Harvey GELLMAN had a hand in purchasing the first computer in this country in 1952 he ran one of the first software programs and was the first to get a PhD based on computer studies. Last month, Dr. GELLMAN died suddenly in Florida at the age of 78.
He made his name as a consultant who advised clients not only on technology, but on the psychology that made the technology work for a company -- with a knack for matching people's skills to the job at hand, colleagues say.
Most important, Dr. GELLMAN put the clients first, always looking out for their best interests rather than simply the consultant's bottom line, says Jim HAYWARD, his partner at Toronto-based Gellman Hayward and Partners for 18 years until it was sold to Montreal-based CGI Group in 1992.
What particularly distinguished Dr. GELLMAN as a consultant was his departure from others in refusing just to analyze a problem and deliver a report to the client, Mr. HAYWARD says.
Instead, Dr. GELLMAN would find out exactly how far the client was ready to go in implementing any change recommended in a report and then guide the client through the change process.
This fundamental shift took root in the mid-1970s, when Dr. GELLMAN became frustrated that too many consultants simply handed over a report and then walked away from the problem, Mr. HAYWARD says.
"The trick is to work beside the client and walk with them, but don't take the problem away from them, " he says. "It's like therapy."
Together, they applied this form of business therapy at Gellman Hayward, which grew from four partners to about 100 employees before it was sold, boasting a client list that read like a Who's Who of corporate Canada.
Indeed, the firm at one time or another advised all the big banks, Bell Canada, Imperial Oil, Labatt Breweries, Eaton's, Hudson's Bay, Spar Aerospace, TransCanada PipeLines, Noranda, Falconbridge, Inco, Atomic Energy of Canada and the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation.
"It was all the big names, says CGI president Serge GODIN, who worked closely with Dr. GELLMAN after the 1992 acquisition and credits him with helping to manage its huge surge in staff mostly through acquisitions -- by integrating and streamlining the various systems.
"Harvey GELLMAN is a brand name, Mr. GODIN says. "He was quite something, very strong, brilliant -- with a big heart."
He was a man of few words, with a deep-seated respect for and interest in people, colleagues and family.
"He would say, 'The janitor and the president are the same, ' recalls Paul GELLMAN, the younger of his two sons, who also is a computer consultant. "He believed it and he lived it."
From the security officers at Dr. GELLMAN's apartment building in Florida, where he lived half the year in his retirement, to the secretary in his doctor's office -- all were touched by him and upset by his death, Paul says.
Born in 1924, Dr. GELLMAN was the middle of five children of Polish parents who immigrated to Toronto in 1928. His youngest brother Albert says nobody in the household ever quarrelled: a calm reigned in the family and reverberated in the future computer guru.
Still, Dr. GELLMAN's life threatened to take an entirely different course early on, when he dropped out of high school to work in an electrical manufacturing plant and help the family make ends meet.
The factory had an electrical test set that only Dr. GELLMAN was able to figure out, Mr. HAYWARD says. The budding tech whiz realized that he wasn't so dumb, went back to school -- and the rest is history.
He attended the University of Toronto, graduating with a bachelor's degree in mathematics and physics in 1947. The following year, the university's newly established Computation Centre, headed by Professor Calvin (Kelly) GOTLIEB, invited him to join and study electro-mechanical devices.
Dr. GELLMAN subsequently was involved in purchasing a huge Ferranti computer from England for $250,000. It was the first computer bought in Canada, sponsored in part by one of the centre's clients Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd.
"The machine would fail every five minutes, Dr. GELLMAN was quoted as saying years later when he was inducted in the industry-sponsored Canadian Information Productivity Awards hall of fame. "We would sit at the monitor and watch the diagonal array of dots, and when a dot dropped, we would stop the machine, reset it and carry on."
He wrote a small program on punch paper tape to help users print efficiently from the computer, one of the first software programs to be run in Canada, and soon he produced the first printout for a computational problem, according to information supplied to Canadian Information Productivity Awards.
