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"RUS" 2003 Obituary


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RUSE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-10-23 published
William Henry HUGHES
By Michael RUSE, Thursday, October 23, 2003 - Page A24
Husband, father, singer, instrument repair expert, teacher, philosopher. Born October 22, 1936, in Sarnia, Ontario Died August 19, in New Denver, British Columbia, of cancer, aged 66.
Bill HUGHES was a student at Victoria College, University of Toronto, and then did graduate work in England, receiving a master's degree from the London School of Economics, and a doctorate from University College London. On returning to Canada in 1965, Bill got a job at the brand new University of Guelph, and he was one of the founding members of its philosophy department. He taught there until he retired in 1997.
Bill and Daphne (his wife of 42 years) have four children, and the family has always been united around a deep love of music. Bill sang in various choirs, including the Guelph Chamber Choir and, most recently in his new home in New Denver, British Columbia, as a member of the Valhalla Choral Society.
He was also an enthusiastic amateur on the double bass, and for several years ran a string instrument repair shop to serve students of the Suzuki String School of Guelph. One of his proudest memories, however, was singing in a barbershop quartet, along with Gordon LIGHTFOOT, when in high school.
Bill HUGHES's philosophical interest and expertise were in social and ethical philosophy. In more recent years, he had become interested in techniques for teaching informal logic, and wrote course material, especially for distance education, turning his work eventually into a textbook. This is now going into its fourth edition. Bill served as department chair, and if there was a university committee on which Bill did not at some time sit, it has not yet been discovered.
He was one of those people known to everyone on campus, and to whom all had at one point or another turned for advice or help.
For this was the main point about Bill HUGHES. At one level, he was a rather ordinary man. At another level, he was a most extraordinary man, the rare example of someone who is truly good. His whole life was given to others -- to his family, to his students, to his colleagues, and to anyone else whom he met. Quakers speak of the "inner light," or "that of God in every person."
Although he had no religious beliefs, Bill saw worth in everyone he knew, and gave unstintingly of his time and effort to all, whether this was a student late in the afternoon who needed some guidance on a project, or a colleague who needed help with an idea or a class, or a child whose cello was not sounding quite right and perhaps needed a new string or bridge.
Bill was not perfect. He made mistakes. But, although Bill may not have believed in heaven, if such there be, he has certainly earned his place. I am sure that God has already nabbed Bill for several important committees. ("Criteria for promotion up the order of angels.") At the end of the day, Bill will be sitting in the divine faculty club, Jeremy Bentham, Doubting Thomas (the patron saint of philosophers), and one or two other slightly non-respectable folk around him, pints of Wellington County -- the nectar of the gods -- in hand.
And now for a good natter: "Tell me, is the ontological argument really valid?"
Michael RUSE was Bill's colleague for nearly 40 years.

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RUSH o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-02-24 published
DUNSMUIR, James Smith
Jimmy DUNSMUIR, on Saturday, February 15, at Hamilton General Hospital after a lengthy battle. Born in Kilmarnock, Scotland on January 17, 1918. Jim was married to Nancy WILSON of Ballyclare, Northern Ireland, who predeceased him in 1985. Survived by his daughter Mollie (Michael CLELAND) of Ottawa; his companion of 15 years, Mary Ann HENDRICKS of Hamilton; his brother David (Ermie) of Toronto; his sister Betty (Hodge) of Buffalo, New York; his nieces Judy of Toronto and Marcia of Illinois; his nephews, Derek of North Carolina, David of Vancouver, and Jim, Harry, Douglas, Bruce and Kevin all of Toronto. Predeceased on January 24, 2003, by Michael's mother Sheila of Vancouver; two families joined in sadness. Jim, who always described himself as ''a lover, not a fighter'', fought his way, with some reluctance but considerable success, from Dunkirk through North Africa. Sicily and Italy, from 1939-1945, for a war he thought was worth fighting. Thanks to the staff of the Hamilton General, in particular Kevin and Anna, and Ann RUSH. In lieu of donations, please consider when you make your next charitable gift, adding a little something in memory of Jim. Arrangements entrusted to Canadian Cremation Services, 80 Ottawa Street, North, Hamilton 905-545-8889.

