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"SSA" 2003 Obituary


SSAINTURENT 

SSAINTURENT o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-08-15 published
Professor played a role in defeat of SSAINTURENT government
By M.J. STONE Special to The Globe and Mail Friday, August 15, 2003 - Page R5
Nearly four decades after Louis SSAINTURENT had been Prime Minister of Canada, McGill professor James MALLORY was surprised to discover how influential he had been in the defeat of Mr. SSAINTURENT's Liberals in 1957. The revelation occurred in 1992 when the cabinet papers of the SSAINTURENT government, which had been sealed for 35 years, were made available to the public.
Unknown to Professor MALLORY, a radio interview he gave in the wake of the 1957 election had caught the Prime Minister's ear. The Liberals had been reduced to 105 seats in the House, seven fewer than the Conservatives. But the Grits were still in a position to form a minority government with the aid of the 25 elected members of the Co-operative Commonwealth Federation, later to become the New Democratic Party.
Mr. SSAINTURENT found himself at a crossroads. While his party was clearly in decline, the Conservatives were on the rise and many questioned whether the Liberals still had a legal mandate to govern. When Mr. SSAINTURENT arrived in cabinet that morning, Prof. MALLORY's radio interview was still ringing in his ears.
Prof. MALLORY, who died in Montreal on June 24, said in the interview that if the Liberals continued to govern it would result in a constitutional crisis. He believed it was the responsibility of John DIEFENBAKER and the Conservatives to form a government. The cabinet papers clearly reflect Prof. MALLORY's influence over the Prime Minister that morning. Mr. SSAINTURENT demanded a copy of the MALLORY interview and after carefully studying the radio transcripts, he handed the rule of government over to the Tories.
Highly regarded as the foremost expert in Canadian legal and federal structures, Prof. MALLORY was often called on to advise governments about constitutional procedures. McGill professor Charles TAILOR/TAYLOR said another good example occurred in 1979.
"Joe CLARK's Conservatives had just lost a parliamentary vote," Prof. TAILOR/TAYLOR recalled. "The governor-general, Ed SCHREYER, telephoned McGill's political science department, looking for Jim. It caused something of a stir when he couldn't be found immediately. SCHREYER was frantic for MALLORY's advice. The governor-general was unsure how to proceed.
"Jim was eventually found and consulted. His advice was that the Conservatives should call an election -- exactly what Joe CLARK did."
The son of a county sheriff, James Russell MALLORY was born on February 5, 1916. He graduated with a Bachelor of Arts from the University of New Brunswick in 1937 and later studied law at Edinburgh and Dalhousie universities.
He met his American-born wife, Frances KELLER, in Scotland, and the couple married in 1940. They had two sons: James and Charles. Prof. MALLORY joined the faculty of the University of Saskatchewan in 1941. Later, he taught at the University of Toronto and Brandon College before moving to McGill in 1946.
A respected scholar and lawyer, Prof. MALLORY was an "old-school" professor who taught at McGill for 45 years. His reputation as a constitutional expert was solidified in 1954 when he published Social Credit and the Federal Power in Canada. The quintessential text mapped out the constitutional parameters of federal/provincial relations.
"James MALLORY was a discreet and modest man," McGill professor Sam NOUMOFF recalled. "He had a profound understanding of morality and he was incapable of self-promotion. He worked on university committee after committee while holding many teaching responsibilities.
"Jim wasn't the sort of man who sought public approval, he just did things because they were the right thing to do."
His son James, who lives in Britain, summed up his father's idealism: "He had a bloody-minded stubbornness. It would manifest sometimes in allowing discussions to go on and on. Then he would do exactly what he intended to do in the first place. Somehow it never impaired his reputation as a genuine democrat."
Prof. MALLORY was the founder of both the Canadian Studies program at McGill and the Canadian Association of University Professors. After retiring in 1982 he was appointed professor emeritus and continued to teach for another 10 years. In 1964, he was elected to the Royal Society of Canada and was later awarded the Queen's Silver Jubilee Medal in 1977.
In 1995, McGill founded the James R. Mallory lecture series, a one-day event that features a special guest who lectures about Canadian issues. Past guests have included Bob RAE, Peter WHITE/WHYTE and Phyllis LAMBERT. The organizers of the event say that this year's lecture will focus on Prof. MALLORY's legacy.
Prof. MALLORY died 11 weeks after the death of his wife on what would have been their 63rd anniversary.

