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"STO" 2003 Obituary


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STOANGI o@ca.on.simcoe_county.nottawasaga.collingwood.the_connection 2003-11-14 published
STOANGI, Albert Joseph
Retired Business Man Passed away at the General and Marine Hospital, Collingwood, on Wednesday, November 5th, 2003. Albert J. STOANGI. beloved husband of the late Wanda Vera MIANDRO (June 4th, 1998,) In his 82nd year. Dear father of Robert and his wife Alexis of Wasaga Beach; Raymond and his wife Ellie of Collingwood; Anthony and his wife Joan of London. Grandfather of Rob, Alysha, Rychelle, Ryan, Amanda, Ellice, A.J., Jeff and Holly. Brother of Tony, Willie, John and Theresa of Toronto. Predeceased by one brother Louis.
Visitation was held at the Watts Funeral Home and Cremation Centre, 132 River Road E., Wasaga Beach on Saturday and Sunday from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Mass of the Christian Burial was celebrated by Rev. Fr. Darrin CORKUM on Monday November 10th, 2003 at Saint Marys Roman Catholic Church, (63 Elgin Street, Collingwood) at 1: 00 p.m. Interment Wasaga Beach Cemetery. Donations to the charity of your choice.
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STOATE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-05 published
BOWER, John Stuart
Past President and Chairman of the Board of the W.C. Edwards Company Ltd., Past President and Director of the Canadian Lumbermen's Association
Passed away peacefully, at Carleton Lodge, Ottawa, on Sunday, March 2nd, 2003.
son of the late Dr. Ira BOWER and the late Eleanor JOHNSTON. Beloved husband of Claudette (Ranger). Devoted father to Sara (Greg McDONALD) and Bob (Anne.) Predeceased by son John (Joanna,) brother William and sister Mary STOATE.
Survived by grandchildren Ken, Heather, Andrew, Shawn, Adam and Alexander, and three great-grandchildren, Jaimee, Sydney and MacKenzie.
Stu was well known throughout the lumber industry. He served as Chairman of the Canadian Lumbermen's Association Wholesale and Export Bureau, and on the Association's Executive Committee and its Board of Directors. He was a member of the Royal Ottawa Golf Club for over 40 years.
Friends may visit at Tubman Funeral Homes, 1610 Roger Stevens Drive, Kars (east of Hwy. 416), on Thursday, March 6th between 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Funeral Service will be held at Manotick United Church, Main Street, Manotick at 1 p.m. on Friday, March 7th.
Our deep appreciation to the staff of Carleton Lodge, especially the staff of Nepean Village, for their wonderful care. Their compassion and their love have helped us all through a difficult journey.
In lieu of flowers, if you wish, donations to Carleton Lodge, or to the Heart and Stroke Foundation would be appreciated.

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STOBIE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-02-25 published
STOBIE, Alexander Malcolm, M.A., M.D. (Oxon,) DORCOG, born 21 February, 1922 in Oxford, England, died peacefully on 23 February, 2003 at Cobourg, Ontario. Malcolm led a colourful, exciting and fulfilling life. A graduate of Clifton College, Bristol; St. Andrew's University, Scotland; and University of Oxford where he gained a Rugby blue as Captain, and M.A. and M.D. degrees before and after serving in the Royal Navy, which included command of a minesweeper in the North Sea, Malcolm and Stephanie emigrated to Canada in 1957 with their young family, settling in Brantford where they were involved in amateur theatre and Malcolm played on the local cricket and rugby teams, inculcating his young sons in the process. After a short sojourn back in England, in 1962, Malcolm and his family returned to Canada, settling in the Colborne/Cobourg area. While in Colborne, Malcolm helped found the village rugby team, cleared a barren field for a pitch, and proceeded to welcome rugby teams from around the province, who all enjoyed great games and great times at the family house. Malcolm's change of medical practice to Cobourg brought him a new set of Friends and patients while retaining his Colborne connections. In Cobourg, Malcolm co-founded the Cobourg Yacht Club and regularly raced his 16 foot Albacore against all comers, with both willing and unwilling family members as crew. Malcolm was a dynamic, intelligent, and energizing person; no one felt untouched by his presence. His family and Friends shall miss him most dearly. His declining years were spent peacefully at Streamway Villa, Cobourg where every attention and care was received. Malcolm leaves his children Anthony, Jonathan, Jane and David, and their partners; grandchildren Christopher, Patrick, Rebecca, Emily, Elizabeth, Matthew, David and Margaret; his ex-wife Stephanie and his previously-deceased wife, Janet. Visitation with Malcom's family will be held on Friday, February 28, 2003, 2-4 p.m. at the MacCoubrey Funeral Home, 30 King St. East, Cobourg, Ontario with a private family service to follow in Aurora. If desired, donations in Malcolm's memory may be directed to the Northumberland Health Care Foundation. Condolences to maccoubrey@sympatico.ca

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STOCKELBACH o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-08 published
JOHNSON, Marion Sellers
Passed away peacefully on March 5, 2003 in Toronto at the age of 96. Beloved wife of J. Ragnar JOHNSON, Q.C. (deceased October 15, 1985,) dear mother of Jon R. JOHNSON and dear mother-in-law of Patricia C. JOHNSON, lovingly remembered by grand_sons, Jon (Karen) and Patrick (Julie) JOHNSON and dear great-grandmother of Jon and Lilja JOHNSON. Dear aunt of Louise Delaware KRIEGER, James WALKER, Douglas WALKER, Edward STOCKELBACH and Herbert SOLEM. Predeceased by her sisters, Flora, Lois, Alice and Mary. Gold medalist in Political Science at the University of Manitoba and member of the Pi Phi Sorority. Graduated in nursing from Columbia Presbyterian Hospital and practised paediatrics at Winnipeg General Hospital. Active member of Calvin Presbyterian Church in Toronto and the University Women's Club in Toronto. She dedicated many years as a volunteer at the Toronto General Hospital, the Canadian Cancer Society and the Canadian Opera Company. Marion had a long and productive life and will be missed by all who knew her. Visitation will take place at the Morley Bedford Funeral Home, 159 Eglinton Ave. W., on Monday, March 10, 2003 from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m.. Private Service. In lieu of flowers, please send donations to the Canadian Cancer Society, the Heart and Stroke Foundation or to a charity of your choice.

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STOCKS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-08 published
CHANDRAN, Beverley Anne
On Friday, March 7, 2003, in her 50th year, Beverley was called to, once again, be one with the Creator of Creation. She went with a blazing smile of glory in her soul, while giving her unselfish, unstoppable gratitude in peace, tranquility, and a twinkle in her eye. At home in Erin, Ontario with her loved ones. In their 29th year of marriage, ever beloved part of Clarence; eternally loving mother of sons Justin (23) and his wife Jennifer; Liam (21) and Keddy (19.) Only daughter of Ambrose and Theresa CARROLL and sister of Gary (Marlene), D'Arcy (Pam) and Paul (Harriet). Only daughter-in-law of Geoff and Lena CHANDRAN and sister-in-law of Brinda McLAUGHLIN (John.) Permanent thanks to dearest and giving Friends, old and new. And special thanks to: Dr. Alan FRIEDMAN and staff, Dr. Henry FRIEDMAN of Duke University Medical Center; Dr. Stephen TREMONT and staff of Rex Hospital Cancer Clinic Dr. Julian ROSENMAN and staff of University of North Carolina Radiation Oncology Clinic; Dr. Lew STOCKS and staff, Dr. Mike DELISSIO and staff, Dr. Robert ALLEN and staff, Dr. Donald BROWN, all of Raleigh and Durham, North Carolina, U.S.A. Dr. Peter COLE of Orangeville, Ontario, and the nursing staff of Robertson and Brown of Kitchener, Ontario. Visitation and a Celebration of Beverley's life will take place at her home: #4998, 10th Sideroad of Erin, Ontario (north of Ballinafad Road, south of 5th Sideroad). Visitation for family and Friends will be held on Sunday, March 9, 2003, from 2 pm to 8 pm. On Monday, March 10, 2003, there will be a private family Funeral Mass, after which, Friends and family are invited to participate in a Celebration of Beverley's life from 3 pm. to 8 pm. In lieu of flowers, the family respectfully requests donations be made to the American Cancer Society (P.O. Box 102454, Atlanta, Georgia 303068-2454) or The Canadian Cancer Society (Wellington County Unit, 214 Speedvale Avenue, W. Unit 4A, Guelph, Ontario N1H 1C4) Arrangements entrusted to Butcher Family Funeral Home, 5399 Main Street, South, Erin, Ontario, Canada. For more information call 519-833-2231.