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RUSHTON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-11-19 published
THOMASSON, Edna (née RUSHTON)
Edna THOMASSON, beloved wife of the late Frank James THOMASSON, died peacefully in her sleep, at home, on November 16, 2003. Edna will be fondly remembered by her children and their spouses: Linda STEVENSON and John STEVENSON, Clive THOMASSON and Deborah ZWICKER, Andrew THOMASSON and Amanda RICKETT; and by her grandchildren Julia, Pippa, Simon, Freya and Sian.
Edna was born in 1928 in Bolton, England, the oldest child of Thomas and Linda RUSHTON and sister of Jim, Leonard, Arnold and Tom. Following an early career in business, she trained as a teacher and continued to further her education, pursuing studies at Wilfred Laurier University while, at the same time, raising her family. In retirement from teaching business studies at Thistletown Collegiate Institute in Toronto, Edna continued to pursue her love of traveling, spending her time between her brothers in England, her grandchildren in Australia and always returning home to her family in Canada.
Edna's family will receive Friends in the Mount Pleasant Cemetery Chapel from 10: 30 to 11:30 a.m. on Friday, November 21, 2003. A short ceremony will be held at 11: 30 at the graveside.

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RUSK o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-08-20 published
Ex-politician and war hero FLYNN dies
Was chairman of Metropolitan Toronto
By James RUSK Municipal Affairs Reporter Wednesday, August 20, 2003 - Page A17
Dennis FLYNN, a war hero who parachuted into France on D-Day and eventually rose to be chairman of Metropolitan Toronto, died yesterday morning as he was preparing to observe an army reserve exercise at Canadian Forces Base Petawawa.
Mr. FLYNN, 79, who had been in poor health in recent years, collapsed, apparently of a heart attack, at his hotel in Pembroke, and was pronounced dead at Pembroke General Hospital, the Canadian Armed Forces said in a statement.
Mr. FLYNN was mayor of Etobicoke from 1972 to 1984, the longest-serving mayor of the Toronto suburb, and was chairman of Metropolitan Toronto from 1984 to 1988. He continued to serve on Metro Council until the 1997 amalgamation that created the new City of Toronto.
He served on the Toronto Police Services Board and was awarded the Order of Canada in 2001.
Major Tim LOURIE, public-relations director of the exercise, said Mr. FLYNN travelled to Pembroke on Monday to observe a reserve exercise in which the Toronto Scottish Regiment (the Queen Mother's Own,) of which Mr. FLYNN was the honorary lieutenant-colonel, was participating.
"Unfortunately, he didn't even get out to see us here," Major LOURIE said. The regiment received the call that he had collapsed in the hotel just before a group of honorary colonels was heading out to observe the exercise.
Mr. FLYNN, was born in County Cork, Ireland, in 1923. When he was two years old he migrated with his family to the Kensington section of Toronto, long a melting pot for immigrants.
In 1938, at age 15, he joined the Toronto Scottish and volunteered for active service at the outbreak of the Second World War. In 1942, he joined the joint Canadian-American unit that came to be known as the Devil's Brigade, and in 1943, he transferred to the 1st Canadian Parachute Regiment.
He jumped into Normandy on D-Day, June 6, 1944, where he was wounded by German fire. After recovery, he rejoined the regiment, jumped into Germany on March 24, 1945, in Operation Varsity, the crossing of the Rhine River, and was wounded again when part of his leg was shattered by machine-gun fire as he escorted two German prisoners across the Rhine.
As a result of the wound, Mr. FLYNN walked with a cane for the rest of his life. "One of his most self-deprecating comments, when talking to young soldiers, was that he had made only three jumps. One was for practice, one was on D-Day, and the third and last was across the Rhine," commented Lieutenant-Colonel Mike TRAYNER, commanding officer of the Toronto Scottish.
After the war, he joined the City of Toronto's clerk's department, and rose to be protocol officer. He failed in his first run for mayor of Etobicoke in 1969, but upset the incumbent, Doug LACEY, in 1972.
In 1984, he was elected chairman of Metropolitan Toronto, replacing Paul GODFREY, now president of the Toronto Blue Jays, who was then leaving Toronto politics to become publisher of the Toronto Sun. His career as Metro chairman ended in 1988, when he lost to Alan TONKS, now a member of parliament.