In 1951, he obtained his PhD in applied mathematics, the first doctorate in Canada for which the theoretical calculations depended on a computer.
That same year, he became head of computing at Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd. and, by 1955, he founded H. S. Gellman and Co. Ltd. in Toronto to advise the growing number of companies seeking his help.
Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd. was his first client and remained one throughout his consulting career.
"He was doing a lot of pioneering work on operating systems, and operating systems that deal with controlling nuclear-power plants, says Bob BANTING, manager of information technology security at Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd. "He understood the programming and the technical stuff, but he also knew how to manage people.... He was very good at assessing skills."
He hired top talent, sizing up job candidates in minutes, and was able to move seamlesslessly from being a good programmer to a good "people person, Mr. BANTING says.
Dr. GELLMAN's early work was computing based on mathematical equations, but the firm quickly moved into what became known as information technology.
His busy consulting firm was swallowed in 1964 by a subsidiary of de Havilland and subsequently by AGT Data Systems before he left with Mr. HAYWARD to form Gellman Hayward.
But by the early 1990s, the firm was "stuck" and started to seek a buyer, Mr. HAYWARD says. "We didn't know how to get to the next level."
When CGI acquired it in 1992, Dr. GELLMAN stayed on as a senior vice-president until he retired six years later.
In 1997, he co-wrote Riding the Tiger, a book that helps business managers use information technology effectively. He was often quoted in the media on managing information systems, and wrote articles on the topic for The Globe and Mail.
In addition, he received many honours during his career, including being named International Systems Man of the Year in 1967. He was a founding member of the Canadian Information Processing Society, among other professional bodies.
In his personal life, he was a private man and a steadfast father and grandfather nine times over. He was devoted to Lily, his wife of 57 years. They were teenage sweethearts, best of Friends and "a model of how we all should live, " says his son Paul.
When Paul's older brother, Steven, decided to pursue a career as a composer and musician, Dr. GELLMAN had some reservations, aware of the risks of such an unconventional and insecure profession.
"Before I left home to study at Juilliard, he said to me, 'I understand you wanting to become a musician. Become the best musician you can be; but I am concerned that you don't become just a musician, ' " Steven says.
"Dad was reminding me to become a full human being, to develop many facets of my life, just as he did."
Dr. GELLMAN and his wife spent a lot of time in Israel, where they had family. In the mid-1970s, he took a six-month sabbatical from work for an extended stay.
He was also part of a small discussion group called the Senge Circle, started more than a decade ago among business colleagues to discuss Peter Senge's management book, The Fifth Discipline. It evolved into regular breakfast meetings to chew over different business tomes.
The last meeting was in October before he went to Florida when the group delved into the Peter DRUCKER classic, The Practice of Management. Dr. GELLMAN was struck by how relevant the book was almost 50 years after he first read it.
Dr. GELLMAN, who died on April 23, leaves his wife Lily, sons Steven and Paul, and siblings Dorothy, Albert and Esther.

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STRAW o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-01-09 published
Last fighter pilot of the Great War
Canadian aviator, a bankteller in peacetime, was 'just doing his duty'
By Allison LAWLOR Thursday, January 9, 2003, Page R7
Henry BOTTERELL, the last of the fighter pilots that fought in the First World War, has died in Toronto. He was 106.
Mr. BOTTERELL, who up until in his late 90s was swimming almost every day, died peacefully at the Sunnybrook Veterans Hospital, now part of Sunnybrook and Women's College Health Sciences Centre, on Friday, less than two months after celebrating his 106th birthday.
One of 16 surviving Canadian veterans of the First World War profiled in a Globe and Mail series in November, Henry BOTTERELL was believed to be the last fighter pilot from the 1914-1918 conflict, according to the Department of Veterans Affairs.
Mr. BOTTERELL declined to take part in the series of interviews, but at a special air-force celebration four years earlier he recalled his days as a fighter pilot.
