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"SPR" 2003 Obituary


SPRACK  SPRAGGE  SPROULE  SPRY 

SPRACK o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-01-08 published
Albert George WEBB
In loving memory of Albert George WEBB, April 9, 1921 to December 24, 2002.
Albert WEBB, a resident of Providence Bay, died at the Mindemoya Hospital, on Tuesday, December 24, 2002 at the age of 81 years. He was born in Durham, and had lived on Manitoulin for the past 6 years. Previous to that, Al had lived in Elliott Lake and Armstrong. He had a great love of the north country, which led him to his job as a bush pilot He truly loved his work, and spent many enjoyable years pursuing his love of the north and of flying. Al was a veteran of WW2, having served overseas.
Survived by his beloved partner Val TAILOR/TAYLOR of Providence Bay, and her family. Will be sadly missed by Ruby CANNARD, the Mike SPRACK family, Linda and Al BAILEY, Harvey and Diane DEBASSIGE, Lloyd JACKSON and Marshall RICHARD of Elliott Lake, Ryan HUTCHINSON/HUTCHISON and Jim HARASYM. Survived by many Friends in the Armstrong, Elliott Lake and Manitoulin area. Also survived by sons Warren and Chris, and one brother in the Hamilton area.
At Al's request, there will be no funeral service. Cremation will take place.
Val TAILOR/TAYLOR would like to thank the doctors and nurses at Mindemoya Hospital for the wonderful care and concern given to Al and herself, during this time. Words cannot express the appreciation. Culgin Funeral Home

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SPRAGGE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-05-06 published
SPRAGGE, Godfrey L.
Died suddenly, at Kingston General Hospital, on Sunday, May 4, 2003, in the presence of his sons John and Michael. He leaves behind a loving family, a circle of Friends who shared his passionate concern for peace and social justice, and who will miss him very much. He was married to Shirley (née COX) for forty-one years. They were a couple and best Friends for fifty years before her death in 1995.
Born in Toronto on January 4, 1929, he studied at Trinity College, Toronto, and worked as a land surveyor and Urban Planner before obtaining his Masters of Planning from Cornell University. He then went on to help found the School of Urban and Regional Planning at Queen's University, Kingston, where he taught for twenty-five years. Following his retirement from Queen's, he trained with Project Accompaniment to serve as an electron observer and witness for peace in Guatemala.
His passion for social justice led him to the Early Years Coalition and Better Beginnings, Kingston Electors On Line, and the Kingston Faith and Justice Coalition. He derived great strength from his involvement with men's support groups, and great pleasure from piano lessons and singing with the Kingston Choral Society and Open Voices Choir. His spiritual journey began with the Anglican Church and led to the Religious Society of Friends (Quakers).
Since the death of his wife, he found great joy with his many Friends. He is survived by his sisters Elizabeth (J.D. WATSON and their three children) of Belfast, and Monica of Toronto sons John (Allison MacDUFFEE) and Michael (Lynne FORAN) of Toronto. He particularly delighted in his grandchildren Kathleen and Liam.
His family will receive Friends at the Robert J. Reid and Sons Funeral Home, 309 Johnson Street, Kingston, on Thursday, May 8 from 6 to 9 p.m. His life will be celebrated at a meeting for worship in the Quaker tradition on Saturday, May 10 at 1: 30 p.m. at the University Club, 130 Stuart Street, Kingston, Ontario. There will also be a Memorial Service at Trinity College Chapel on Monday, May 12 at 2 p.m. with a reception to follow in the Combination Private Dining Room. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the United Way serving Kingston, Frontenac, Lennox and Addington for the Success by Six Program, 417 Bagot Street, Kingston, Ontario K7K 3C1 or the Kingston Symphony Association, P.O. 1616, 11 Princess Street, Suite 206, Kingston, Ontario K7L 5C8.
Online Guest Book www.reidfuneralhome.com (613) 548-7973

