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"SEA" 2003 Obituary


SEABROOK  SEAGRAM  SEALE  SEALEY  SEARLE  SEARLS  SEARS 

SEABROOK o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-12-03 published
Jack SEABROOK
The family of Jack SEABROOK, a resident of Mindemoya, regret to announce Jack's sudden death. Visitation will take place on Wednesday, December 3 at the Mindemoya United Church from 7-9p.m. The funeral service will be conducted at the church on Thursday, December 4 at 11 a.m. For further information, please call the Culgin Funeral Home 282-2270.

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SEABROOK o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-12-10 published
John Ellsworth SEABROOK
In loving memory of John Ellsworth SEABROOK July 18, 1923 to November 30, 2003.
John Ellsworth SEABROOK, known as "Jack" passed away suddenly at 80 years, on November 30, 2003.
He was born in Chatsworth, July 18, 1923 and made his home in Mindemoya, Manitoulin Island, since 1931. He leaves to remember him, his beloved wife Marion. His cherished kids: Cathy, Deb, John, Diana, Mark and Vanda. Their spouses: David, Cheryl, Keith and Michelle. His treasured grandchildren: Brent, Brady, Logan, Meg, Kate, Sarah, Jenny, Ben, Philip, A.J., Josh, Lyric, Jasmine, Morgan and Jessie. His one beautiful great grandchild Teigan. His sisters: Ella (Peggy) HAHN and Lois CHALLINOR. Predeceased Maxine PRINGLE and Fern SEABROOK. His brother, Archie. Predeceased Bill. His sisters-in-law: Joanne
SMITH, Millie SEABROOK and Aletha SEABROOK. Predeceased Lorene STANLEY. His brothers-in-law: Jim HAHN, Jim SMITH and George STANLEY. Predeceased Hugh PRINGLE. His nieces and nephews: Clay, Susan, Bill, Beth, Robert, Paul, David, Charlie, John, Geoff, Mark, Kevin and Tara. Predeceased Lynn. All will miss him dearly. He was an original. He realized his own dreams of becoming a machinist, a master mechanic, a carpenter, the developer of the Brookwood Brae Golf Course, windmill designer, gentleman farmer (all animals at his farm died of old age) and curator and creator of Jack's Agriculture Museum. We all knew and loved him and he became our example to follow our dreams. His colourful, warm character shone at auctions, plays, card games, and church committees. He was the crank shaft and spark plug of our family. He loved Massey Harris tractors, Triumph motorcycles, Blue Jay games, yellow wooden shoes, novels by Louis L'Amour, movies with John Wayne, grape juice and certo (for arthritis), raisin pie and ice cream - and us!
"Everyday you're breathin' is a good day." This philosophy was reflected in his love for his wife, his kids, his grandkids, his Friends and his community. His love will shine in those he's left behind. Friends called the Mindemoya United Church on Wednesday, December 3, 2003. Funeral service was held on Thursday, December 4, 2003 with Reverend Mary Jo ECKERT TRACY officiating. Cremation to follow. Culgin Funeral Home

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SEAGRAM o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-30 published
SEAGRAM, Campbell L.E. (Cam)
July 12, 1935 - December 28, 2003. Died peacefully, after a brief period of declining health, at Sunnybrook and Women's College Health Sciences Centre. son of the late Beryl and Campbell A. SEAGRAM. He leaves his beloved wife Janet ALLEN; sons Campbell W., Philip A., Andrew B. (Linda HAWKINS) and Mark A. (Amy;) and his grandchildren Austin, Georgia and Mac. Loved brother of Robert P. SEAGRAM and Shirley BREITHAUPT. A private service will be held.