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RUSSELL o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-01-22 published
Captain Lynn Gerald FREEMAN, 1930-2003
"We all must sail sometimes with the wind and sometimes against it, but we must sail and not drift nor lie at anchor"
It is with sadness and regret that we announce the passing of our dad, Lynn Gerald FREEMAN, after a lengthy illness, on Saturday, January 11, 2003, with his family at his side, at the Hotel Dieu hospital in St. Catharines. Lynn was born in Tehkummah, the son of the late Mildred (RUSSELL) and Ernest FREEMAN.
Lynn is survived by: the mother of his children, Sandra FREEMAN and his kids, Jerry, Cindy, Mark, Angela and Kim, his grandchildren who he loved very much: Sandra, Christa, Natacha, Mark Jr. and Jake, his brothers and sisters: Earl (Effie,) Gelena HOPKIN, Lorraine EADIE (Ted), Marion CASE (Harold), Dick (Lois), Betty LAWSON, Margaret DIBONAVENTURA, Conrad (Judy), Myrna BEATON (Ken) and Brenda ROBINSON. Lynn was predeceased by his brother Larry.
Besides his family, Lynn's passion in life was sailing on the Great Lakes. He was at home on the water and took great pride in the ships he sailed for some 45 years. He will be remembered and missed by those who sailed with him during those years. Until Lynn became ill he was current with all traffic in the Welland Canal. At Lynn's request, cremation will take place with a private family service. A memorial service will take place on Manitoulin Island at a later date.

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RUSSELL o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-10-22 published
N. Peter SMITH
August 5, 1946 to October 19, 2003.
Pete went to join he heavenly Father on Sunday morning with his wife and best friend, Esther at his bedside in the Mindemoya Hospital. Pete had courageously fought a lengthy battle with prostate cancer. Pete was born in Toronto and grew up in London. He returned to Toronto to work, and begin his family, but often dreamed of leaving for a more rural lifestyle. During the years of living in the city, he spent his weekends and vacations with his Friends and family, building a cottage on the Pickerel River-Le Grou lake near Arnstein. He was eventually able to realize his dream of farming and he moved his family to Powassan. He later enjoyed living and working in Parry Sound. He was able to realize another dream of entrepreneurship when he opened his gift shop "The Pickle Jar" in Port Loring. Pete chose Manitoulin Island as his final earthly home, and felt he had almost found paradise at his home in Gore Bay overlooking the North Channel.
Pete loved the outdoors and always believed in being a good steward of the land, attempting to leave the environment in a better condition. His hobbies included golfing, hunting, fishing, all terrain vehicles, sledding, boating, and walking, as well as woodworking, collecting antiques and many more interests. He loved to socialize and enjoyed spending time in conversation with people.
Pete was the younger son of Allan and Margaret SMITH (predeceased) of Toronto. He will be missed by his brother David (Sylvia) of Oakville, his children, Brian of Huntsville, Scott (wife Valerie) of Oshawa, and Wendy (Chris) of Parry Sound. Step son Jamie (Cheryl) and granddaughter Rebecca TAILOR/TAYLOR of Guelph. Mother and father-in-law, Fred and Beulah RUSSELL of Tehkummah, sisters and brothers-in-law, Evelyn RUSSELL BAEHR of Kitchener, Barbara and Keith FLAHERTY of Southampton. Nieces and nephews, a great niece and great nephew, and many Friends.
Pete was active in the Mindemoya Missionary Church and will be missed by his church family.

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RUSSELL o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-06 published
McMULLEN, Kathleen
At the Northumberland Health Care Centre, Cobourg, Monday, March 3, 2003 at the age of 93. Kathleen (née FITZPATRICK,) wife of the late George Adams McMULLEN. Loving mother of Linda McMULLEN of Peterborough and Bob McMULLEN (Anne Marie) of Stratford. Predeceased by her daughter Margie LEMON. Mother-in-law of Morley LEMON and his wife Sandra. Dear Nana of William LEMON and his wife Donna, Kelly Anne LEMON, Jennifer, Julie and Michael McMULLEN. Great grandmother of Meg and Ben LEMON. Sister of Margaret FITZPATRICK of Cobourg. Kathleen will also be remembered by her extended family David PATERSON, Elspeth RUSSELL and Diane RANKIN and families. A memorial service will be held at the Legion Village Recreation Hall, 111 Hibernia Street, Cobourg, on Saturday, March 8 at 2: 00 p.m. In lieu of flowers, donations to the charity of your choice would be appreciated by the family.

