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"SCO" 2003 Obituary


SCOBIE  SCOFIELD  SCOTT  SCOULER 

SCOBIE o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-01-08 published
Donald Arthur CASSIDY
In loving memory of Donald Arthur CASSIDY " Hop" at Manitoulin Health Centre in Little Current on Monday January 6, 2003 in his 75th year.
Beloved husband of Lillian (née FLAHERTY.) Predeceased by parents Ernest and Helen CASSIDY. Brother of Eunice SCOBIE of Dundas and Beatrice WHITE/WHYTE of Columbia, South Carolina. Predeceased by brother Leonard and sister Madeline. Cherished father of Janice BOOKER of Ridgeway, William (Bill) of Port Colborne, Ruth WILSON (Bruce) of Little Current, Beverly CASSIDY (Scott MURRAY) of Welland and Roger of Little Current.
Beloved grandfather of Derek, Tammy, Scott, Gregory, Joshua, Sarah, Valerie, Brett, and Brian. Great grandfather of three. Uncle of many nieces and nephews. Visitation from 2: 00 until Memorial service at 3: 30 p.m. Wednesday January 8, 2003 at Grace Bible Church.

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SCOBIE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-19 published
The voice of Ontario horse racing
For three decades, the announcer added detail and drama to his calls at Woodbine, Fort Erie and Greenwood tracks
By Allison LAWLOR, Special to The Globe and Mail Friday, December 19, 2003 - Page R13
When the great Secretariat burst out of the starting gate at Toronto's Woodbine Race Track on that dark and miserable day in late October, 1973, in what would be his final race, Daryl WELLS was behind the microphone calling the race for fans.
"In a blaze of glory, ladies and gentlemen, he's all yours," Mr. WELLS cried as the Triple Crown-winner won the Canadian International by 12 lengths.
Daryl WELLS Jr. was there that day in the announcer's booth to hear what would be his father's most famous call and share his excitement of seeing the last career race of the horse, considered by many to be the greatest thoroughbred of all time.
"I thought it was the greatest thing that ever happened," said Daryl WELLS Jr., who carried on the tradition and now calls races at Ontario's Fort Erie track.
Mr. WELLS, the voice of Ontario thoroughbred racing for more 30 years, from just after the new Woodbine Race Track opened in the spring of 1956 to the summer of 1986, died last Friday of heart disease in Niagara Falls, Ontario He was 81.
For three decades, Mr. WELLS was at the Ontario Jockey Club microphone, describing the thoroughbred races at Woodbine, Fort Erie and Greenwood, entertaining fans with his calls that were both accurate and exciting. When the gates opened, fans could often be heard imitating his familiar, trademark call: "They're off."
Whether it was a small, weekday afternoon race or the prestigious Queen's Plate, Mr. WELLS made every call dramatic and detailed. "Every horse got his call," said his long-time friend Gary ALLES.
Behind the microphone, Mr. WELLS was a pro who also had a mischievous streak that could sometimes be seen in the announcer's booth. Mr. ALLES remembers one day sitting next to his friend while he was calling a race at Woodbine. A second after telling fans where their horses were in the race, he switched off his microphone and asked Mr. ALLES which horse he had betted on that day. Back to the microphone, he gave fans a quick update before turning off the microphone again. This time with the microphone off, he started giving Mr. ALLES the call he really wanted to hear that his horse looked poised to win. But before Mr. ALLES could get too excited the microphone was back on again and Mr. WELLS was giving fans the true account of the race.
"He had a mischievousness that emanated from his eyes," Mr. ALLES said.
Daryl Frederick WELLS was born on December 10, 1922, in Victoria. As a young boy, he would tag along when his parents went to the races. "That's what got him interested," said his wife, Marian WELLS.
By the age of 15, he had entered the broadcasting world as a disc jockey, after a local radio station allowed him to play a few records. "It [his career] took off from there," Daryl WELLS Jr. said.
Several years later, he headed east and got a job in the sports department of radio station CHML in Hamilton, where he worked in the 1940s and 1950s and later as a sports director for CHCH-TV. During the Second World War, he served for a time in Britain with the Canadian Army.
Ed BRADLEY, a former general manager of Greenwood, Mohawk and Garden City Raceways, can remember his first introduction to Mr. WELLS in 1955. Working then as an announcer at Long Branch track in Toronto's west end, Mr. BRADLEY recalls one day seeing a man standing around outside his announcer's booth watching while he worked.
The next day he saw the same man again. Mr. BRADLEY was curious about this mysterious man but thought nothing of him again until the following spring when the track opened in Fort Erie. He was in the announcing booth when his manager came to him to tell him he had a new guy for him to break in.
"The guy walked in and it was Daryl WELLS," Mr. BRADLEY said.
They got down to work and, right away, Mr. BRADLEY recognized Mr. WELLS's voice from his broadcasting work. After three days of training, Mr. WELLS was ready to call a race on his own.
"He turned out to be a real pro," Mr. BRADLEY said, adding that Mr. WELLS was very descriptive in his calls and got to know what the jockeys were doing during a race.
During a time when horse racing was among the country's favourite sports, and fans would regularly stream out of work to head to the bar to watch a race, Mr. WELLS was its voice, said Wally WOOD, a former long-time racing columnist. "He was the poster boy for the sport," Mr. Wood said. "He was willing to do anything to promote racing....
"He was very good for racing," Mr. WOOD added.
A true showman, Mr. WELLS not only had the voice, but he looked as though he had just stepped out of an Armani commercial. "Daryl was show business and he dressed like it," Mr. ALLES said.
After 30 years as a well-loved fixture in the announcing booth, Mr. WELLS left Woodbine in July of 1986 amid controversy. His employers suspended him after the Ontario Racing Commission fined him for his part in a 1983 wager that returned a $237,598 payoff. "Touting" (volunteering an opinion on the outcome of a race for profit) was the official description and is strictly against the rules. While it was never a case of Mr. WELLS affecting the outcome of a race, he was suspended and his career as a horse-race announcer was over.
"He missed the excitement of the track," Ms. WELLS said, adding that it was the people he missed most of all. After he left Woodbine, he seldom went to the track except on special occasions.
"He always wanted to be surrounded by people," said Ms. WELLS, who never knew when she would come home to find her husband throwing an impromptu party.
Mr. WELLS, who had been living in Lewiston, New York since the late 1980s, died on December 12 at the Greater Niagara General Hospital in Niagara Falls. He leaves his wife; children Dana, Daryl Jr. and Wendy; sister Velda SCOBIE; and stepchildren Michael, Kelly and Jeffrey.