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SPROULE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-08-01 published
COX, Elford Bradley ''E.B.''
Died peacefully, in his 90th year, on Tuesday, July 29th, 2003, at Toronto General Hospital, with loving family by his side. He is survived by his wife Elizabeth ''Bet'' (CAMPBELL,) daughters Sally SPROULE (Dale) and Kathy SUTTON (Steve,) grandchildren Jason HARLOW (Cindy KRYSAK) and Jennifer HARLOW and great-granddaughters Elizabeth and Terran HARLOW, as well as nieces Donna and Frances. He was predeceased by his brother Arthur Berwyn COX. He will be remembered with love also by his many Friends, particularly Dean ALLEN of Toronto. A family service will be held August 9th. A memorial service to celebrate E.B.'s life and work as one of Canada's foremost sculptors is being planned for September. Expressions of sympathy in the form of donations to favourite charities will be appreciated.

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SPROULE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-09-19 published
SCOTT, Lewis Clayton - August 16, 1909 - September 17, 2003
Died peacefully at Southlake Village Nursing Home, age 94, after a full and distinguished life as a sportsman. In an era when shooting, fishing, hunting and riding were the epitome of sportsmanship, Scott excelled at all.
Born on August 16, 1909 in Vermillion, South Dakota, Lew came to Toronto at an early age with his family. One of his first employers was the Toronto Carpet Company (where he met his future wife Alice PARKER.) He then moved on to the brokerage business with Barrett Sye and Co. as well as in the Toronto Grain Exchange. He established L.C. Scott Construction Company in the 1940's which operated in Canada, the United States and England. After World War 2, the company built a large number of schools and hospitals in Southern Ontario as well as some of the post war homes that were built in New Toronto and North York.
Lew had a lifelong passion for horses. During a family stint in California when he was a youngster, he first galloped racehorses at Hollywood Park and when he grew too big, switched to exercising polo ponies. After his business career was established, he acquired property in Markham - Wyndstone Farm - from which he bred and raised thoroughbred racehorses, steeplechasers and sport horses as well as bird dogs and prize- winning Shorthorn cattle.
Lew was an equestrian sportsman of international stature. He competed in steeplechasing and timber racing in Canada and the United States winning a number of prestigious trophies including the Prince of Wales trophy three times. He played polo in Canada, the United States, England and Barbados and competed at horse shows across Ontario. He was a keen foxhunter and served as the whipper-in for the Toronto and North York Hunt for 20 years prior to becoming a Master of Foxhounds in 1972, a position he held until 1990.
He raised bird dogs and competed with them all over North America in the 40's and the 50's. He was a top fly fisherman and enjoyed duck and pheasant hunting. Both he and his wife Alice were crack shots and long time members of the Toronto Gun Club. As a young man, he was a member of the Argonaut Rowing Club.
At one time, a member or director of the Toronto and North York Hunt, the Canadian Hunter Society, the Canadian Equestrian Team, the Canadian Thoroughbred Horse Society, the Toronto Polo Club and several U.S. polo clubs, the Cowdray Polo Club, United Kingdom Canadian director of the Master of Foxhounds Association of America, the Goodwood Club and the Argonaut Rowing Club. He was also an accomplished pilot who loved flying and had owned several planes.
In 1989, after 54 years of marriage, he lost his beloved wife Alice whose charm, hospitality and hard work was the foundation of the family and the basis which allowed Lew's energetic pursuit of his interests.
Predeceased also by his only son Lewis Christian (Skipper). Leaves daughters Alice FERRIER (Glen) and Susan Jane ANSTEY (Michael VAN EVERY,) granddaughters Jennifer ANSTEY, Elizabeth TRACEY, Janet Louise GAYFORD, Mary FRALEIGH and Margaret Ann SPROULE. Great grandchildren Owen TRACEY, Will FRALEIGH, Jamie FRALEIGH and Tom FRALEIGH.
He will be remembered for his enthusiasm, toughness, loyalty and keen interest in the people and things around him.
If desired, donations in his memory may be made to Think First Canada (for injury prevention in sports and recreation), Med-West Medical Centre, Suite 2-227, 750 Dundas St. West, Toronto, Ontario M6J 3S3 or to the Royal Agricultural Winter Fair Endowment Fund.
A Private family service was held. Arrangements entrusted to the Thompson Funeral Home, 29 Victoria Street, Aurora (905-727-5421).

