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"SCA" 2003 Obituary


SCACE  SCAMAN  SCANES  SCANLAN 

SCACE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-27 published
KERNOHAN, Kathryn Margaret (née KINNEAR)
Born December 29, 1911 died December 24, 2003 in Toronto, her birthplace. Beloved wife of the late Gordon E. KERNOHAN. Predeceased by her parents Thomas H. and Margaret G. KINNEAR (née NASMITH) and her brother T. Clark KINNEAR. Much loved and most loving mother of Susan SCACE (Arthur,) Kathy and Patrick KINNEAR (Ginny.) Adored ''Gammi'' of Jennifer and Patrick, Gordon and Cayleigh, and Sarah and Maggie. Special Grammi to Matthew, Jonathan and Adam. Cherished Auntie Kay to Bill KERNOHAN, the late Dodie PHILLIPS Tom, Bob and Bill KINNEAR and Margo HYDE. A heartfelt thank you to all the caregivers at Belmont House over the last ten years. A memorial service will be held on Monday, January 12, 2004 at 11 o'clock at Timothy Eaton Memorial Church. A reception will follow. If desired, donations may be made to Timothy Eaton Memorial Church, 230 St. Clair Avenue West, Toronto M4V 1R5, or to a charity of your choice.

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SCACE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-30 published
KERNOHAN, Kathryn Margaret (née KINNEAR)
Born December 29, 1911 died December 24, 2003 in Toronto, her birthplace. Beloved wife of the late Gordon E. KERNOHAN. Predeceased by her parents Thomas H. and Margaret G. KINNEAR (née NASMITH) and her brother T. Clark KINNEAR. Much loved and most loving mother of Susan SCACE (Arthur), Kathy and Patrick (Ginny). Adored ''Gammie'' of Jennifer and Patrick, Gordon and Cayleigh, and Sarah and Maggie. Special Gammie to Matthew, Jonathan and Adam. Cherished Auntie Kay to Bill KERNOHAN, the late Dodie PHILLIPS Tom, Bob and Bill KINNEAR and Margo HYDE. A heartfelt thank you to all the caregivers at Belmont House over the last ten years. A memorial service will be held on Monday, January 12, 2004 at 11 o'clock at Timothy Eaton Memorial Church. A reception will follow.

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SCAMAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-07-24 published
CAIE, Alastair G.R.
Died on July 22, 2003, at his home in Goderich, Ontario of esophageal cancer. Al was born in Glasgow, Scotland and graduated from the University of Glasgow in 1954 with a Masters of Arts and Economics. He then joined the Royal Air Force, where he flew as a pilot for three years. In 1957 he emigrated to Montreal, Quebec, where he was employed at Canadian Pratt and Whitney Aircraft, Bell Canada and later Northern Electric. In 1981 he moved to Burlington, Ontario and worked at Northern Telecom in Mississauga as Director of International Tax Planning. From 1986-1988 Al was the manager of Corporate Tax Policy with the Government of Alberta in Edmonton. In 1992 Al and his family retired to Goderich where he has spent the past 11 years enjoying golf, wood working, reading and walking trails at Naftel's Creek and Fall's Reserve. He leaves his wife Kathryn, sons George (Susan) of Burlington, Andrew of Goderich and step-son James (Jennifer) STORM of Kitchener; grandchildren Brandon and Brooke CAIE and Elizabeth and William STORM; sisters Audrey and Jessie CAIE of Glasgow, Scotland, brother Roderick (Tynne) CAIE of Bromley, Kent, England and in-laws Betty and Jack SCAMAN of Goderich. At Al's request there will be no funeral service. A gathering of family and Friends to celebrate his life will be held on August 2, 2003 from 1-4 p.m. at his home at 122 Warren Street, Goderich. As an expression of sympathy, donations to the Canadian Cancer Society will be greatly appreciated.