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SCOFIELD o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-24 published
Fight master set standards for stage combat
Canadian Press, Wednesday, December 24, 2003 - Page R9
Stratford, Ontario -- Patrick (Paddy) CREAN, a longtime fight director at the Stratford Festival who set international standards on staging combat in theatre, died Monday after an illness. He was 93.
Mr. CREAN, who was a competitive fencer, began choreographing fights in 1932 when he was working in his native England as an actor in The Legends of Don Juan. From then on he was frequently hired to stage fight scenes in theatre and movies such as The Master of Ballantree and The Sword of Sherwood Forest. He worked with actors including Paul SCOFIELD, Laurence OLIVIER, Trevor HOWARD, Alec GUINNESS, Douglas FAIRBANKS Jr. and Errol FLYNN, often acting as FLYNN's stunt double in movies.
Mr. CREAN first came to the Stratford Festival in 1962 to be fight arranger for a staging of Macbeth and ended up by making Stratford his home. He remained as festival fight director until 1983, arranging combat scenes for such demanding productions as The Three Musketeers. He continued to work as an actor, sometimes taking small roles in shows for which he had done fight arranging and also performing a one-man show, The Sun Never Sets. A funeral will be held Saturday in Stratford.

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SCOTT o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-05-21 published
Nellie Eveleen NOLAND
Nellie NOLAND, a resident of Bayside Apartments, Gore Bay, passed away at the Mindemoya Hospital on Monday, May 19, 2003 at the age of 84 years.
She was born in Burpee Township, daughter of the late Thomas and Flora SCOTT) WITTY. Nellie worked hard all her life on the farm, cleaning camps and cottages and raising her family. She enjoyed cooking, baking, sewing, knitting and crocheting many items for all her family and the community. She was a member of the United Church and Mills Women’s Institute for many years. A loving and loved mother, grandmother, and friend, she will be sadly missed, but memories will be cherished.
Dearly loved and loving wife of the late George E. NOLAND, loving and loved mother of Frederick (predeceased Oct 10 1939,) Doris MIDDAUGH (husband Raymond) of Mills, Willard NOLAND (wife Donna) of Mills, and Margery VEAUDRY (husband Rheo, Ray) of Providence Bay. Dear brother of Ken WITTY of Thessalon. Predeceased by sisters Ruby and Bella and brothers Willard, James and Grant. Dear grandmother of 14 grandchildren and many great-grandchildren. Also survived by a number of nieces and nephews. Relatives and Friends will meet at the Burpee-Mills Cemetery on Wednesday, May 21, 2003 at 11: 00 am for a graveside service. The Reverend Geraldine BOULD will officiate. There will be no funeral home visitation at Nellie’s request.

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SCOTT o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-08-20 published
Lottie Mae McDONALD
In loving memory of Lottie Mae McDONALD, July 29, 1922 to August 14, 2003.
Lottie Mae McDONALD, a resident of Meadowview Apartments, Mindemoya, passed away at her residence on Thursday, August 14, 2003 at the age of 81 years. She was born in Gordon Township daughter of the late William and Sarah (STRAIN) SCOTT. Lottie Mae had been very active in her community, having been a member of the Horticultural Society, The Agricultural Society and a School Board Trustee for 18 years. She had many hobbies, including gardening, knitting, sewing, and quilting. Well known and respected in her community, she will be sadly missed by all who knew her. A loving mother, grandmother, sister and friend, many fond memories will be cherished. She was predeceased by her husband Jack McDONALD in 1984. Loving and loved mother of John and his wife Anita of Sioux Lookout, Peter and his wife Nancy of Kenora, Carey of Orillia, Penny and husband Milford of Barrie, Paul and his wife Christine of Sudbury and Adam and his wife Kathy of Mindemoya. Proud grandmother of Bonnie, Jason, Jacqueline, Sean, Jane, Casey, Scott, Lindsay, Ben, Kaitlyn and T.J. Dear sister of Beatrice BEANGE, Ted SCOTT (predeceased,) Margie BLACKBURN, Maria McDERMID, John SCOTT and Fred SCOTT. Friends called the Salem Missionary Church, Spring Bay, on Friday, August 15, 2003. The funeral service was conducted at the Church on Saturday, August 16, 2003 with pastor Al WILKINSON officiating. Interment in Providence Bay Cemetery. Culgin Funeral Home.

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SCOTT o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-02-21 published
Elizabeth Audrey HEILIG (née HILLMER)
Daughter of the late Robert and Mabel HILLMER of Southampton Ontario and long time resident of Oakville, Ontario Died peacefully and with grace in her 98th year on February 19th, 2003. She was predeceased by her husband Carl, her son Kenneth, her brother George HILLMER and her sister-in-law Margaret HEILIG. She will be missed by her son Bob (Margaret), daughter Margie (Ron), daughter-in-law Kay SCOTT and her ten grandchildren- John, Katherine HEINRICHS, Nancy, Mike; Chris, David, Karen GRANT, Linda, James; Daniel ROGERS. She is also survived by her sister-in-law Alice HEILIG of Hamilton and 15 great-grandchildren. We would like to thank Tita BAGUISA for her devoted care of Elizabeth and the staff of North York Seniors Health Centre for their sensitive support. A Memorial Service will be held on February 22nd at the North York Seniors Health Centre, 2 Buchan Court, North York at 2: 00pm. In lieu of flowers donations may be sent to the Marine Heritage Society, Box 421, Southampton, Ontario N0H 2L0 or your favourite charity.

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SCOTT o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-06 published
Died This Day -- Thomas SCOTT, 1870
Thursday, March 6, 2003 - Page R9
Orangeman adventurer and settler born about 1842 at Clandeboye, Ireland, in 1863, arrived in Canada and drifted west, in 1869, settled at Red River Colony (Manitoba) to work as a labourer, held anti-Catholic views fiercely opposed to Métis, arrested by Louis RIEL's followers, insulted and provoked jailers, in March, 1870, put on trial for insubordination and condemned to death, executed by Métis firing squad at Fort Garry.

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SCOTT o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-07 published
OXTOBY, Willard Gurdon
Professor Emeritus of Comparative Religion at Trinity College, the University of Toronto. Widely respected for his contribution to the understanding of other faiths, Will contributed to and edited the widely read book World Religions. Born in 1933 in Marin County, California, Will graduated Phi Beta Kappa from Stanford University and earned his Ph.D. in Near Eastern Studies at Princeton, with post-doctoral studies at Harvard Divinity School. After working for two years in Jerusalem with the team translating and interpreting the Dead Sea Scrolls, Will received his ordination from the Presbyterian Church in California. In his more than 40-year career as a professor, he taught at McGill, Yale, the University of Toronto, and the College of William and Mary. At the U of T, he launched the Graduate Centre for the Study of Religion in 1976. Will married Layla JURJI in 1958, and together they had two children, David and Susan OXTOBY. Subsequent to Layla's death from cancer in 1980, Will married Julia CHING, a renowned scholar of Chinese philosophy and religion, and recipient of the Order of Canada. Julia, the adoptive mother of John CHING, who died of cancer in 2001. Will's loving care for both Layla and Julia during their illnesses will be long remembered. Willard OXTOBY died of cancer on March 6 in Toronto, at age 69. He will be greatly missed by his daughters-in-law Julie SCOTT and Helen CHING, by grandchildren Duke and Tessa OXTOBY and Erica and Michelle CHING, and by his brother Lowell and sister Louise and their families. Will touched the lives of many Friends and colleagues, and will be remembered fondly by many former students. The family will receive visitors at Morley Bedford Funeral Home, 159 Eglinton Ave. W., on Sunday, March 9 from 2-5 p.m. Funeral Service will beheld at Trinity College Chapel, 6 Hoskin Ave., on Wednesday, March 12 at 3 p.m. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made in memory of Willard G.Oxtoby, c/o The Hospital for Sick Children Foundation supporting Neurosurgery, 555 University Ave. Toronto, M5G 1X8 or online at www.sickkids.ca.