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RUSSELL o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-04-12 published
'He kept a little flame of geometry alive'
Superstar University of Toronto mathematician considered himself an artist, but his seminal work inevitably found practical applications
By Siobhan ROBERTS Saturday, April 12, 2003 - Page F11
Widely considered the greatest classical geometer of his time and the man who saved his discipline from near extinction, Harold Scott MacDonald COXETER, who died on March 31 at 96, said of himself, with characteristic modesty, "I am like any other artist. It just so happens that what fills my mind is shapes and numbers."
Prof. COXETER's work focused on hyperdimensional shapes, specifically the symmetry of regular figures and polytopes. Polytopes are geometric shapes of any number of dimensions that cannot be constructed in the real world and can be visualized only when the eye of the beholder possesses the necessary insight; they are most often described mathematically and sometimes can be represented with hypnotically intricate fine-line drawings.
"I like things that can be seen," Prof. COXETER once remarked. "You have to imagine a different world where these queer things have some kind of shape."
Known as Donald (shortened from MacDonald,) Prof. COXETER had such a passion for his work and unrivalled elegance in constructing and writing proofs that he motivated countless mathematicians to pick up the antiquated discipline of geometry long after it had been deemed passé.
John Horton CONWAY, the Von Neumann professor of mathematics at Princeton University, never studied under Prof. COXETER, but he considers himself an honorary student because of the COXETERian nature of his work.
"With math, what you're doing is trying to prove something and that can get very complicated and ugly. COXETER always manages to do it clearly and concisely," Prof. CONWAY said. "He kept a little flame of geometry alive by doing such beautiful works himself.
"I'm reminded of a quotation from Walter Pater's book The Renaissance. He was describing art and poetry, but he talks of a small, gem-like flame: 'To burn always with this hard, gem-like flame, to maintain this ecstasy, is success in life.' "
Prof. COXETER's oeuvre included more than 250 papers and 12 books. His Introduction to Geometry, published in 1961, is now considered a classic -- it is still in print and this year is back on the curriculum at McGill University. His Regular Polytopes is considered by some as the modern-day addendum to Euclid's Elements. In 1957, he published Generators and Relations for Discrete Groups, written jointly with his PhD student and lifelong friend Willy MOSER. It is currently in its seventh edition.
Prof. COXETER's self-image as an artist was validated by his Friendship with and influence on Dutch artist M. C. ESCHER, who, when working on his Circle Limit 3 drawings, used to say, "I'm Coxetering today."
They met at the International Mathematical Congress in Amsterdam in 1954 and then corresponded about their mutual interest in repeating patterns and representations of infinity. In a letter to his son, Mr. ESCHER noted that a diagram sent to him by Prof. COXETER that inspired his Circle Limit 3 prints "gave me quite a shock."
He added that " COXETER's hocus-pocus text is no use to me at all.... I understand nothing, absolutely nothing of it."
While Mr. ESCHER claimed total ignorance of math, Prof. COXETER wrote numerous papers on the Dutchman's "intuitive geometry."
Though Prof. COXETER did geometry for its own sake, his work inevitably found practical application. Buckminster FULLER encountered his work in the construction of his geodesic domes. He later dedicated a book to Prof. COXETER: "By virtue of his extraordinary life's work in mathematics, Prof. COXETER is the geometer of our bestirring twentieth century. [He is] the spontaneously acclaimed terrestrial curator of the historical inventory of the science of pattern analysis."
Prof. COXETER's work with icosohedral symmetries served as a template of sorts in the Nobel Prize-winning discovery of the Carbon 60 molecule. It has also proved relevant to other specialized areas of science such as telecommunications, data mining, topology and quasi-crystals.
In 1968, Prof. COXETER added to his list of converts an anonymous society of French mathematicians, the Bourbakis, who actively and internationally sought to eradicate classical geometry from the curriculum of math education.