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STOECK o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-04-07 published
He struck gold at the old Empire games
By Tom HAWTHORN Special to The Globe and Mail Monday, April 7, 2003 - Page R7
Jim COURTRIGHT, who has died, aged 88, was one of Canada's top track-and-field athletes, winning a gold medal in the javelin throw at the 1938 British Empire Games in Sydney.
Just getting to the meet was a marathon for Mr. COURTRIGHT, an engineering student at Queen's University in Kingston, Ontario The price of a train ticket to Vancouver beyond his means, he found work as a prisoner escort, travelling cross-country in a converted box car while handcuffed to a man facing deportation.
In any event, he found his fare and went on to join the Canadian team which arrived in Australia on January 15, 1938.
In the javelin throw, Mr. COURTRIGHT faced formidable competition in Stanley LAY of New Zealand and Jack METCALFE of Australia. LAY, a sign writer by trade, had been a capable cricketer who put his arm to great success. METCALFE was a superb athlete whose specialty was the triple jump, in which he won a bronze at the Berlin Olympics in 1936 and gold at the Empire Games in 1938. In the end, it was the Canadian who prevailed, followed by LAY and METCALFE.
Despite his gold medal, Mr. COURTRIGHT was overshadowed by Eric COY of Winnipeg, who had won two medals and so was awarded the Norton H. Crowe Trophy as Canada's outstanding amateur athlete that year. Mr. COURTRIGHT also trailed Mr. COY and sculler Bob PEARCE in voting for the Lou Marsh Trophy as Canada's top male athlete, a prize open to amateurs and professionals. Mr. PEARCE won the trophy.
Later in 1938, Mr. COURTRIGHT unleashed a throw of 62.74 metres, an intercollegiate record at the time that still ranks as the third longest in Queen's University history. He broke his leg in an accident at a gold mine in Northern Ontario in the summer of 1939, yet recovered to play guard for the school's basketball team the following winter.
James Milton COURTRIGHT was born in 1914 to a civil engineer and the daughter of the town sheriff in North Bay, Ontario The family moved to Ottawa and the boy participated in football and field events at Glebe Collegiate.
Mr. COURTRIGHT placed third nationally in the javelin in 1934 while still a student at the University of Ottawa. He finished second the following year behind Mr. COY.
In 1936, the Ottawa student was the best in the land and attended the Berlin Olympics that summer. One of 28 competitors in the javelin, Mr. COURTRIGHT's best throw of 60.54 metres was too short to qualify for the final round. He finished 14th in an event won by Gerhard STOECK of Germany, whose winning toss of 71.84 metres was inspired by chanting crowds at the Olympic stadium, among them Adolf Hitler.
The disappointment of his Berlin performance spurred Mr. COURTRIGHT to greater success in throwing events. In 1937, he was Canada's intercollegiate champion in javelin and the shot put.
In July, he travelled to Dallas to compete at a 200-athlete meet organized as part of the city's Greater Texas and Pan-American Exposition. Mr. COURTRIGHT won the gold medal in javelin at the Cotton Bowl. The success of the meet inspired the organizing of the first official Pan-American Games fourteen years later.
Mr. COURTRIGHT attended postgraduate classes in engineering at Queen's, where he did double-duty as star athlete and track coach. He was also president of the student body in his final year.
After graduation, Mr. COURTRIGHT joined Shell Canada as a refinery engineer in Montreal in 1941. As he was promoted he accepted back-and-forth postings from Montreal to Toronto to Vancouver to Toronto to Montreal to Toronto, including a stint as a public-relations co-ordinator.
He became a vice-principal at Queen's in 1970, a job he held until retirement nine years later.
Mr. COURTRIGHT died on February 21, just days after the 65th anniversary of his triumph in Sydney. He leaves eight children and sister Celina COURTRIGHT of Ottawa. He was predeceased by his wife, Mary (née Roche), and three brothers.
In 1958, a moving van loaded with the family's possessions caught fire and burned, destroying many of Mr. COURTRIGHT's medals and trophies. A prize rescued from the ashes was the gold medal from the British Empire Games. It is now in the hands of a grand_son.

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STOGRE o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-06-11 published
Genevieve Anne Dorothy McGREGOR
In loving memory of Zigos Genevieve Anne Dorothy McGREGOR who began her spiritual journey May 22, 2003 at Saint Peter's Health Care Centre, Hamilton, Ontario where she was met by her mother Julia RECOLLET McGREGOR and her father William McGREGOR Sr., and sisters Agnes, Helen, Florence, Barbara, Mary Louise, Marion, Susan and Veronica for their awaited reunion. Left to carry on her memory, love, kindness and generosity are her brothers Arthur and wife Violet, George, Murray Sr., and wife Marion McGREGOR all of Birch Island, her nephew Greg and his wife Linda McGREGOR of Barrie, and her best friend Betty CALDWELL of Hamilton. Also, survived by many nieces and nephews, grand nieces and nephews. Sadly missed by her relatives and Friends in Birch Island and her neighbours in Hamilton.
Visitation and wake service were held at the Whitefish River First Nation Community Centre. Funeral Mass was held at Saint Gabriel Lalemant on Monday May 26, 2003 with Reverend Michael STOGRE S.J. officiating. Interment in Birch Island Cemetery.

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STOGRE o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-08-27 published
Helena Viola {McGREGOR} TOOLEY
In loving memory of Helena Viola {McGREGOR} TOOLEY, May 7, 1920 to August 13, 2003.
Beloved wife of George Bruce TOOLEY of Steinbach Manitoba. Loving mother of Brucette WATERSON (Doug), Theodore (Betty), Juanita BROWN (Buster), Andre (Gail). Predeceased by sons Douglas and James. Loving grandmother of Crystal (Mark), Michael (Nancy), Jennifer (Paul), Jason, Sonny, Evelyn (Corey), Justin (Brandy), Jesse (Crystal), Lynette, Shawee, Teri, predeceased by Sean (Brucette), Bruce (Andre). Great Grandmother of Fern, Miah, Natashia, Alexandra, Brooklyn, Riley, Cameron, Tristen and Trinity. Sister of Rose (Harold) DOOLEY and Geraldine (Carl) ZIEGLER of Little Current, Oscar McGREGOR, Godfrey (Ann) and Jean-Mary Jane (Lawrence) ANDREWS of Birch Island. Predeceased by parents Dave and Louise McGREGOR, Theresa, Blanche, Theodore, Gordon (Rebecca), and Evelyn. Sister-in-law of Roy (Bernice), Jim (Betty), Fred (Dianne) and Velma (predeceased). Special Aunt to many nieces and nephews. Visitation was held on Sunday, August 17, 2003 at the Birch Island Community Centre. Funeral service was held on August 19, 2003 at St. Gabriel Lalement Roman Catholic Church. Interment in Birch Island Cemetery, Birch Island, Ontario. Reverend Michael STOGRE officiating.