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SCOTT o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-04-22 published
Died This Day -- Richard SCOTT, 1913
Tuesday, April 22, 2003 - Page R7
Politician born February 25, 1825, at Prescott, Ontario; in 1852, elected mayor of Ottawa; won seat in provincial parliament; in 1874, named to Senate by Prime Minister Alexander Mackenzie served as Secretary of State 1874-78, and 1896-1908; died in Ottawa.

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SCOTT o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-06-12 published
Notice To Creditors And Others
All claims against the estate of Mary Pauline OAKLEY, late of the City of Toronto and Province of Ontario, who died on the 22nd day of November, 2002, must be filed with the undersigned personal representatives on or before July 17, 2003. Thereafter, the undersigned will distribute the assets of the said Estate having regard only to the claims then filed
Dated at Toronto this 10th day of June, 2003.
Ronald L. MacFEETERS, Sheila A. MacFEETERS and Linton W. SCOTT, Estate Trustees With A Will, by Homested and Sutton, Barristers and Solicitors, Suite 700, 4 King Street W., Toronto, Ontario M5H 1B6
Page B11

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SCOTT o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-06-12 published
Three cheers for a funny fellow
Like his hapless Canadian hero, he often found himself in hilarious situations
By Carol COOPER Special to The Globe and Mail Thursday, June 12, 2003 - Page R9
Once in the middle of an interview at the Toronto airport, writer Donald JACK left to fetch a document from his car. Notorious for a sense of direction so poor he found it difficult to navigate through a city park, let alone the airport's massive parking lot, Mr. JACK took so long to find his vehicle that by the time he returned the interviewers had gone.
Like Bartholomew Bandy, the hapless hero of The Bandy Papers, Mr. JACK's eight-volume comic-novel series describing an Ottawa Valley boy's adventures during both world wars and between, the author often found himself in hilarious situations, made the more so by his telling.
A three-time winner of the Stephen Leacock Memorial Medal for Humour, Mr. JACK died last week at his home in England. He was Listeners were reduced to tears of laughter by his tales of construction disasters while having a villa built in Spain; a house sale falling through on closing day; and an aging bright yellow car named Buttercup, whose sun roof shattered soon after it was searched for drugs at the Spanish-French border, showering Mr. JACK with glass, insects and rust.
Once, while being toured with his daughter around the offices of his publisher, McClelland and Stewart, Mr. JACK entered the boardroom and shouted with surprise. There on the carpet lay a large amount of dog excrement left by an employee's pet. In his Bandy-like way, the writer very nearly stepped into it.
"If you could choose one author out of the entire world who during a visit to his publisher would stumble across this, it would be Donald JACK," said Douglas GIBSON, president and publisher of McClelland and Stewart, who knew the writer for more than 30 years.
"Things would go wrong for Don, very seldom caused by himself," said Munroe SCOTT, a close friend of more than 45 years. "He would narrate all this stuff either in person or in a letter and make it all hilarious, because he always saw, in retrospect at any rate, the funny side of things. You'd be doubled up with laughter."
Despite Mr. JACK's incident-prone nature, it would be a mistake to see Mr. JACK as a buffoon, said Mr. SCOTT, also a writer. "He was enormously well read, erudite and could handle the language with aplomb at many levels. He could make me feel like a Philistine."
Said author Austin CLARKE, who was Mr. JACK's neighbour for five years during the 1960s. "He was a quiet, reserved, retiring kind of man. You would never have known he was a writer."
Mr. JACK's Leacock medals came for three volumes of The Bandy Papers: Three Cheers for Me, in 1963, That's Me in the Middle, in 1974 and Me Bandy, You Cissie, in 1980. Published between 1963 and 1996, they still enjoy a loyal following, including a Web site which draws mail from around the world. Six of the eight volumes were recently reissued by McClelland and Stewart.
Drawn from Mr. JACK's fascination with the First World War, the rural people he met in the Ottawa Valley and his time in the Royal Air Force, The Bandy Papers feature the blundering Bartholomew Wolfe Bandy, who in the first volume, Three Cheers for Me, inadvertently becomes a hero, despite capturing his own colonel by mistake.
Ensuing volumes follow Mr. Bandy's adventures through to the Second World War. Although devastatingly funny, they also describe war's horrors and the realities of the home front, and lampoon war's leaders.
Mr. Bandy encounters and influences historical figures, such as then British minister of defence Winston Churchill, and generously offers him use of the altered Bandy phrase "blood, sweat, toil and tears."
While best known for The Bandy Papers, Mr. JACK wrote countless documentary film scripts, stage, television and radio plays, as well as two non-fiction books: the history of a Toronto radio station, Sinc, Betty and the Morning Man, and another about medicine in Canada, Rogues, Rebels and Geniuses.
His third play, The Canvas Barricade, won first prize in the Stratford Shakespearean Playwriting Competition in 1960. Produced in 1961, it was the first, and remains the only, original Canadian play performed on the main stage of the Stratford Festival.
Mr. JACK, however, did not see much of its opening. He left the auditorium for the lobby. "During the performance, we'd be aware of a crack of light from a door opening slightly and a white face would stare through, then vanish for a while, before another door would open a crack, and the same apparition would fleetingly appear," Mr. Scott said.
Born on December 6, 1924 in Radcliffe, Lancashire, England, Donald Lamont JACK was one of four children of a British doctor and a nurse from Prince Edward Island. After attending Bury Grammar School in Lancashire and Marr College in Scotland, he gained enough qualifications to attend London University.
While stationed in Germany with the Royal Air Force in the last year of the Second World War, Mr. JACK attempted short-story writing, but thought he lacked talent. After his mother asked him, "Isn't it about time you left home?" Mr. JACK immigrated to Canada in 1951.
Interspersed with jobs as a member of a surveying crew in Alberta and a bank teller in Toronto, Mr. JACK studied at the Canadian Theatre School in Toronto run by Sterndale BENNETT. There he wrote two plays, one of which drew praise from theatre critic Nathan COHEN and a job offer from a film Company. Mr. COHEN later wrote Mr. Scott, decrying Canadian theatre's "shameful treatment" of Mr. JACK, which largely ignored him.
A theatrical background enhanced Mr. JACK's writing, according to Mr. Gibson. "His dialogue was terrific and his scene-setting was excellent."
After leaving the school, with the encouragement of his wife, Nancy, whom he married in 1952, Mr. JACK worked in the script department of Crawley Films in Ottawa. Two years later in 1955, the company's head, Budge CRAWLEY, let him go because he thought Mr. JACK would never make a good writer.
A dry first year of freelancing followed, until in 1957 Mr. JACK sold the play version of his novelette Breakthrough, published in Maclean's, to Canadian Broadcasting Corporation Television. It became the first Canadian television play to be simultaneously telecast to the United States.
He never looked back. By 1972, A Collection of Canadian Plays, Vol. 1, which included Exit Muttering by Mr. JACK, noted he had written 40 television plays, 35 documentary film scripts, several radio plays and four stage plays. The works included Royal Canadian Navy and Canadian Armed Forces training films for the National Film Board and often demanded a great deal of research.
Mr. JACK wrote with military discipline, beginning at 9 a.m., taking tea at 11 a.m., lunch at 1 p.m., tea again at 3 p.m. and finishing at 5 p.m. "All my life, I swear, that routine never altered," said one of his daughters, Lulu HILTON.
Persisting in writing drafts in pen and ink long before adopting the typewriter and, much later, a word processor, Mr. JACK often developed storylines while walking. A 1959 Canadian Broadcasting Corporation press release explains Mr. JACK's dedication: "My self-discipline is to keep reminding myself of how lucky I am to be able to be the only thing I ever really wanted to be -- a writer."
During the early 1980s, Mr. JACK and his wife returned to England to be near their daughters who had emigrated there, and their grandchildren. Mr. JACK missed Canada's open spaces and its classless society, and visited often.
At the time of his death, he was working on the ninth volume of The Bandy Papers. He died on or about June 2 of a massive stroke at his home in Telford, Shropshire, England. He leaves his two daughters, Maren and Lulu, six grandchildren and one great-grandchild, a brother and a sister. His wife Nancy died in 1991.