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SEALE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-06-16 published
Dorothy Mae SEALE
By Grace STEVENSON Monday, June 16, 2003 - Page A18
Teacher, student, writer, wife and mother. Born December 7, 1907, in Chisholm Township, Ontario Died April 6, 2003, in Oshawa, Ontario, of natural causes, aged 95.
'Fifty years ago, a neighbour seeing my three small children said, 'Dorothy, this is the best part of your life.' She was wrong. Being alive right now is the best part of my life."
Dorothy SEALE wrote this two years ago in an assignment for the Creative Writing class she was enrolled in at the Oshawa Senior Citizens Centres. At the time, she was 93.
Confined to a wheelchair a great part of the day because of the ravages of peripheral neuropathy, Dorothy never lost her interest in life. Another of her articles focused on the many disturbing happenings in the world and complained that she was suffering from "a malady with no cure in sight called Too Much Information." But, much as it worried her, she made no effort to escape the information overload. She watched television, listened to radio broadcasts and ingested news reports daily. She also read and discussed with her many visitors the latest books. The day she went to the hospital and, with little warning, died, she left an atlas opened to a map of Iraq propped on a stand near her chair in her apartment.
Born to Tom and Annie ANDERSON, Dorothy grew up on a farm in Chisholm Township in Ontario. She took her nursing training at Riverdale Hospital, attended the University of Toronto, and then taught anatomy at a hospital in Quebec City. When she married Lewis SEALE, they bought a house in Sillery, a suburb of Quebec. Lewis worked in his father's lumber mill during the years their two sons and one daughter grew up. Later, he did auditing for the provincial government. Dorothy often went with him on these jobs and, while she waited in the car, made beautiful sketches of anything that caught her fancy. In 1983, they moved to Oshawa, Ontario, to be near their children, but Dorothy always retained a deep concern for the problems of the province where 53 of her 95 years were spent.
In 1987, when the program director of the Senior Citizens Centre suggested Dorothy join a memoir writing group, she protested, "I can't write; I never could write; and I come from a long line of people who didn't write." But she did join the class and, delving into her past, discovered more than one writer in her family. Her great-great-great grandfather, John THOMAS, head factor at Moosonee, Ontario, for Hudson Bay Co. between 1769 and 1813, wrote copious notes to head office. His extensive reports, now in the Hudson Bay Company archives in Winnipeg, continue to be a valuable source of research information on the era. About him, Dorothy wrote, "At this time, the company did not allow European women at its posts. So John married a native woman, Margaret (whose name he anglicized), and had nine children by her." Dorothy was very proud of her native genes.
Charles THOMAS, John's oldest son and Dorothy's great-great grandfather, was sent to England to be educated, but returned to take charge of several trading posts across Canada. He kept detailed diaries, now lost, but his life story, too, is well documented in the Hudson Bay Company archives. In more recent years, Dorothy's cousin, Stanley ANDERSON, received an Ontario Heritage Foundation award for his help in compiling a history of Chisholm Township, and a "first cousin once removed" married writer Carol SHIELDS. Dorothy was certainly wrong when she said there were no writers in her family.
Like other seniors who join writing groups, Dorothy made many new Friends and found an added dimension to her life through her writing. Although unable to attend the classes in person the last months of her life, she continued to enroll, receive the assignments, and send her submissions to the teacher every week.
Grace STEVENSON is a friend of Dorothy's.