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SPROULE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-11-15 published
Sculptor 'entirely original'
A wood carver from a young age who made many public works, he was befriended by the Group of Seven and later carved their tombstone epitaphs
By Bill GLADSTONE, Special to The Globe and Mail Saturday, November 15, 2003 - Page F10
A Canadian sculptor who as a young man was adopted by the Group of Seven has died in Toronto. E. B. COX, who prided himself on achieving artistic and commercial success without ever taking a penny in government grants, was 89.
Mr. COX was a young associate, of some of the Group of Seven with whom he went on northern sketching trips; A. Y. JACKSON once complimented him on his "good sense of form." He later carved their tombstone epitaphs.
A wood carver from a young age, he came to master stone and even the delicate art of faceting and carving precious stones; he also tried metal, ceramics and glass. Because he liked to work fast, he pioneered the use of power tools to quicken the chiselling process, a technique that purists initially disdained as a form of cheating.
According to one 1990s guide-book, he had "more sculpture on view in Toronto's public places than any other single artist." His 20-piece Garden of the Greek Gods, originally installed in the 1950s on the Georgian Peaks near Collingwood, Ontario, was later relocated to the far more populous grounds of the Canadian National Exhibition near the Dufferin Gate. The only fully human representation in the group, an 11-foot-high statue of Hercules, was carved from a six-tonne piece of Indiana limestone -- "the biggest piece of stone used by a sculptor in Canada," according to friend and patron, Ken SMITH.
Among his many other public works are a fish fountain for a courtyard at the former Park Plaza Hotel, a stone bear for the Guild Inn, a stone Orpheus for Victoria College, lavish countertops and railings for historic bank buildings, a large seated lady for McMaster University and whimsical creatures for a school yard in Milton, Ontario
Having mastered big, he also excelled at small: He used to claim that he invented coffee-table art. He carved little totem poles to put himself through university, and became known for his small bear sculptures, which he sold at popular prices, especially at Christmas. "At university, I damned near starved," he would explain. "I don't believe in starving artists."
Influenced by Iroquois and West Coast Haida art, he focused on bears, beavers, birds and other animals as well as human torsos, masks and heads; he often caught the animals in quirky fluid poses and never failed to capture their essential natures. He once crafted an all-Canadian limited-edition chess set for the Hudson's Bay Co., with beavers as pawns, coureurs de bois as knights, Indian princesses as queens, and so on. He was "the great bridge between aboriginal art and modern art," according to Mr. SMITH and others. A picture book about him, featuring an essay by Gary Michael DAULT, was published by Boston Mills Press in 1999.
"He was entirely original," said Toronto sculptor Dora DE PEDERY- HUNT. "Absolutely nobody else did what he did. What style he had was entirely his. I call him a real good sculptor, a real good artist."
The younger of two brothers, Elford Bradley COX was born on July 16, 1914, in Botha, Alberta., where his family made a short-lived attempt at farming; he learned to carve by watching his maternal grandfather whittle kindling by the fireside. He persisted in sculpting even though his pious father was vehemently opposed to the creation of "graven images," he told Toronto Life magazine in 1997. The family returned to Bowmanville, Ontario, where E. B. spent most of his childhood, and where his mother died suddenly after an epileptic attack when her favoured son was a young teenager. When it was time for him to go to university, "his father sent him off with $5, a suitcase and a wish of good luck," said Kathy SUTTON, the younger of his two daughters.
Studying languages at the University of Toronto from 1934 to 1938, Mr. COX was befriended by German professor and painter Barker FAIRLEY, who introduced him to A. Y. JACKSON, Fred VARLEY and Arthur LISMER of the Group of Seven.
Mr. COX started teaching languages at Upper Canada College, but soon left to join the war effort as an intelligence officer, interrogating prisoners of war in Europe.
Afterward, he resumed teaching at Upper Canada College, and devoted part of a summer to a school canoe trip on the Mississauga River the next summer he escorted a group of boys on an even more adventurous trip down the Churchill River in the barren lands. "That was just unheard-of in those years," recalled Terence A. WARDROP, who joined that expedition and became Mr. COX's lifelong friend and solicitor. "It was a big trip and it was almost historic the rivers and some of the lakes were unmapped in 1948."
Quitting his teaching job in 1949, Mr. COX married the former Betty CAMPBELL, bought a farm near Palgrave, Ontario, and discovered that he could survive as a full-time artist. (Although he considered government subsidies poisonous, he once applied for a government grant to study Canadian stones suitable for sculpting -- and was turned down. "I did my stone research without their damn-fool money," he told The Globe and Mail in 1970.) Moving to a rural property in north Toronto and later to a Victorian house in eastern Toronto, he separated from his wife but remained on excellent terms with her and their daughters.
Being partial to pranks, he once purchased a canoe for his wife as a gift and, to achieve maximum surprise, paddled it to the dock at the family cottage in a rented disguise. Along with his love of humour, Friends recall his sharp wit and his ability to cut through social pretense. "He said he wanted his gravestone to read, 'I told you I was sick,' " recalled art dealer John INGRAM. " That's what I remember about him -- his great sense of humour and just what a wonderful compassionate guy he was. He tried to give this air of being an old curmudgeon, but in fact, he was anything but."
Becoming a mentor to many young artists, Mr. COX generously shared his tools and experience with them. "He didn't have much mentoring when he was learning to be an artist -- people didn't help him so he took the opposite tack," said his daughter Kathy.
Always enthusiastic and full of ideas, he was usually in his workshop early in the morning -- and kept on working even after losing his sight in his final years. His home was full of fine sculpture and painting, including a portrait of Mr. COX by Mr. FAIRLEY that hung over the mantel. "It was a lovely place, and by the time you got out of there, you were in a buying fever," Mr. SMITH recalled. "E.B. himself was part of the fun of buying stuff. People were just charmed by the atmosphere he created." He was also famously not particular about the prices he asked from genuine admirers of his work.
As for his art's place in the world, he was confident it would last, at least in the physical sense. "We'd have these long philosophical talks about whether there was an afterlife and what legacy to leave behind," friend Eric CONROY recalled. "He'd say that his stone works would be there long after Rembrandt's paintings had crumbled."
E. B. COX died in Toronto on July 29, leaving his wife Betty, daughters Sally SPROULE and Kathy SUTTON, two grandchildren and two great-grandchildren.

