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"SOL" 2003 Obituary


SOLAJIC  SOLEM  SOLOMON 

SOLAJIC o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-05-22 published
SOLAJIC, Zoran
Zoran died peacefully at home with his loving wife Maja and daughter Ana by his side on Wednesday, May 21, 2003 at the age of 53 years. He is loved and will be greatly missed by his father-in-law Mirko RISTIC of Belgrade, Jeff ROBERTS and many relatives, Friends and colleagues. The family will receive Friends at First United Church, 397 Kent St. Ottawa on Saturday from 12: 30 until time memorial service at 2 p.m. Those wishing may make memorial donations to the Cancer Research Society, 305-200 Isabella St. Ottawa, K1S 1V7. Condolences, donations or tributes may be made at www.tubmanfuneralhomes.com.

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SOLEM o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-08 published
JOHNSON, Marion Sellers
Passed away peacefully on March 5, 2003 in Toronto at the age of 96. Beloved wife of J. Ragnar JOHNSON, Q.C. (deceased October 15, 1985,) dear mother of Jon R. JOHNSON and dear mother-in-law of Patricia C. JOHNSON, lovingly remembered by grand_sons, Jon (Karen) and Patrick (Julie) JOHNSON and dear great-grandmother of Jon and Lilja JOHNSON. Dear aunt of Louise Delaware KRIEGER, James WALKER, Douglas WALKER, Edward STOCKELBACH and Herbert SOLEM. Predeceased by her sisters, Flora, Lois, Alice and Mary. Gold medalist in Political Science at the University of Manitoba and member of the Pi Phi Sorority. Graduated in nursing from Columbia Presbyterian Hospital and practised paediatrics at Winnipeg General Hospital. Active member of Calvin Presbyterian Church in Toronto and the University Women's Club in Toronto. She dedicated many years as a volunteer at the Toronto General Hospital, the Canadian Cancer Society and the Canadian Opera Company. Marion had a long and productive life and will be missed by all who knew her. Visitation will take place at the Morley Bedford Funeral Home, 159 Eglinton Ave. W., on Monday, March 10, 2003 from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m.. Private Service. In lieu of flowers, please send donations to the Canadian Cancer Society, the Heart and Stroke Foundation or to a charity of your choice.

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SOLOMON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-01-22 published
She danced on tabletops of Ottawa
Former reporter with capital connections hosted parties for the powerful and waged a spirited campaign to save railway cabooses
By Randy RAY Special to The Globe and Mail Wednesday, January 22, 2003, Page R5
Most who knew her have a story to tell about Starr SOLOMON, a journalist and public-relations practitioner who for years hosted glamorous parties in Ottawa that attracted a who's who of cabinet ministers, bureaucrats and media people.
Ms. SOLOMON, the widow of Hy SOLOMON, former Ottawa bureau chief for The Financial Post, has died in Toronto. She was 64.
Long-time friend and colleague Walter GRAY/GREY remembers the time Ms. SOLOMON convinced former Prime Minister Brian MULRONEY and Liberal Member of Parliament Sheila COPPS -- for years Mr. MULRONEY's nemesis -- to sing together at the National Press Club in Ottawa in the mid-1980s, following the annual Parliamentary Press Gallery dinner.
"They sang a duet. The song was You Made Me Love You," says Mr. GRAY/GREY, a former Globe and Mail bureau chief in Ottawa, who played the piano while the two politicians crooned in tandem. Ms. COPPS is now Canada's heritage minister.
Edna HAMPTON, one of Ms. SOLOMON's closest Friends, said acquaintances, colleagues and politicians always looked forward to dinner parties at the SOLOMON home in Ottawa's trendy Glebe neighbourhood. Trouble was, you never knew when the meal would be served.
"I always used to eat first because the parties would zip along and she would let dinner go. You might eat at 8, you might eat at 11 . . . but you always knew the food would be good," said Ms. HAMPTON, a retired journalist.
Ms. SOLOMON was born in Ottawa and moved to North Bay, Ontario, as a child, where she attended elementary and high school. In the late 1950s, she landed a reporting job with The North Bay Nugget, where Ms. HAMPTON was a senior reporter at the time. Later, The Ottawa Citizen hired her as a reporter and she wrote under the byline Starr COTE, the surname of her first husband.
