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"SIN" 2003 Obituary


SINCLAIR  SINELLI  SINGH  SINKER 

SINCLAIR o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-10-22 published
Patricia Joan STERRITT
In loving memory of Patricia Joan STERRITT (née MORRIS) a resident of Manitowaning, died at Laurentian Hospital, Sudbury, on Sunday, October 19, 2003 at the age of 69.
Pat was born in Brampton, daughter of the late Gilbert and Mona (TRIMBLE) MORRIS. Will be dearly missed by her loving husband Malcolm SINCLAIR STERRITT and her children Richard (Rick) STERRITT of Brampton, Wendy (GRAY/GREY) and husband Jim of Palgrave, Robert and wife Lorie of Caledon East, Carl and wife Karen of Alton. Her six grandchildren Mandy, Laura, Nicole, Samantha, Jake and Benjamin will miss their "Nanny"
Predeceased by brothers Robert and Brian and survived by dear sister Virginia and husband Yvon GALIPEAU of Milton, Gail GRIFFITH of Brampton, Mary (CLARIDGE) and husband Hap of Salmon Arm, BC, Julie (CAMPBELL) and husband Brian of Brampton, brothers John, of Brampton and Grant and wife Pam of Chatham. Visitation was held on Monday, October 20, 2003. Funeral service was held on Tuesday, October 21, 2003 all at St. Paul's Anglican Church, Manitowaning, Ontario. Reverend Canon Bain PEEVER officiating. Burial in Hilly Grove Cemetery.

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SINCLAIR o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-02-24 published
YOCOM, John H. (Jack) Hons. B.A., M.A., Ph.D., M.B.A.
At North York on February 22, 2003 after a lengthy career in education, journalism, corporate communications and community service. Survived by his beloved wife Catherine CHARLTON, (pre-deceased by his loving wife Helen DOLAN 1989.) Survived by his sister Helen RIGG, Dunnville; also by sons John J. (Suzy) of Mississauga, Paul A. of Calgary, Mary Anne MAHONEY (Dr. James) of Toronto, and nine grandchildren: Jay, Robert and Christopher YOCOM, Michael, Mark, Mary Helen and Matthew MAHONEY, and Wesley and Natalie YOCOM of Calgary. Born in Dunnville, Ontario, 1911; educated at Toronto, Ottawa and York Universities; after U.C. graduation taught high school in Ottawa for a short time before joining the Royal Canadian Air Force as a Flt. Lt. for World War 2 overseas service. Upon return joined Saturday Night Magazine, becoming managing editor; left Saturday Night Magazine to work for British American Oil Company (later Gulf Oil Canada). Upon retirement worked for a short while at Vickers and Benson Advertising. Involved in professional and community service; President, Toronto Canadian Club, Chairman, Institute of Canadian American Studies, President, Life Member and Fellow of Canadian Public Relations Society, President and Life Member Arts and Letters Club of Toronto. Board Member: Canadian Paraplegic Association, Toronto Symphony National Youth Orchestra and other institutions. Member: Royal Canadian Military Institute, and Royal Canadian Legion, Ft. York Br. Consultant to the Canadian National Institute for the Blind. Recipient of: the Queen's Silver Coronation Medal; University of Toronto 70 year medal; York University's Schulich School of Business Distinguished Alumni Award. Business awards include; four Silver Anvils by Public Relations Society of America for premier corporate communications. The family will receive Friends at the Humphrey Funeral Home - A. W. Miles Chapel, 1403 Bayview Avenue (south of Eglinton Avenue East), from 7-9 p.m. on Tuesday. Funeral Service in the chapel on Wednesday at 1: 00 o'clock. Officiating clergy: the Rev. Dr. Malcolm SINCLAIR, Metropolitan United Church and Father Paul CUSACK, St. Gabriel's Roman Catholic Church.

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SINCLAIR o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-04-12 published
'He kept a little flame of geometry alive'
Superstar University of Toronto mathematician considered himself an artist, but his seminal work inevitably found practical applications
By Siobhan ROBERTS Saturday, April 12, 2003 - Page F11
Widely considered the greatest classical geometer of his time and the man who saved his discipline from near extinction, Harold Scott MacDonald COXETER, who died on March 31 at 96, said of himself, with characteristic modesty, "I am like any other artist. It just so happens that what fills my mind is shapes and numbers."