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SCOTT o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-06-23 published
GILLESPIE, Harriet Louise (née MORTON)
Died peacefully on June 21, 2003. Harriet was born May 24, 1926 in Glace Bay, Nova Scotia, daughter of Edith L. and W. Douglas MORTON. Devoted wife of John B. GILLESPIE, Q.C., Toronto, for almost 55 wonderful years. Loving mother of Joan (Andrew POTTINGER,) Jill, Jay (Lili HOFSTADER) and Susan (Paul NICHOLAS). Grandmother of Leigh and Drew POTTINGER of W. Vancouver, Ben and Claire SCOTT of Sydney, Australia, Sean and Jackie GILLESPIE of Toronto and Hattie NICHOLAS of Ottawa. Sister of Douglas B. MORTON and Scott MORTON, Nova Scotia. Service will be held on Wednesday, June 25, 2003 at 3 p.m. at St. Leonard's Anglican Church, 25 Wanless Avenue. No visitation is planned. In lieu of flowers, donations in Harriet's memory may be made to either Sunnybrook Hospital or The Canadian Cancer Society.

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SCOTT o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-07-24 published
Died This Day -- Dorothy COLLINS, 1994
Thursday, July 24, 2003 - Page R7
Singer and actor born Marjorie CHANDLER in Windsor, Ontario, on November 18, 1926; in 1950s, performed on television's Your Hit Parade; sang trademark Be Happy, Go Lucky for sponsor Lucky Strike cigarettes; later performed weekly top hits; in the 1960s, demonstrated flair for comedy in helping set up gags on unwitting victims for Allen Funt's Candid Camera; married to bandleader/composer Raymond SCOTT, with whom she ran a record label; starred in original Broadway cast of Stephen Sondheim's Follies; regarded as one of finest vocalists of her era; died of heart attack in New York.

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SCOTT o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-07-31 published
Died This Day -- Jay SCOTT, 1993
Thursday, July 31, 2003 - Page R7
Journalist, critic and author born Jeffrey Scott BEAVEN in Lincoln, Neb., on October 4, 1949; raised in New Mexico. Moved to Canada in 1975 and, two years later, relocated from Calgary to Toronto (changing his name to Jay SCOTT) to write insightful film reviews for The Globe and Mail until his death at 43 from Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome-related causes.

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SCOTT o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-09-04 published
Artist and portraitist refused to compromise
Works in his trademark use of colour hang in the Art Gallery of Ontario, Toronto's Mount Sinai Hospital and in private collections
By Carol COOPER Special to The Globe and Mail Thursday, September 4, 2003 - Page R9
When the director of the University of Toronto's Hart House Gallery needed a portrait of Hart House warden Dr. Jean LENGELLÉ, she called artist Gerald SCOTT.
"In this case, Gerry was a perfect fit for Jean, because Jean wanted something that was not staid and traditional, which is certainly Gerry," said the director, Judi SCHWARTZ.
"He [Dr. LENGELLÉ] liked the patterning approach that Gerry took, and the two of them got along very well."
Mr. SCOTT painted the 1977 LENGELLÉ portrait and countless others in the manner of his friend and mentor, Group of Seven artist Fred VARLEY.
"Gerry placed colours together that you wouldn't think of, and when you stand back from the painting, you get the effect of the work, and when you get closer to it, you start to notice the colours," Ms. SCHWARTZ said of the LENGELLÉ portrait.
One of the foremost Canadian portrait painters, whose works hung in the inaugural exhibition of Toronto's prominent Greenwich Gallery along with those of Michael Snow, Graham Coughtry and William Ronald and are found in the Art Gallery of Ontario, Toronto's Mount Sinai Hospital and numerous private collections, Mr. SCOTT died of cancer at the age of 76. Along with Dr. LENGELLÉ, Mr. SCOTT's subjects included a Bermudan prime minister and a Baroness Rothschild. One of six children, whose father worked as a building engineer and car salesman, Gerald William SCOTT was born in Saint John. Although his birth certificate reads September 30, 1926, Mr. SCOTT always said it was wrong and he was born in 1925. To help support his family during the Depression, Mr. SCOTT danced on the city's docks, missing school to do so. After service in the Canadian army during the Second World War, he returned to Toronto where his family had settled.
There he met and married the Italian countess Josephine Maria INVIDIATTA. An English teacher who recognized her husband's gifts, she taught Mr. SCOTT to read. Thereafter, he read incessantly, devouring all types of material. Countess INVIDIATTA also encouraged Mr. SCOTT to attend the Ontario College of Art, now named the Ontario College of Art and Design.
Graduating from the college in 1949, Mr. SCOTT won the Reeves Award for all-round technical proficiency in drawing and painting. After a short career in advertising and turning down an opportunity to do a cover for Time magazine, he focused on fine art.
Mr. SCOTT taught at his alma mater part-time from 1952 to 1958 and full-time for a period beginning in 1963. And he participated in shows at both The Roberts Gallery and The Greenwich Gallery, later renamed The Isaacs Gallery.
While other artistic styles, such as abstract expressionism came and went, Mr. SCOTT continued with portraiture. "He didn't want to compromise his style," said his son Paul SCOTT. "He didn't follow trends."
Lacking the time to develop a body of work for a show, and with a self-effacing temperament which disliked the gallery scene, by the mid-eighties Mr. SCOTT no longer exhibited his work, sticking to commissions and teaching, and writing plays and poetry.
Teaching took up much of Mr. SCOTT's time, and he was known as a good one. For 25 years, he taught at the Three Schools of Art and later at the Forest Hill Art Club, both in Toronto.
"He was an inspirational teacher," said Michael GERRY, a student of Mr. SCOTT for six years and now an instructor at Central Technical High School in Toronto.
"He was one of the few people around who understands the vocabulary. He really knew his lessons. Not only was he skillful, he was thoughtful, unusually thoughtful. Colour and temperature were his specialty."
Said his friend and fellow artist Telford FENTON, "He had wonderful use of colour. It spoke to you."
A deliberate, patient and methodical instructor, popular with Rosedale matrons, Mr. SCOTT taught his students to observe colour. "He could see colour everywhere," said Joan CONOVER, who served as a portrait model for Mr. SCOTT. 'They're [the colours] there, Joanie,' he would say to me. 'All you have to do is stop looking. Close your eyes and then open them, very quickly. Close them, open them again, and you'll get a brief glimpse [of the colours].'"
Mr. SCOTT also demonstrated painting for his students. "Most teachers would not demonstrate," said another SCOTT student Roger BABCOCK. " His demonstrations were like a Polaroid picture. They would form before your eyes."
When students complained of lack of subjects, Mr. SCOTT told them how he stayed up nights painting works of his hand.
As he taught, Mr. SCOTT discussed the Bible, religion or politics. But he would not discuss his war experiences, according to Ms. CONOVER. "It made his stomach hurt," she said.
Mr. SCOTT used his right thumb for certain strokes, and was highly critical of his work, only signing it with persuasion.
Good Friends since the fifties with Mr. FENTON, the pair was known as the Laurel and Hardy of the art world.
Once, they sold the same painting to three different clients, eventually making good to all three. Another time while sailing, Mr. SCOTT's boat crashed into the dock of the Royal Canadian Yacht Club. Always charming Mr. SCOTT ended up in the club's bar, along with those of his party, treated to a round of drinks.
Mr. SCOTT continued working until he suffered a heart attack three years ago.
He died on July 13 and leaves his partner Joyce, two ex-wives, children Paul, Sarah, Hannah, Rebecca, Aaron, Amelia Jordan, Jarod and Dana, and five grandchildren. His first wife, Josephine, and a son, Simon, predeceased him.