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SCANES o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-09-30 published
CROWE, Doris Mary (née SCANES)
Born in Winnipeg, July 12, 1921, daughter of Richard SCANES and Alice PAYNE, sister of Lenore and Jimmy, married Marshall CROWE, December 5, 1942. Graduate of United College, Winnipeg (B.A.: History and English) awarded highest standing in her class. Doris died on Friday, September 26, 2003, surrounded by family and Friends, after a long and spirited battle with cancer. Beloved wife, dear mother of Tom (Allison), Alison, Helen (David), Sheila (Brian), Abigail, Seumien (Nabo), Le (Ping) and Nick (Irene). Delighted and indefatigable grandmother of Jessica, Caleb, Innie, Susan, David, Adam, Cathy, Yuli, Jonathan, Ben, Rebecca and Ariana. Predeceased by her dear Friends Ann PHELPS and Starr SOLOMON. During World War 2, Doris worked as a reporter for the Vancouver Sun and taught high school. After the war, she accompanied Marshall on diplomatic postings, chiefly to New York and Moscow. During the 60's, she worked for Canadian Broadcasting Corporation Radio and wrote and narrated a series of documentaries on life in the Soviet Union. She also worked tirelessly for the Toronto French School in its early years, helping to establish the first school library. Doris studied public relations in the early 70's, and did a variety of work in that field, including shepherding Harold CARDINAL through the Ottawa launching of ''The Unjust Society''. She also served as public relations director for the Canadian Nurses' Association. She was a member of the Committee for an Independent Canada and campaigned for the provincial and federal Liberal parties in many elections, beginning with Mitchell SHARP's campaign in the Toronto riding of Eglinton in 1963. In her 70's, Doris returned to university to study English history, Russian and Chinese. for the last 30 years of her life, Doris focused on the farm that she and Marshall ran near Portland. Among many enterprises, Doris was instrumental in introducing the Dexter cow into Canada. According to Doris' wishes, there will be no funeral. Arrangements by Scotland Funeral Home, Elgin. The family will receive Friends on Saturday, October 4, 12 to 8 p.m., at the farm, 4421 Old Kingston Road, Portland. In lieu of flowers, donations to the hospice, St. Vincent de Paul Hospital, Brockville (613) 342-4461, ext. 2271 would be most gratefully received. Their compassion, skill and generosity of spirit did much to ease Doris' last days when she could no longer be at her beloved farm. In memory of Doris: plant a garden, serve paella, learn a language, read a book to a child, be kind to an animal, support universal health care, live at peace with nature.

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SCANLAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-02-04 published
Ottilie BENDER
By Lawrence SCANLAN And Ulrike BENDER Tuesday, February 4, 2003, Page A20
Aunt, bookkeeper, artist, landlady, gardener. Born August 27, 1920, in Bessarabien, Romania. Died March 20, 2002, in Toronto, of liver cancer, aged 81.
Ottilie BENDER was slim and elegant, tall in every way, as slow and graceful as the giraffe. Skin pale, almost translucent. High cheekbones, eyes blue and strong. Otti was the child of a successful German farmer in old Romania. A peasant girl, but one with standing. Confidence coursed in her; her stated opinion had the look and feel of fact.
Direct too, Tante (Aunt) Otti once critiqued a book of mine: "You didn't say much but, by golly, you said it well." The "by golly" came with physical punctuation: her slapping both knees with her hands. She picked up the phrase when she came here from Germany in 1952. That, and "Vell, anyvay" -- the latter phrase uttered at dinner to shift gears and speak of other matters.
When she arrived, she worked in a hospital cafeteria but spent years at night school studying English, then typing and bookkeeping, before landing work with an art and framing business. She came here in defiance of her father and showed her signature strength of will. The first BENDER to cross the ocean.
Tante Otti was a woman ahead of her time. She knew that women in her era were valued as obedient housewives and capable mothers and not as strong-minded individuals. "I never would have developed as a person if I had married," she once said.
She would eventually save enough money to become landlord and superintendent at her west-end Toronto apartment complex. Her tiny digs teemed with her own art landscapes, still lifes, a portrait of John F. Kennedy. She loved beauty. An art teacher once praised her imagination and sense of colour. Later, she would move to a plain house in old Mimico, Ontario, one with a basement apartment and a paying tenant. Form mattered; function more.
Ottilie BENDER believed that you helped those less well-off -- not by handouts, but by encouraging them to pull themselves up by their bootstraps. But, like all interesting people, she contradicted herself.
Her tenant drifted from job to job, fell behind in his rent. She never tossed him out, for he was her project. She tried to instill in him her own work ethic, her faith in diligence, her practical spirit. She gave him the benefit of the doubt, for "you have to see the good in everyone."
I find it ironic that Otti's liver failed her. This woman who abhorred strong drink all her life, who drank "ein Schluck" of wine at Christmas dinner, who watered down tea. Restraint defined her.
Although otherwise in good health, she was plagued for years by poor circulation, and would attend Christmas dinner at her brother's place -- their thermostat always set to tropical -- wearing a cardigan, heavy slacks and, over her shoes, plastic bags against the cold.
I admired and will remember Otti's self-reliance: how at peace she was with who she was, her steely pride, that peasant stoicism. The BENDER family has lost its chief historian, its best letter-writer, its clan gatherer, its most capable patroness.
The ducks and geese on the bay close by have lost a companion, too. "Walking makes me feel free the way I felt when I was young in Romania," she once said. On the shoreline she met Friends who likewise found joy in the breezes off the lake, in tossing bread to grateful birds in the setting sun. The geraniums in pots along her windowsills will miss her, the tall conifers she planted as seedlings, the flowers in her lavish garden. There will be no fat tomatoes this summer. I will miss engaging her, a process that was as lively when she was 81 as it was almost three decades ago. She was, by golly, a great lady.
Lawrence is married to Ulrike, Ottilie's niece.