"She was always full of energy and fond of fun assignments," recalls Ms. HAMPTON. " She would cover anything from a royal tour to a St. Patrick's Day event up the Ottawa Valley."
Among her plum assignments was the visit to Ottawa by U.S. president John F. KENNEDY and his wife, Jacqueline. She also wrote restaurant reviews for The Citizen, where she developed a reputation as a lively writer who was quick-witted, entertaining and personal. Ms. SOLOMON often fought it out for the big local stories with Joyce FAIRBAIRN, a reporter with the now-defunct Ottawa Journal. Ms. FAIRBAIRN later became a Senator.
Ms. SOLOMON left The Citizen in the mid-1960s and moved to Toronto, where she worked with the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation as a writer/producer. She married Mr. SOLOMON on January 23, 1966. The couple lived in Toronto until Mr. SOLOMON was transferred to Washington to open a bureau for The Financial Post.
When the SOLOMONs returned to Ottawa, Ms. SOLOMON and a partner formed a public-relations firm. She quickly became a fixture in the city's media and political circles, a move Mr. GRAY/GREY calls "networking at its best. She had a wide range of Friends and she used these connections to her greatest advantage. I wish I had her Rolodex."
For about 10 years in the 1980s, Ms. SOLOMON and Mr. GRAY/GREY worked at the same public-relations firm, where they teamed up on a variety of projects.
"There was the day the African chief Butelezi arrived in Ottawa as a front for a group of Canadian businesses trying to develop business relations with South Africa. I was assigned to shepherd the chief around town," says Mr. GRAY/GREY. " Starr was to accompany his lady, the lovely Princess Irene, whose sole interest was to shop -- especially at Zellers. As they made their departure laden down with Zellers bags. I think the princess gave Starr a tip for her services."
The pair also worked together on an unsuccessful campaign to stop the Canadian National Railway from eliminating railway cabooses. "The cabooses disappeared, but to this day, the Save the Caboose sweatshirt has been the most comfortable sweatshirt in our respective wardrobes," says Mr. GRAY/GREY.
Over the years Ms. SOLOMON volunteered her public-relations skills for many campaigns. She was a founding member of the Legal Education and Action Fund, which was established to advance women's equality rights, and served on the board of directors of the Ottawa Civic Hospital.
As a couple, the SOLOMONs were known in Ottawa for throwing glamorous parties, some planned, some spontaneous, that attracted the leading cabinet ministers, writers and journalists of the day. Ms. SOLOMON entertained and amused guests with her wit and political insights, while her husband was an engaging conversationalist whose business and political insights held the attention of politicians and bureaucrats.
Those who attended their soirees remember Ms. SOLOMON as a welcoming hostess and terrific cook, whose specialty was Greek and Mediterranean dishes. When guests arrived, she was always beautifully dressed and "the records were on the turntable," recalls Mr. GRAY/GREY. " Patsy Cline was her favourite. But also lots of jazz -- her friend Brian Browne, Oscar Peterson, Oliver Jones." Often guests would sing and dance around the SOLOMONs' dining-room table.
"We did have serious discussions on serious subjects, from time to time," adds Mr. GRAY/GREY.
Former Ottawa Citizen food editor and restaurant reviewer Kathleen WALKER remembers Ms. SOLOMON as "literally . . . the kind of person who danced on tabletops. She was just wonderful and wild. We had a ball together. Great sense of humour. A terrific lady."
She will also be remembered as a great friend "who was there in thick and thin if you had a problem," says Mr. GRAY/GREY.
After her husband died in 1991, Ms. SOLOMON moved back to Toronto, where she did volunteer consulting and public relations work for various organizations, including Legal Education and Action Fund and a Greek nursing home. She was also a trustee of the Hyman SOLOMON Award for Excellence in Public Policy Journalism, established to honour her husband's legacy.
Ms. SOLOMON leaves her two sons, Adam and Ben, two grandchildren and two brothers. A celebration of her life is to be held at the National Press Club in Ottawa on January 29 at 5: 30 p.m.