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SEALEY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-08 published
MORRISSEY, Professor Emeritus Frederic
Resident of El Cerrito, California, and long time member of the Faculty of Berkeley's Haas School of Business, died February 27 at John Muir Hospital of complications from a brain aneurysm. He was 82 years old. Professor MORRISSEY is survived by his wife and best friend of 59 years Eileen, his son John (Kathy) of Ridgefield, Connecticut and daughter Patricia CAHILL (Brent) of Oakville, Ontario. He is also survived by ''the best grandchildren in the world'' Bob and Kelly MORRISSEY, Jonathan and Anne SEALEY, his sister Margaret BOURASSA (Rene) and numerous nieces and nephews. Professor MORRISSEY was born in Brantford, Ontario Canada and attended the University of Toronto as an undergraduate and graduate student. He then was awarded the Granville Garth Fellowship and attended Columbia University where he earned his Ph.D. in Economics. He joined the Berkeley Business School faculty in 1949, progressing through the academic ranks to full Professor of Business Administration. In addition to lecturing he served in a number of administrative positions including two separate terms as Associate Dean of Academic Affairs. As a nationally recognized expert in finance and regulation of Public Utilities he was called upon by Governor Reagan to serve on the California Public Utilities Commission, which he did for 2½ years. Upon leaving the Commission he resumed his teaching career and served as a consultant and expert witness in utility regulation cases. Upon his retirement from the University in 1985, he was awarded the Berkeley Citation for Distinguished Achievement and Notable Service to the University. In lieu of flowers the family request a donation to a charity of personal choice. A celebration of his life is planned in Oakville in May.

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SEARLE o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-05-14 published
Lois Irene (MUCKLOW) WHITE/WHYTE
In loving memory of Lois Irene (MUCKLOW) WHITE/WHYTE who passed away at Mindemoya Hospital on Thursday, May 8, 2003 at the age of 59 years.
Dear wife of Reginald WHITE/WHYTE, of Mindemoya. Predeceased by son Reginald. Predeceased by parents James and Irene MUCKLOW of North Bay. Loving sister to James and Ines MUCKLOW of Kirkland Lake, sister-in-law to Mary and Eric SEARLE of Huntsville, Beulah AYLES of Newfoundland, Doris WILHSHIRE and Weslley of Newfoundland, Millicent WILLIAMS of Denver, Colorado. Predeceased by brothers-in-law, Bill, Jack, Philip and Frank all of Newfoundland. Will be sadly missed by nieces and nephews. Visitation and Funeral Service were held on Saturday, May 10, 2003 at the Mindemoya Missionary Church. Cremation to follow. Arrangements in care of Island Funeral Home.

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SEARLS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-10-25 published
GIBSON, James Alexander, C.M., M.A., M.Litt., (D.Phil.Oxon,) LL.D President Emeritus, Brock University
After a long and useful life, clear-headed to the end, died in Ottawa on October 23, 2003. Born in Ottawa in 1912, elder son of John Wesley GIBSON and Belle Crawford McGEE; school and college in Victoria, Rhodes Scholar from British Columbia in 1931; Foreign Service Officer, Department of External Affairs (1938-47); served with the Prime Minister on missions to Washington, Quebec Conferences, San Francisco, London and Paris.
Original member of Faculty of Carleton College, (1942); from 1952, first Dean of Arts and Science, Carleton University; later Dean of Arts and Deputy to the President; in 1963, named Founding President of Brock University.
A founding member of the Canadian Association of Rhodes Scholars, he held various offices and served as editor of the newsletter for 19 years. For over 60 years, he was a member of the Canadian Historical Association and of the Canadian Institute for International Affairs, as well as national and regional voluntary organizations.
He is survived by his daughters, Julia MATTHEWS and Eleanor S. JOLY (Gerald,) and his son Peter James; grandchildren Alison MATTHEWS- DAVID (Jean Marc), Colin MATTHEWS (Nathalia), Micheline, Nina (Jean-Marc BERNIER) and Gerald JOLY, Anna GIBSON (Robert) and Hilary TERHUNE (Peter;) two great-grandchildren. His wife Caroline died in 1995; also surviving are his brother William and his sister Isobel SEARLS in Victoria.
Memorial services will be held in Ottawa (December) and in St. Catharines at Brock University on November 7th, at 3 p.m. If desired, memorial remembrances may be made to the James A. Gibson Library, Brock University, St. Catharines, Ontario L2S 3A1.