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SSAINTURENT o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-09-13 published
Died This Day -- Paul Joseph James MARTIN, 1992
Saturday, September 13, 2003 - Page F11
Politician and statesman born on June 23, 1903, at Ottawa; 1935, first elected to House of Commons; 1943 appointed parliamentary assistant to minister of labour; 1945, entered cabinet as secretary of state; 1946, became minister of national health and welfare forced prime minister SSAINTURENT to accept national health insurance 1963, appointed secretary of state for external affairs; 1968-74, served as government leader in Senate; 1975-79, served as high commissioner to Britain; made three failed attempts at Liberal Party leadership (in 1968, lost to Pierre TRUDEAU;) died at Windsor, Ontario; two-volume memoirs, A Very Public Life, published in 1983 and 1986.

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SSAINTURENT o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-11-20 published
John Edward Burns (Ted) HOWELL
By Frank GARDINER Thursday, November 20, 2003 - Page A26
Father, husband, Sunday School teacher, fisherman, sports enthusiast, Crown Attorney. Born June 26, 1934, in Goderich, Ontario Died August 11, in Omemee, Ontario, of cancer, age 69.
Ted HOWELL, through all of his life, was a little man with a big heart and a giant intellect.
During his early years growing up in Goderich, Ted displayed an early love of academic excellence mixed with a fun sense of competitiveness in all endeavours from table tennis and hockey, to debating contests sponsored by the local Lion's Club.
As part of his 1950 high-school election campaign for treasurer, Ted and his loyal cohorts dressed up as members of the Mafia. Ted in his zoot suit, trench coat and oversized fedora imitated a smaller version of Chicago gangster Al Capone with a campaign slogan: "Vote for me. I need the money." Ted won.
Ted loved a physical challenge. Few could beat him at his favourite sport of table tennis. Many fell prey to his quick eye and cunning strategies and years later Ted won several table tennis championships with the Scarborough Kings Table Tennis Club.
Another field of Ted's early expertise was lawn croquet. On the large lawn of their home, the HOWELL family had a grand lawn croquet court. Ted, as usual, took this game very seriously and had little patience with anyone who did not do the same. Ted was an expert at the double-ball knock out.
These traits also made him a memorable boys' Sunday School teacher at North Street United Church where he creatively handled -- some might say "civilized" -- some lads bigger than himself, all tough, key members of the "Church Street gang." With his leadership, he earned their life-long respect.
Ted graduated at the top of his high-school class and went off to University of Toronto and then on to Osgoode Law School where he earned an award for outstanding contribution to school life.
He was called to the bar in 1960.
Jack BATTEN's book titled Lawyers quotes Ted: 'But from the time I started reading Erle Stanley Gardner as a kid, around grade seven, I wanted to be a courtroom lawyer.' HOWELL won a public speaking award in high school, and an essay he wrote about Canada's role in the United Nations took him on an all-expenses-paid weekend to Ottawa, where he proudly shook hands with Prime Minister Louis SSAINTURENT. HOWELL was a diligent student and he was headed for law.
"Ted HOWELL is, in almost every respect, a perfect servant of the Crown. He is an admirably correct man. There is no stuffiness in his make-up but he sends out the message that he values propriety and turns off at bad manners. He conducts himself according to such old verities."
Visiting a summer camp, Ted met the woman who was to become his wife and soul-mate for 40 special years. Ted and Theresa (TIFF) were married in 1963. This was Ted's greatest project and he is the proud father of Thomas (and his wife Andrea METRICK) and Michael. Ted was the grandfather of Ashley HOWELL.
Ted HOWELL's many legal accomplishments and Friendships over 40 years embraced eminent legal associates and Friends as well as Goderich pals. He was a proud Goderich character. He was a long-time resident of Scarborough, Ontario, as well as his family's cottage and country home in Omemee, Ontario
Ted is missed and remembered.
Frank GARDINER is a one-time Sunday school pupil of Ted HOWELL.

