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"SIL" 2003 Obituary


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SILCOX o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-07-19 published
He gave his city artistic merit
Windsor gallery's longtime director built a fine collection in his pursuit of 'communal pride'
By Bill GLADSTONE Special to The Globe and Mail Saturday, July 19, 2003 - Page F9
Canada's art world is lamenting the end of an era with the demise of Kenneth SALTMARCHE, founding director of the Art Gallery of Windsor, who died in Toronto on July 3 at the age of 82.
An accomplished artist, Mr. SALTMARCHE ultimately made his greatest mark as an arts administrator and is being remembered as one of the last of a dying generation of artists-turned-gallery directors who revitalized the art scene across the country.
Hired in 1946 to oversee operations of what was then the Willistead Art Gallery in Windsor, Ontario, he transformed the facility from a room on the second floor of the municipal library into a leading regional institution that possessed an astute collection of nearly 3,000 works by the time he retired in 1985.
"The gallery really had a very simple and rather primitive beginning, and he built it from absolute scratch, from zero," said Bill WITHROW, former longtime director of the Art Gallery of Ontario. "I was always impressed with that fact."
As a collector, Mr. SALTMARCHE is remembered for having "a good eye" and for acquiring many works by artists initially considered out of the mainstream, such as Harold Town and Prudence Heward. Over time his judgment was proved sound as a favoured artist's reputation would soar, along with the market value of his or her works.
He concentrated on attaining both historical and contemporary Canadian works, including numerous canvases of the Group of Seven, thus laying the foundation of the gallery's present collection of more than 5,000 pieces.
"He often collected against the current, which means you can make a dollar go a lot further," said David SILCOX, managing director of Sotheby's Canada. "He bought people when they weren't popular -- he was very intelligent that way."
Alf BOGUSKY, director of the Kitchener-Waterloo Art Gallery, calls the collection Mr. SALTMARCHE assembled a "magnificent accomplishment" that reflects "the beautiful story of the development of Canadian painting, as represented by the earliest formal portraiture by British and French artists right through to the contemporary period of the Seventies."
Known for his energetic vision, Mr. SALTMARCHE had a knack for drumming up community involvement through innovative programs such as Art in the Park, now a long-established annual event in Windsor. Aided by his wife Judy, he made the gallery a vibrant centre of cultural life and charmed volunteers and patrons alike to new heights of involvement and philanthropy.
Aware of the advantages of being situated at Canada's southernmost border point, he cultivated friendly relations with the Detroit Institute of Arts, situated across the river and a few city blocks away, even sending over exhibitions of Canadian art. In the mid-1950s, he scored a major coup by persuading his U.S. counterparts that a key work languishing in their collection would have a much more appreciative home in Canada.
As a result, the Detroit Institute of Arts donated A Side Street Group of Seven stalwart Lawren Harris's celebrated 1919 painting of a snow-covered Toronto street -- to the Willistead gallery as a gift in commemoration of Windsor's 100th birthday. (Tom Thomson's 1914 painting Algonquin Park came into the gallery's possession in the same period.)
When nine previously unknown early 19th-century watercolours by early bureaucrat-painter George Heriot appeared on the market in 1967, Mr. SALTMARCHE was determined to acquire them despite their "distinctly Old Master price tag" exceeding $45,000. He quickly raised three-quarters of the sum from Windsor residents, then convinced the Canada Council into making an exceptional grant of $10,000 to complete the purchase.
Mr. SALTMARCHE saw collecting as "an art museum's primary function," and once wrote: "Communal pride -- whether civic or national in scale -- is engendered by the owning of works of art of outstanding value and is a completely natural reason for assembling a permanent collection."
He struggled with the library board for years to make the gallery an autonomous institution, and his eventual success was seen as a milestone by directors of other regional galleries. In the early 1970s, he moved the gallery into a historic renovated brewery building. It later ceded those premises to the province (for use as a casino) and moved into a prominent new downtown building in 2001.