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STOKES o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-07-12 published
Moms always liked him best
The Happy Gang's popular lead singer had a good reason for saying hello to his mom whenever the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation radio classic was on air
By James McCREADY Special to The Globe and Mail Saturday, July 12, 2003 - Page F10
The double knock on the door occurred every afternoon at 1.
"Who's there?"
"It's the Happy Gang."
"Well, come on in!"
Then Eddie ALLEN, Bert PEARL, Bobby GIMBY and the rest of the cast of Canada's most popular radio program would break into "Keep happy with the Happy Gang."
Mr. ALLAN, the show's main singer, accordion player and sometimes emcee, died last week, leaving Robert FARNON as the gang's sole surviving member.
Every day as many as two million Canadians tuned in The Happy Gang, which led the national ratings for most of its run on Canadian Broadcasting Corporation from 1937 to 1959. Until television came along in 1952, Mr. ALLEN and his cast mates were among the most famous people in the country.
The show was the creation of Mr. PEARL, who'd come to Toronto from Winnipeg (his real name was Bert SHAPIRA) to study medicine. To pay for his education, he started playing piano on radio with a band that included violinist Blain MATHE, organist Kay STOKES and Mr. FARNON, a trumpet player who would go on to be the most successful of them all.
The band morphed into the Happy Gang and Mr. PEARL was the driving force behind it. Eddie ALLEN was hired as the fifth member of the troupe and stayed with the program until it went off the air.
He was born Edward George ALLEN on December 24, 1920, in Toronto, and came from a family of musicians. His father, Bill ALLEN, played the trombone and was in a military band in France during the First World War. When Eddie was 10, his father asked him what instrument he wanted to play. The boy thought about it for a while and made up his mind after seeing a huge piano accordion in a music-store window.
"It was bigger than I was," Mr. ALLEN remembered, "but dad bought it anyway."
In a couple of years, he was entertaining at small events with his accordion, making $5 or $10 a week. Better than a paper route. He also won some local singing contests. When he was 17, he started singing and playing three nights a week on a radio program called The Serenader. Bert PEARL heard it and called him in.
"I auditioned him with Bert PEARL, and we liked him right away," Mr. FARNON says from his home on Guernsey in the Channel Islands. "He looked about 12 years old and could barely see over the top of his accordion. He was terribly shy, no self-confidence like the rest of us. He was very popular with the ladies, a very good-looking little chap."
What impressed most was his voice. "There really wasn't a singer in the Happy Gang until he came along. I really liked his voice."
Mr. FARNON remembers an incident from a Happy Gang rehearsal. "Eddie was about to sing a song called, I'll Take You Home Again, Kathleen, and I came up behind him and said, 'If you bring the gasoline.' He laughed so much he couldn't sing it when we went on the air."
The Happy Gang was old Canada, when the country was more rural and white skinned. It is impossible to imagine the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation mounting something so corny and wholesome. How corny was it? The host, Mr. PEARL, was known as "that slap-happy chappy, the Happy Gang's own pappy."
He also knew that sentiment sold. Mr. ALLEN would sing The Lord's Prayer on the program, two or three times a year, such as Good Friday, and during the war he sang it as an inspiration for mothers and their boys overseas.
By that time, the show's "appeal was enormous," wrote Ross MacLEAN, the late Canadian Broadcasting Corporation producer and media critic who began listening as a child. "During the war years... its influence on the nation was profound. Its almost daily performance of There'll Always Be An England helped maintain home-front resolve and stirred at least this school kid into a frenzy of tinfoil collection, war certificate sales and the knitting of various items for the navy."
Among the cast, Mr. ALLEN was the kid. He was slight, about 5-foot-6, and looked as though he were too young to shave. A newspaper reported that while he was on his honeymoon in 1942, a hotel clerk in Hamilton didn't believe he was old enough to be married and refused to rent him a room. Even some of his fans were quoted by writer Trent FRAYNE as saying, "Oh my goodness, don't tell me that little boy's married."
On air, he always sang old-fashioned ballads. "Every mother would love the stuff he sang," said Lyman POTTS, a retired broadcaster who crossed paths with some of the gang. He recalled that one of the songs Mr. ALLEN performed on a Happy Gang recording was I'm a Lonely Little Petunia in an Onion Patch. It was popular on the program, maybe because it was the perfect example of the Happy Gang's sort of cornball humour.
Another example is the line Mr. ALLEN used almost every day in the early years of the program. Mr. PEARL had told him not to let fame go to his head -- "Don't ever get the idea that you're too big to say hello to your mother." So, for his first six years, Mr. ALLEN's opening words were "Hello mom."
During the war, they dropped the shtick for fear of hurting the feelings of mothers with sons in uniform. It sparked a letter-writing campaign. "Don't let Eddie stop saying 'Hello mom,' " Liberty Magazine reported in May, 1945. "He reminds me of my own boy overseas. I wonder if he could think of all of us mothers when he says hello."
Over the years, the show appeared 195 times, always live (tape had yet to come into use when it began), in the course of an annual 39-week season, most of the time with the same cast. Its time slot was moved when the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation began running a 1 p.m. newscast, but the shift to 1: 15 EST didn't hurt the ratings. At first, it was produced in a studio on Davenport Road in Toronto and later in front of an audience of 700 to 800 on McGill Street near College and Yonge.
The program's mainstay was not talk or jokes but music, and the signature double knock on the door was an old-fashioned radio sound effect provided by Blain MATHE, who would move up to the mike and rap twice on the back of his violin.
Working together so closely did create some personality conflicts. There were practical jokes, usually aimed at the most uptight cast member: Mr. PEARL, a control freak who loved to plan the program in detail and had his own small office at the McGill Street studio.
One day, Mr. ALLEN and the other Happy Gang members set all the clocks forward by a few minutes. "We're late," they announced to Mr. PEARL, who raced into studio. After the opening, a couple of performers started to whine: "I don't want to do this."
Thinking they were actually on air, Mr. PEARL was shocked -- and didn't feel much better when he learned it was all a joke. It might have been one of the reasons he suffered a nervous breakdown (called "nervous exhaustion" for public consumption) and left the show in 1950 after 18 years and moved to the United States.
Eddie ALLEN took his place as emcee, but the incident rated an article in Maclean's by June CALLWOOD, the country's top magazine writer at the time, entitled: The Not So Happy Gang.
By then Mr. FARNON was long gone. During the war, he had joined the Canadian Army Show's band, and later led the Canadian band with the Allied Expeditionary Force, just as Glen MILLER led its U.S. ensemble. After the war he became a top arranger, working on Frank Sinatra albums and scores for such movies as Horatio Hornblower starring Gregory Peck.
Sinatra, however, was a little too flash for Eddie ALLEN, who preferred Bing Crosby. He was a sharp dresser, but his style was understated, almost always a conservative suit and muted shirt in a business where the shirt easily could have been orange.
His love of clothes gave him something to do when he left show business. Eddie ALLEN owned a men's clothing store in the west end of Toronto after he left the program. He later retired and moved to London, Ontario