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SCOTT o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-09-17 published
Malcolm "Mac" THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON
By Beth THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON Wednesday, September 17, 2003 - Page A26
Husband, father, grandfather, entrepreneur. Born May 1, 1936, in Montreal. Died March 13, in Lindsay, Ontario, of cancer, aged From a very early age, Mac was intrigued with the workings of the world and anxious to find his place in it. It didn't take him long to land his first job, as a 12-year-old delivering telegrams on bicycle throughout hilly Montreal, and later, grocery orders, thrilled with every small tip he received. Over the course of the next few years he would hold a variety of jobs, assisting a number of uncles in their wide-ranging business ventures including one who trained horses at Blue Bonnets racetrack, one who ran a house painting company, and one who owned a cigar store on Sherbrooke Street. As the only child of John and Gertie THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON, he regaled his parents often with work anecdotes. Story-telling was a trait Mac cultivated early and called upon often throughout his life.
Growing up in the east end of Montreal, his first life lessons were learned on the street: how to speak French and how to make Friends quickly, two traits he proudly carried with him throughout his life. After graduating from Sir George Williams (now Concordia University,) he married his high-school girlfriend, Ann SCOTT, in 1958, and accepted a job with Armstrong Cork in Montreal. Two children soon followed, Steve and Beth, and then a few job transfers with Armstrong, first to Waterloo, Quebec, and then to Lindsay, Ontario, in the capacity of plant manager of Britton Carpets. It was in Lindsay that his third child, Max, was born.
He left the carpet mill in the early 1970s to begin living his real dream -- working in the hospitality industry. He built a small inn in Lindsay, the Red Carpet Inn, starting with just 12 rooms and a restaurant. Over time, and with the help of his family and business partners, he successfully grew the business to include 64 guest rooms, several banquet facilities, a restaurant and bar.
In 1988, widowed and aged 52, Mac was at a place in life where others might start to slow down. He chose to gear up. He found love again and began sharing his life with Judy MATTE, whom he married in 1990, welcoming her two grown children Dan and Julie.
By this time, Mac had sold the Red Carpet Inn and was initiating a new chapter in his career: Pizza Hut. The first franchise was built in Lindsay, and within a few years, he and his family had grown the business to include 18 stores: 11 in Ontario (including one Taco Bell and one Kentucky Fried Chicken) and seven in Quebec.
Throughout his career, Mac was active with a number of organizations, most notably serving as the charter treasurer of the Lindsay Ross Memorial Hospital Foundation from January 1989 to June 1992. He also offered his services as party treasurer of the Victoria-Haliburton Liberal Party. In a business capacity, Mac sat on numerous committees for the Pizza Hut/Tricon organization.
His efforts did not go unnoticed: he won the 1988 National Pizza Hut Franchisee of the Year Award, the 1994 Franchise Business Consultant Award and the 2001 Tricon Global Partnering Award.
Mac was not immune to tragedy, having to endure the death of his son Steve in 1999, but he bore it bravely, choosing to focus his positive energy and ever-ready sense of humour on his growing family, which had expanded to include eight grandchildren and a number of daughters- and sons-in-law.
Although many will remember Mac for his keen business sense, his real legacy is his staunch belief in the indomitability of the human spirit, never losing sight of what tomorrow had to offer. As he was fond of telling his grandchildren, "Keep the faith," a motto he himself practised until the end.
Beth THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON is Mac's daughter.