Born September 29, 1920, in Cardiff, Wales, Kenneth Charles SALTMARCHE arrived in Windsor with his family at the age of four, and moved with them to the village of Vienna, south of London, Ontario, during the Depression. It was in Vienna's one-room schoolhouse that he encountered the travelling exhibition of Group of Seven reproductions that inspired him to dedicate his future to art. "He always told me that seeing that show was the pivotal point in his passion for art," said his son Noel.
A graduate of the Ontario College of Art, he began programming at the Willistead Art Gallery about 1946; he also began to write art and music criticism for the Windsor Daily Star and painting landscapes, still lifes and family portraits. In 1947, he married Judith DAVIES, and they had Noël and his twin brother David two years later. His family often joined him on painting expeditions around the world, some of which resulted in solo exhibitions of art.
He was a member of the Order of Canada and held an honorary law degree from the University of Windsor. As well, he was the founding president of the Ontario Association of Art Galleries and a founding member and past president of the Canadian Art Museum Directors Organization.
Soon after Judith died in 1992, he painted a series of watercolours "and that was the last work he did," Noël said. Afflicted with senile dementia, he spent his last years in several retirement homes and then a nursing home, Castleview Wychwood, in Toronto.
Predeceased by brothers Ronald and Leslie as well as his wife, Mr. SALTMARCHE leaves Noël and David, daughters-in-law Deb and Anita, and four grandchildren, all of Toronto.

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SILESKY o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-10-22 published
Alberta Ann (MAGUIRE) SLOSS
In loving memory of Alberta Ann (Maguire) Sloss, November 1, 1947 to October 9, 2003.
Alberta SLOSS, a resident of Espanola died at the Espanola General Hospital on Thursday, October 9, 2003, at the age of 55 years.
She was born in Mindemoya, daughter of the late Oswald and the late Elsie (QUACKENBUSH) MAGUIRE. Alberta was a teacher at the Webbwood Public School, S. Geiger School in Massey and A. B. Ellis School in Espanola. She was a member of the Spring Bay Pentecostal Church and the Queensway Pentecostal Church in Espanola. She enjoyed gardening but her greatest joys were serving the Lord Jesus and the time she dedicated to her loving husband, children and grandchildren. Alberta will be greatly missed by all who knew her or worked with her over the years.
Dearly loved and loving wife of Ken SLOSS of Espanola. Loving mother of Bryan and wife Susin SLOSS of Thornhill, Brent and wife Chani SLOSS of Alma, and Brad and wife Amber SLOSS of Cambridge. Dear grandmother of Shekinah, Blake, Shayna and Hannah Joy. Dear sister of Rosalie JAGGARD (husband David) of Mindemoya and Elsie SILESKY of Englehart (husband Clifford predeceased). Also survived by five nieces and nephews.
Friends called the Culgin Funeral Home, Gore Bay on Sunday, October 12. The funeral service was held from the Wm. G. Turner Chapel at the Culgin Funeral Home on Monday, October 13, 2003 with Pastor Frank HANER officiating. Interment followed in Long Bay Cemetery.

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SILINS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-04-05 published
SILINS, Guntis, M.D.
Died suddenly and unexpectedly on March 31, 2003. Husband of Ruta and father of Matiss, Austris and Krisjanis. Funeral service will be held on Wednesday, April 9, 2003 at 1: 00 p.m. at St. John's Latvian Lutheran Church, 200 Balmoral Avenue, Toronto. Mourners may pay their respects to the family beginning at 12: 00 p.m. Turner and Porter Yorke Chapel, (416) 767-3153, can be contacted for additional information. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the charity of your choice in Guntis' memory.