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STOKES o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-04 published
A painter of real people
Toronto artist sought to get beneath a subject's veneer to achieve a 'luminous presence'
By Allison LAWLOR, Special to The Globe and Mail Thursday, December 4, 2003 - Page R11
'She'll paint you the way she wants," David MIRVISH, patron and art collector, once said of the Canadian portrait painter Lynn DONOGHUE.
"She's sensitive to mood," Mr. MIRVISH, who sat for Ms. DONOGHUE on several occasions, told The Financial Post Magazine in 1984. "She may catch you at a different angle, and not every subject feels that's the way they want to be seen. The important thing is whether it's a successful picture or not. You shouldn't expect to like a portrait."
But what you could expect if you were having your portrait painted by Ms. DONOGHUE is that you would at the very least enjoy the process. Sitting for the Toronto-based painter was like having tea with a lively, old friend.
"You were always chatting about this and that with Lynn," said Father Daniel DONOVAN, an art collector and professor of theology at St. Michael's College in the University of Toronto, who also sat for Ms. DONOGHUE. " She was always vibrant and alive."
Always seeking to get beyond a person's veneer, Ms. DONOGHUE enjoyed the process of trying to draw out her subjects. "She wanted people to [be] open and communicate with her," Father DONOVAN said.
Mr. DONOGHUE, considered one of the pre-eminent portrait painters in Canada, died last month in Toronto. She was 50.
"She made a huge impact [in the Canadian art world] and did so at a very young age," said Christian Cardell CORBET, founder of the Canadian Portrait Academy.
"She was at a stage... where she was just about to take off," Mr. CORBET said. "What she could have contributed was just cut short."
Ms. DONOGHUE started showing her work in 1973. Her early work caused a stir when some galleries refused to show her giant portraits of naked males. Since then she has had countless group shows and solo exhibitions. Her work can be found in the Art Gallery of Ontario, the Ontario Legislature, the National Museum of Botswana, the Vancouver Art Gallery, and several other private and public collections.
Ms. DONOGHUE, who was elected a member of the Royal Canadian Academy of Arts in 1991, did both commissioned and non-commissioned portraits. One of her notable commissions was of John STOKES, the former speaker of the Legislative Assembly of Ontario.
Last year, Ms. DONOGHUE completed a portrait of Margaret ATWOOD that came was at once celebrated. After approaching the Canadian literary icon to paint her portrait, Ms. DONOGHUE set about to capture Ms. ATWOOD using bright oil colours. In the portrait, Ms. ATWOOD, sits with her legs crossed and looks out at the viewer wearing a vibrant, green shirt.
"She was not afraid of colour," Mr. CORBET said. "She would take it [paint] right from the tube."
Three years ago, Terrence HEATH, the former director of the Winnipeg Art Gallery, wrote in BorderCrossings following an exhibition of Ms. DONOGHUE's work at a Toronto gallery: "Each painting... is a statement in colour. The figures are set in colour fields that tell you as much about the figure as the likeness and body position do. Most remarkable about these paintings is their sheer luminous presence."
"She created honest portraits" and "didn't follow much of a systematic approach to portraiture," Mr. CORBET said. "She allowed her spontaneity and intuition to come through."
Ms. DONOGHUE once said that her historic mentors, such as Frans Hals, conveyed in their portraits the feeling of people who are very alive. "Why do people know, when they look at a painting of mine, that it is a real person?" she told The Financial Post Magazine in 1984. It was one of her perpetual queries into the nature of portrait painting.
Lynn DONOGHUE was born on April 20, 1953, in the small community of Red Lake in northern Ontario, more than 500 kilometres from Thunder Bay. Her father Graham DONOGHUE was a mining engineer who moved his family about, including a spell in Newfoundland. Ms. DONOGHUE finished high school at H.B. Beal Secondary School in London, Ontario She graduated in 1972 with a special art diploma.
Having lived in England and New York as an artist, Toronto was home to Ms. DONOGHUE. She lived with her 14-year-old son Luca in a loft in a converted industrial building in the city's west end. Her loft doubled as her studio. In the cluttered space, some of her paintings hung on the walls and canvases were stacked next to the essentials required for daily living. Living off the sale of her paintings, Ms. DONOGHUE financially scrapped by month to month, her Friends said.
Described as vivacious and gregarious, she was "the life of the party." An active member of the arts community, she could regularly be seen at gallery openings and art shows around Toronto. Outside the art world, she was an active community member. Most recently she helped to organize events for Toronto's new mayor David MILLER during the municipal election. She also attended the Anglican Church of Saint Mary Magdalene, where a painting she had done of her son's baptism hung on the wall.
An exhibit of Ms. DONOGHUE's most recent major work is scheduled to open at the MacLaren Art Centre in Barrie, Ontario, in March. Called the The Last Supper, the large group piece, which Ms. DONOGHUE started in 2001, consists of 13 portraits encircling a central table piece, which is itself a triptych. The installation requires a total wall space of about 5 metres by 10 metres (16 feet by 34 feet).
Father DONOVAN well remembers how he first learned of the project. One day, he received a call from Ms. DONOGHUE asking if he would have lunch with her. She had an idea she wanted to talk to him about. The idea turned out to be the The Last Supper and Ms. DONOGHUE said she needed his help. After their lunch, she invited Father DONOVAN, along with several others, to dinner. While they were eating and drinking, she photographed them, capturing their mannerisms and expressions. From the photographs, she made a series of sketches which she then used to develop the large group piece.
"She loved what she was doing," Mr. CORBET said. "There was this inner drive that said 'go on.' "
Ms. DONOGHUE, an insulin-dependent diabetic, died on November 22 in a Toronto hospital, after suffering from an insulin reaction that led to a coma.
She leaves her parents Marjorie and Graham DONOGHUE, her son Luca LANGIANO and his father, Domenico LANGIANO and sister Barbara VAVALIDIS.

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STONE o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-12-17 published
Victoria PITAWANAKWAT (STONE)
In loving memory of Victoria PITAWANAKWAT, July 13, 1937 to December 6, 2003.
Victoria PITAWANAKWAT, a resident of Wikwemikong, passed away at the Manitoulin Health Centre, Little Current, on Saturday, December 6, 2003 at the age of 66 years.
She was born in Little Current, daughter of the late George and Seraphine SPANISH) PITAWANAKWAT. Victoria was a postal worker for 29 years. She enjoyed puzzles and collected spoons while traveling and was especially fond of cows. She will be sadly missed by her family and all who knew her. Surviving are common-law husband Jarvis McCUMBER, sons George (Richard) STONE, friend Henrietta, John STONE, friend Pearl of M'Chigeeng and Jeffrey STONE, friend Margaret Anne. Proud grandmother of Johnny STONE, Kristy STONE, Timmy STONE, Tito SMITH, Jeremy SMITH, Tara STONE and Sara STONE and great grandchildren Katie Summer Seraphine STONE and Erica STONE. Also survived by many nieces and nephews. Predeceased by sister Mary LISCUMB (Harry,) Mabel CORBIERE (Paul) and Archie PITAWANAKWAT.
Friends called at St. Ignatius Church, Buzwah on Monday and Tuesday evening.
The funeral mass was held at Holy Cross Mission on Wednesday, December 10, 2003 with Fr. Dougals McCarthy as celebrant. Cremation to follow.