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SCOTT o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-09-19 published
SCOTT, Lewis Clayton - August 16, 1909 - September 17, 2003
Died peacefully at Southlake Village Nursing Home, age 94, after a full and distinguished life as a sportsman. In an era when shooting, fishing, hunting and riding were the epitome of sportsmanship, Scott excelled at all.
Born on August 16, 1909 in Vermillion, South Dakota, Lew came to Toronto at an early age with his family. One of his first employers was the Toronto Carpet Company (where he met his future wife Alice PARKER.) He then moved on to the brokerage business with Barrett Sye and Co. as well as in the Toronto Grain Exchange. He established L.C. Scott Construction Company in the 1940's which operated in Canada, the United States and England. After World War 2, the company built a large number of schools and hospitals in Southern Ontario as well as some of the post war homes that were built in New Toronto and North York.
Lew had a lifelong passion for horses. During a family stint in California when he was a youngster, he first galloped racehorses at Hollywood Park and when he grew too big, switched to exercising polo ponies. After his business career was established, he acquired property in Markham - Wyndstone Farm - from which he bred and raised thoroughbred racehorses, steeplechasers and sport horses as well as bird dogs and prize- winning Shorthorn cattle.
Lew was an equestrian sportsman of international stature. He competed in steeplechasing and timber racing in Canada and the United States winning a number of prestigious trophies including the Prince of Wales trophy three times. He played polo in Canada, the United States, England and Barbados and competed at horse shows across Ontario. He was a keen foxhunter and served as the whipper-in for the Toronto and North York Hunt for 20 years prior to becoming a Master of Foxhounds in 1972, a position he held until 1990.
He raised bird dogs and competed with them all over North America in the 40's and the 50's. He was a top fly fisherman and enjoyed duck and pheasant hunting. Both he and his wife Alice were crack shots and long time members of the Toronto Gun Club. As a young man, he was a member of the Argonaut Rowing Club.
At one time, a member or director of the Toronto and North York Hunt, the Canadian Hunter Society, the Canadian Equestrian Team, the Canadian Thoroughbred Horse Society, the Toronto Polo Club and several U.S. polo clubs, the Cowdray Polo Club, United Kingdom Canadian director of the Master of Foxhounds Association of America, the Goodwood Club and the Argonaut Rowing Club. He was also an accomplished pilot who loved flying and had owned several planes.
In 1989, after 54 years of marriage, he lost his beloved wife Alice whose charm, hospitality and hard work was the foundation of the family and the basis which allowed Lew's energetic pursuit of his interests.
Predeceased also by his only son Lewis Christian (Skipper). Leaves daughters Alice FERRIER (Glen) and Susan Jane ANSTEY (Michael VAN EVERY,) granddaughters Jennifer ANSTEY, Elizabeth TRACEY, Janet Louise GAYFORD, Mary FRALEIGH and Margaret Ann SPROULE. Great grandchildren Owen TRACEY, Will FRALEIGH, Jamie FRALEIGH and Tom FRALEIGH.
He will be remembered for his enthusiasm, toughness, loyalty and keen interest in the people and things around him.
If desired, donations in his memory may be made to Think First Canada (for injury prevention in sports and recreation), Med-West Medical Centre, Suite 2-227, 750 Dundas St. West, Toronto, Ontario M6J 3S3 or to the Royal Agricultural Winter Fair Endowment Fund.
A Private family service was held. Arrangements entrusted to the Thompson Funeral Home, 29 Victoria Street, Aurora (905-727-5421).

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SCOTT o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-10-07 published
Jonathan SWALLOW
By Chris MALETTE Tuesday, October 7, 2003 - Page A24
Teacher, educational software consultant, ski and soccer coach, and dad. Born in Glenn Ridge, N.J., on April 20, 1958. Died April 27 in Stirling, Ontario, of sudden heart failure, aged 45.
Kids who love a cold day on a fast ski hill, somewhat sedentary soccer moms and dads who liked to break an occasional sweat and, strangely, frogs everywhere will miss Jonathan SWALLOW. Jonathan was 45 when, in the prime of an athletic and active life, his heart -- harbouring a hidden, undiagnosed ailment that affected the rhythm of the organ -- betrayed an otherwise vibrant man in his prime.
Born in suburban New Jersey and educated at Syracuse University, Jonathan came to Canada in the 1980s to undertake graduate studies at McMaster University where he met the woman who would become his wife, Mary Ellen THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON. He went on to achieve his PhD at the University of Toronto.
In his professional career, Jonathan was lauded by scholars for his cutting-edge work in interactive learning software. At Waterloo, he collaborated with professor Norm SCOTT and the Centre for Learning and Teaching Through Technology -- or LT3 -- to create a program that allows biology students to dissect frogs in a virtual environment, on computer, without harming a single amphibian.
After moving to Stirling, north of Belleville, Ontario, and beginning a family there, Jonathan made fast and strong Friends in the local amateur theatre community. He helped get couch-potato parents off the sofa for an adult soccer league and coached in the Stirling and District Minor Soccer League. But Jonathan truly came to the fore on the ski slopes of Ontario.
Batawa Ski Club holds many memories of Jonathan. During the winter he was either on the road, at a ski race, over by the fireplace talking earnestly with a parent, sitting at a table with his family and Friends or on the hill having a great time with his racers.
At a moving and funny, yet surreal, memorial service for Jonathan at the tatty but active ski club in May, one of Jonathan's closest Friends and fellow Batawa racing coach, Jeff DURISH, remembered Jonathan's dual sense of duty and of fun: "The Rookie program, for children not old enough to travel with a league team, had fallen on hard times and nobody had run it for a number of years. Jonathan phoned me and talked me into helping him revive the program. Helping Jonathan was one of the best decisions that I have ever made. I always meant to thank him for it, now I wish I had."
Jonathan would always show up to practice with a backpack full of beanbags, ropes and bungee cords, his arms full of bamboo poles and his head full of crazy ideas. All the other coaches would scratch their heads and marvel at the weird and wonderful drills he came up with -- four kids hanging onto a bamboo pole doing 360s down the hill, racers hanging onto long ropes as they carved big turns around beanbags. Those crazy beanbags were always strewn across the hill.
Of course there were always the weird songs and dances to go along with the drills. It was effective, it was amazing, it was silly, it was fun, it was wonderful and full of joy -- it was Jonathan.
"Jonathan was an exceptional coach because he was a great teacher, an inventor and a child at heart," said brother-in-law Rob TERRY.
Jonathan leaves wife Mary Ellen, daughter Jenny Lee and son Joseph, as well as scores of grateful soccer kids, skiers and leopard frogs everywhere who croak their thanks for a life well lived.
Chris MALETTE is a ski dad who shared a mug or two of hot chocolate with Jonathan SWALLOW.