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SILLS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-02-24 published
BUCHANAN, Audrey Cameron
At the Cambridge Memorial Hospital, on Sunday, February 23, 2003, in her 90th year. Audrey BUCHANAN (née SMAIL,) formerly of Toronto, was the beloved wife, for over 60 years, of the late Stanley BUCHANAN (2000.) Dear mother of Betty BUCHANAN of Toronto, and Nancy RZESZUTKO and her husband, Walt, of Cambridge; loved grandmother of Sian SILLS and Mark FRANKLIN of Toronto, Erin and Michael HARTMAN of Burlington and Kathryn and Corryn RZESZUTKO of Cambridge dear sister of Alex SMAIL of Oakville; dear sister-in-law of Alfred BUCHANAN of Toronto; and special aunt of Kathleen SMAIL of Tualatin, Oregon, Pat BRANDON of Coldwater, Ontario, Blake and Allison SMAIL, Bruce and Judy SMAIL, all of St. Joseph's Island, Ontario, and Janet SMAIL of Sault Saint Marie. Audrey graduated in nursing from Women's College Hospital in 1937, following which she became Night Supervisor of The Ontario Hospital in Saint Thomas. Since her retirement from nursing, Audrey had been actively involved with the Alumnae Association of Women's College Hospital. She treasured the long, happy summers spent with children and grandchildren at the family cottage at Floral Park on Lake Couchiching. Since 2001, she resided at Queen's Square Terrace in Cambridge, Ontario, where she found a happy and fulfilling life surrounded by new best Friends and kind caregivers. Friends will be received at Coutts Funeral Home and Cremation Centre, 96 St. Andrews Street, Cambridge (wwwfuneralscanada.com), on Tuesday from 7-9 p.m. The funeral service will be conducted in the funeral home chapel on Wednesday, February 26, 2003 at 3 p.m. A reception will follow in the Coutts Family Reception Cottage. Spring interment will take place at Carlyle Cemetery in Iron Bridge, Ontario. As expressions of sympathy, donations may be made to Women's College Hospital Alumnae Memorial Fund, 58 Lascelles Boulevard, Toronto, Ontario M5P 2E1.

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SILVERMAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-05-26 published
Eileen KRIEGER
By Lesley KRIEGER, Karen McDONALD and Bob SILVERMAN Monday, May 26, 2003 - Page A14
Daughter, granddaughter, niece, sister, dancer, student leader. Born January 5, 1981, in Ridgeway, Ontario Died January 20, near Belleville, Ontario, in a car accident, aged 21.
Eileen grew up in a small town where she spent most of her time either dancing at her mother's dance studio or running wild on her grandmother's farm. "Eileen the Bunny Queen" was an early nickname that reflected her love of rabbits. But she spent time with more that just rabbits -- there were also all of those raccoons, squirrels, chickens, turkeys and, of course, horses. Later, she even managed to integrate cats, dogs and rabbits into her university life.
She grew into a beautiful young woman with a dazzling smile and what seemed to be boundless energy. She once told her housemate that she found sleep boring. As she matured she became immersed in myriad activities but family remained at the centre of her life. She was a loving daughter to her father Charlie, and a mentor to her younger brother Karl and sister Meaghan.
Eileen's interests and those of her mother meshed to a greater extent than they do for many mothers and daughters. One of those passions was dance. Her final performances were in Casa Del Sol, Spain. An extraordinary bonding took place among the dance Friends as they travelled and worked together.
Eileen's high school years left their mark on her teachers. One teacher, Ken GIBBONS, found working closely with her at the student leadership camp to be "a joy and learning experience for me. She was a natural teacher who knew the material and showed a genuine concern for those she was leading. The greatest thrill for a teacher is to know even one person like Eileen." Hugh O'BRIAN, founder of Hugh O'Brian Youth Leadership, recalls Eileen's qualities at the World Leadership Congress, calling her "a true achiever and a great representative of Canada."
This straight-A student somehow managed to spend a year as president of her high-school student council, stay involved in sports, and receive the 1999 Award for Excellence and the Principal's Leadership Award before entering Queen's University in 2000 where she majored in Development Studies and Sociology.
While at Queen's she took a job as a waitress at Summerhill (the principal's official residence, which is used for entertaining). There, her poise, self-confidence and engaging personality resulted in her meeting and getting to know many people, including members of Queen's Board of Trustees, honorary-degree recipients, and Members of Parliament.
From her first year on campus Eileen became involved in the Canadian Student Leadership Conference (now known as Withinsight) which is a Queen's student-run initiative. This annual conference takes place in Ottawa and attracts students from across the country who come to hear government, business and other community leaders speak or lead workshops. It was at that conference one year, that Eileen met Richard, who became her true love.