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STONE o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-12-17 published
Alphonse Ignatius CORBIERE
Surrounded by his children, Alphonse Ignatius CORBIERE moved on to the spirit world, peacefully on Monday, December 15, 2003. Lovingly remembered by his wife Mae CORBIERE and friend Bertha ROY. Dear brother of Georgina NIXON and Liz BRIDGES. Loving and loved father of Jean STONE, (husband Mack,) Menesa CORBIERE (husband Wally,) Roger CORBIERE, Sandra BAYER, Bonita TAIBOSSIGAI (husband Jason) and Rodney CORBIERE (wife Barbara.) Loved grandfather of Kelly, Mack Jr., Sarah, Jeff, Shanna, Ryan, Rhiannon, Rachel, John, Anthony, Matthew, Chad, Kyra, Joshua, Wilfred, Bethany, Nicholas and Cameron. Also survived by many nieces and nephews. Predeceased by his parents Clayton and Eliza CORBIERE, sister Sharon CORBIERE and son Larry TAILOR/TAYLOR.
Friends may call at Alphonse's residence 5785A Hwy 540, M'Chigeeng on Tuesday evening and Wednesday. The funeral mass will be celebrated at Immaculate Conception Church, M'Chigeeng on Thursday, December 18, 2003 at 11 a.m. with Fr. Robert FOLIOT as celebrant. Interment in M'Chigeeng cemetery. Culgin Funeral Home.

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STONE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-02-19 published
Harry David (Butch) FREEDHOFF
By Alex STAHL Wednesday, February 19, 2003 - Page A32
Husband, father, grandfather, executive, athlete. Born November 14, 1938, in Toronto. Died May 4, 2002, of Lou Gehrig's disease, aged 63.
To his face, it was almost never Harry. Born redheaded to Anne and Ben, he weighed a sinister 35 pounds after one year, which prompted the lifetime nickname "Butch, " often becoming "Butchie" because of his likeable nature.
His physicality developed early. Anne, a ranked tennis player, and Ben, also ranked, as well as a Hockley Valley Ski Club co-founder, taught him the skills and instilled gritty determination, concentration and self-discipline. He won the Telegram Tennis Tournament at 9; for the next five decades, he ranked among the top of his peer-group at the provincial and national levels. He represented Canada as a 1955 Junior Davis Cup participant, in the 1961 and 1965 Maccabiah Games and during the 1982 Senior World Team Championships.
That early family closeness never left Butch. After first meeting his future wife, Sandra STONE, movie-like, he predicted their fate together to a friend. Married in 1963, Sandy and Butch soon brought Richard and Marla into their lives. In the 1990s, daughter-in-law Meredith and granddaughter Merritt extended and intensified family life.
Butch had compensated for his lack of academic interest with his competitive nature and love of interaction with people. After seven years in high school, his career as an outstanding marketer started ignominiously: from a $50-a-week stockbroker, he became a manufacturer's agent for children's wear. He was later president at Charan Toys, where he triumphed by securing the North American rights to Batman action figures. After a tour with Tyco Toys and Sega Canada, his career culminated in 1994 with Sony Computer Entertainment Canada. There he was instrumental in leading the marketing of Sony's Playstation platforms.
The mark of any man is the character displayed in the face of adversity. Butch dealt with any setback with a touch of philosophy, objectivity and humanity. If his opponent played better, it was acknowledged (and then Butch worked out harder on his machines). If business life proved impossible (such as entrepreneurial bankruptcy on the eve of his son's bar mitzvah), Butch discovered a new source for joke-making, and then another, better job. When his mother developed Parkinson's disease, he became even more devoted.
When personal or professional successes occurred, his spontaneous speechmaking allowed him to openly share his joy with family, Friends and colleagues. His audiences quickly learned to expect hilarious anecdotes, followed by insightful and heartfelt truths that everyone found entertaining and endearing. If his words were persuasive, his actions spoke even louder. Generous and hospitable to virtual strangers (when his condo's doorman couldn't obtain immigration permits for his family in Somalia, Butch spontaneously found and paid for the professional help to make the reunion happen), Butch and Sandy opened their doors and lives to many.
I learned of Butch's affliction on 9/11. Whereas athletics and business offer future opportunities and hope for improvement, the verdict of Lou Gehrig's disease does not. Last March, with his family and close Friends, I spent a week with him in Florida during that time, physical changes were heartbreakingly noticeable. But he regaled us, then as always and until the end, with his comic genius, memory and insightfulness, regularly scrawling one-liners on his writing board and delivering his smiling, nodding, thumbs-up optimism. In body, mind and soul, he remains with me as a mensch to the core, who lived on the high and through the low -- an example to emulate.
Butch's friend Alex wrote this with Butch's wife Sandy and other family members.

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STONE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-08-15 published
Professor played a role in defeat of SSAINTURENT government
By M.J. STONE Special to The Globe and Mail Friday, August 15, 2003 - Page R5
Nearly four decades after Louis SSAINTURENT had been Prime Minister of Canada, McGill professor James MALLORY was surprised to discover how influential he had been in the defeat of Mr. SSAINTURENT's Liberals in 1957. The revelation occurred in 1992 when the cabinet papers of the SSAINTURENT government, which had been sealed for 35 years, were made available to the public.
Unknown to Professor MALLORY, a radio interview he gave in the wake of the 1957 election had caught the Prime Minister's ear. The Liberals had been reduced to 105 seats in the House, seven fewer than the Conservatives. But the Grits were still in a position to form a minority government with the aid of the 25 elected members of the Co-operative Commonwealth Federation, later to become the New Democratic Party.
Mr. SSAINTURENT found himself at a crossroads. While his party was clearly in decline, the Conservatives were on the rise and many questioned whether the Liberals still had a legal mandate to govern. When Mr. SSAINTURENT arrived in cabinet that morning, Prof. MALLORY's radio interview was still ringing in his ears.
Prof. MALLORY, who died in Montreal on June 24, said in the interview that if the Liberals continued to govern it would result in a constitutional crisis. He believed it was the responsibility of John DIEFENBAKER and the Conservatives to form a government. The cabinet papers clearly reflect Prof. MALLORY's influence over the Prime Minister that morning. Mr. SSAINTURENT demanded a copy of the MALLORY interview and after carefully studying the radio transcripts, he handed the rule of government over to the Tories.
Highly regarded as the foremost expert in Canadian legal and federal structures, Prof. MALLORY was often called on to advise governments about constitutional procedures. McGill professor Charles TAILOR/TAYLOR said another good example occurred in 1979.
"Joe CLARK's Conservatives had just lost a parliamentary vote," Prof. TAILOR/TAYLOR recalled. "The governor-general, Ed SCHREYER, telephoned McGill's political science department, looking for Jim. It caused something of a stir when he couldn't be found immediately. SCHREYER was frantic for MALLORY's advice. The governor-general was unsure how to proceed.
"Jim was eventually found and consulted. His advice was that the Conservatives should call an election -- exactly what Joe CLARK did."
The son of a county sheriff, James Russell MALLORY was born on February 5, 1916. He graduated with a Bachelor of Arts from the University of New Brunswick in 1937 and later studied law at Edinburgh and Dalhousie universities.
He met his American-born wife, Frances KELLER, in Scotland, and the couple married in 1940. They had two sons: James and Charles. Prof. MALLORY joined the faculty of the University of Saskatchewan in 1941. Later, he taught at the University of Toronto and Brandon College before moving to McGill in 1946.
A respected scholar and lawyer, Prof. MALLORY was an "old-school" professor who taught at McGill for 45 years. His reputation as a constitutional expert was solidified in 1954 when he published Social Credit and the Federal Power in Canada. The quintessential text mapped out the constitutional parameters of federal/provincial relations.
"James MALLORY was a discreet and modest man," McGill professor Sam NOUMOFF recalled. "He had a profound understanding of morality and he was incapable of self-promotion. He worked on university committee after committee while holding many teaching responsibilities.
"Jim wasn't the sort of man who sought public approval, he just did things because they were the right thing to do."
His son James, who lives in Britain, summed up his father's idealism: "He had a bloody-minded stubbornness. It would manifest sometimes in allowing discussions to go on and on. Then he would do exactly what he intended to do in the first place. Somehow it never impaired his reputation as a genuine democrat."
Prof. MALLORY was the founder of both the Canadian Studies program at McGill and the Canadian Association of University Professors. After retiring in 1982 he was appointed professor emeritus and continued to teach for another 10 years. In 1964, he was elected to the Royal Society of Canada and was later awarded the Queen's Silver Jubilee Medal in 1977.
In 1995, McGill founded the James R. Mallory lecture series, a one-day event that features a special guest who lectures about Canadian issues. Past guests have included Bob RAE, Peter WHITE/WHYTE and Phyllis LAMBERT. The organizers of the event say that this year's lecture will focus on Prof. MALLORY's legacy.
Prof. MALLORY died 11 weeks after the death of his wife on what would have been their 63rd anniversary.