Prof. COXETER's work focused on hyperdimensional shapes, specifically the symmetry of regular figures and polytopes. Polytopes are geometric shapes of any number of dimensions that cannot be constructed in the real world and can be visualized only when the eye of the beholder possesses the necessary insight; they are most often described mathematically and sometimes can be represented with hypnotically intricate fine-line drawings.
"I like things that can be seen," Prof. COXETER once remarked. "You have to imagine a different world where these queer things have some kind of shape."
Known as Donald (shortened from MacDonald,) Prof. COXETER had such a passion for his work and unrivalled elegance in constructing and writing proofs that he motivated countless mathematicians to pick up the antiquated discipline of geometry long after it had been deemed passé.
John Horton CONWAY, the Von Neumann professor of mathematics at Princeton University, never studied under Prof. COXETER, but he considers himself an honorary student because of the COXETERian nature of his work.
"With math, what you're doing is trying to prove something and that can get very complicated and ugly. COXETER always manages to do it clearly and concisely," Prof. CONWAY said. "He kept a little flame of geometry alive by doing such beautiful works himself.
"I'm reminded of a quotation from Walter Pater's book The Renaissance. He was describing art and poetry, but he talks of a small, gem-like flame: 'To burn always with this hard, gem-like flame, to maintain this ecstasy, is success in life.' "
Prof. COXETER's oeuvre included more than 250 papers and 12 books. His Introduction to Geometry, published in 1961, is now considered a classic -- it is still in print and this year is back on the curriculum at McGill University. His Regular Polytopes is considered by some as the modern-day addendum to Euclid's Elements. In 1957, he published Generators and Relations for Discrete Groups, written jointly with his PhD student and lifelong friend Willy MOSER. It is currently in its seventh edition.
Prof. COXETER's self-image as an artist was validated by his Friendship with and influence on Dutch artist M. C. ESCHER, who, when working on his Circle Limit 3 drawings, used to say, "I'm Coxetering today."
They met at the International Mathematical Congress in Amsterdam in 1954 and then corresponded about their mutual interest in repeating patterns and representations of infinity. In a letter to his son, Mr. ESCHER noted that a diagram sent to him by Prof. COXETER that inspired his Circle Limit 3 prints "gave me quite a shock."
He added that " COXETER's hocus-pocus text is no use to me at all.... I understand nothing, absolutely nothing of it."
While Mr. ESCHER claimed total ignorance of math, Prof. COXETER wrote numerous papers on the Dutchman's "intuitive geometry."
Though Prof. COXETER did geometry for its own sake, his work inevitably found practical application. Buckminster FULLER encountered his work in the construction of his geodesic domes. He later dedicated a book to Prof. COXETER: "By virtue of his extraordinary life's work in mathematics, Prof. COXETER is the geometer of our bestirring twentieth century. [He is] the spontaneously acclaimed terrestrial curator of the historical inventory of the science of pattern analysis."
Prof. COXETER's work with icosohedral symmetries served as a template of sorts in the Nobel Prize-winning discovery of the Carbon 60 molecule. It has also proved relevant to other specialized areas of science such as telecommunications, data mining, topology and quasi-crystals.
In 1968, Prof. COXETER added to his list of converts an anonymous society of French mathematicians, the Bourbakis, who actively and internationally sought to eradicate classical geometry from the curriculum of math education.
"Death to Triangles, Down with Euclid!" was the Bourbaki war cry. Prof. COXETER's rebuttal: "Everyone is entitled to their opinion. But the Bourbakis were sadly mistaken."
One member of the society, Pierre CARTIER, met Prof. COXETER in Montreal and became enamoured of his work. Soon, he had persuaded his fellow Bourbakis to include Prof. COXETER's approach in their annual publication. "An entire volume of Bourbaki was thoroughly inspired by the work of COXETER," said Prof. CARTIER, a professor at Denis Diderot University in Paris.