"Death to Triangles, Down with Euclid!" was the Bourbaki war cry. Prof. COXETER's rebuttal: "Everyone is entitled to their opinion. But the Bourbakis were sadly mistaken."
One member of the society, Pierre CARTIER, met Prof. COXETER in Montreal and became enamoured of his work. Soon, he had persuaded his fellow Bourbakis to include Prof. COXETER's approach in their annual publication. "An entire volume of Bourbaki was thoroughly inspired by the work of COXETER," said Prof. CARTIER, a professor at Denis Diderot University in Paris.
In the 1968 volume, Prof. COXETER's name was writ large into the lexicon of mathematics with the inauguration of the terms "COXETER number," " COXETER group" and "COXETER graph."
These concepts describe symmetrical properties of shapes in multiple dimensions and helped to bridge the old-fashioned classical geometry with the more au courant and applied algebraic side of the discipline. These concepts continue to pervade geometrical discourse, several decades after being discovered by Prof. COXETER.
Prof. COXETER became a serious mathematician at the relatively late age of 14, though family folklore has it that, as a toddler, he liked to stare at the columns of numbers in the financial pages of his father's newspaper.
He was born into a Quaker family in Kensington, just west of London, on February 9, 1907. His mother, Lucy GEE, was a landscape artist and portrait painter, and his father, Harold, was a manufacturer of surgical instruments, though his great love was sculpting.
They had originally named their son MacDonald Scott COXETER, but a godparent suggested that the boy's father's name should be added at the front. Another relative then pointed out that H.M.S. COXETER made him sound like a ship of the royal fleet so the names were switched around.
When Prof. COXETER was 12, he created his own language -- "Amellaibian" a cross between Latin and French, and filled a 126-page notebook with information on the imaginary world where it was spoken.
But more than anything he fancied himself a composer, writing several piano concertos, a string quartet and a fugue. His mother took her son and his musical compositions to Gustav HOLST. His advice: "Educate him first."
He was then sent to boarding school, where he met John Flinders PETRIE, son of Egyptologist Sir Flinders PETRIE. The two were passing time at the infirmary contemplating why there were only five Platonic solids -- the cube, tetrahedron, octahedron, dodecahedron and icosahedron. They then began visualizing what these shapes might look like in the fourth dimension. At the age of 15, Prof. COXETER won a school prize for an English essay on how to project these geometric shapes into higher dimensions -- he called it "Dimensional Analogy."
Prof. COXETER's father took his son along with his essay to meet friend and fellow pacifist Bertrand RUSSELL. Mr. RUSSELL recommended Prof. COXETER to mathematician E.H. NEVILLE, a scout, of sorts, for mathematics prodigies. He was impressed by Prof. COXETER's work but appalled by some inexcusable gaps in his mathematical knowledge. Prof. NEVILLE arranged for private tutelage in pursuit of a scholarship at Cambridge. During this period, Prof. COXETER was forbidden from thinking in the fourth dimension, except on Sundays.
He entered Trinity College, Cambridge, in 1926 and was among five students handpicked by Ludwig WITTGENSTEIN for his philosophy of mathematics class. During his first year at Cambridge, at the age of 19, he discovered a new regular polyhedron that had six hexagonal faces at each vertex.
After graduating with first-class honours in 1929, he received his doctorate under H. F. BAKER in 1931, winning the coveted Smith's Prize for his thesis.
Prof. COXETER did fellowship stints back and forth between Princeton and Cambridge for the next few years, focusing on the mathematics of kaleidoscopes -- he had mirrors specially cut and hinged together and carried them in velvet pouches sewn by his mother. By 1933, he had enumerated the n-dimensional kaleidoscopes -- that is, kaleidoscopes operating up to any number of dimensions.
The concepts that became known as COXETER groups are the complex algebraic equations he developed to express how many images may be seen of any object in a kaleidoscope (he once used a paper triangle with the word "nonsense" printed on it to track reflections).
In 1936, Prof. COXETER was offered an assistant professorship at the University of Toronto. He made the move shortly after the sudden death of his father and following his marriage to Rien BROUWER. She was from the Netherlnds and he met her while she was on holiday in London.