Eileen became the national director of the 2003 conference, but she did not get to see the results of her hard work; the accident that took her life occurred three days before the conference was to begin. Her executive team members were devastated by her loss but came together to run a very successful conference in her honour. In future conferences, there will be an annual award offered in her name.
Upon hearing of her death, Al FISHER, a professor of music at Queen's, wrote: "I found her (to be) a vital, intelligent and accomplished young person. The cruelty of a sudden, violent death for such a treasure is profoundly numbing."
Lesley KRIEGER is Eileen's mother, Karen McDONALD her aunt; Bob SILVERMAN, Dean of Arts and Science at Queen's, a friend.

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SILVERSIDES o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-04-02 published
Robert TROW
By Ann SILVERSIDES Wednesday, April 2, 2003 - Page A20
Gay liberation and A.I.D.S. activist, health-care worker, musician. Born November 23, 1948, in Toronto. Died October 21, 2002, in Toronto, of a brain aneurysm, aged 53.
The last time I saw Robert, he was bicycling north on Church Street near Queen Street in Toronto, heading to a meeting. Though he was running late, he graciously stopped to answer some questions I'd been meaning to ask him about the history of Hassle Free Clinic, the downtown Toronto sexual health clinic where he spent 26 years, first as a volunteer and later as a long-time staff member. A few weeks later, Robert was dead, and Canada lost a knowledgeable, tireless Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome activist who had kept up his activism until the day he died.
About 400 people attended his memorial service at Hart House Theatre at the University of Toronto. As an undergraduate, Robert had performed in that theatre, and he remained a member of Hart House long after completing two University of Toronto graduate degrees.
He grew up in Thornhill, Ontario, the eldest of three boys. His father was an engineer, and his mother a homemaker. Playing piano, which he took up as a child, was a lifelong passion.
Many gay men are rejected by, or alienated from, their original family; their gay Friends become their family. Robert was lucky: he maintained close ties with parents, brothers and extended family, and kept up with both (heterosexual) best Friends from high school and a large family of gay Friends.
In the mid-1970s, Robert began working and living communally. He volunteered on the collective that ran The Body Politic, a left-wing gay liberation newsmagazine published in Canada but with a worldwide readership. He wrote articles, mostly about health-care issues, edited, proofread and did paste-up -- but also took on the thankless task of distribution manager. He lived in a series of communal houses with his former long-time partner, writer Gerald HANNON, and other Body Politic collective members.
To his Friends, Robert was known as Bunny, and his foibles -- dithering, an aversion to drafts, a highly developed sense of personal frugality, a propensity to lose his wallet, a talent for being, as Gerald noted, sprawlingly messy -- were more than offset by his generosity to all and his wicked sense of fun.
When Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome emerged in the early 1980s, Robert helped organize the first public Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome forum in Toronto on April 5, 1983, which was sponsored by Hassle Free and Gays in Health Care. He went on to be a founding member of the Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome Committee of Toronto. After a test for Human Immunodeficiency Virus was developed, Hassle Free became the first clinic in Canada to offer anonymous testing. When anonymous testing was eventually legalized in Ontario, the government adopted Robert's manual on anonymous testing guidelines.
Robert served on the Ontario Advisory Committee on Human Immunodeficiency Virus/Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome and other bodies. "But first of all, he was passionate about Hassle Free Clinic. He wouldn't take on anything that wasn't also good for the clinic," said Jane GREER/GRIER, his co-worker at the clinic. All the while, Robert was Human Immunodeficiency Virus positive and coping with the effects of his condition and medications.
The Ontario Ministry of Health awarded him a posthumous citation, and Toronto City Council observed a moment's silence in his honour. Silence was an odd tribute, Gerald noted -- because Robert almost never stopped talking, whether it was his "up-to-date" gossip about the Hapsburgs or the Holy Roman Empire, or his appreciative "Oh, boy!" when one of his Friends served him dinner.
Robert is survived by his partner, Denis FONTAINE, his parents Bill and Lucie, his brothers Philip and Christopher, and his wide family of Friends.