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SPRY o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-12-10 published
Sarah Jane (Jennie) SPRY
In loving memory of Sarah Jane (Jennie) SPRY, November 14, 1912 to December 4, 2003.
Jennie SPRY, a resident of the Manitoulin Lodge for the past 5 years, and formerly of Mindemoya, passed away at the Lodge on Thursday, December 4, 2003 at the age of 91 years. She was born at Manitowaning, daughter of the late Thomas and Letitia PHILLIPS. Jennie had a variety of interests, which included gardening, cooking and quilting. Her greatest joy and love was her family. A wonderful and loving wife, mother and grandmother, sister and friend, she will be remembered fondly by all her family and all who knew her. Her beloved husband Leonard (Toot) SPRY predeceased in 1992. Cherished mother of Jean PEARSON (husband Norris predeceased,) Evelyn TAILOR/TAYLOR and husband Ted, Leonard SPRY Jr., and his wife Carol and Keith SPRY and his wife Colleen. Forever remembered by seven grandchildren, twelve great grandchildren and one great great granddaughter. Beloved sister of Alice SPRY (husband Lloyd predeceased), and Harry PHILLIPS (wife Bessie predeceased). Predeceased by grand_sons Mike, Tom and Tim and son-in-law Norris PEARSON. Friends called The Mindemoya United Church on Sunday, December 7, 2003. The funeral service was conducted at the church on Monday, December 8, 2003 with Pastor Maxine McVEY officiating. Spring interment in Mindemoya Cemetery.

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