As a professor, Prof. COXETER was known to flout set curriculum. Ed BARBEAU, now a professor at the U of T, recalled that at the start of his classes, Prof. COXETER would spread out a manuscript on the desks at the front of the room. During his lecture, he would often pause for minutes at a time to make notes when a student offered something that might be relevant to his work in progress. When the work was later published, students were pleasantly surprised to find that their suggestions had been duly credited.
Prof. COXETER was also known to show up to class carrying a pineapple, or a giant sunflower from his garden, demonstrating the existence of geometric principles in nature. And he was notorious for leaping over details, expecting students to fill in the rest.
The Canadian Broadcasting Corporation's resident intellectual, Lister SINCLAIR, was one of Prof. COXETER's earliest students. He once recounted that Prof. COXETER would "write an expression on the board and you could see it talking to him. It was like Michelangelo walking around a block of marble and seeing what's in there."
Asia Ivic WEISS, a professor at York University, Prof. COXETER's last PhD student and the only woman so honoured, describes an incident that perfectly exemplifies Prof. COXETER's math myopia. Going into labour with her first child, she called him to cancel their weekly meeting. Prof. COXETER, who never acknowledged her pregnancy, said not to worry, he would send over a stack of research to keep her busy when she got home from the hospital.
Despite several offers from other universities, Prof. COXETER stayed at University of Toronto throughout his career.
Like his father, he was a pacifist. In 1997, he was among those who marched a petition to the university president's office to protest against an honorary degree being conferred on George BUSH Sr. Prof. COXETER recalled with disdain Robert PRITCHARD's telling him, "Donald, I have more important things to worry about."
After his official retirement in 1977, Prof. COXETER continued as a professor emeritus, making weekly visits to his office. These subsided only in the past several months. On the weekend before his death, he finished revisions on his final paper, which he had delivered the previous summer in Budapest.
In his last five years, he survived a heart attack, a broken hip (he sprung himself from the hospital early to drive to a geometry conference in Wisconsin) and, most recently, prostate cancer.
Considering his 96 years of vegetarianism and a strict exercise regime, he felt betrayed by his body. "I feel like the man of Thermopylae who doesn't do anything properly," he commented recently after an awkward evening out, quoting nonsense poet Edward LEAR.
Prof. COXETER died in his home, with three long last breaths, just before bed on the last day of March.
His brain is now undergoing study at McMaster University, along with that of Albert EINSTEIN. Neuroscientist Sandra WITELSON is tryng to determine whether his brain's extraordinary capacities are associated with its structure.
Prof. COXETER met with her at the beginning of March and learned that the atypical elements of Einstein's brain, compared with an average brain, were symmetrical on both right and left sides.
Prof. WITELSON said she wondered whether there might be similar findings with Prof. COXETER's brain. "Isn't that nice," he said. "I suppose that would indicate all my interest in symmetry was well founded."
Prof. COXETER leaves his daughter Susan and son Edgar. His wife died in 1999.
Siobhan ROBERTS is a Toronto writer whose biography of Donald COXETER will be published by Penguin in 2005.

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RUSSELL o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-08-11 published
STANBURY, Amadita Diana Oland Halifax (née OLAND)
Died peacefully at her family home on August 9, 2003 after a long and courageous battle with breast cancer. Born a twin on Easter Sunday, 1918 in Guildford, England, she was the only daughter of the late Colonel Sidney C. OLAND and Herlinda deBedia OLAND. Following World War 1, she lived in Havana, Cuba, Halifax and later in Hollywood, where both her parents were in motion pictures.
Upon her return to Nova Scotia, she attended the Convent of the Sacred Heart and then Mount Saint Vincent Academy and has enjoyed her affiliations with both schools ever since. She was also educated abroad in Lausanne, Paris and London. One of her passions was riding horses, where she excelled and won various awards both in Halifax. Still remembered as a significant social event, her marriage to Norman STANBURY in July 1938 took place on the first sunny day following six weeks of rain. On its front page, above a wedding photo, the Halifax Herald ran a huge banner ''Happy the Bride the Sun Shines On''. The sun continued to shine for over 50 years of marriage.
She joined the Junior League and loved her work in the Well Baby Clinic, During her lifetime of dedication to raising her family, she was active in her support of the Arts including the Canadian Opera Company, the London Theatre Company, the Kiwanis Music Festival and numerous local theatre companies including Neptune Theatre She was knowledgeable about and gained great pleasure from her study of antiques.