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SEARLS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-11-26 published
A scholar and a gentle man
'Fine example of a great Canadian' who founded Ontario's Brock University was once private secretary to prime minister Mackenzie KING
By Ron CSILLAG, Special to The Globe and Mail Wednesday, November 26, 2003 - Page R9
In an almost Zen-like fashion, James GIBSON knew the value of not acting. In the late 1960s, when a group of student radicals seized part of Brock University, hoping to be dragged away kicking and screaming, Dr. GIBSON, who had helped found the institution a few years earlier, reacted in a way no other university president did when faced with the same problem: He did nothing. The protesters, he reasoned, may have had legitimate grievances, but their unseemly actions offended his firm sense of propriety. In time, the students simply went away.
It was an effective, though uncharacteristic, action for a man who embodied Brock's Latin motto: "Surgite," freely translated as "push on." That he did, through some 65 rich years of advancing higher education and in public service, most notably as a private secretary to former prime minister Mackenzie KING, whose penchant for soothsaying and assorted eccentricities Dr. GIBSON kept mainly to himself until later in life.
Just five days before his death in Ottawa on October 23 at the age of 91, Dr. GIBSON was doing what he loved: Watching a new group of graduates receive their diplomas at the fall convocation of Brock University in St. Catharines, Ontario, the school he had launched as founding president in 1963.
At a recent memorial service at Brock, David ATKINSON, the university's president and vice-chancellor, recalled a man whose attributes a strong moral fibre, clarity of thought and a general uprightness, all tempered by a warm and gentle touch -- harkened to a quaint, bygone era. "It's unlikely we will meet anyone like him again," Dr. ATKINSON said.
In the House of Commons on October 27, Dr. GIBSON was praised by St. Catharines Liberal member of parliament Walt LASTEWKA as "a fine example of a great Canadian."
Dr. GIBSON, whose knowledge of Canadian history and government were legend, was in the news this past summer as the oldest of over 1,000 Rhodes Scholars who flew to England for a five-day bash honouring the centenary of the trust. With his brother William, also a Rhodes Scholar, Dr. GIBSON dedicated a re-leaded stained-glass window at the chapel of Oxford's New College.
A normally discreet man, he had sharp words for former prime minister Brian MULRONEY, not an Oxford graduate, who surprised guests at the alumni dinner -- and raised a few eyebrows -- when he took a seat on the podium alongside Oxonians Bill CLINTON and Tony BLAIR, and guest Nelson MANDELA. Many alumni, Dr. GIBSON included, felt that Mr. MULRONEY, who had been invited by The Independent newspaper chain, had no business being there. Though upset, Dr. GIBSON retained his dignity, saying simply, "I was offended."
James Alexander GIBSON was born in Ottawa, in 1912, to Canadian-born parents of Irish-Scottish stock with strong Methodist and Quaker leanings. Raised in Victoria, he graduated with a B.A. in history from the University of British Columbia at age 18. Less than a year later, he was one of the youngest boys at Oxford.
"That was the real dividing line in my life," he told The Globe and Mail last July. "The economic depression was beginning to take over and some of the graduates in my year at University of British Columbia ended up digging ditches, but I had a guaranteed income for three years."