Starr SOLOMON, journalist, public-relations specialist; born Ottawa, February 27, 1938; died Toronto, January 3, 2003.

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SOLOMON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-02-15 published
ADAM/ADAMS, Robert ''Bob'' Watson
Born January 22, 1921 in Windsor, Ontario, Bob died February 10, 2003 at the age of 82, from complications arising from heart disease and cancer. Bob started Adams Rent-All in 1967, with his first store on Avenue Road. The business grew to include six stores in the Toronto area. He retired in 1989 upon selling the business. An active member of the Rental Association of Canada until his death, he served as president in 1973 and 1974. The son of Dr. Frederick ADAM/ADAMS and Essie (née WATSON,) Bob was a Flight Lieutenant in the Royal Canadian Air Force. In November 1943, his Wellington aircraft was shot down while bombing a ship in Naxos harbour, Greece, and for the next six weeks he and his crew evaded enemy capture before returning to Allied territory. In 1965, he became a member of the newly formed Royal Air Forces Escaping Society (Canadian Branch). Its 140 members were Canadian airmen who, after being shot down over Europe, escaped or evaded capture with the help of the underground. The Society's purpose was to honour and assist the individuals who guided airmen to safety, and who often suffered from imprisonment and torture as a result. Bob was president of the Society's Canadian Branch in 1995 and 1996. Bob is survived by his loving wife and best friend, Joan (née BERKELEY;) his children John, Patricia, and Mary; his sons-in-law, Lawrence SOLOMON and Steve DOUGLAS/DOUGLASS; and his granddaughters Essie and Catharine. He will be missed dearly by them, and by his many Friends. Bob is predeceased by his brothers, Frederick Coulson and John Charles, both Royal Canadian Air Force pilots, who were killed in action in 1941 and 1945. A celebration of Bob ADAM/ADAMS' life will be held on February 23, at 2900 Yonge Street. All who knew him and his family are welcome to drop by, anytime from 1: 00 pm until 5:00 pm. If desired, donations can be made to Toronto's West Park Healthcare Centre in Bob's memory.

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SOLOMON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-01 published
Ex-pilot aided foreigners who hid soldiers
By Kelly HAGGART Saturday, March 1, 2003 - Page F11
Robert ADAM/ADAMS, past president of a society set up to honour and assist individuals who risked their lives helping Allied airmen evade capture during the Second World War, died in Toronto this month of cancer. He was 82.
Mr. ADAM/ADAMS was a 22-year-old Canadian pilot on loan to Britain's Royal Air Force when his plane was shot down after bombing a German ship in southern Greece. Stout-hearted people on two small islands in the Aegean, risking torture or execution for their actions, sheltered the six-man crew for a month until they were rescued.
After the war, Mr. ADAM/ADAMS founded a chain of tool-rental stores in the Toronto area called ADAM/ADAMS Rent-All, which he sold when he retired in 1989.
In 1965, Mr. ADAM/ADAMS joined the newly formed Canadian branch of the Royal Air Forces Escaping Society. The group vowed to assist the citizens who had helped Allied airmen who fell into their midst escape or evade capture; thanks to their courage, almost 3,000 men had made it back to safety.
"The object of the society is to remember, " the group's literature says, "and to aid our helpers who may still be suffering the results of imprisonment and torture at the hands of the enemy, and to maintain the very strong Friendships that developed during those years."
(Ernest BEVIN, Britain's foreign secretary in 1945-51, told the first chairman of the group's British chapter: "Your society does a damned sight more good in Europe than all my ambassadors rolled together.")
John DIX, a fellow member of the Escaping Society's Canadian branch, said that, "in most cases, we only knew our helpers a week or less -- we were just passing through. But the nature of the relationship and the tension of the times were such that they became lifelong Friends. We never forgot them, we had them over to Canada every year, we kept in touch. We owed them a debt of honour."
Flight Lieutenant ADAM/ADAMS and his crew of four Britons and an Australian left their base in Benghazi, Libya, on the night of November 6, 1943, scouting for targets to bomb. They spotted a German ship anchored off Naxos, an island in the Cyclades group south of Athens.