As a alumna of Mount Saint Vincent, she was Chair of their Project One-Futures for Women fund raising campaign and was among the first to receive the University Alumnae Award of Distinction.
She is survived by her six children - Penelope (Barry RUSSELL,) Michael, and Lindita (Charles WALKER) all of Halifax; Bruce and Christopher (Asifa BHATIA) of Vancouver, Norman, Toronto; also eight grandchildren-Charles (Loraine TOBIA,) Paul (Dawna BEARISTO) and Dick RUSSELL, Susannah and Katherine STANBURY, Roland STANBURY and Diana and Charles WALKER; three great-grandchildren and two and two step great-grandchildren. She is also survived by her twin brother, Bruce S. OLAND, Halifax , and many cousins, nieces and nephews. She was predeceased by her husband, Norman, and two brothers, Victor deBedia and Don Jamie.
Visitation will be at Snows Funeral Home from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. on Tuesday. The Funeral Mass will be celebrated by Reverend Gordon MacLEAN at Canadian Martyrs Church, 5900 Inglis Street, Halifax at 11: 00 a.m. on Wednesday, August 13. A private family burial service will be held later at Santa Maria del Pilar Chapel, Sackville, Nova Scotia. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the Nova Scotia Division of the Canadian Breast Cancer Society or the charity of your choice. On line condolences snow@funeralscanada.com

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RUSSELL o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-10-16 published
Father figure to the Canadian stage
British-trained Stratford character actor never craved starring roles
By Allison LAWLOR, Special to The Globe and Mail, Thursday, October 16, 2003 - Page R11
For Mervyn " Butch" BLAKE, entering a theatre was a magical experience, something he never tired of during an acting career that spanned close to three-quarters of a century. Mr. BLAKE, one of the most loved members of the Stratford Festival Company, died on October 9 at a Toronto nursing home after a long illness. He was 95.
"Theatre seems to give me life," Mr. BLAKE said in 1994. "I just feel marvellous when I enter the theatre... it's one of the things which keeps me going."
Over his long stage life that included 42 consecutive seasons with the Stratford Festival of Canada, Mr. BLAKE "had the distinction of playing in every single play of Shakespeare's," said Richard MONETTE, Stratford's artistic director.
"He had a great life in the theatre," Mr. MONETTE said.
Adored by both audiences and fellow actors, the veteran actor was known across Canada for his enormous talent and generosity of spirit. When he wasn't working at Stratford, he acted on the country's major stages and in television and film.
For seven seasons, he toured with the Canadian Players, bringing professional theatre to smaller towns. And in 1987, he won a Dora Mavor Moore Award for best performance in a featured role in a production of Saturday, Sunday, Monday at what was then called CentreStage (now CanStage).
"Everyone loved Butch without exception," said John NEVILLE, a former Stratford's artistic director.
Mervyn BLAKE was born on November 30, 1907, in Dehra Dun, India, where his father was a railway executive.
His father wanted him to become an engineer but after falling in love with the theatre, Mr. BLAKE was able to persuade his father to allow him to study at London's Royal Academy of Dramatic Art. In 1932, he graduated and soon made his professional stage debut at the Embassy Theatre in London
During the Second World War, he served in the British Army as a driver. It was during the war years that he is said to have got his nickname Butch. A witness to the horrors of the Bergen-Belsen concentration camp, Mr. BLAKE was present at the liberation of the camp by British troops. It was an experience that haunted him for the rest of his life.
At the war's end, he returned to England and to the stage. He married actress Christine BENNETT and spent the years between 1952 and 1955 at the Shakespeare Memorial Theatre in Stratford-upon-Avon. There he worked with many of the great British actors such as Sir Laurence OLIVIER, Sir Michael REDGRAVE and Dame Peggy ASHCROFT.
Despite his success on the British stage, he decided to join the Stratford Festival of Canada, then in its fifth season. With his family in tow, Mr. BLAKE moved to Canada and in 1957 appeared in a production of Hamlet with Christopher PLUMMER in the title role.
"He wasn't a leading actor," said actor and director Douglas CAMPBELL. "He was a supporting player. As a supporting player you couldn't get better."