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SCOTT o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-10-11 published
Creator of Savage God
Theatre director was a Canadian nationalist, a fan of the avant garde and a champion of playwright George Ryga. He was also seen as a kook, a dilettante and a street fighter
By Tom HAWTHORN Special to The Globe and Mail Saturday, October 11, 2003 - Page F9
John JULIANI was a provocateur in life as on stage. A man passionate about the possibilities of theatre, he roused reverence in some, antipathy in others.
His most infamous act was to challenge the Stratford Festival's newly hired artistic director to a duel. Robin PHILLIPS's offence was that he is British when Mr. JULIANI and others were certain a land as grand as Canada was capable of producing a director for its Shakespearean theatre.
What he called a "romantic gesture with tongue in cheek" earned cheers from Canadian theatre directors and sneers from much of the theatre establishment.
Mr. JULIANI, who has died at the age of 63, was an unabashed Canadian nationalist, a dedicated fan of the avant garde, an ardent defender of the right of actors to a decent living, a champion of playwright George Ryga and a tireless figure so commanding as to develop an intense loyalty among acolytes.
At the same time, he was seen as a kook, a dilettante and a street fighter. One critic called him "the Tiger Williams of Canadian theatre," his pugnacious approach earning him comparison to a notorious hockey goon. In his defence, Mr. JULIANI explained that he was merely a "true believer" with opinions on controversial subjects.
Mr. JULIANI's credits were long and varied, including spontaneous Sixties street happenings such as the staging of his own wedding as a theatrical performance and brief appearances on such 1990s television dramas as The X-Files.
From 1982 until 1997, Mr. JULIANI was executive producer of radio drama for Canadian Broadcasting Corporation Radio in Vancouver. He helped to bring to air many celebrated productions, including the brilliant and provocative Dim Sum Diaries by playwright Mark LEIREN- YOUNG.
Mr. JULIANI also possessed a head-turning beauty, with a profile as striking as a Roman bust. Radio host Bill RICHARDSON commented on his handsomeness at a raucous memorial after his death, calling him a "hunka hunka burnin' love." Some said he had the looks and bearing of a Shakespearean king.
John Charles JULIANI was born in Montreal on March 24, 1940. Raised in a working-class neighbourhood, he attended Loyola College and was an early graduate from the fledgling National Theatre School.
He spent two seasons as an actor at Stratford before being hired as a theatre teacher at Simon Fraser University in 1966. The new university atop Burnaby Mountain east of Vancouver was a hotbed of radicalism in politics and the arts. Mr. JULIANI bristled at an imposed curriculum and so infuriated the administration that he was banned from the campus in 1969.
Mr. JULIANI was heavily influenced by the writing of Antonin Artaud, a Surrealist who championed a theatre based on the imagination. He long sought to erase the barrier between scripted text and sensory impression, between performer and audience, to mixed success.
After moving to the West Coast, Mr. JULIANI launched a series of experiments in theatre. He credited these productions to Savage God, which was less a troupe in the traditional sense than a title granted to any performance involving Mr. JULIANI. The name came from William Butler Yeats's awestruck reaction to Alfred Jarry's Ubu Roi: "After us, the Savage God?"
Savage God defied explanation, though many tried and even Mr. JULIANI offered suggestions. Savage God was "an anthology of question marks," he once said. (It was, after all, the 1960s.) "Savage God is simply the Imagination," he told the Vancouver Sun, "insatiable, unrelenting, fiercely energetic, wary of categorization, fond of contradiction and inveterately iconoclastic."
In January, 1970, Mr. JULIANI married dancer Donna WONG, a ceremony conducted as a Savage God performance at the Vancouver Art Gallery. He repeated the process at the christening of his son. Ms. WONG- JULIANI would be his domestic and drama partner for more than three decades.
In 1971, the streets of Vancouver were the scene of several spontaneous and sometimes incomprehensible -- performances under the aegis of PACET ("pilot alternative complement to existing theatre.") The $18,000 project, funded by the federal government, incorporated Gestalt therapy sessions in street performances.
Theatrical events took place willy-nilly across the city, including malls, the airport, the library and Stanley Park. Admission was not charged, nor did all spectators appreciate their role as audience to avant-garde performance. A scene in which bicyclists wearing gas masks pedalled along city streets left many scratching their heads in puzzlement.
In 1974, Mr. JULIANI moved to Toronto to set up a graduate theatre-studies program at York University.
He called the program PEAK (" Performance, Example, Animation, Katharsis") and perhaps should have found an acronym for PEEK, as the instructor and his class stripped naked to protest against a lack of classroom space.
The challenge to the new Stratford artistic director in 1974 was written on a piece of parchment and delivered in London by Don RUBIN, a York colleague. Alas, Mr. RUBIN could not find a proper gauntlet and wound up ceremoniously striking Mr. PHILLIPS with a red rubber glove, an absurd note to a theatrical protest.
In 1978, Mr. JULIANI took the stage in a Toronto production of Children of Night, portraying Janusz Korczak, a doctor and teacher who ran an orphanage in the Warsaw ghetto. The critics were appalled.
Gina MALLET of the Toronto Star said Mr. JULIANI's performance sullied Dr. Korczak's memory. Jay SCOTT of The Globe and Mail, noting "the dreadfulness" of Mr. JULIANI's acting, said the production robbed the dead of their dignity.
From the stage, Mr. JULIANI challenged the Star's critic to a public debate on the aesthetics of theatre. He also wrote a letter to the editor, noting that Holocaust survivors in the audience had wholeheartedly embraced the production.
Mr. JULIANI wound up in Edmonton, where he continued to condemn the "exorbitance, elitism and museum theatre" of the establishment.
In 1982, he directed and co-wrote Latitude 55°, a feature film with just two characters -- a slick woman from the city and a Polish potato farmer -- set in a snowbound cabin. "It is filled with a passionate conviction that evaporates in pretentious pronouncements," The Globe's Carole CORBEIL wrote, "filled with truthful moments that evaporate in the desire to use every narcissistic trick in the book."
In a 1983 book examining the alternative theatre movement in Canada, author Renate USMIANI devoted most of a chapter to Mr. JULIANI, a decision that got her a scathing rebuke from a reviewer who considered him worthy of little more than a footnote.
"His works are curiosities; at best, they are worthy experiments in Artaudian theory," Boyd NEIL wrote in a Globe review. "But they are neither popular... nor influential."
Mr. JULIANI's years at Canadian Broadcasting Corporation Radio in Vancouver were both productive and successful. Among the many projects he directed was a three-part adaptation of Margaret Laurence's The Diviners; King Lear, starring John COLICOS; a 13-part series titled, Disaster! Acts of God or Acts of Man?" and, famously, Ryga's The Ecstasy of Rita Joe, with Leonard GEORGE portraying a role once assumed on stage by his late father, Chief Dan GEORGE. The surprise selection of Mr. GEORGE was typical of Mr. JULIANI's often brilliant casting.
Mr. JULIANI directed a 1989 production of The Glass Menagerie at the Vancouver Playhouse with Jennifer Phipps and Morris Panych. Globe reviewer Liam LACEY praised a production that "opens up the play like an old treasure chest, and lets in some fresh air without rearranging or disturbing the work's original grandeurs and caprices."
Four years later, Mr. JULIANI was directing a production of the mystery thriller Sleepwalker when actor Peter HAWORTH took sick shortly before opening night. The director suddenly found himself as the male lead. "Not even the most colossal egotist would want to do this," he said.
Dim Sum Diaries, a series of monologues written by Mr. LEIREN- YOUNG, received protests when aired by Canadian Broadcasting Corporation Radio in 1991. One episode, entitled The Sequoia, in which the white vendor of a luxury home launches a tirade against the Hong Kong immigrant who cuts down two rare and spectacular trees on the property, was accused of being racist. The playwright's well-intentioned exploration of stereotyping was charged with fostering those very prejudices.
After directing Dim Sum Diaries, Mr. JULIANI urged the playwright to tackle an issue that was dividing his church. Mr. LEIREN- YOUNG remembers replying: "You're talking same-sex marriage in the Anglican church and you want a straight Jewish guy to write this?"
The resulting play, titled Articles of Faith: The Battle of St. Alban's, was staged at Christ Church Cathedral in downtown Vancouver to great acclaim.
The collaborations between young playwright and veteran director succeeded in achieving Mr. JULIANI's goal of inspiring dialogue through theatre.
Mr. JULIANI had a reputation as a demanding taskmaster for novice and veteran actors alike. Rehearsals were jokingly called "Savage God Boot Camp."
He maintained a breakneck pace, both in the theatre and in the boardroom. He was artistic co-director of Opera Breve, a small company dedicated to nurturing young singers; president of the Union of British Columbia Performers (Alliance of Canadian Cinema, Television and Radio Artists); and, a former national president of the Directors Guild of Canada, among many boards on which he served.
Feeling fatigued in early August, Mr. JULIANI was diagnosed with liver cancer. The end came swiftly. He died on August 21 at Lions Gate Hospital in North Vancouver.
He leaves his wife of 33 years, Donna WONG- JULIANI, and a son, Alessandro JULIANI, an actor. He also leaves brothers Richard and Norman.
(Wit was long a part of the JULIANI mystique. The family pet, a canine named Beau Beau, was referred to in the family's paid obituary notice as a Savage Dog.)
For one who roused such passions, Mr. JULIANI felt that he led a conservative life. "I have always been a square," he once said.
A theatrical farewell to Mr. JULIANI attracted hundreds to St. Andrew's Wesley Church in Vancouver on Labour Day, a Monday and traditionally a quiet date on the theatre calendar. Those in attendance were encouraged to write remembrances on Post-It notes, which were then stuck to the church's pillars.
The City of Vancouver has declared next March 24, which would have been Mr. JULIANI's 64th birthday, to be Savage God Day.