After dropping 16 bombs, one of the plane's two engines was hit by German flak. "Luckily, it kept going for 10 minutes, which gave us time to make a getaway, Mr. ADAM/ADAMS told his daughter, Patricia ADAM/ADAMS. " Then it conked out and we had to slowly descend."
He ditched his disabled Wellington bomber flawlessly into the sea. The crew escaped through hatches, and a dinghy and a parachute popped out of the aircraft before it sank within 30 seconds of hitting the water. The men paddled ashore to the island of Sifnos, half a kilometre away.
"After complaining about our cigarettes being wet, we slept in the parachute under an olive tree, Mr. ADAM/ADAMS recalled. "In the morning, we were discovered by a girl riding by on a donkey. She went to fetch her father [George KARAVOS], and he went and got someone who could understand English and who decided we weren't German."
The initial suspicion was mutual. When Mr. KARAVOS took the men to his home and offered them water, they were afraid to drink it, until the farmer reassured them by taking a first sip.
The six men were hidden first in a mountaintop monastery on Sifnos, and then in a cave used as a goat pen on the neighbouring island of Serifos. Their presence was kept from local children, in case they unwittingly tipped off the German patrol that visited the islands several times a week from the nearby occupied island of Milos.
"During the war, 180 people on Sifnos died because they didn't have enough to eat, Mr. ADAM/ADAMS said. "But the locals made a big fuss over us, bringing food and cigarettes."
The men spent 10 days in the monastery, with a stream of hungry people climbing the steep path to bring them bread and cheese, oranges, figs, retsina and handfuls of precious, rationed cigarettes.
Then the Sifnos chief of police, Demetrius BAKEAS, who was determined the men should not be captured, arranged for them to go to Serifos, because "there are people there who can help you."
A fisherman took them under cover of darkness to Serifos. There, housed in the goat pen, they found five British commandos spying on German troop movements. Conditions were primitive in that cave for the next 20 days, but the spies had a wireless and were able to arrange the air crew's rescue. A Royal Navy gunboat disguised as a Greek fishing vessel picked them up and, moving by night, took them to safety in Cyprus.
All six men survived the war, and later learned they had succeeded in sinking that ship in Naxos harbour.
Mr. ADAM/ADAMS kept in touch with his helpers after the war, with his letters translated for him by a Greek neighbour in Toronto.
"I remember being taken to Greek community functions, " Patricia ADAM/ADAMS recalled. "And every Christmas Dad would send a parcel to the school on Sifnos, with paper and pencils, and little dime-store gifts for the children. Putting that package together every year was very emotional."
"Bob was a very great guy, with a great sense of humour, " said Roy BROWN, secretary of the Escaping Society. Mr. ADAM/ADAMS was treasurer of the society at his death, and served as president in 1995-96.
"We have about 100 members now across the country, who are in their 80s and beyond, Mr. BROWN said. "Most of our helpers are in the same or worse shape, so we're not bringing them over as we did up until five or six years ago. But we still help out when we see a helper in need."
Robert Watson ADAM/ADAMS was born on January 22, 1921, in Windsor, Ontario, where his father, Dr. Frederick ADAM/ADAMS, was the medical officer of health for more than 20 years. If he had returned to base that night after the raid on Naxos harbour, he would have received the cable informing him of his father's death back home.
After graduating from Windsor's Kennedy Collegiate in 1939, Mr. ADAM/ADAMS worked in a bank before enlisting in June, 1941. A few weeks later his older brother, Coulson, was killed during training in England, shot down by a German night fighter that had sneaked across the Channel. His other brother, John, was also a bomber pilot killed in action, shot down during a raid on Hanover, Germany, just a few months before the war in Europe ended.
Robert ADAM/ADAMS's story was featured in a Canadian Broadcasting Corporation-Television documentary in 1966, when a Telescope camera crew followed him and his wife, Joan, back to Sifnos, where they received a hero's welcome.
"Those Greeks had nothing to gain and everything to lose, " Mr. ADAM/ADAMS told the show's associate producer, George Ronald. "They were starving, and yet they gave us everything. They were superb.... I don't think they know just how kind and generous and how brave they were."