Mr. BLAKE always saw himself as a character actor who never cared that much about starring roles, said Audrey ASHLEY, a former Ottawa Citizen theatre critic and author of Mr. BLAKE's 1999 biography With Love from Butch.
"He was one of those actors you never had to worry about," Ms. ASHLEY said. "You knew Butch was always going to do a good job."
Known for his unfailing good nature and even temper, he enjoyed re-telling gaffes he had made on stage. Mr. MONETTE remembers one performance where Mr. BLAKE appeared on stage as the Sea Captain in Twelfth Night. The character Viola asks him, "What country, Friends, is this?" And instead of responding "This is Illyria, lady." Out of his mouth popped, "This is Orillia."
To the younger actors at Stratford, Mr. BLAKE was a father figure. "He was very fond of the young actors and would take them under his wing," Ms. ASHLEY said.
Stephen RUSSELL remembers arriving at Stratford for his first season in the mid-1970s. He was placed in the same dressing room as Mr. BLAKE, an experience he still holds close to his heart.
"He was one of the most generous human beings," Mr. RUSSELL said.
One of the areas Mr. BLAKE was most helpful in was teaching fellow actors how to apply stage makeup. He loved makeup and on his dressing-room table he had an old rabbit's foot that he would use to apply his face powder, Mr. RUSSELL said.
Aging didn't stop him from applying his own elaborate makeup. Playing the role of old Adam in As You Like It required him to go through the same makeup ritual when he was 70 years old as it did when he performed the role years earlier as a much younger man.
Aside from the stage, one of Mr. BLAKE's passions was cricket. During his first season in Stratford, he played on the festival's team and was responsible for starting a friendly, annual cricket match against the Shaw Festival in Niagara-on-the-Lake.
Each season, members of the two acting companies would come together for a civilized afternoon of cricket and tea. The Stratford team still goes by the name of Blake's Blokes.
In honour of his talent and dedication to the theatre, Mr. BLAKE was appointed a member of the Order of Canada in May, 1995.
"When he entered, the stage just lit up," Mr. RUSSELL said.
Mr. BLAKE leaves his wife Christine BENNETT; children Andrew and Bridget; and stepson Tim DAVISSON.
Details of a memorial service to be held in Stratford, Ontario, have yet to be announced.

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RUSSELL o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-13 published
RUSSELL, Kathleen - Estate of
Notice To Creditors And Others
All claims against the Estate of Kathleen RUSSELL, late of 602 Melita Crescent Toronto, Ontario, M5G 3B1, who died on or about August 5th, 2003, must be filed with the undersigned personal representative on or before the 30th day of January, 2004. Thereafter, the undersigned will distribute the assets of the Estate having regard only to the claims then filed.
Dated the 28th day of November, 2003.
Maralyn CALE, Executor
by McKechnie, Jurgeit and MacKenzie,
Solicitors, 655 Dizon Road, Rexdale,
Ontario, M9W 1J4
Page B6

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RUSSELL o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-20 published
RUSSELL, Kathleen - Estate of
Notice To Creditors And Others
All claims against the Estate of Kathleen RUSSELL, late of 602 Melita Crescent Toronto, Ontario, M5G 3B1, who died on or about August 5th, 2003, must be filed with the undersigned personal representative on or before the 30th day of January, 2004. Thereafter, the undersigned will distribute the assets of the Estate having regard only to the claims then filed.
Dated the 28th day of November, 2003.
Maralyn CALE, Executor
by McKechnie, Jurgeit and MacKenzie,
Solicitors, 655 Dizon Road, Rexdale,
Ontario, M9W 1J4
Page B5

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RUSSELL o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-27 published
RUSSELL, Kathleen - Estate of
Notice To Creditors And Others
All claims against the Estate of Kathleen RUSSELL, late of 602 Melita Crescent Toronto, Ontario, M5G 3B1, who died on or about August 5th, 2003, must be filed with the undersigned personal representative on or before the 30th day of January, 2004. Thereafter, the undersigned will distribute the assets of the Estate having regard only to the claims then filed.
Dated the 28th day of November, 2003.
Maralyn CALE, Executor
by McKechnie, Jurgeit and MacKenzie,
Solicitors, 655 Dizon Road, Rexdale,
Ontario, M9W 1J4
Page B5

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