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STONE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-10-24 published
Composer, jazz musician worked with Ellington
By Mark MILLER, Friday, October 24, 2003 - Page R11
Toronto -- Ron COLLIER, a well-respected composer and teacher in the Canadian jazz community, died in Toronto on Wednesday of cancer. He was 73.
Mr. COLLIER, who was born in Coleman, Alberta., played trombone during his teens with the Kitsilano Boys Band in Vancouver then moved in 1950 to Toronto.
While working in local dance bands and studio orchestras there, he was involved with Gordon DELAMONT, Norman SYMONDS, Fred STONE and others in the late 1950s as a performer and composer in "third-stream" jazz, an idiom that framed jazz improvisation in such classical forms as fugue, sonata and concerto.
Mr. COLLIER turned exclusively to composition in 1967, the year that he led a studio orchestra for the LP Duke Ellington North of the Border with the noted American pianist as guest soloist. Mr. COLLIER subsequently collaborated personally with Ellington on a ballet, The River, in 1970, and a symphonic work, Celebration, in 1972, although his contributions went largely unacknowledged. He also wrote for ballet, radio, television and film and completed arrangements for recordings by Moe Koffman and the Boss Brass his last major work was a big-band setting of Oscar Peterson's Canadiana Suit/, premiered in 1997.
Mr. COLLIER, a warm, direct man, taught for many years in Toronto at Humber College, where his influence was felt by at least two generations of musicians now active on the Canadian jazz scene.

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STONE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-17 published
STONE, Gale
The Stone and Co. family is saddened by the passing of Gale STONE, our Founder's wife of 21 years.
Gale courageously fought the cancer that had been afflicting her since 2001, and managed the journey on her own terms with a high degree of dignity and grace, a true reflection of the lady she is. Richard and Gale were blessed with each other's love and affection, which was the core strength for both during this difficult journey. Her final days were spent in a calm and peaceful state, with her entire family at her side.
Gale's positive outlook on life and her genuine caring for others made all that knew her feel special. She will be sorely missed.
In celebration of her passion for children, donations can be made in lieu of flowers to the Gale and Rich Stone Learning Fund, to the Toronto Central Ontario Region office of Hemophilia Ontario at 416 924 3446.
Page B5

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STONEMAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-11-10 published
STONEMAN, Douglas Wright, D.D.S., F.R.C.D. (C.) Professor Emeritus U. of T. Faculty of Dentistry, former Captain Royal Canadian Air Force Dental Corps ''The Rainbow Squadron''
Died suddenly on November 7, 2003 in his 82nd year at Sunnybrook Hospital surrounded by family. Survived and never to be forgotten by his beloved wife Lucy of 57 years, sons Bill, Rick, John, daughter-in-law Jane and grandchildren Pete, Katie and Courtney. Doug's long and remarkable life was made all the richer by family, Friends, patients and colleagues. Private family arrangements.
Special thanks to Doctors PANG and CHAPMAN and the nurses in The Schulich Cardiac Centre for their skill, expertise and most of all compassion. The family would also like to make special mention of Emergency Medical Services paramedics Ryan VAN POORTEN and Rod SHORTT who like Doug always knew the right thing to do and then did it. A life truly well lived.
Donations in Doug's memory can be made to The Schulich Heart Centre, Sunnybrook Health Science Centre, Toronto, Ontario.

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STONEMAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-11-15 published
MILLER, Marjorie Florence (née SMYTH)
of Oakville, Ontario. Died peacefully on Thursday, November 13, 2003, in her 78th year, after a brief illness at Oakville Trafalger Memorial Hospital, surrounded by her family. Predeceased by her husband Tom of 53 years. Survived and never to be forgotten by their daughter Jane STONEMAN, son-in-law Rick, grandchildren Pete and Katie and sister Vera SHAW of Surrey, British Columbia. All those who knew and loved her will miss Marge's Friendship, bright smile and ready laugh. After Tom's death and the loss of sight in her remaining eye, some of that spark was diminished. She soldiered on with the help and support of her many steadfast Friends whose companionship she cherished. In the end her prayers were answered: her darkness was transformed into light, as she was able to see and be with Tom once more. Many thanks to the staff on 4E at Oakville Trafalger Memorial Hospital whose remarkable and uncommon compassion and care made her journey easier. As well to Dr. Frank ROUSE, a dear friend and physician of 42 years, who was there for her until the end. A celebration of her life will be arranged for a later date at Hearthstone By The Lake, Burlington, Ontario. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to The Salvation Army or the Canadian National Institute for the Blind.

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STOPA o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-07-23 published
WIESMAN, Brahm
Died peacefully and with dignity July 20, 2003. He leaves his wife Madge, brother-in-law Alan BERNSTEIN of Montreal, nephew Robert and his wife Judy of Ottawa, niece Janet MENDELSON and her husband Stephen and their family of Nepean, Ontario, nephew Mark MADRAS and his wife Eva of Toronto, niece Karen MADRAS- STOPA and her husband Ed and family of East Greenwich, Rhode Island, brother-in-law David McCULLOCH and his wife Janet of Glasgow, Scotland, brother-in-law George McCULLOCH and his wife Ina and family of Glasgow, niece Helen FARMER and her husband Stewart and family of Glasgow, and nephew Gordon McCULLOCK and his wife Linda and family of Glossop, England. Born on June 13, 1926, Brahm lived his rich life with the greatest consideration and care for others. He studied architecture and community planning at McGill University in preparation for what was to become a distinguished career in the field of city planning. After taking on senior management positions in the Cities of Edmonton, Victoria, and Vancouver, he was asked to join the faculty of University of British Columbia's School of Community and Regional Planning in 1967. He went on to serve as Director of the School for 12 years. In that position, he was much loved as a colleague and teacher, and provided internationally admired leadership to the planning profession. In retirement, Brahm continued to actively promote good planning by advising universities in Asia on planning curricula, consulting to cities in China, and speaking out forcefully as a citizen on Vancouver area issues. A service will be held, 11 a.m. on Wednesday, July 23, at Schara Tzedeck Cemetery in New Westminster, 2345 Marine Drive. In lieu of flowers, donations may be sent to ''Prostate Cancer Research at Vancouver General Hospital'', Vancouver General Hospital and University of British Columbia Hospitals Foundation, 855 West 12th Avenue, Vancouver, V5Z 1M9.