Mr. BAKEAS, who had moved to Athens after retiring from the police force, returned to Sifnos for the emotional reunion held 23 years after he helped save Mr. ADAM/ADAMS's life. Earlier, he had written to "my dear friend" in Canada: "It is not possible for me to forget the danger which connected us in those terrible war days. We shall be always waiting you."
In addition to his wife, Mr. ADAM/ADAMS leaves his children John, Patricia and Mary, sons-in-law Lawrence SOLOMON and Steve DOUGLAS/DOUGLASS, and granddaughters Essie and Catharine.
Robert Watson ADAM/ADAMS, chain-store founder and past president of the Canadian branch of the Royal Air Force Escaping Society born in Windsor, Ontario, on January 22, 1921; died in Toronto on February 10, 2003.

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SOLOMON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-04-22 published
He founded Readers' Club of Canada
Nationalist visionary struggled financially to publish Canadian writers
By Carol COOPER Special to The Globe and Mail Tuesday, April 22, 2003 - Page R7
In the early 1960s, when writers asked Peter and Carol MARTIN where to publish their manuscripts on Canada, the couple realized how few choices there were. Inspired, the Martins, both voracious readers, staunch nationalists and founders of the Readers' Club of Canada, decided to start their own press. In 1965, Peter Martin Associates came into being. Last month, Peter MARTIN died of lung cancer in Ottawa.
In an industry overshadowed by American companies, Peter MARTIN Associates was among the first in a wave of independent publishing houses to open during a time of rising Canadian nationalism.
Launched in a downtown Toronto basement on a shoestring budget, skeleton staff, idealism and enthusiasm, the company flew by the seat of its pants. Its employees were often young and new to the business. But many, including Peter CARVER, Michael SOLOMON and Valerie WYATT, went on to become Canadian mainstays.
"It really was a time of Canadian nationalism and those of us who believed in that cause could see what Peter and Carol were doing," said Ms. WYATT, a children's editor who spent four years with the company in the seventies.
During the 16 years before its sale in 1981, Peter Martin Associates published approximately 170 works, mainly non-fiction. Its presses put out I, Nuligak, the autobiography of an Inuit man; The Boyd Gang by Marjorie LAMB and Barry PEARSON; Trapping is My Life by John TETSO; and the Handbook of Canadian Film by Eleanor BEATTIE. Others who came through their doors included Hugh HOOD, Robert FULFORD, John Robert COLOMBO, Douglas FETHERLING and Mary Alice DOWNIE -- all to have their works published.
Started with small amounts of seed money from private investors and no government funding, Peter Martin Associates constantly struggled financially. At one point, for a bit of extra cash, the office became the designated nuclear-fallout shelter for the street. Pat DACEY, once the firm's book designer, lugged suitcases of books up the street to sell at Britnell's bookstore with summer employee Bronwyn DRAINIE.
Working at Peter Martin Associates was always fun, Ms. WYATT said. "You went in to work happy and you stayed happy all day."
Still, in a time when Canadian works received little recognition, she remembers finding it difficult to get media interviews for the author of Martin-published book.
Yet another title caused trouble with its subject. The company was putting out a collection of previously published sayings of former prime minister John DIEFENBAKER, called I Never Say Anything Provocative, edited by Margaret WENTE. Mr. DIEFENBAKER heard about the project, called Mr. MARTIN and threatened to sue. Mr. MARTIN stood firm.
"He handled it with such élan," said writer Tim WYNNE- JONES, then in the art department. "He was suitably dutiful, but not in awe. Mr. DIEFENBAKER was just over the top, as was his wont."
The book went to press and Mr. DIEFENBAKER did not go to court.
Once listed along with Peter GZOWSKI in a Maclean's magazine article on "Young Men to Watch," Mr. MARTIN was born on April 26, 1934 in Ottawa to a dentist father and a mother who drove an ambulance in the First World War. The younger of two sons, he attended Trinity College School in Port Hope, Ontario and the University of Toronto, where he earned a degree in philosophy.