In the 1968 volume, Prof. COXETER's name was writ large into the lexicon of mathematics with the inauguration of the terms "COXETER number," " COXETER group" and "COXETER graph."
These concepts describe symmetrical properties of shapes in multiple dimensions and helped to bridge the old-fashioned classical geometry with the more au courant and applied algebraic side of the discipline. These concepts continue to pervade geometrical discourse, several decades after being discovered by Prof. COXETER.
Prof. COXETER became a serious mathematician at the relatively late age of 14, though family folklore has it that, as a toddler, he liked to stare at the columns of numbers in the financial pages of his father's newspaper.
He was born into a Quaker family in Kensington, just west of London, on February 9, 1907. His mother, Lucy GEE, was a landscape artist and portrait painter, and his father, Harold, was a manufacturer of surgical instruments, though his great love was sculpting.
They had originally named their son MacDonald Scott COXETER, but a godparent suggested that the boy's father's name should be added at the front. Another relative then pointed out that H.M.S. COXETER made him sound like a ship of the royal fleet so the names were switched around.
When Prof. COXETER was 12, he created his own language -- "Amellaibian" a cross between Latin and French, and filled a 126-page notebook with information on the imaginary world where it was spoken.
But more than anything he fancied himself a composer, writing several piano concertos, a string quartet and a fugue. His mother took her son and his musical compositions to Gustav HOLST. His advice: "Educate him first."
He was then sent to boarding school, where he met John Flinders PETRIE, son of Egyptologist Sir Flinders PETRIE. The two were passing time at the infirmary contemplating why there were only five Platonic solids -- the cube, tetrahedron, octahedron, dodecahedron and icosahedron. They then began visualizing what these shapes might look like in the fourth dimension. At the age of 15, Prof. COXETER won a school prize for an English essay on how to project these geometric shapes into higher dimensions -- he called it "Dimensional Analogy."
Prof. COXETER's father took his son along with his essay to meet friend and fellow pacifist Bertrand RUSSELL. Mr. RUSSELL recommended Prof. COXETER to mathematician E.H. NEVILLE, a scout, of sorts, for mathematics prodigies. He was impressed by Prof. COXETER's work but appalled by some inexcusable gaps in his mathematical knowledge. Prof. NEVILLE arranged for private tutelage in pursuit of a scholarship at Cambridge. During this period, Prof. COXETER was forbidden from thinking in the fourth dimension, except on Sundays.
He entered Trinity College, Cambridge, in 1926 and was among five students handpicked by Ludwig WITTGENSTEIN for his philosophy of mathematics class. During his first year at Cambridge, at the age of 19, he discovered a new regular polyhedron that had six hexagonal faces at each vertex.
After graduating with first-class honours in 1929, he received his doctorate under H. F. BAKER in 1931, winning the coveted Smith's Prize for his thesis.
Prof. COXETER did fellowship stints back and forth between Princeton and Cambridge for the next few years, focusing on the mathematics of kaleidoscopes -- he had mirrors specially cut and hinged together and carried them in velvet pouches sewn by his mother. By 1933, he had enumerated the n-dimensional kaleidoscopes -- that is, kaleidoscopes operating up to any number of dimensions.
The concepts that became known as COXETER groups are the complex algebraic equations he developed to express how many images may be seen of any object in a kaleidoscope (he once used a paper triangle with the word "nonsense" printed on it to track reflections).
In 1936, Prof. COXETER was offered an assistant professorship at the University of Toronto. He made the move shortly after the sudden death of his father and following his marriage to Rien BROUWER. She was from the Netherlnds and he met her while she was on holiday in London.
As a professor, Prof. COXETER was known to flout set curriculum. Ed BARBEAU, now a professor at the U of T, recalled that at the start of his classes, Prof. COXETER would spread out a manuscript on the desks at the front of the room. During his lecture, he would often pause for minutes at a time to make notes when a student offered something that might be relevant to his work in progress. When the work was later published, students were pleasantly surprised to find that their suggestions had been duly credited.
