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"SNI" 2003 Obituary


SCHNIEDER/SNIDER/SNYDER 

SCHNIEDER/SNIDER/SNYDER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-09-18 published
Peter DEVINE
By Mary DEVINE
Scholar, athlete, husband, father, grandfather, great-grandfather, friend. Born January 21, 1914, in Ottawa. Died February 2, in Ottawa, of natural causes, aged 89.
By Mary DEVINE Thursday, September 18, 2003 - Page A28
Peter DEVINE was defined by the grocery business he, and his father before him, operated on York Street in the Byward Market in Ottawa. Founded in 1911, DEVINE's was a local institution until it closed in 1975. In the late 1930s, Peter took over his father's fledgling business and developed it into Ottawa's premier grocery establishment. Except for his years of armed service in Newfoundland during the Second World War, Peter managed his business 12 hours a day, six (often seven) days a week for almost 40 years. Sixty years before the advent of internet home grocery-shopping, DEVINE's red trucks, carrying individual orders in wooden boxes, could be seen making the rounds to 24 Sussex Drive, Rideau Hall, Parliament Hill, embassies and private clubs, as well as to customers elsewhere in the city. On most Saturdays and preceding major holidays, shopping at DEVINE's was a ritual for generations of Ottawa families.
While Peter blossomed into a successful merchant, he began his adult life as a gifted athlete and scholar. When he was just 14, he won the McKinley Trophy, awarded to the best Ottawa junior tennis player under 16. He continued playing tennis until he was 80. While earning his B.A. and the Governor General's Medal at the University of Ottawa in 1934, Peter starred with the local hockey team. During this time, he was heralded by many as Ottawa's finest prospect for National Hockey League ranks. After earning his M.A. in Ottawa in 1936, he began his PhD studies at the University of Toronto, finding time to centre a Varsity Blues hockey line. Just a couple of credits shy of his PhD, Peter returned to Ottawa to attend to his ailing father's business. He continued to play hockey; his bride-to-be, Aurelia GRIMES, saved clippings from Ottawa newspapers which document, for his family today, his "brilliant" play with the Hull Volant during that time.
Peter and Aurie married in 1940 and raised seven children, living most of their married life in the Glebe neighbourhood of Ottawa. Aurie died suddenly of heart failure at age 60 in 1974.
After decades devoted to the grocery business and Aurie's untimely death, Peter became somewhat philosophical by the mid-1970s. Rather than sell and risk damaging his reputation at the hands of a new proprietor, Peter decided to close the store in 1975. After almost 65 years as a fixture on the Byward Market, DEVINE's ceased to exist.
Peter embarked on a new life. He took art appreciation courses at Carleton University and travelled to Europe to observe first-hand the paintings reproduced in his text books. He became an avid gardener in an attempt to learn how the produce he had sold for 40 years was grown. He spent many hours volunteering for the Canadian Cancer Society, St. Vincent's Hospital and the Ottawa Food Bank. In the late 1970s, Peter met Anne SCHNIEDER/SNIDER/SNYDER who became his closest companion until his death. In 1981, they established a new business, Handi-House, to serve disabled customers. After they sold the business, they travelled extensively.
Peter was renowned for his generosity. In the early 1980s, he opened his home to a family of five Cambodian refugees who have since made a successful life for themselves in Canada. His identity to many outsiders was his commercial success; however, to his family and close Friends, he was an intensely private, independent and humble man, a devout Catholic who attended mass virtually every day of his full life.
Peter's daughter Mary DEVINE wrote this with help from her siblings: Gloria, Peter, Patrick, Christopher, Michael and Nancy.

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SCHNIEDER/SNIDER/SNYDER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-10-07 published
Desire impressed scout
By Tim WHARNSBY Tuesday, October 7, 2003 - Page S11
Toronto -- Dan SCHNIEDER/SNIDER/SNYDER had a twinkle in his eye and an eye for beating the odds. Nobody knew this better than Atlanta Thrashers scout Dan MARR, who took a chance on Snyder.