Ann SILVERSIDES is a friend of Robert TROW.

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SILVERSTEIN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-22 published
Champ didn't tell his mother
Toronto fighter was talked into boxing by his brothers during the Thirties as a way to make more money
By Barbara SILVERSTEIN Special to The Globe and Mail Saturday, March 22, 2003 - Page F11
When Leon SLAN became Canada's champion heavyweight boxer, he didn't tell his mother. She disapproved of the sport, so he kept the news to himself -- though not for long. Mr. SLAN, who died last month at the age of 86, had for years fought under another name and managed to escape his mother's wrath until 1936, when he won the national amateur title and the irresistibility of fame upset his comfortable obscurity.
The modest Mr. SLAN went on to become a successful Toronto businessman who had so allowed boxing to settle into his past that in 1986 most of his Friends were surprised when he was inducted into the Canadian Boxing Hall of Fame. It astonished everyone that the man they knew as the co-owner of a luggage-making company was known in boxing circles as Lennie STEIN, holder of the Canadian amateur heavyweight title from 1935 to 1937.
A quiet and unassuming giant of a man, his wife described him as invariably soft-spoken. "I never heard him raise his voice once in all the years we were married, Isabel SLAN said.
By all accounts, Mr. SLAN's mild demeanour belied his prowess in the ring, said his son, Jon SLAN. " For a man who was a champion at a blood sport, he was the gentlest person you ever met."
Born in Winnipeg to Russian immigrants on June 28, 1916, Mr. SLAN was the second of three sons. In 1922, the family moved to the Annex area of Toronto where he attended Harbord Collegiate Institute. His father, Joseph SLAN, was a struggling tailor with interesting ideas about the garment industry. In 1931, he headed a co-operative called Work-Togs Limited. It consisted of a small band of tailors who were to share in the profits. The project suffered from poor timing: It came on the scene at the height of the Depression and failed dismally.
In 1934, Joseph SLAN died in poverty and Leon and his two brothers Bob, who was born in 1914, and Jack, born in 1918 -- had to provide for their mother. Bringing home meagre paycheques from what little work they could find, the three decided to find a supplement.
At the time, boxing was a popular spectator sport and one of the few that was open to Jewish athletes. Bob and Jack knew that a good fighter could earn a decent living in the ring. Their eyes fell on Leon. At 17, their 6-foot-2, 200-pound, athletic brother towered over most grown men.
"Leon was big and strong and Bob and Jack thought he should be boxing, Mrs. SLAN said. "The family needed the money."
They persuaded him to give it a try and promised their support, she said. "They took him to over the gym. There they were, the three boys walking down the street arm-in-arm with Leon in the middle. They all walked over together to sign Leon up."
They didn't consult their mother. In fact, the brothers decided to enter the fight name Lennie STEIN, so she wouldn't read about Leon in the papers and worry.
As it turned out, the new Lennie STEIN was a natural. Mr. SLAN won his first major fight in a Round 1 knockout over the Toronto Golden Gloves title holder. " STEIN is durable and exceptionally fast for a heavyweight, " The Toronto Star reported in 1935. "He has the ability to rain punishment on his opponents with both hands."
In this way, he won almost all of his major fights. It helped, too, that his coach happened to be Maxie KADIN, a legend in Ontario boxing. Out of 40 bouts, Mr. SLAN netted 34 wins, 22 by knockout, and six losses.
A fighter who possessed a dogged and implacable manner, he was popular with the fans.
"He was known for not staying down on the canvas, Jon SLAN said. "On those rare times when he was decked, he always refused the referee's outstretched hand and picked himself up."
Yet, for all his success, Mr. SLAN rejected the opportunity to go fully professional. A manager and promoter from New York had seen him in a bout with a certain German boxer and saw possibilities.
"He wanted to promote him as the Great White Jewish Hope, " Jon said.
The German boxer happened to be the brother of Max SCHMELING, the Aryan protégé of Adolf Hitler and the Third Reich, who in 1936 had defeated the otherwise invincible Joe LOUIS in the upset of the century. To make it even more interesting, the manager proved to be the famous John BUCKLEY, who called the shots for Jack SHARKEY, a heavyweight who had beaten SCHMELING four years earlier.