Prof. COXETER was also known to show up to class carrying a pineapple, or a giant sunflower from his garden, demonstrating the existence of geometric principles in nature. And he was notorious for leaping over details, expecting students to fill in the rest.
The Canadian Broadcasting Corporation's resident intellectual, Lister SINCLAIR, was one of Prof. COXETER's earliest students. He once recounted that Prof. COXETER would "write an expression on the board and you could see it talking to him. It was like Michelangelo walking around a block of marble and seeing what's in there."
Asia Ivic WEISS, a professor at York University, Prof. COXETER's last PhD student and the only woman so honoured, describes an incident that perfectly exemplifies Prof. COXETER's math myopia. Going into labour with her first child, she called him to cancel their weekly meeting. Prof. COXETER, who never acknowledged her pregnancy, said not to worry, he would send over a stack of research to keep her busy when she got home from the hospital.
Despite several offers from other universities, Prof. COXETER stayed at University of Toronto throughout his career.
Like his father, he was a pacifist. In 1997, he was among those who marched a petition to the university president's office to protest against an honorary degree being conferred on George BUSH Sr. Prof. COXETER recalled with disdain Robert PRITCHARD's telling him, "Donald, I have more important things to worry about."
After his official retirement in 1977, Prof. COXETER continued as a professor emeritus, making weekly visits to his office. These subsided only in the past several months. On the weekend before his death, he finished revisions on his final paper, which he had delivered the previous summer in Budapest.
In his last five years, he survived a heart attack, a broken hip (he sprung himself from the hospital early to drive to a geometry conference in Wisconsin) and, most recently, prostate cancer.
Considering his 96 years of vegetarianism and a strict exercise regime, he felt betrayed by his body. "I feel like the man of Thermopylae who doesn't do anything properly," he commented recently after an awkward evening out, quoting nonsense poet Edward LEAR.
Prof. COXETER died in his home, with three long last breaths, just before bed on the last day of March.
His brain is now undergoing study at McMaster University, along with that of Albert EINSTEIN. Neuroscientist Sandra WITELSON is tryng to determine whether his brain's extraordinary capacities are associated with its structure.
Prof. COXETER met with her at the beginning of March and learned that the atypical elements of Einstein's brain, compared with an average brain, were symmetrical on both right and left sides.
Prof. WITELSON said she wondered whether there might be similar findings with Prof. COXETER's brain. "Isn't that nice," he said. "I suppose that would indicate all my interest in symmetry was well founded."
Prof. COXETER leaves his daughter Susan and son Edgar. His wife died in 1999.
Siobhan ROBERTS is a Toronto writer whose biography of Donald COXETER will be published by Penguin in 2005.

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SINCLAIR o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-05-24 published
He ran O'Keefe Centre in its prime
Former accountant was an innovator: He booked a show using surtitles and a play about an interracial romance
By Carol COOPER Special to The Globe and Mail Saturday, May 24, 2003 - Page F10
Late one spring night in 1963, a phone call awoke Hugh WALKER, the first managing director and president of Toronto's O'Keefe Centre for the Performing Arts. A police officer wanted to know if "we had a mad Russian called Nuri-something dancing at the O'Keefe Centre," Mr. WALKER wrote in his book, The O'Keefe Centre: Thirty Years of Theatre History.
After the opening performance of Marguerite and Armand, in which he starred with Dame Margot FONTEYN, Rudolph NUREYEV had danced up the centre of Yonge Street, attempting headstands on cars as he went. Police intervened in the interest of Mr. NUREYEV's safety, but after a scuffle, the dancer landed in jail for causing a disturbance.
Endlessly kind, courtly and patient, Mr. WALKER notified the Royal Ballet with whom Mr. NUREYEV was performing, and the dancer was released.
Mr. WALKER, the man who smoothed the way for the stars appearing at the O'Keefe as overseer of its operations and who had previously supervised its construction, has died at the age of 93.
O'Keefe Centre, now named the Hummingbird Centre, opened on October 1, 1960, with the first performance of Camelot in the country's first Broadway musical. The show starred Richard BURTON, Julie ANDREWS and Robert GOULET and played to a glittering crowd.