The first time MARR sat down to have breakfast with SCHNIEDER/SNIDER/SNYDER at the Boot and Blade Dining Lounge in Owen Sound, Ontario, seven years ago, the initial impression SCHNIEDER/SNIDER/SNYDER made was good enough.
"Snydes had this twinkle in his eye that said he was going to get there no matter what the odds were," MARR recalled yesterday, a day after the 25-year-old hockey player died of fatal injuries suffered in a car accident with teammate Dany Heatley last week.
The odds were stacked against SCHNIEDER/SNIDER/SNYDER making it to the National Hockey League. He was a scrawny teenager. He didn't possess a grand scoring touch. He lacked the impressive speed that smaller players need. But MARR couldn't cross SCHNIEDER/SNIDER/SNYDER off his list of prospects.
"When you watch a game as a scout, you look at the basics," MARR said from his Toronto home yesterday. "You look at skating ability, size and strength. Dan didn't score high in the basics. But then you make a list of the best players on each team and he was the best player on his junior team [the Owen Sound Platers]."
MARR, who was a Toronto Maple Leafs scout at the time, simply used common sense and invited SCHNIEDER/SNIDER/SNYDER to the Leafs' rookie camp in 1998. When SCHNIEDER/SNIDER/SNYDER wasn't offered a contract, he returned to Owen Sound for a fourth season.
MARR, who joined the expansion Thrashers a few weeks later, told SCHNIEDER/SNIDER/SNYDER not to give up. MARR wanted SCHNIEDER/SNIDER/SNYDER for the Thrashers.
"I know this sort of thing is said all the time, but you wish some of the players you see with more talent had the heart, courage and determination of Dan SCHNIEDER/SNIDER/SNYDER," MARR said. "He played like his personality. He was an honest performer, whose work ethic and attitude were infectious.
"Everything you saw with this guy is that he gave it his all. That's why a superstar like Dany HEATLEY took him in as a roommate last summer and the two trained together...... He fit in everywhere."

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SCHNIEDER/SNIDER/SNYDER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-10-07 published
A close-knit community mourns death of National Hockey League player
Anthony REINHART visits the hometown of Dan SCHNIEDER/SNIDER/SNYDER, a kid who just wouldn't quit.
By Anthony REINHART Tuesday, October 7, 2003 - Page A3
Elmira, Ontario -- On the main street of Elmira, three slabs of polished black granite rise from a fountain in Gore Park.
The monument, erected in 2001 after a string of car accidents, bears the names of those taken too young. The name Dan Snyder will now join a list that's grown too long, too quickly for this bucolic town of 9,600, better known for its maple syrup and Mennonites.
Mr. SCHNIEDER/SNIDER/SNYDER, a 25-year-old forward with the Atlanta Thrashers of the National Hockey League, died Sunday night, six days after teammate Dany HEATLEY lost control of his speeding Ferrari and crashed on a narrow Atlanta street.
In the wider world of sport and celebrity, Mr. SCHNIEDER/SNIDER/SNYDER will be remembered, perhaps only briefly, as the latest professional athlete to die in the fast lane.
But it's different here in his hometown, a short country drive north of Kitchener-Waterloo, where community ties are drawn tight by blood and strengthened by sidewalk familiarity.
Here, Mr. SCHNIEDER/SNIDER/SNYDER will be remembered as a scrappy, hard worker who refused to listen when they said he was too skinny, too small, too whatever to play mid-level junior hockey, let alone in the National Hockey League.
"He just kept proving people wrong," his uncle, Jeff SCHNIEDER/SNIDER/SNYDER, said yesterday outside the old brick house where Mr. SCHNIEDER/SNIDER/SNYDER had lived with his parents.
"And we were hoping that he'd be able to do that again this week, but that's one battle he couldn't overcome, I guess."
The fight of Mr. SCHNIEDER/SNIDER/SNYDER's life began on the night of September 29, after he and Mr. HEATLEY, the Thrashers' 22-year-old scoring sensation, left a social gathering with the club's season-ticket holders.