"I had good hands," he said then. "I didn't have the fighting acumen of some, like Billy BISHOP. I was just a bank clerk. I wasn't one of the very best, but I had my share of action."
On August 29, 1918, Flight Lieutenant BOTTERELL flew his Sopwith Camel over Vitry, France. After dropping four bombs on a railway station, he was heading back to his airfield when he encountered a German observation balloon. He fired 400 rounds into the balloon with his aircraft machine gun.
With the balloon ablaze, the soldier leaped from the basket and opened his parachute. As the flaming remains of the balloon fell to the ground, Mr. BOTTERELL had enough time to swing around and shoot his enemy, but didn't. Instead, he snapped him a chivalrous salute before heading back to base. The moment was captured by aviation artist Robert TAILOR/TAYLOR, in his painting Balloon Buster.
"He was an adventurer," said Jon STRAW, a friend and former director of the Great War Flying Museum in Brampton, Ontario Mr. STRAW is also working on a book on Canadian pilots who served in the First World War with Allan SNOWIE, a retired naval aviator who is now a pilot with Air Canada.
Like many of the veterans from the First World War, Mr. BOTTERELL didn't consider his war efforts to be heroic.
"He didn't think it was any big deal, he thought he was just doing his duty," Mr. STRAW said.
In 1916, Mr. BOTTERELL was working for the Bank of North America (now the Bank of Montreal) when his older brother Edward, who played football for the Toronto Argonauts, was killed overseas by a sniper. A few months later, Henry, then 20, enlisted with the Royal Naval Air Service and was sent to England to train as a fighter pilot.
His sister, Edith, who worked as a secretary for an admiral at the time, had helped him get what she thought would be a safer assignment in the war. But that didn't prove to be true. At one point in the war, new pilots had a life expectancy of three weeks.
Mr. BOTTERELL's flying career got off to a difficult start. Engine failure caused him to crash on only his second takeoff in September, 1917, at Dunkirk, France. He suffered head injuries, a fractured leg, and broken teeth and spent six months in hospital. He was eventually demobilized as disabled and discharged. But he later re-enlisted and qualified as a fighter pilot again and returned to France in early 1918.
His flight log reveals that he was attached to the 208th Squadron serving in France from May 11 to November 27, 1918. His records show that during that time, he flew patrols and fought over places including Serny, Estrées and Arras. He then transferred to Belgium, according to the Department of Veterans Affairs.
Wing Commander Neil MEADOWS, the commanding officer of Royal Air Force 208 Squadron, said in his condolences to Mr. BOTTERELL's family that Henry "remains, an inspiration to our trainee pilots. I do feel that we have lost a tangible part of what we are, and what we aspire to be.
"Undoubtedly, he did not view his actions as out of the ordinary, but his courage and dedication to duty are an example that I hope our trainees will emulate in their own flying careers," he wrote on behalf of the squadron. "I am sure, therefore, that his spirit will live on with the young pilots that continue to serve on 208 Squadron."
During his war service, Mr. BOTTERELL flew a variety of planes, but the Camel, which got its name from the hump created by two machine guns imbedded under its cowling, was his favourite. He had one particular close call, when on a flight a bullet ripped through his ear and smashed his goggles.
"I went out like a light for a few minutes, and I recovered just before I crashed," he once said.
Henry John Lawrence BOTTERELL was born in 1896 in Ottawa to Henry and Annie BOTTERELL. His mother raised him after his father died of pneumonia when Henry was a young boy. Henry attended Lisgar Collegiate Institute in Ottawa. An athletic young man, he played football like his older brother and remained physically active throughout his life.
"He was a loner," said his son Edward BOTTERELL, adding that his father enjoyed sports he would do alone such as swimming, cross-country skiing and sailing. In 1919, he returned to Canada and to banking as an assistant chief accountant. He remained with the Bank of Montreal until his retirement in the 1960s. As a souvenir from the war he brought back a Belgian fence post that had snagged the wing of his Camel on a low-level flights. It is now in the Canadian War Museum in Ottawa.