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SCOTT o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-04 published
Dorothy Della SCOTT
By Eugen BANNERMAN, Thursday, December 4, 2003 - Page A26
Mother, friend, practical joker. Born June 13, 1917. Died October 5, in Wingham, Ontario, of natural causes, aged 86.
Dorothy Scott's grandparents arrived with their family from England in 1876, and, several years later, rented a house and farm near Brussels, Ontario
It was a long journey by wagon over the rough, corduroy roads that wound through Huron County. They carried all their belongings with them. When they arrived, they found the house was still occupied, so the family had to make do in the barn's milking parlour. Dorothy's grandfather was a carpenter and boarded off one corner of the stable. Her grandmother scrubbed, whitewashed the walls and ceiling and tidied the place for her growing family, until the other family moved out.
Dorothy's grandmother was expecting, and it was here she gave birth to her fifth child (Dorothy's mother), and named her Thirza. Her grandfather took the newborn infant and wrapped her in a home-made blanket. He put clean straw in the cattle manger and laid her in it. "Just like the baby Jesus."
Dorothy told me this story on one of my first visits. I was the newly appointed United Church minister in Blyth, Ontario, and at 85, Dorothy was one of its oldest members. Old in years but not in spirit. Growing old should not keep us from laughing and having a good time, Dorothy often told me, for as soon as we stop laughing, we age rapidly. Dorothy's joie de vivre was spontaneous and infectious. Even when she was hooked up to plastic tubing supplying her with vital oxygen, the sparkle (and laughter) in her eyes was always present.
Dorothy Della SCOTT was born to Thirza (WALDEN) and John CALDWELL. She grew up on her parents' farm and on June 15, 1938, married Laurie SCOTT, also a farmer. She received a dining-room suite and a milk-cow as a wedding gift from her father. They had two children, Robert and Donald.
Dorothy SCOTT learned as a child to have fun and laugh. In spite of the hard work and deprivations of farm life, the years did not repress or smother her inner child. Often it burst forth in unexpected and unique ways.
Her worst prank, she told me, was when she was a nurse and decided to play a trick on a new orderly. She had the other nurses cover her with a sheet as she lay down on a trolley and "played dead." The new orderly was called and told to take the body to the morgue. She lay absolutely still until they were in the elevator. Then she sat up, and frightened the poor man, "really bad," as she said.
There was also a serious dimension to Dorothy's life. As a young mother, she almost died giving birth to her second son, Donald. But in the privacy of that moment, she had a near-death vision of Christ. "If this was death," [she] thought, "no one need be afraid."
Dorothy was unsentimental about many things but not her family. She concluded her memoirs, Dorothy's Memories (2002), by tracing her own happy life to a happy childhood and loving husband and family.
Shortly after my arrival in Blyth, Dorothy tested her new minister's tolerance for humour. She slipped a white envelope into my hand as I was saying goodbye to parishioners after worship. "Don't open it now. Give it to your wife and read it when you get home." It was the first of many jokes from the Internet that made us laugh with pleasure and anticipation.
We will miss Dorothy, her cheerful disposition, her countless stories, her white envelopes, and her cushion-seat in the third row of the sanctuary.
Eugen is Dorothy's friend and minister.

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SCOTT o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-23 published
LEITH, Mary Isobel
Daughter of the Reverend M.J. and Mrs. LEITH (née SCOTT.) Born on September 29, 1907 at Wapella, Saskatchewan, died on December 18, 2003 in Victoria. Predeceased by her sister, Marjorie and her brother, Scott. She is survived by nieces, nephews and their families. Miss LEITH worked under the United Church of Canada, Women's Missionary Society and Boards of Overseas and Home Missions for 39 years in Japan and Canada. Private family cremation arrangements. For those wishing to make a remembrance, donations to the Mission and Service Fund of the United Church of Canada, 3250 Bloor Street West, #300, Etobicoke, Ontario, M8X 2Y4 would be appreciated by the family. Condolences may be offered at www.mccallbros.com McCall's Of Victoria 250-385-4465

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SCOTT o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-29 published
McMEHEN, Ruth Victoria (MILLER)
In Ottawa, Sunday, December 28, 2003. Ruth Victoria MILLER, born December 4, 1916. Widow of James McMEHEN. Beloved mother of Carol SCOTT- MILLER of Vancouver, Jo RODRIGUEZ (Gonzalo) of Santo Domingo, Gordon (Moira) of Toronto and Kathy NEMES (Laszlo) of Auburn, California. Adored by her 9 grandchildren and 8 great-grandchildren. Devoted aunt to many nieces and nephews. She will be remembered for her incorrigible sense of humour, her kindness and affection, and her singular love for her family. She died as she lived, bravely and unselfishly. Friends may assemble Tuesday at Annunciation of our Lord Church, 2414 Ogilvie Road, Ottawa for Mass of Christian Funeral at 11 a.m. In lieu of flowers, donations to the Elizabeth Bruyere Palliative Care Unit appreciated.
Nothing Gold Can Stay
Nature's first green is gold,
Her hardest hue to hold.
Her early leaf's a flower
But only so an hour.
Then leaf subsides to leaf,
So Eden sank to grief.
So dawn goes down to day,
Nothing gold can stay.
- Robert Frost
Kelly Funeral Homes (613) 235-6712

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SCOULER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-10-22 published
CRAINFORD, Doreen (SCOULER)
Died peacefully on October 18, 2003 after 84 years of happy life. A victim of Alzheimer's Disease, she will be lovingly remembered and missed by her family, former colleagues of the Royal Academy of Dancing and her traveling companions. She leaves her son Steven and her grandchildren Jennifer and David. A memorial gathering will be held at a later date. Donations to the Alzheimer's Society in her memory would be appreciated.

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