The annual stipend was only £400 but it enabled Dr. GIBSON to live comfortably and travel to the rest of Europe when he wasn't studying modern history, debating in the Oxford Union Society and keeping wicket for the New College cricket squad, the Nomads.
Back in Ottawa and armed with a doctorate in history, he joined the Department of External Affairs. On his second day on the job, he was whisked to the prime minister's office for a six-month secondment that lasted nine years. Mr. KING, who was also External Affairs minister, blocked Dr. GIBSON's promotions to postings abroad three times because "he told me I stopped him getting into trouble."
The prime minister was a notorious taskmaster, calling on his assistant to work most evenings and weekends to draft letters and speeches. Throughout, "Dad never complained about anything," said his daughter Julia MATTHEWS. " But as he got older, he loosened up a little."
According to his daughter, he came to describe the famously erratic leader as "a very grumpy man and a very lonely man, insensitive, and quite damaging to work for."
Ultimately, it occurred to the clan that perhaps the unmarried prime minister was simply jealous of Dr. GIBSON's status as a beloved family man and father of three children. "Whenever we went on a family holiday, Dad always got called back," remembered Ms. MATTHEWS.
But a high point came in the spring of 1945, when Dr. GIBSON accompanied Mr. KING and 380 other delegates to San Francisco and the founding of the United Nations. During the historic two-month conference, Dr. GIBSON got personal glimpses of such leaders as the Soviet Union's Andrei GROMYKO and Britain's Anthony EDEN, but the task at hand, he later recalled, was to keep the Canadian prime minister "on the rails."
Fearing he would never advance in the public service, Dr. GIBSON resigned in 1947 and took a teaching post at Ottawa's Carleton University, where he later served as the first dean of arts and science and deputy to the president. By the early 1960s, he was courted by a group of community leaders in the Niagara peninsula to establish Brock University. When he began as founding president, the school had seven faculty (known as "the magnificent seven"), 29 students and a "library" consisting of a shelf of books. Today, it boasts more than 15,000 students and 47,000 alumni.
His first order of business at Brock was the creation of a library.
Now housed in the campus's Schmon Tower, it has become something of a landmark on the Niagara Escarpment. Dr. GIBSON, fondly known by faculty as "James A.," remained as Brock's president until 1974. He was named to the Order of Canada in 1992, and the library was named after him in 1996.
He was also a leading figure in the Unitarian faith, serving for a time as chaplain of the Unitarian Congregation of Niagara.
Asked what dinner-table conversation was like at home, Ms. MATTHEWS sighed good-naturedly. "Oh, God. There was a lot of current events. He had all the answers. He was always lecturing, but he could be really charming." Even after his vision started to fail, he travelled, read and wrote. "He never felt old."
After moving from his beloved St. Catharines to an Ottawa retirement home, Dr. GIBSON lectured residents on "governors-general I have known."
Dr. GIBSON was predeceased by his wife of 57 years, Caroline (née STEIN,) and leaves three children, seven grandchildren, two great-grandchildren, his brother, and a sister, Isobel SEARLS.
His final days were summed up poetically by Josephine MEEKER, a former professor at Brock. After attending the university's convocation last month, Dr. GIBSON "went for a long walk, returned to his residence, went into the lounge area, took off his coat and folded it up, put it on the back of his chair, sat down, folded his hands in his lap, closed his eyes, and died."