In 1929 he married and moved with his wife Maud to Montreal. They raised two children before his wife died in 1983 after suffering several strokes. During the Second World War, Mr. BOTTERELL commanded an Air Cadet Squadron, in Quebec, though he himself never took to the air. After returning home in 1919, he gave up flying.
In 1999, Mr. BOTTERELL was the guest of honour at a mess dinner commemorating the 75th anniversary of the Royal Canadian Air Force. That same year he celebrated his own 102nd birthday at a hotel in Lille, France, where he and other Canadian veterans were marking the 80th anniversary of the end of the War.
Despite his failing memory, his son Edward said his father was "moved by the experience."
Mr. BOTTERELL is survived by daughter Frances MARQUETTE of Houston, Texas, and son Edward BOTTERELL of Mississauga, Ontario
Henry BOTTERELL, aviator and banker; born in Ottawa on November 7, 1896, died in Toronto on January 3, 2003.

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STRICKLAND o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-04-21 published
Isabel STRICKLAND
By Deborah CRAWFORD Monday, April 21, 2003 - Page A14
Mother, neighbour, secretary. Born April 28, 1919, in Toronto. Died December 30, 2002, of natural causes, in Toronto, aged 83.
Isabel (PATERSON) STRICKLAND was a wonderful person and all who knew her realized what a very special lady she was.
Isabel was born in Toronto and raised in Swansea with her older brother, Tommy. Her father passed away when she was very young, leaving her mother to raise and support the family. Isabel, at a very young age, had to learn how to cook, sew, and keep house. She worked after school and on Saturdays as a housemaid for several different families, as well as caring for their children.
Isabel married the love of her life on May 2, 1942: Leonard STRICKLAND of the Royal Canadian Air Force. Sadly, their marriage was cut short by tragedy: he was reported missing in action on February 6, 1944. His plane's last known position was somewhere over Scotland, and was never found. At the young age of 25, Isabel found herself a widow, never to remarry.
Isabel, being a strong, determined lady ahead of her time, would carry on and make a wonderful life for herself. In December, 1944, she bought her own house on Toronto's Dufferin Street. She lived in this house with her mother, but had to rent out the top floor in order to make the mortgage payments. Over the years she had several boarders come and go; some remained truly good Friends. Her mother, Annie, passed away in her home on January 29, 1947, after Isabel had cared for her through a long illness.
Isabel continued to work hard and rent out rooms in her home. She had many jobs over the years: working for Thomas Edison Co., Bell Canada, Executone Ltd., and even working in a butcher store.
In 1949, a young family with three small children moved in next door to her. She became a very close friend to this family, helping them out by providing clothing and food on many occasions. By the summer of 1955, the family had three more children and was in turmoil. The mother had left the family, leaving the father with six children to care for. Isabel agreed to care for one of the children -- me -- on a temporary basis. Unfortunately, because of the complete break-up of the family, I was not able to return to my parents. Eventually, Isabel became my legal guardian and raised me just as though I were her very own daughter. I lived with Isabel for 20 years, and she was a loving, caring, supportive mother to me.
At the age of 59, Isabel took on a full-time job in her community working for Member of Parliament Charles CACCIA, as his constituency secretary for the Davenport riding. This job was well-suited to Isabel as it consisted of helping people with their problems. She had to learn many aspects of many social issues such as immigration, welfare, and the old-age pension. In October of this past year, Isabel was awarded The Queen's Golden Jubilee Medal for her outstanding contribution and service in the riding of Davenport.
Isabel took on this job with great conviction and with the utmost patience, and worked for Mr. CACCIA for 16 years, retiring at the age of 75. One year after she retired, she became quite ill and had to give up her home. She bought an apartment in Etobicoke and lived there for approximately four years until her health continued to fail. She spent the last three years in a nursing home until she passed away.