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STOPARCZYK o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-04-11 published
Heather PAREKH
By Navin PAREKH, Nisha STOPARCZYK, Shaan PAREKH and Neil PAREKH Friday, April 11, 2003 - Page A20
Heather PAREKH
Wife, mother, daughter, sister, grandmother, devout Christian. Born June 5, 1943, in Toronto. Died January 24, 2003, in Ottawa, of ovarian cancer, aged 59.
Boxing Day!
Heather gathered us -- her husband Navin, daughter Nisha and sons Shaan and Neil -- around the kitchen table in our home in Ottawa. We knew what this surreal meeting was about. Because we had great difficulty talking, Heather began. She told us her plan for her last rites.
With tears in our eyes and heavy hearts, we listened as she told us that she did not want a wake nor a "funeral." She wanted a celebration of her life. Holding our hands, she spoke in a steady voice, telling us what songs and prayers would be sung, what readings and prayers spoken.
She asked us to let tears come, but reminded us, "Life must go on." Four weeks before she died, Heather was performing her most important duty as a wife and a mother: preparing her family to accept her death and our lives afterwards.
At Heather's celebration, Father Bob POOLE began his tribute by describing Heather as a "human magnet." Indeed, people from all walks of life were attracted to her -- from ardent bridge players and her Indian in-laws, to a developmentally disabled young man who had become a close friend.
Born in Toronto, Heather was the second child of Lucy and William NOBLE. It was a family of teachers. Father was the principal of Lawrence Park Collegiate. Her brother William became a professor of anthropology at McMaster University; her sister Nancy teaches public school.
We met at the University of Toronto's International Student Centre, where she was studying English. I was born and raised in India and had immigrated to Canada in 1965. We were married in 1966 after Heather graduated, and lived in Toronto until 1969, before moving to Ottawa.
Heather gave 100 per cent to whatever she did, including reconciling our cultural differences. She not only learned Gujarati (when she wanted yogurt she would always use the Gujarati term "dahin") she could also write it, well enough to send long letters to my mother.
When my father, Kaka, fell ill, she cared for him (he told me he she was like his mother). Together we visited India four times.
Although Heather was born Protestant, I sensed that she was seeking something. She found it when she converted to the Catholic faith in the mid-1980s. As with everything else she did, she immersed herself fully in all aspects of her faith and her church community, whether in leading singsongs, or prayers, or volunteering for distributing clothing and food to the needy, or cooking for social gatherings, or lending an empathetic ear to someone in distress.
After the children were grown, she worked as a sales representative for Ottawa magazine. She always had oomph, joie de vivre. At Halloween parties, even her best Friends did a double take when, clad in a white sari, Heather would bow her head and bring her hands together to greet them as Mother Teresa.
After we took a holiday in Italy, she transformed the dining room into a Tuscan restaurant complete with a sign, "Trattoria di PAREKH," red, green and white streamers, and a hand-written menu in Italian.
In January, 2000, Heather was diagnosed with ovarian cancer. With a strong faith, she braved the disease for three years. When the doctor told her that the end was near, she accepted the prognosis courageously and lovingly.
Navin is Heather's husband, Nisha is her daughter and Shaan and Neil are her sons.

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STOPPS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-08-01 published
STOPPS, Evelyn (SCROGGIE)
After a short illness, died at St. Joseph's Health Centre on July 30th, aged 80. Evelyn was born in Chatham, Ontario to George E. SCROGGIE and the former Clarice Louis VON GUNTEN. Later Evelyn won several scholarships at Westdale Collegiate Institute in Hamilton enabling her to attend the University of Toronto, Victoria College, for her B.A. degree after which she moved to the University of Saskatchewan where she obtained an M.A in Physiology. Returning to Ontario she obtained an M.D. in 1952 from the University of Toronto, being one of only nine women in a class of 176.
In 1954 she married another physician, Jim STOPPS. The next few years were devoted to raising a family of three girls. Winnie is now an architect living in Boston. Jennie is an interior designer in Toronto and Susan is a jeweller and silversmith also living in Toronto. Evelyn developed a family practice in Bloor West Village in Toronto while also working at Women's College Hospital and The University of Toronto Health Centre. Evelyn died a much-loved doctor, wife, mother and grandma. Her great joys were her patients, her family (now including four grandchildren Max, Katy, Hannah and Nicholas) and the world of nature. Funeral arrangements are private and include a family gathering of remembrance at the cottage.

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STOREY o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-06-04 published
Dennis N. STOREY
In loving memory of Dennis N. STOREY July 4, 1930 to May 30, 2003.
Three score and ten is quoted in the Good Book as man's allotted time on Earth. "Having surpassed this time span each and every hour, day, week, month and year, is a bonus to be utilized for enjoyment and to lead a good life trying to give others something to look forward to in later years." Death is the natural end to life, no matter how it arrives, it is the end. Dennis met his end on Friday evening at his home. Patti invites you to a celebration of his life on Saturday, June 6, 2003 at 32 Hawberry Lane (off White's Point Rd.) at 2: 00 pm. Come and have a glass of wine on him.

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STORM o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-07-24 published
CAIE, Alastair G.R.
Died on July 22, 2003, at his home in Goderich, Ontario of esophageal cancer. Al was born in Glasgow, Scotland and graduated from the University of Glasgow in 1954 with a Masters of Arts and Economics. He then joined the Royal Air Force, where he flew as a pilot for three years. In 1957 he emigrated to Montreal, Quebec, where he was employed at Canadian Pratt and Whitney Aircraft, Bell Canada and later Northern Electric. In 1981 he moved to Burlington, Ontario and worked at Northern Telecom in Mississauga as Director of International Tax Planning. From 1986-1988 Al was the manager of Corporate Tax Policy with the Government of Alberta in Edmonton. In 1992 Al and his family retired to Goderich where he has spent the past 11 years enjoying golf, wood working, reading and walking trails at Naftel's Creek and Fall's Reserve. He leaves his wife Kathryn, sons George (Susan) of Burlington, Andrew of Goderich and step-son James (Jennifer) STORM of Kitchener; grandchildren Brandon and Brooke CAIE and Elizabeth and William STORM; sisters Audrey and Jessie CAIE of Glasgow, Scotland, brother Roderick (Tynne) CAIE of Bromley, Kent, England and in-laws Betty and Jack SCAMAN of Goderich. At Al's request there will be no funeral service. A gathering of family and Friends to celebrate his life will be held on August 2, 2003 from 1-4 p.m. at his home at 122 Warren Street, Goderich. As an expression of sympathy, donations to the Canadian Cancer Society will be greatly appreciated.

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STORMS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-06-11 published
STORMS, Peter Henderson
Died Saturday, June 7, 2003. Loving husband of Isabel STORMS. Father of Sandra, Peter Stewart, Wendy and Pamela. Grandfather of Charles and Nicole LEHOCZKY, Andrew and Sarah STORMS and Jennifer WORKMAN. Great grandfather of Nicholas and Alexander LEHOCZKY and Wendy Emma WORKMAN. Friends may call at the Morley Bedford Funeral Home, 159 Eglinton Ave. West (2 lights west of Yonge Street)
Today, Wednesday June 11, from 7-9 p.m.
A memorial service will be held in Christ Church Deer Park, 1570 Yonge Street, Toronto (corner of Yonge and Heath St. West) Thursday, June 12, 2 p.m.