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SSAINTURENT o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-10 published
FULTON quietly kept the Canadian Football League in running order
By Stephen BRUNT, Wednesday, December 10, 2003 - Page S8
Less than a month back, during Grey Cup week, Greg FULTON picked up his phone to answer a few questions from a reporter.
Frail health had kept him from making the trip to Regina, but in conversation he was sharp as a tack and again proved himself to be a one-man encyclopedia of Canadian football history.
Paul MARTIN, the prime minister to be, was going to make a much publicized pregame appearance at Taylor Field, fresh from the Liberal leadership convention.
Aside from Pierre TRUDEAU, FULTON was asked, did he remember any other prime minister taking the time to attend the Grey Cup? "Well," he said, "I don't remember Mackenzie KING being there. Or Louis SSAINTURENT."
Of course, he knew because he was there. It seemed he was always there -- a player beginning in Winnipeg in 1939, a statistician and treasurer for the Calgary Stampeders from 1950 to 1966, a fixture in the Canadian Football League office from 1967 on, and, finally in his last job, the Canadian Football League's honorary secretary and official historian, a title surely unique in all of pro sports.
The National Football League still has a few owners with connections to the game's early days, and in hockey and baseball there are at least a handful of sportswriting elders who still remember when. But only the Canadian Football League actually employed someone who had an inside view extending back more than 60 years.
Considering how tumultuous some of those seasons have been and considering the game's highs and lows and the cast of strange and wonderful characters who came and went, what a tale FULTON could tell.
He was 84 when he died on Monday, and with him, sadly, is lost much of the anecdotal story of the league. (Commissioner Tom WRIGHT, who during his relatively short term on the job had come to appreciate FULTON's special role, planned to have FULTON's memories committed to tape and transcribed. Sadly, that didn't happen before FULTON fell ill.)
FULTON's tenure with the league office was perhaps the only significant legacy of Keith DAVEY's 54-day reign as commissioner in 1967. Davey lured FULTON to Toronto from Calgary to act as the league's treasurer. When Jake GAUDAUR took over from DAVEY, he decided to keep FULTON on.
"It would be the most important decision I would make," GAUDAUR says now, which, given the events of his 16 years in office, is quite a statement. Every subsequent commissioner -- and there have been a bunch -- endorsed and echoed that original decision.
Not that anyone on the outside would really understand. "All of those beneficial things he did for the league were all out of public view," GAUDAUR said. "He never received any sort of media credit, nor did he want any. Clearly, it was a labour of love for him. That's kind of corny to say that, but I really believe it was."
In those early days, the league was a two-man, two-secretary operation. FULTON, an accountant by profession, kept the books, kept an eye on club finances and kept the minutes during league meetings -- all during a period when the game grew into a multimillion-dollar sports business. He was also charged with producing the schedule every year, a trickier proposition than it might seem, given the uneven number of teams, the east-west split and the importance of certain dates in certain places.
At one point, GAUDAUR remembers, they turned the task over to a computer. And then, after the computer coughed out its work, they handed it to FULTON, who fixed it. "He had what I consider to be a computer mind," GAUDAUR said. "It was an incredible mind."
The Canadian Football League took a turn for the worse after GAUDAUR left the post. Commissioners came and went, the league at times teetered on the brink of insolvency, the disastrous U.S. expansion played itself out and the owners at times resembled a bag of mixed nuts.
But there was always FULTON, quietly keeping things in running order, breaking the tension with his wry, quiet sense of humour, loyal first and foremost to the game he loved.
"He was a remarkable person," GAUDAUR said. "It really was a pleasure to be around the guy."
Several generations of those who spent time in the Canadian Football League orbit share those sentiments and mourn the loss.

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