"The promoter got so interested in this meeting of German and Jew that he offered my father a contract, but he didn't offer enough money, " Jon said.
The problem, it turned out, was that Mr. SLAN couldn't afford to turn professional, he once told a Globe and Mail reporter. "I was making good money then, $25 a week, and I was supporting my mother, " he said in 1988. "I asked him [Buckley] to put up $5,000 [and] he just laughed at me. He said he had hundreds of heavyweights."
Negotiations ended right there. "He was [only] interested in me because I was Jewish and that would go over big in New York."
It wasn't the only time that race emerged as an issue. Mr. SLAN had boxed under the auspices of the Young Men's Hebrew Association until 1936 when it was blackballed by the Amateur Athletic Union of Canada for withholding a portion of its proceeds. The money was earmarked for the Canadian Olympic effort, but the Young Men's Hebrew Association had refused to support the upcoming 1936 Berlin Games because of Germany's poor treatment of Jews. In the end, the Amateur Athletic Union permitted Mr. SLAN to enter as an independent and he went on to fight unattached to win the Toronto and national titles.
"It seemed so easy at the time, " he said in 1988. "I was a very quiet kid, but when I won, I became such a hero."
That glory turned out to be the undoing of Lennie STEIN, the fighter -- though it was all something of an anticlimax. The one thing Leon SLAN had feared on his way up through the ranks came to nothing: his mother finally found out that he boxed and then failed to react -- at least, not that anyone in the family can remember.
"She just took it in her stride, said Isabel SLAN. " She was a Jewish mother from the old country. I don't think she really understood what boxing was all about."
Perhaps, too, it helped to smooth matters that her son's secret endeavours had ended in triumph. She can only have felt a mother's pride.
In 1937, Mr. SLAN retired from boxing and found a job at a produce stall in Toronto's old fruit terminal on Colborne Street and was later hired by his brother Bob, a proprietor of Dominion Citrus Ltd. It was tough work with long hours, Mrs. SLAN said. "Leon would have to get up at 2 o'clock in the morning to go unload the fruits and vegetables off the trucks."
Even so, he still had some time for boxing. After working long days at the market, he taught athletics at the Young Men's Hebrew Association and it was there that he met Isabel MARGOLIAN. A concert pianist newly arrived from Yarmouth, Nova Scotia, she happened to take one of his boxing classes for women.
"We were all lined up in a row, punching bags, " she remembered. "Leon came up to me and told me I wasn't punching hard enough. Then he took my hand and hit it into the bag to show me how to do it. I felt my bones crunch, but I didn't say anything."
As it turned out, he had broken her hand. When he learned what had happened, he phoned her and thus began a different relationship. They married in 1942 and later that year Mr. SLAN enlisted in the army where he ended up in the Queen's Own Rifles. While in the army, he returned to boxing and won the 1942 Canadian Army heavyweight title.
After the war, the SLAN brothers founded Dominion Luggage in Toronto's garment district, a company that started small with eight workers and grew into a successful enterprise employing 200. Each brother had a different responsibility -- Jack was the designer, Bob took care of the administration and Leon was the salesman.
"It was a job that really suited him, Mrs. SLAN said. "He was very personable [and] sold to Eaton's, Simpsons, Air Canada -- all the big companies. He became good Friends with many of the buyers."
The three brothers enjoyed a comfortable relationship built on affection and loyalty, Jon said.
"Bob liked to fish, so he took Thursdays and Fridays off to go to his cottage. My father took Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday afternoons off to golf."
Jack, the creative force among them, rarely left the business but never begrudged his brothers their leisure time.
"They had the perfect partnership, " said Jon, a relationship anchored by their mother. "They were her surrogate husbands. I don't think there was a SLAN wife who felt that she wasn't playing second fiddle to my grandmother."
The brothers went to her house every day for lunch until she was 90. "She made old-time Jewish food. Her definition of borscht was sour cream with a touch of beets, " Jon said. "She cooked with chicken fat and the boys loved it."