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SCANLAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-06-02 published
Clare SCANLAN
By Tom SCANLAN and Larry SCANLAN Monday, June 2, 2003 - Page A16
Mother, wife, grandmother, sister, nurse. Born July 15, 1924, at Tamworth, Ontario Died April 19 in Toronto, of brain cancer, aged 78.
Clare SCANLAN never lied about her age. She simply never acted her age. There was a vitality to her, a vibrancy. She would drum her hands on her knees as punctuation -- exclamation marks! -- to deliver good news: The Jays had bested the Yanks, a Canadian had won a medal, grandchildren were coming 'round for a visit.
The second child of four, Clarissa Mary Catherine FLYNN was born on a farm in southeastern Ontario to Irish-Catholic parents, Leonard and Gertrude FLYNN. Her parents' legacy to her included great good senses: of humour, justice, the divine.
After acquiring her nursing degree at Hotel Dieu Hospital in Kingston, Ontario, she met -- on a blind date in Belleville -- our father, Bernard. Photos of the time capture her soft features, her wavy black hair, her starlet good looks and elegant taste in clothes.
The children came, in batches of four. Larry, Theresa, Tom and Wayne arrived when Nakina, in northern Ontario, was home. In 1956, there was a pause as the family settled in the Scarborough homestead, modest by some standards, but for Clare it was a dream come true. Then followed the rest of the gang: Stephen, Rosemarie, Karen and David. Bernard claims a stranger once asked, "Are they all yours or is it a picnic?"
"They're all mine," he famously replied, "and it's no picnic."
Actually, it was. Mom had a natural ability to make us all feel special and accomplished (while insisting that she herself was neither). Feeding and clothing eight children can't have been easy. Only when we left home, we joke, did we learn to add one can of water to the soup, not four, or that milk was also available in non-powdered form. And if Karen's clothes looked a lot like Theresa's, or David's skates like Wayne's, who cared? We remember only a house full of people, noise, confusion -- and laughter.
"I used to worry more about having too much money," Clare once said, "than I did about having too little." Remarkable. And as the eight of us matured and married, each and every new partner acquired a second mother.
It was not only what Clare did for family and Friends, but how. She unfailingly remembered birthdays, visited the sick, befriended strangers at parties. Hers was a quiet and discreet philanthropy, almost instinctive.
The grandchildren, the ones who call her "Aunie," were especially nurtured. Chickadee, she would call each baby, or "Sweet pie." She'd say, "Oh I love my babes. I worried too much about my own children, but with the grandchildren, I just love to hear their stories and all the things they're doing."
After Clare finally stopped nursing at Providence Manor, she and Bernard took up golfing, got a winter place in Florida, cheered the Jays. They were pals and on the go. Clare always moved quickly (as anyone who ever saw her on a putting green will attest). Life was too precious to move slowly and, besides, she didn't want to miss a thing. When cancer struck, hard and fast, the tears came but the laughter stayed. "Your mother taught us how to live," Dad said, "and now she'll teach us how to die." And so she did, with great dignity and selflessness. And though our mother's death hurt us, and always will, to be such an intimate part of her leave-taking -- at home -- was a privilege.
In our grief, we took comfort when others praised her lack of pettiness and disdain for gossip, her sincerity and compassion, how well she listened and appreciated every kindness, her child-like delight in life itself. We had all been "Aunied" and we will never be the same.
Tom and Larry are Clare's sons.

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