Mr. HEATLEY, according to Atlanta police, was driving his 2002 Ferrari 360 Modena at about 130 kilometres an hour when he lost control and struck a fence made of brick and wrought iron.
The car was sheared apart, and both men were thrown to the pavement. Mr. HEATLEY, who suffered a broken jaw and torn knee ligaments, faces several charges. Mr. SCHNIEDER/SNIDER/SNYDER suffered a fractured skull and died of brain injuries without regaining consciousness.
People who knew him said he would have never driven so recklessly himself, that he preferred his pickup truck to the flashy cars that a fat paycheque affords.
"That's not Dan," said Bob CUMMINGS, who taught Mr. SCHNIEDER/SNIDER/SNYDER in grade school and helps manage the Junior B Elmira Sugar Kings, for which Mr. SCHNIEDER/SNIDER/SNYDER, his father and his uncle all played.
"He enjoyed life, but he respected life."
Standing in the Sugar Kings dressing room yesterday afternoon, Mr. CUMMINGS described a career rife with hints why Mr. SCHNIEDER/SNIDER/SNYDER took so little for granted.
Even the Sugar Kings, one rung down from the level where the National Hockey League drafts most of its talent, had their doubts when he arrived for the 1994-95 season.
"By the end of the season, he was probably one of the best players we had," Mr. CUMMINGS said.
His hard work caught the eye of the Junior A Owen Sound Platers (now the Attack,) but just barely; they drafted Mr. SCHNIEDER/SNIDER/SNYDER in the seventh round.
"He beat those odds and became the captain," Mr. CUMMINGS said, "probably the best captain they ever had."
Still not deemed good enough for the National Hockey League, Mr. SCHNIEDER/SNIDER/SNYDER became a free agent and landed with the Thrashers' farm teams in Chicago and Orlando, where he helped both win league championships.
Atlanta finally called him up in the latter half of last season. He scored 10 goals and four assists in 36 games. "That isn't bad for a kid at the National Hockey League level who wasn't supposed to play Junior B," Mr. CUMMINGS said.
An ankle injury, resulting in surgery last month, was expected to delay Mr. SCHNIEDER/SNIDER/SNYDER's start with the Thrashers this season. Still, he was excited, just five days before the crash, when team officials told him to find a place to live in Atlanta, his uncle said.
"He had really earned the respect of the people at the highest level of hockey in the last half of last year," Jeff SCHNIEDER/SNIDER/SNYDER said.
The people of Elmira shared in that excitement, as they have several times since the SEILING brothers (Rod and Ric) and Darryl SITTLER from nearby St. Jacobs, made the big time decades ago.
Now, they are left mourning yet another one of their young.
Matthew SHANTZ, 13, paid his respects yesterday by walking into Central Source for Sports on the main street to order a Thrashers jersey, complete with Mr. SCHNIEDER/SNIDER/SNYDER's name and number.
Matthew, who hopes to play for the Toronto Maple Leafs one day, said he met Mr. SCHNIEDER/SNIDER/SNYDER a couple of times, since his father knows the SCHNIEDER/SNIDER/SNYDER family.
"It's bad," he said simply, standing in front of the store, where plastic letters spelled out "We Remember Dan SCHNIEDER/SNIDER/SNYDER" in the window, beneath a Thrashers jersey.
Mr. SCHNIEDER/SNIDER/SNYDER's funeral will be held in Elmira on Friday.