One would think that being a widow at such a young age and never remarrying, would perhaps lead to a lonely life, but not in Isabel's case. Isabel had a wonderful sense of humour and loved to tell stories (and she had many to tell). People used to say to her, "You should write a book," but this was not to be. Instead, she fulfilled her life by helping so many others, giving us the most precious thing of all: her time.
Deborah is Isabel's daughter.

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STROGRE o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-01-08 published
Donald Gregor McGREGOR
In loving memory of Donald Gregor McGREGOR, December 17, 1931 to December 20, 2002.
Donald Gregor McGREGOR Senior of Whitefish River First Nation, Birch Island who passed on to the Spirit World on Friday, December 20, 2002 at the Manitoulin Health Centre at the age of 71 years. Known for his gentle spirit and kind sense of humour, he enjoyed spending time with his family, fishing, hunting, bingo and home projects. He worked for E. B. Eddy for 20 years before retiring in 1996. He also served several terms as Band Councillor on the Whitefish River Band Council and was President of St. Gabriel's Parish Council for many years. He was honoured as an Elder and Eagle Staff Carrier of Whitefish River First Nation. He was of the Eagle Clan and his Ojibway name he proudly carried was Ogimas, given to him by his father when he was a young lad. He played many years with the Sheguiandah Bears and was an avid supporter of minor hockey. Much beloved husband of 41 years and best friend of Mary Grace (nee MANITOWABI.) Loving and cherished father of Lucy Ann (husband Donald TRUDEAU) of Blind River, Patty (husband Leon LIGHTNING) of Hobbema, Alberta, Donald (wife Sandrah RECOLLET) and Kiki (husband Stephen PELLETIER) of Birch Island and Christopher WAHSQUONAIKEZHIK (wife Carol) of Sudbury. Proud and very loving grandfather of Donnelley, Kigen, Akeshia, Paskwawmotosis, Donald, Assinyawasis, Anthony, Kihiwawasis, Kianna Rae, Waasnode, Christina, Charles and Christopher. Survived by sisters Lillian McGREGOR of Toronto, Shirley McGREGOR of Birch Island and brother Peter McGREGOR of Nova Scotia and brother-in-law Roman BILASH. Also survived by brothers-in-law David (Linda), Ron (Nikki), Dominic (Brenda), and sisters-in-law Veronica (Andrew,) Rosie GAUVREAU (Gordon) and Medora(Don). Predeceased by parents Augustine and Victoria and in-laws David and Agatha MANITOWABI. Also predeceased by brothers Robert E. McGREGOR, Allan A. McGREGOR, and sister, Mary JACKO, Colleen FONT, Estelle CYWINK, Violet BONADIO and Olive McGREGOR and sister-in-law Shirley MANITOWABI McKAY. He was also a special uncle to 67 nieces and nephews.
Rested at the Whitefish River Community Centre. Funeral Mass was held at St. Gabriel's Lalamant Church, Birch Island on Tuesday, December 24, 2002 with Father Mike STROGRE officiating. Arrangements entrusted to the Lougheed Funeral Home.

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STROHBACH o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-09-08 published
INGLE, Nita M. (née GUILBAULT)
Died peacefully surrounded by family at Toronto General Hospital on Friday September 5, 2003, in her 76th year. Nita is survived by husband Lorne INGLE; children Richard JESSUP, Pat Penner (Tim), Berta JESSUP- RAMSAY (Rob), Barb JESSUP- GENEST (Paul), Bill JESSUP (Brenda,) and step-children Barb STROHBACH (Herb,) Margot INGLE (Jack Hayes,) and Roger INGLE (Shiela.) Nita will also be lovingly remembered by 13 grandchildren. Following her career as a special education teacher, Nita's concern and desire to help others continued through her participation and leadership in volunteer organizations. Nita's love of life and laughter will be missed by all. In accordance with her wishes there will be no service. A celebration of Nita's life will be held at a later date. The family wishes to express sincere thanks to Karen, May and the staff at The Briton House for their support and assistance. If desired memorial donations may be made to a charity of your choice.

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