In The Toronto Star, Gordon SINCLAIR wrote: "A salaam to Hugh WALKER for bringing the O'Keefe Centre home on time after 30 months of strain on his patience, nerves and humour."
Mr. WALKER had, in fact, developed an ulcer during the centre's construction, and the strain didn't end with its opening. Shortly after the curtain, his wife, Shirley, smelled smoke. It turned out to be a burning escalator motor, and after the fire was extinguished, Mary JOLLIFFE, the centre's publicist, ran to a hotel across the street for air freshener. The audience came out at intermission none the wiser.
It took royalty to solve another problem. At the time, temperance sentiment remained strong in Toronto, and teetotallers criticized the fact the O'Keefe was funded by, and named for, a brewery.
Mr. WALKER set about to gain acceptance for the centre. Learning that the Queen was visiting Canada in June of 1959, he convinced her aides that she should stop briefly at the construction site and view a model of the building.
Before an audience of arts patrons and the press, the Queen inspected the model and showed such an interest that she overstayed her schedule, delaying the start of the Queen's Plate, her next stop, by half an hour.
Mr. WALKER didn't know that the Queen or the O'Keefe would be in his future when he became executive assistant to Canadian Breweries and Argus Corp. owner E. P. TAILOR/TAYLOR in 1955.
It was only after his hiring that he learned that Mr. TAILOR/TAYLOR had responded to a challenge made by Nathan PHILLIPS, then mayor of Toronto, for industry to build a desperately needed performing arts theatre in the city. For the project, Mr. TAILOR/TAYLOR gave $12-million and the services of his new assistant.
With the slogan "To bring the best of live entertainment to the greatest number of people at the lowest possible prices," the 3, 211-seat multipurpose theatre, designed by modernist architect Peter DICKINSON, quickly became a predominant Canadian venue, predating the Place des Arts in Montreal and the National Arts Centre in Ottawa.
Pre-Broadway shows, musicals, ballets and plays from around the world came to the O'Keefe and it replaced Maple Leaf Gardens as the Toronto venue for the Metropolitan Opera. International stars such as Louis ARMSTRONG, Paul ANKA, Tom JONES, Diana ROSS and Harry BELAFONTE performed there.
During one of Mr. BELAFONTE's many performances at the centre, he experimented with a wireless mike. Accidentally, he tuned into the police frequency. "The O'Keefe audience had the unusual experience of listening in on a lot of police messages, while the police were able to enjoy hearing BELAFONTE sing Ma-til-da!," Mr. WALKER wrote.
Another O'Keefe story concerned Carol CHANNING. When the performer appeared at the centre in Hello, Dolly, she needed to make a number of quick costume changes. Since there wasn't enough time for Ms. CHANNING to run backstage to her dressing room, the crew put up a roofless tent in the wings.
From the fly bridge, the stagehands looked down on Ms. CHANNING, remaining quiet while they watched her change. After her last performance, she looked up at them and said, "Well, boys, hope you've enjoyed the show. 'Bye now."
Other more critical events are associated with the O'Keefe. In 1964, while awaiting her divorce from Eddie FISHER, Elizabeth TAILOR/TAYLOR stayed with Richard BURTON while he starred in Sir John GIELGUD's production of Hamlet at the centre. One weekend between performances, the couple stole off to Montreal and married.
And in 1974, ballet dancer Mikhail BARYSHNIKOV arranged his defection from the Soviet Union at the centre.
During the early 1960s, the O'Keefe became home to the National Ballet of Canada and the Canadian Opera Company. In his book, Mr. WALKER credits the centre with allowing the companies' artistic growth.
Still, not everyone spoke so kindly about the O'Keefe. Many critics denounced its acoustics and less-than-intimate size.
For that, Mr. WALKER had a ready answer. In 1985, Herbert WHITTAKER, then The Globe and Mail's drama critic, wrote: "Against the fading chorus of these ancient complaints, I hear an echo, the rather quiet British tones of Hugh WALKER: 'We know it [O'Keefe Centre] is too large for legitimate theatre, Herbert, but think of all the things Toronto would have missed if E. P. TAILOR/TAYLOR hadn't built it when he did?' "
Born on March 2, 1910, in Scotland to Brigadier-General James Workman WALKER, who fought in the Middle East during the First World War, and Jane STEVENSON, Hugh Percy WALKER was the middle of three children. After earning a B.A. at Cambridge University, he became a chartered accountant.