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SCHNIEDER/SNIDER/SNYDER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-06 published
SCHNIEDER/SNIDER/SNYDER, Edward Cavell
Group Captain, Royal Canadian Air Force (retired), Distinguished Flying Cross, Canadian Forces Decoration, died peacefully on November 29, 2003 in Tsawwassen, British Columbia. He was 87. Ed SCHNIEDER/SNIDER/SNYDER was born in Preston (now Cambridge,) Ontario on March 9th, 1916, and joined the Royal Canadian Air Force on November 5, 1940, as an Airman 2nd Class and had risen to the rank of Group Captain by the time he retired in 1968, after 28 years of service. He served in two tours of operations and was Executive Assistant to two Air Vice Marshals, at Eastern Air Command and Air Force Headquarters in Ottawa. He saw active duty as a Navigation Officer in 5 and 11 Squadrons during the Second World War, on successful anti-submarine patrols in Canso PBYs over the North Atlantic; he later served in 412 Squadron. He married Bernice May COULTER of Pugwash, Nova Scotia on October 30, 1941 and had three children, Gregory, Peter and Virginia. After teaching Military History at Royal Military College during the early 50s he attended the Officer's Staff College at Bracknell, England in 1955, returning to Canada as Commanding Officer of Mont Apica Radar Station in Quebec. In 1960 he was posted to Madison, Wisconsin as Canadian Liaison Officer with North American Aerospace Defense Command. After a final tour of duty at Air Force Headquarters in Ottawa he retired, first to Florida, then to Kelowna, British Columbia. He became a stockbroker, then managed a specialty steel company and finally became a realtor before retiring in 1982 in Tsawwassen, where he had lived since 1971. He was an avid birder, traveler and sailor and had circumnavigated Vancouver Island in his Bayfield 29 with his brother Elmer. He is survived by Bea, his loving wife of 62 years, and his three children in Vancouver, Toronto and Penticton, their spouses and his five grandchildren, Morgan, Lauren, Miles, Chelsea and Weston. By his request, there will be no funeral. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada. Per Ardua Ad Astra

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SCHNIEDER/SNIDER/SNYDER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-11 published
An old-fashioned newsman
Distinguished journalist began humbly as a copy boy at the Hamilton Spectator and soared to the top of the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation
By James McCREADY, Special to The Globe and Mail Thursday, December 11, 2003 - Page R11
During the October Crisis of 1970, there were a lot of editors who buckled under. They followed the orders of the police and the Quebec and federal governments about not printing or broadcasting some details about the kidnapping of British Trade Commissioner James CROSS and the kidnapping and murder of Quebec cabinet minister Pierre LAPORTE.
Many editors and broadcast executives took to self-censorship, anticipating what the authorities wanted and keeping newscasts and newspapers clean. Denis HARVEY, who has died at age of 74, was not one of them.
Then editor of The Gazette of Montreal, the man he faced down was Jerome CHOQUETTE, Quebec's justice minister and the public face of authority during much of the crisis. CHOQUETTE did not want newspapers to publish the full manifesto of the Front de libération du Québec. Denis HARVEY ignored the request and published it.
The paper also broke the news that police had a photograph of James CROSS sitting on what looked like a box of dynamite. The justice minister warned The Gazette editor he could be arrested under the terms of the War Measures Act, but Mr. HARVEY called his bluff.
During the crisis, Mr. HARVEY didn't change his habits. When the paper was put to bed, he would walk to the Montreal Men's Press Club in the Mount Royal Hotel carrying the bulldog or first edition of the paper and sit at the bar and argue statistics with the sports editor, Brodie SCHNIEDER/SNIDER/SNYDER.
There would also be political discussions, some of them heated, since the man who wrote the stamp column at the paper had been called up from the reserves in the military and took himself, and the War Measures Act, quite seriously.
Mr. HARVEY was an old-fashioned newsman, a high-school dropout who rose to edit newspapers and who went on to run the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation Television news service and then the entire Canadian Broadcasting Corporation-Television network.
Denis Martin HARVEY was born on August 15, 1929, in Hamilton, where his father was a customs inspector. He left school halfway through Grade 13 and landed a job as a copy boy at The Hamilton Spectator. This was not uncommon and was the traditional route for a young person coming into the newspaper business. Journalism schools were all but unknown and university-educated reporters and editors were rare.
He went from copy boy, ripping the wire copy off the machines, to listening in for police tips on radio scanners. He became a sports writer and in 1952 quit the paper and went to travel in Europe for six months. He came back to the Spectator as a general reporter the next year.