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STORRING o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-24 published
Charlotte Isabel GROVER
By Kathryn STORRING, Wednesday, December 24, 2003 - Page A20
Woman of words, lover of cats. Born September 25, 1953, in Toronto. Died October 1, of cancer, aged 50.
You may have noticed my cousin on one of her regular tours of Toronto's Eaton Centre. A large woman -- a side-effect of medication she may have been somewhat dishevelled, depending on the day. You may have also noticed how her purposeful stride was interrupted by a limp, the result of a hip problem. It's unlikely she returned any glance you cast her way. In middle years, she wasn't out to seek your acceptance or the approval of the so-called normal world.
Charlotte GROVER did not have an easy life -- not one most of us would choose. She had schizophrenia coupled with mild autism, after all. But how do we measure happiness or define achievement? In the end, is it not about being cushioned by love, living in a supportive home, knowing you've overcome incredible challenges?
Raised by doting parents and living for the past eight years with Pilot Place, a residence for schizophrenics, Charlotte was gentle, endearingly polite and keenly curious about her interests: words, animals, history, droll jokes. All of this made it easy for me and another cousin, Holly McBRIDE of Peterborough, Ontario, to accept a request from Charlotte's mother that we be future co-guardians. In retrospect, my acceptance may also have been an attempt to settle the past -- all those years when Charlotte's name evoked profound sadness in our extended family; those years when few of us knew what to say or do.
Charlotte's father, John, an accountant who loved art and poetry as much as numbers, died in 1993. Her mother, Rachel, whose remarkable intellect fuelled a career at the University of Toronto's rare books library, had a stroke last spring that has left her partially paralyzed.
As a child, Charlotte was healthy, bright and cheerful, but her behaviour was decidedly unusual. I remember her standing apart, watching, as her cousins played on my family's farm near Peterborough. It was more than the awkwardness of a city kid visiting country cousins. Often she would retreat to the house and read a dictionary, emerging to recite definitions in her measured tones. There was also her obsession with our Siamese cat, Simon. Insistent, predictable questions would start with, "Do you like Simon, Kathy?" and progress through a stream of comparisons to other, lesser felines.
Still, her behaviour did not attract labels. If anything, we looked upon her as an intellectual in the making. However, in teen years, schizophrenia overshadowed her life. School marks plummeted. Attempts were made to find specialized education and, later, suitable lodging -- fresh starts and new disappointments for parents who were steadfast in their love and support. With visitors to the family home, Charlotte was distant. Conversations would pull her in, but she would quickly disengage. Often, making tea was her easiest social connection.
This all changed in recent years with improved medications and her move to Pilot Place. She still visited her mother regularly, but her life found a new rhythm in a mix of independence, support and routine. She took pleasure in visits to the Eaton Centre or the library's history section. She had setbacks, including a vascular necrosis, which affected her hip, but she never complained unless you made specific inquiries. Instead, she filled conversations with questions about family, jobs or hobbies -- and, of course, Simon.
It seems unfair that during this period of calm, cancer was silently stalking her. By the time it revealed itself, with painful blood clots, Charlotte had only one week to live, spent in St. Michael's Hospital. We gathered there -- family, my aunt's Friends, a compassionate medical team and Pilot Place staff. If it had to be, it was the best it could be.
Kathryn STORRING is Charlotte's cousin.

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STOS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-03 published
Man dies in ditch accident
By Will STOS, Wednesday, December 3, 2003 - Page A15
A Richmond Hill man died early yesterday morning after being buried in a ditch he had been digging in his front yard.
Lorenzo PILAGATTI, 40, died after the walls collapsed and firefighters on scene were unable to free him. His body was recovered several hours later.
Firefighters from Richmond Hill and Vaughn were called to the scene at 8: 30 p.m. Monday to free Mr. PILAGATTI from the ditch. An initial collapse had covered him up to his chest. About 1 a.m., a second cave-in completely covered him.
Mr. PILAGATTI's wife and two daughters were at home at the time, although they were not outside.
"It's awful, absolutely terrible," said Constable Kim Killby of York Regional Police. "I mean, these rescue workers were with him for hours, talking to him, trying to keep him warm. And to get so close and then all of the sudden another collapse to occur, and this time cover him completely. They couldn't get to him."
Police said Mr. PILAGATTI was using a backhoe to dig a trench in his yard, possibly to connect his home to a sewer line or make repairs. He was buried when he began digging in the trench with a shovel.
Constable KILLBY said the mud and ground water made recovery difficult.
Firefighters involved in the incident returned yesterday evening for briefing. A critical-incident stress team was brought in to assist them.

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STOTT o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-06-05 published
Kenneth Peter BARR
Died peacefully at home on Monday, June 2, 2003 with dignity and courage, after a brief battle with cancer, his wife Trish by his side. Ken was born November 25, 1949 and raised in St. Catharines, Ontario. Predeceased by his mother Isabel. Ken is survived by his father David BARR, wife Patricia, sons Paul and Craig HANSON and grand_son T.J. Also survived by his sister Judy and family, father-in-law John STOTT, and extended family members Normande GAUDETTE and Margaret HANSON- BROWN. Ken spent 35 years in the telecommunications industry in Canada and is well respected by colleagues, customers and business partners. Ken's caring, Friendship and respect for all individuals are hallmarks of his personality and his leadership style. Ken's extensive career included President of CTI, President of Lucent Canada's, Business Communications Systems, and a variety of sales, marketing, regulatory and management roles at American Telephone and Telegraph, TTS, Nortel, BCSI and Bell Canada. Most recently Ken was President and Chief Executive Officer of Vancouver based Security Biometrics. Ken's involvement with the community included the United Way, Junior Achievement, the Bay Street Rat Race and Ronald McDonald House. Ken balanced his business life with his love for his family. His special place for himself, family and Friends was Oak Lake, where he loved to relax and appreciate the wonders of nature. Ken's love of life is exemplified by his genuine concern for family and Friends and his many hobbies and interests including flying, boating, snowmobiling. His spirit will live on in all of us. Funeral service will be held at Timothy Eaton Memorial Church, 230 St. Clair Avenue West on Monday, June 9th at 11: 00 a.m. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made in Ken's memory to the Canadian Cancer Society, 20 Holly Street, Suite #101, Toronto M4S 3B1 or the Ronald McDonald Children's Charities of Canada, McDonald's Place, Toronto, Ontario M3C 3L4.

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STOTT o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-01 published
ENGLEBERT, Margaret Winifred Lade (née MURRAY)
born Kilmacolm, Scotland, died in Vancouver, November 27th, 2003. Predeceased by husband Renny, survived by Susan (Joe STOTT) and Michael (Donna) and grandchildren Rob and Johanna. There will be no service. In lieu of flowers please donate to the Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals or a charity of your choosing.

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STOVER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-03 published
CUMMINGS- STOVER, Dorothy
Peacefully at her residence on Saturday, March 1, 2003. Dorothy beloved wife of Charles STOVER and the late Albert Francis CUMMINGS. Beloved mother of Al, Paul and his wife Patricia of Lake Forest, Illinois, and the late Bruce CUMMINGS and his first wife Mary. Loving grandmother of Paul, Meaghan, Elizabeth, Heather and Anne. Friends may call at the Funeral Home of O'Connor Bros., 1871 Danforth Avenue Toronto (Two blocks west of the Woodbine Subway Station) on Tuesday from 7-9 p.m. Funeral Mass in The Church of the Canadian Martyrs (Woodbine Avenue South of O'Connor Drive) on Wednesday at 11 a.m. Cremation. In lieu of flowers donations in Dorothy's name to the Alzheimers Society would be appreciated. (Supervised Parking at Funeral Home).

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STOW o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-09-09 published
TREES, Frances Dixon
Died peacefully, at Toronto, on Saturday, September 6, 2003. Fran spent her working years at the Hospital for Sick Children and had served in the Navy during World War 2. Predeceased by her beloved sister Betsy STOW. Sister-in-law of Ticker STOW, and much loved aunt of Dunc McLaren, Matthew and Rowly STOW. Many thanks from the family to her Friends and to the staff and dedicated Personal Care Workers at the Balmoral Club who helped to keep her spirits up. A graveside service will be held at St. James' Cemetery, 635 Parliament Street, on Friday, September 12th at 11 o'clock. Reception to follow at the Balmoral Club, 155 Balmoral Avenue (at Avenue Road). In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the Hospital for Sick Children, 555 University Avenue, Toronto M5G 1X8.

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