Mr. WALKER worked with firms in London, Palestine, Quebec, Scotland and Michigan before being employed by Mr. TAILOR/TAYLOR.
Although a great lover of theatre, upon his appointment as the O'Keefe's managing director, Mr. WALKER had little experience with its business side. This led to some innocent faux pas, such as when he booked a photo shoot with the Camelot stars at 10 in the morning, impossibly early for actors. In response, Mr. BURTON exclaimed: "What, in the middle of the night?" Ms. JOLLIFFE said.
Still, director and theatre critic Mavor MOORE said Mr. WALKER dealt with difficulties well. "He was very smooth," Dr. MOORE said. "He was very expert at handling people and situations. He was a calm man."
Mr. WALKER trusted his staff, Ms. JOLLIFFE said. "He was willing to take direction from staff people who had already been in the business, and that was unusual."
And he was gracious and courteous. "He gave great dignity to the performing arts profession and he treated people wonderfully," Ms. JOLLIFFE said. "He was a perfect model of a former era of English gentlemen."
Known for his hospitality, Mr. WALKER always visited the stars in their dressing rooms before opening night and entertained them afterward at First Nighters' parties with Mrs. WALKER.
When the WALKERs took Leonard BERNSTEIN to the Rosedale Country Club, Mr. WALKER tolerated Mr. BERNSTEIN's sending back the wine three times, Ms. JOLLIFFE said.
Along with bringing in commercial performances from the United States and Britain, Mr. WALKER showed some daring in booking shows. In 1961, Kwamina, the story of a romantic relationship between a white woman and a black man, played the O'Keefe.
Acknowledging Toronto's Italian population, Mr. WALKER arranged for Rugantino, the biggest musical hit in Italian history, to play at the O'Keefe in 1963. It was the first foreign-language attraction in North America to use "surtitles," and although plagued with technical difficulties, it played to 60-per-cent capacity.
Things changed for Mr. WALKER and O'Keefe Centre in the late 1960s. Initially, the centre had been a subsidiary of the O'Keefe Brewing Co., owned by Canadian Breweries, and was never intended to make a profit. The company wrote off its operating losses and property taxes.
When Mr. TAILOR/TAYLOR retired in 1966, directors of Canadian Breweries decided that they could not continue to pay the O'Keefe's high taxes. To resolve the situation, Metropolitan Toronto was given the centre in 1968.
A new and inexperienced board of directors brought a new way of doing things, and the centre's losses began to mount.
Mr. WALKER wrote that after the disastrous 1971-72 season, "what followed was not the happiest part of my 15 years at the O'Keefe Centre, and I would like to forget some of the things that happened."
In his final working years, Mr. WALKER dealt with both the centre's internal changes and rising competition from the Royal Alexandra Theatre, the St. Lawrence Centre and emerging alternative theatres.
After his retirement in 1975, he spent 10 years at the Guild of All Arts in Scarborough, Ontario, as the director of Guildwood Hall, curating former Guild Inn owner Spencer CLARK's historical architectural collection of artifacts, writing and illustrating a booklet on them, curating Mr. CLARK's art collection, making a film and lecturing.
He and his wife lived on the Guild's grounds for four years in the now-demolished Corycliff, where they hosted parties whose guests included many stars from the O'Keefe days.
Along with writing the O'Keefe Centre history while in his 80s, Mr. WALKER golfed.
Sue NIBLETT, who worked with him at the Guild, recalls seeing Mr. WALKER nattily attired in golf clothing and Wellingtons standing in two feet of snow driving balls into Lake Ontario.
"He had a love of life that I've never experienced or met in anybody before," Ms. NIBLETT said. "He didn't waste a day of his life as far as I could see."
Mr. WALKER died on May 2 and leaves daughters Katrina PARKER and Zoë ALEXANDER and two grandchildren. Another daughter, Sarah CHENIER/CHENÉ, and his wife, Shirley, predeceased him.