During a year in Ottawa as the president of the National Federation of University Students, Mr. MARTIN met his first wife Carol. They married in 1956 and moved to Toronto. Three years later, they founded the Readers' Club in Featuring one Canadian book a month, it distributed works by Mordecai RICHLER, Irving LAYTON, Morley CALLAGHAN and Brian MOORE among others, and supplied its members with coupons. While continuing to run the Readers' Club (sold in 1978 to Saturday Night Magazine and closed in 1981), the MARTINs started Peter Martin Associates.
Throughout his career, Mr. MARTIN spoke out for Canadian publishing. Alarmed by the sale of Ryerson Press and Gage Educational Press in 1970 to American firms, he called a meeting of publishers to discuss problems in the industry. Named the Independent Publishers Association, the group started in 1971 with 16 members and with Mr. MARTIN as its first president. In 1976, it was renamed the Association of Canadian Publishers and continues today with 140 members. As a result of the group's efforts, Canadian publishing began to receive federal and provincial funding.
In the late 1970s, the MARTINs went their separate ways. Afterward, Mr. MARTIN published a small newspaper, The Downtowner, and owned a cookbook store with his second wife, Maggie NIEMI. In 1983, they moved near Sudbury, Ontario, where Mr. MARTIN did freelance book and theatre reviews, then moved to Ottawa in 1985 to work as president for Balmuir Books, publisher of the magazine International Perspectives and consulting editor for the University of Ottawa Press.
After a spinal-cord injury in 1997, Mr. MARTIN was left a quadriplegic, except for limited use of his left arm. Even so, he remained active, maintained a heavy e-mail correspondence and spent time in the park reading while seated in a bright-yellow wheelchair.
Mr. MARTIN leaves his children Pamela, Christopher and Jeremy and his wife Maggie NIEMI. He died on March 15.

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SOLOMON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-09-30 published
CROWE, Doris Mary (née SCANES)
Born in Winnipeg, July 12, 1921, daughter of Richard SCANES and Alice PAYNE, sister of Lenore and Jimmy, married Marshall CROWE, December 5, 1942. Graduate of United College, Winnipeg (B.A.: History and English) awarded highest standing in her class. Doris died on Friday, September 26, 2003, surrounded by family and Friends, after a long and spirited battle with cancer. Beloved wife, dear mother of Tom (Allison), Alison, Helen (David), Sheila (Brian), Abigail, Seumien (Nabo), Le (Ping) and Nick (Irene). Delighted and indefatigable grandmother of Jessica, Caleb, Innie, Susan, David, Adam, Cathy, Yuli, Jonathan, Ben, Rebecca and Ariana. Predeceased by her dear Friends Ann PHELPS and Starr SOLOMON. During World War 2, Doris worked as a reporter for the Vancouver Sun and taught high school. After the war, she accompanied Marshall on diplomatic postings, chiefly to New York and Moscow. During the 60's, she worked for Canadian Broadcasting Corporation Radio and wrote and narrated a series of documentaries on life in the Soviet Union. She also worked tirelessly for the Toronto French School in its early years, helping to establish the first school library. Doris studied public relations in the early 70's, and did a variety of work in that field, including shepherding Harold CARDINAL through the Ottawa launching of ''The Unjust Society''. She also served as public relations director for the Canadian Nurses' Association. She was a member of the Committee for an Independent Canada and campaigned for the provincial and federal Liberal parties in many elections, beginning with Mitchell SHARP's campaign in the Toronto riding of Eglinton in 1963. In her 70's, Doris returned to university to study English history, Russian and Chinese. for the last 30 years of her life, Doris focused on the farm that she and Marshall ran near Portland. Among many enterprises, Doris was instrumental in introducing the Dexter cow into Canada. According to Doris' wishes, there will be no funeral. Arrangements by Scotland Funeral Home, Elgin. The family will receive Friends on Saturday, October 4, 12 to 8 p.m., at the farm, 4421 Old Kingston Road, Portland. In lieu of flowers, donations to the hospice, St. Vincent de Paul Hospital, Brockville (613) 342-4461, ext. 2271 would be most gratefully received. Their compassion, skill and generosity of spirit did much to ease Doris' last days when she could no longer be at her beloved farm. In memory of Doris: plant a garden, serve paella, learn a language, read a book to a child, be kind to an animal, support universal health care, live at peace with nature.

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