He did everything, from labour columnist to business writer. At 26, he was city editor of the Spectator and then news editor. In 1961, he was executive editor and held that job for five years.
In 1966, he moved to The Canadian Magazine, a joint venture with the Toronto Star. It meant leaving Hamilton after 21 years, but it was the first step to the most important job in his career editor of The Gazette, which he took over in 1969, the year he turned 40.
Mr. HARVEY was tough. He scared people with a gruff demeanour, which at times seemed like something out of The Front Page. When he arrived at The Gazette, it was losing the newspaper war with rival Montreal Star. Many editors had cozy sinecures. Almost right away, Mr. HARVEY fired the head of every department but one. When one editor came into his office and said he had found another job and was giving two weeks' notice. HARVEY shot back: "Two hours' notice." The man was gone in less.
However, he inspired loyalty in his staff of reporters and editors.
"He could be tough but he stood up for his staff. And he was completely honest and honourable. A stand-up guy," said Brian STEWARD/STEWART/STUART, who covered city hall at The Gazette and was later hired by Mr. HARVEY at the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation. "You always wanted to impress him."
One night at Martin's, a bar next door to The Gazette, there were complaints about a sports picture in the paper. The photographer said to Mr. HARVEY: " I'd like to see you do better."
Next night he was at the Forum for a Canadiens game. Along with two regular photographers, he took pictures which, unsigned, went back to the office for selection. His picture made the paper.
It was a combination of hot news stories and the ability to turn around a failing newspaper that made his reputation at The Gazette. The police strike in 1969, the October Crisis, riots and labour battles made the period one of the most exciting in the paper's history.
Having secured his reputation as an editor, Mr. HARVEY was lured away to television in 1973 to become chief news editor at Canadian Broadcasting Corporation Television News in Toronto. His colleagues told him he was crazy.
"My newspaper Friends said: 'How can you make the transition?' Mr. HARVEY said years later. "But I'm surprised more people don't. I believe in changing jobs."
Although he didn't know anything about television, he told people: "I do know pictures." He went to CBS in New York for a crash course in television news.
Canadian Broadcasting Corporation-Television News was as much of a mess as The Gazette had been. There had been a series of editors who hadn't managed to get a handle on the place. Mr. HARVEY took quick action and made it more professional, spending less time on bureaucracy and more time on the main newscast.
One night, an old-time producer was called into his office and the new chief news editor asked him why he hadn't gone with a fresh lead story. The producer replied he couldn't order anyone to do that -- that was the lineup editor's job. Mr. HARVEY disagreed and said: "Put on your coat and go home." The man kept his job, but worked on the desk and not as a producer.
During his short reign at Canadian Broadcasting Corporation News, he brought in fresh faces and got television reporters to think about breaking stories instead of following newspaper headlines. Audience levels rose and so did Mr. HARVEY, moving up the ladder at the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation. But the promise of a big paycheque lured him to a three-year stint at The Toronto Star starting in 1978.
There, he was first in charge of the editorial page and then became editor in chief and vice-president. He left the Star in 1981 and was replaced by George RADWANSKI, the future federal privacy commissioner, who had worked for him at The Gazette. Mr. HARVEY returned to the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, taking over sports for the English network. By 1983, he was vice-president of the entire English network of the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation.
He held that job for seven years. He used to say his favourite part of the job was the power to do programming. He changed the face of the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation and it has stayed that way. Mr. HARVEY took the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation all Canadian -- it took several years but he stopped running American program in prime time.
"We have handed over this most powerful medium to a foreign country," he told a broadcasting conference in 1990. "Nowhere else in the world had one country imported the total television of another country."
Along with Canadian content, one of his lasting creations was the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation's news and current-affairs specialty channel Newsworld. He left the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation in 1991 and worked off and on as a broadcast consultant. He spent a lot of time travelling and took up some rather un-tough-guy hobbies, such as bird-watching and going to the ballet.
Mr. HARVEY, who died after a brief struggle with cancer, leaves his wife Louise LORE, and Lynn and Brian, his two children from an earlier marriage.

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