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SINCLAIR o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-09 published
BERMINGHAM, Mary Louise (Lou) (née DONALD) -- Died peacefully at her home on Monday, December 8, 2003, in her 75th year, after a lengthy illness, surrounded by her family and assured of their love for her. Predeceased by Bill, her loving husband of 50 years. Reunited with her parents George and Beatrice DONALD. Survived by her children Tim and his wife Candace, Susan (JASPER) and her husband Terry, Patrick and his wife Amy, and Anne, all of whom will so deeply miss her smiles, her warmth and her unfailing cheerfulness. Also survived by her adoring grandchildren Sarah, Christopher, Katie, Hudson, Cabot, Will, Georgia, Carmichael and Alistair. They will always hold her in their hearts as the perfect Granny to them all. Lou will also be greatly missed by her sisters, Joan SINCLAIR and Allison GILBERT, and by her brother, Alex DONALD. Lou embodied the spirit of Christmas all the year and gave her many Friends strength and comfort in their lives. Her gardens and her home were always beautiful and welcoming. The family welcomes all who would like to share their memories of Lou to Otterburn on Thursday, December 11, 2003, from 3 p.m. to 8 p.m. A memorial service will be held at Saint John's Church in Ancaster at 11 o'clock a.m. on Friday, December 12, 2003 (Halson & Wilson Streets). In lieu of flowers, donations to Saint John's Anglican Church or to a charity of your choice would be gratefully received.

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SINELLI o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-11-28 published
MURRAY, Mari-Ellen
It is with great sorrow that we announce the death of Mari-Ellen MURRAY on Saturday, November 22nd, 2003 while vacationing in South Africa. A vibrant and determined woman, Mari-Ellen lived life as a perpetual adventure, unaltered by her battle with breast cancer. She died quickly and mercifully while pursuing her love of travel with her cherished husband Andrew BISHOP. Beloved daughter of Norman and Nerina MURRAY; granddaughter of Luigia SINELLI, sister of Jacqueline, Stephanie and Rob WATSON, Marisa and Paul GRETHER, and Christine; treasured Aunt Mimi of Madeleine and Cole WATSON; much-loved daughter-in-law of Trevor and Barbara BISHOP; sister-in-law of Timothy and Michael. Our inspiration and pillar of strength, she will be sorely missed by all who knew her. Visitation at Kopriva Taylor at 64 Lakeshore Road West in Oakville from 2: 00 to 5:00 p.m. and 7:00 to 9:00 p.m. on Sunday, November 30th, 2003. The Funeral Mass will take place on Monday, December 1st at 1: 30 p.m. at St. Basil's Church, 50 St. Joseph Street at Bay Street in Toronto. In lieu of flowers, donations to The Princess Margaret Hospital, 610 University Ave. Toronto, M5G 2M9 or Willow Breast Cancer Support and Resource Services, 785 Queen Street East, Toronto, M4M 1H5 would be greatly appreciated.

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SINGH o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-06-13 published
Dr. Kundan S. KHERA
Research scientist, toxicologist, husband, father, golfer and writer. Born May 12, 1922, in East Punjab, India. Died April 1, 2005, in Ottawa, of heart attack, aged 80.
Clyde SANGER - page A20
When Kundan KHERA completed his memoirs at the age of 80, some Friends objected to the title, A Life of struggles. They mentioned his scientific honours. You should call them, they said, Success After a Life of struggles. But, out of devotion to the truth rather than any bitterness, he stuck to his choice.
There were times when, but for his sense of discipline, he came close to despair. In June, 1958, he returned to the Punjab from France with his doctorate from the Sorbonne and with high hopes of an immediate professor's post and plans to develop a vaccine for foot-and-mouth disease. Instead, he was told to wait for word of an appointment.
Daily for two months he walked his father's six cows through deep mud to the well in Kot Khera, the village where he was born and where 12 family members -including his own six children - were then surviving on his father's meagre pension.