Sophie SLAN died in 1984 at the age of 93.
In 1972, the SLANs sold Dominion Luggage to Warrington Products, a large conglomerate. "Warrington made them an offer they couldn't turn down, " Isabel said.
Even so, the brothers' relationship continued into retirement. "They called each other every day, even when their health was failing, " Jon said. "Bob died in 2000 and Jack in 2002. My father took their deaths very hard."
Although he never boxed again, Mr. SLAN played sports well into his 70s and could still show his mettle. He had taken up tennis at about the age of 40 and, when he couldn't get a membership at the exclusive Toronto Lawn Tennis Club in Rosedale, he co-founded the York Racquets Tennis Club. It opened in 1964, directly across the street from the Toronto Lawn Tennis Club.
Mr. SLAN died of heart failure in Toronto on February 11. He leaves his wife Isabel, son Jon and daughters Elynne GOLDKIND and Anna RISEN.

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SILVERSTEIN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-10-29 published
A champion of Canadian textile workers
By Barbara SILVERSTEIN, Special to The Globe and Mail Wednesday, October 29, 2003 - Page R5
A pioneer in the labour movement within Toronto's once-vibrant garment industry and an early advocate of basic social-welfare programs has died at the age of 105.
As a union activist, William (Velvl) KATZ survived blacklisting in the 1920s to establish the embroidery local of the International Ladies Garment Workers Union and later went on to co-found the Labour League, a Jewish radical left-wing mutual-benefit society that later evolved into the United Jewish People's Order.
"He was a man of integrity, intelligence and idealism," said his daughter Ida ABRAMS. "He held... an exacting moral standard. If he gave his word, he meant it."
Mr. KATZ, who died in April of heart failure, was born in 1897 in a small Polish town just north of Krakow. He and his three younger siblings were raised in the sheltered communal life of Hasidism, an ultra-Orthodox Jewish sect. Mr. KATZ studied at a religious school and later apprenticed as a cobbler and had almost no exposure to the secular world until 1918, when he fled to Germany to avoid military conscription. In 1997, he told the Canadian Jewish News that his life changed dramatically. In Poland, the only books were religious, he said. "Suddenly there were books on every subject imaginable."
By all accounts, Mr. KATZ became caught up in the intellectual fervour ignited by the 1917 Bolshevik Revolution. "He thought communism would bring an end to anti-Semitism and all other forms of discrimination and injustice," said Ida ABRAMS. "He believed the revolution was just around the corner."
In 1920, a cousin who was suddenly unable to travel offered Mr. KATZ a free boat ticket and he arrived in Toronto with the address of the relatives of a German friend. Mr. KATZ became their paying boarder. In the course of his stay, he courted their daughter Bluma and married her in 1922. Two years later, he brought his brother Ben and then his sisters Lil and Eva to Canada. Similar efforts to bring his half-sister Esther failed and she did not survive the Holocaust.
Around that time, Mr. KATZ quit shoemaking and turned to the garment industry where he took up union organizing. Eventually, his reputation as a "lefty" alienated bosses and by 1924 he was unemployed. Ida ABRAMS recalls vivid memories of May Day parades she attended with her father. "People marched with banners and flags and sang union songs. There was always the threatening presence of policemen on horseback."
His job problems ended in 1930 when Mr. KATZ became a partner in a modest embroidery shop on Adelaide Street. Although he was an employer himself, he continued to support the efforts of the labour unions. In those years, Mr. KATZ campaigned for basic social-welfare programs -- such as old-age pensions and unemployment insurance -- through the Labour League Mutual Benefit Society, a Jewish radical socialist organization he co-founded in 1926.
Mr. KATZ had initially belonged to the Workmen's Circle, an established left-wing Jewish proletariat benefit society but in the mid-20s it ruptured over ideological differences. Mr. KATZ was among a radical group that broke away to establish the Labour League which, in later years, even ran political candidates. In 1945, the league was renamed the United Jewish People's Order.