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SEARS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-05-02 published
Architect had a passion for museums
He won Governor-General's Award for a high-rise called 'a superior project' and helped to put the Royal Ontario Museum on the map
By Allison LAWLOR Friday, May 2, 2003 - Page R11
For Toronto architect Henry SEARS, working in museum-exhibit planning and design proved to be the perfect fit. What better place for a man interested in the world to delve into the fine details of everything from fossils to Meissen china?
"He had an inquiring mind, "said Doreen SEARS, his wife of 51 years. "[Museums] fed his natural curiosity in the most wonderful way."
Mr. SEARS, who died on March 19 at the age of 73, began his museum work in the mid-1970s at the Royal Ontario Museum when he was hired to be part of a task force to plan future expansion of the Toronto institution.
"Our job was to reimagine the Royal Ontario Museum, "said Louis LEVINE, director of collections and exhibitions at the Museum of Jewish Heritage in New York. At the time, Mr. LEVINE was a curator at the Royal Ontario Museum and part of the task force.
"He was the one who made us think. He wouldn't take fuzzy answers from us, "Mr. LEVINE said.
Mr. SEARS relished his job. Mr. LEVINE recalled how his good friend would show up at meetings unable to contain his enthusiasm. With the excitement of a young child, he would describe to the group, many of whom were academic archeologists, what he had learned on his travels through the museum.
"He was hungry for information. He wanted to know how things work, "said his son Joel SEARS.
The task force produced an influential publication called Communicating With the Museum Visitor in 1976, which became a textbook for museum work, said Dan RAHIMI, director of collections management at the Royal Ontario Museum. The publication put the museum on the world map as being a leader in museum theory, Mr. RAHIMI added.
In subsequent years, Mr. SEARS continued to work with the Royal Ontario Museum on various projects ranging from designing travelling exhibits to gallery space. "He was so sensitive to the content. He would always ask what is this gallery about? What stories do they tell?" Mr. RAHIMI said.
Aside from the Royal Ontario Museum, Mr. SEARS worked with several other museums across Canada, the United States and Europe. In recent years, he and his firm Sears and Russell were working with the National Museum of Ireland in Dublin in the planning for a new permanent gallery. Mr. SEARS also worked with the Nova Scotia Museum, the Peabody Museum at Yale University and the National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution, among others.
"I don't think he ever had the sense that he would ever retire," said Jeff WEATHERSTON, an architect at Sears and Russell. "He just loved the work here."
Henry SEARS was born in Toronto on October 30, 1929. After graduating from Harbord Collegiate Institute in downtown Toronto, he went on to study architecture at the University of Toronto, from which he graduated in 1954. While at university he met a young woman named Doreen on a blind date. The couple married on July 1, 1951, and later had two sons.
After graduating from university, the young couple headed to Europe where they spent six months travelling before heading home. Back in Toronto, Mr. SEARS went to work for a variety of architectural firms before heading out on his own. In the late 1950s he and a partner Jeff KLEIN started the firm Klein and Sears. They worked on several housing projects in the city, including the Alexandra Park Co-operative. Built in the 1960s, the large public-housing project was one of the city's earliest such schemes.
A fellow of the Royal Architectural Institute of Canada, Mr. SEARS received a Governor-General's Award for residential design in 1985. The award was for Cadillac Fairview Corp.'s Bay-Charles Towers, a mixed-use project designed by Mr. SEARS.
"A superior project, "the jury selecting the winners said at the time. According to the jury, the Toronto project shows that "the basic high-rise type provides opportunities for richness of expression hitherto rarely explored."
In 1984, Mr. SEARS created a new firm called Sears and Russell that was dedicated solely to museum work. Over the years, he acted as a mentor to several young architects who came to work for him and others who worked with him in the museum field.
Outside of work, Mr. SEARS loved to travel, and spent time at the family's country place near Meaford, north of Toronto, and on a sailboat on Lake Ontario. An avid sailor, Mr. SEARS continued to race even last year. "He was endlessly energetic and enthusiastic," Joel SEARS said.
Mr. SEARS, who died following a battle with cancer, leaves his wife, Doreen, and sons Alan and Joel.
"He was an optimist to the last minute, "Mr. LEVINE said. "He added beauty to the world."

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SEARS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-10-13 published
BENT, Vera Clara (née SEARS)
With her family at her side, Vera died peacefully at the North York Seniors Health Centre, Friday, October 10, 2003 in her 99th year. Beloved wife of the late Norman Arthur BENT. Devoted mother of Maurice BENT and Margie Penhallow. Loving mother-in-law of Pat BENT. Beloved sister of Margaret and Mable and the late Harry, Art, Ernie, Dorothy and Annie. Dearest Nana of Jacqueline KENNEDY (John,) Stephen BENT (Tara,) Warren BENT (Jody,) Andrea BENT and Tim PENHALLOW. Proud great grandmother of Madison, Lauren, Cameron, Charlotte and Graydon. Special thanks to Carol and to the staff of the 4th Floor at North York Seniors Health Centre for all their loving care and compassion. A private family service will be held at the Humphrey Funeral Home - A. W. Miles Chapel, 1403 Bayview Avenue (south of Eglinton Avenue East), on Wednesday, October 15. Interment Pine Hills Cemetery. If desired, donations may be made to North York General Hospital Building Fund, 4001 Leslie Street, Toronto, M2K 1E1.

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