Eventually, he took work as a poorly paid instructor in pathology at the Punjab Veterinary College. His career was stalled by a hostile director, who rejected his journal article on lumbar paralysis in sheep (akin to mad-cow disease), and he had to bargain his way to professor level by promising to refuse a senior post offered him in Nigeria.
Kun followed a family tradition of struggle and, as others saw it, insubordination. His father Kesar SINGH fought for the British in Mesopotamia and survived the five-month Turkish siege of Kut, and later imprisonment. But, after qualifying as a veterinary officer, he was passed over for promotion because he opposed the taking of bribes.
By 1962, Kun had tired of the bureaucracy haunting his career in India. A year's fellowship in Texas led to work in Ottawa as a pathologist in the Food and Drug Directorate. His 28 years in Health Canada were so productive that in 1988 the Society of Toxicology gave him the Arnold J. Lehmann Award for scientific excellence, and an American book listed him among its "2,000 Outstanding Scientists of the 20th Century."
His major work was in reproductive toxicity. Arriving at Health Canada just after the thalidomide disaster, his research challenged the widely held view that a mother simply channelled a toxic chemical through the placenta to the embryo or fetus. His work, originally on mice, showed that a vast majority of chemicals, if taken in large doses, first caused toxic effects in the mother or placenta, and could account for many fetal malformations. He struggled for 10 years to get his "outlandish" theory of maternal toxicity accepted, at length triumphing at a 1986 conference of the European Teratology Society. The drug industry took swift note, and regulatory agencies revised their methods of assessing human safety.
Kun had been betrothed to Rajinder at 11 and married at 15. Although they often lived at a distance, he was a caring husband and father to their four daughters and two sons, sent much of his salary back to them in India and rejoiced when his children emigrated to Ohio. They divorced in 1971, and soon after Kun met and married Claire PAULIN. Their years together, on the farm they owned near Prescott, Ontario, or on the golf courses in Ottawa, were clearly the happiest and most tranquil of his life. Every photograph shows him smiling.
Movingly, Claire's daughter Roxanne told at Kun's funeral how her stepfather had inspired her to study and to persevere. His sons, Jag and Autar, both industrial engineers, were also testament to his example. Success after a life of struggles, indeed.
Clyde SANGER is a family friend.

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SINGH o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-06-17 published
HOAG, Howard Arthur
Died Sunday, June 15, 2003, at home in Toronto, surrounded by Friends. Howard will be greatly missed by his beloved bride Louise RICH and her daughter Odette HUTCHINGS, as well as by his innumerable Friends and his family, in particular his sister Sharon. Howard loved life. His humour, wit, intelligence and broad smile charmed everyone he met. Diagnosed with liver cancer in December, Howard lived the last six months with incredible courage, determination and optimism. The devotion and concern of his wide group of Friends, including those from the Toronto Racquet Club and the Toronto Scottish Rugby Club has been remarkable. The annual Robbie Burns Supper will not be the same without him. Many thanks to Dr. SIU at Princess Margaret, Drs SINGH, HUSSEIN, STEINBERG, Rosa BERG and the Palliative Care Team at Mt. Sinai and Trinity Hospice. Special thanks to Howard's friend Fred REID- WILKINSON for being there. A service to celebrate Howard's life will be held 4: 00 p.m., Saturday, June 21, East Common Room, Hart House, University of Toronto, with a reception to follow. In lieu of flowers donations may be made in Howard's name to Trinity Home Hospice, Suite 1102 - 25 King St. West, Toronto M5L 1G7.

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SINKER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-06-30 published
PALM, Nikolai - Estate of
Notice To Creditors And Others
All claims against the Estate of Nikolai PALM, late of Toronto, Ontario who died on or about the 16th day of May, 2004 must be filed with the undersigned Estate Trustees on or before the 31st day of July, 2004, after which date the estate will be distributed having regard only to claims of which the Estate Trustees then shall have notice.
Dated at Township of Strathroy-Caradoc, this 8th day of June, 2004.
William John LOMAX and Viive-Ann LOMAX,
Estate Trustees
By Their Solicitor
George E. SINKER, Barrister and Solicitor
53 Front St. W., Strathroy, Ontario N7G 1X6
Page B8

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