In its formative years, the Labour League established several cultural institutions that still exist today: the Morris Winchevsky School, the Toronto Jewish Folk Choir (formerly the Freedom Singing Society), and Camp Naivelt, a collective of 90 cottages near Brampton, Ontario The camp was a popular venue for folksingers Pete SEEGER and Phil OCHS performed there -- and it was where the Canadian folk group The Travellers got its start.
United Jewish People's Order flourished until 1956, when Mr. KATZ learned of the atrocities of Soviet leader Joseph Stalin and disenchantment set in. Instead, he supported institutions in Israel, and the preservation of Yiddish culture. Through this he became Friends with Canadian Yiddish poet Simcha SIMCHOVITCH, whose latest book Toward Eternity: Collected Poems, is dedicated to Mr. KATZ.
Mr. KATZ, whose wife died in 1972, leaves his daughter Ida ABRAMS and his sister Eva GANTMAN.

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SILVERSTONE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-08-15 published
Howard HOAG
By Steven DENURE, Julia WOODS, Michael HOMER, Marty SILVERSTONE Friday, August 15, 2003 - Page A28
Friend, husband, father, rugby player. Born September 17, 1952, in Ottawa. Died June 15, in Toronto, of cancer, aged 50.
Friends experienced a quintessential Howard HOAG moment a few years ago on the dock at a friend's cottage at a remote spot in Georgian Bay. They had an old recurve bow and a quiver full of new arrows, and were taking turns shooting at -- and missing a floating target anchored far out in the bay. As was his lifelong habit, Howard arrived much later than anticipated. He stepped out of the boat with a nautical flourish, and, after being roundly berated for being late and bringing what looked to be only six (warm) beer, he picked up the bow and tested its pull. Then he turned and fired an arrow and hit the previously unthreatened target the first time, with a satisfying thunk, like an exclamation mark at the end of a sentence. In the moment of stunned silence that followed, he gave a withering Hoagian look. "That's how it's done," he said, and picked up his six-pack and his knapsack, which turned out to be full of wine, and headed up the hill, leaving the merry band on the dock properly put in its place.
His Friends spent so much time waiting for him that they dubbed it "Howard time." The wait was always worth it. At every party there was "before Howie" and "after Howie." With his arrival, the conversation always sparkled a little more, the wine tasted better, the room seemed to grow bigger -- plus there was his unique ability to infuriate and/or entertain everybody in the room.
Howard grew up in Trois-Rivières, Quebec, the youngest of four children born to a production manager at the mighty CIP paper mill. As a child he was a Boy Scout, soloist in the church choir and an avid canoeist. He would later tell stories about paddling around the islands in the St. Lawrence River and watching the foam from the mill make the paddles disappear.
His voice eventually changed and, when he got to Montreal's McGill University, so did the songs. Howard studied environmental biology, but his true passion was the game of rugby. In recent years, Howard was best known as the heart and soul of the Toronto Scottish Rugby Club, as well as a key organizer of its annual Robbie Burns night. In Montreal, however, he's a legend: it was his monumental gaffe (he loudly lambasted a group of football coaches while the men in question sat in the next room listening to every word) that led to the creation of the Howie Hoag Award. Since its inception in 1971, "the Hoag" has been given out weekly during the MacDonald College football season to the player who performs the most remarkable misdeed of the week.
We are comforted to know that the last several years of Howard's too-short life were the absolute best. At 48, the classic lad and confirmed bachelor met the love of his life, the incomparable Louise RICH, and her daughter, Odette HUTCHINGS. This perfect trio -- whose adopted nickname was H.R.H. -- did not have anything like the number of years they deserved together, but what they did have was packed with enough love and laughter to fill many longer lifetimes.
Tragically, last Christmas Eve, Howard, who'd battled cancer as a child, learned that the radiation treatment that had saved his life 42 years earlier had probably led to the growth of an inoperable tumour in one of his bile ducts. In early June, Howard was given only a few days to live, but survived long enough to marry Louise and spend another week with his family and the Friends he loved. He also lived long enough to die on the day and at the hour of what used to be his absolutely favourite kind of night: just after midnight on a midsummer's eve with a full moon, which Howard used to say was "God's flashlight."
Steve, Julia, Mike and Marty are Friends of Howard HOAG.

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