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"RIC" 2003 Obituary


RICARD  RICH  RICHARD  RICHARDSON  RICHER  RICHERT  RICHLER  RICHMOND  RICHTHAMMER  RICKETT 

RICARD o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-07-14 published
Philanthropist extraordinaire
Francophone students were among the many beneficiaries of her generosity
By Randy RAY Special to The Globe and Mail Monday, July 14, 2003 - Page R7
Ottawa -- Before he died in February, 1993, millionaire Baxter RICARD urged his wife Alma to spend the couple's fortune wisely. ''Put it back into the community, " he told her. ''Spend it well.'' Mrs. RICARD did not let her husband down.
In the 10 years following the death of Mr. RICARD, who owned a chain of radio, television and cable stations in Northern Ontario, she earned a reputation as one of Canada's most generous philanthropists, highlighted by a $23-million donation in 1998 to a fellowship fund that promotes higher education to francophone students across the country.
Mrs. RICARD, who was born in Montreal on October 4, 1906, died at her home in Sudbury on June 2. She was 96.
To date, the Ottawa-based Fondation Baxter and Alma Ricard has given 81 students a total of $4.2-million to further their postsecondary education. Other beneficiaries of the couple's generosity have included colleges, hospitals, church groups and universities in Sudbury and Toronto.
''Mrs. RICARD is one of the biggest philanthropists in Canada," said Alain LANDRY, executive director of the foundation, which was formed in 1988 to distribute the RICARDs' money to various charitable causes. The fellowship fund was set up a decade later.
Mrs. RICARD, formerly Alma VÉZINA, moved to Sudbury in 1931 after responding to a job advertisement from a hardware store run by Félix RICARD, father of Baxter RICARD. She was trained as a secretary at the time.
''She took the train and arrived at 4 a.m.," says Mr. LANDRY. ''In those days, a young lady was not to be seen with a man going to a hotel, so she and Baxter went to a church where they sat until daylight, and she fell in love with him.'' She worked as an administrative assistant to the elder Mr. RICARD and eventually married Baxter, who in later years inherited his father's hardware store and ran it with the help of his wife.
In 1947, the RICARDs left the hardware business and began building a broadcasting empire in Northern Ontario, starting with two radio stations in Sudbury and growing to include numerous radio and television stations. Radio stations established by the couple included CHNO, the first bilingual radio station in Ontario, CFBR and CJMX-FM.
In 1974, when cable television started to expand, Baxter RICARD and some colleagues obtained a licence for cable distribution in northern and eastern Ontario and created Northern Cable Holdings Ltd., which served the greater Sudbury area and areas as far north as Hearst, Ontario In 1980, the company acquired two television stations to serve the same areas and gave it the name Mid-Canada Television. Mr. RICARD also had an interest in a Toronto cable-television company.
Alma RICARD was her husband's ''right-hand person" and took an active part in the broadcasting business and all other ventures he was involved in, including the city-planning committee in Sudbury, the board of directors at Sudbury General Hospital and the Central Canada Broadcasting Association. ''They were inseparable in all those activities," says Mr. LANDRY.
Like Felix RICARD, Baxter and Alma RICARD were strong believers in a Canadian mosaic that included French-speaking citizens. In an era when Ontario's francophones were not permitted to study in French, Felix RICARD didn't have the financial means to promote the francophone culture and lobby for French schooling, so he became an outspoken trustee on the local school board.
As a trustee, he was ''a defender of the rights of francophones in matters of French education... [who] made significant gains for the francophone population of that region. A school in Sudbury bears his name," says a document obtained from Fondation Baxter & Alma Ricard. Baxter and Alma RICARD, on the other hand, made millions in the broadcasting industry and had the financial wherewithal to further the francophone cause, including the struggle for a quality education for French-speaking Ontarians.
''Baxter had no family and the couple had no children so they had to think of who would inherit their money," says André LACROIX of Sudbury, a lawyer, business associate and long-time friend of the RICARDs. ''Fairly early in the game they realized most of their assets should be used for charitable purposes. That's when they developed the idea of a charitable foundation.'' In its initial years after Mr. RICARD's death, the foundation donated $600,000 to Cambrian College and $1-million each to Sudbury General Hospital, the University of Sudbury, and Laurentian University, all in Sudbury, and a total of more than $4-million to the University of Toronto and St. Michael's Hospital in Toronto.
In the early 1990s, the RICARDs and their associates sold their radio and television stations to Baton Broadcasting and their cable distribution company to CFCF Ltd. In 1998, on the strength of money reaped from the sale, the fellowship fund was started and aimed specifically at francophone Canadians living permanently in a minority situation outside of Quebec who need money to advance their studies beyond a bachelor's degree.
Based on Baxter RICARD's idea, the fund was created jointly by businessman Paul DESMARAIS Sr., now chairman of the executive committee of management and holding company Power Corporation of Canada. Mr. DESMARAIS and Mr. LACROIX, plus Paul DESMARAIS Jr., are members of the board of directors of Fondation Baxter & Alma Ricard.
It was launched with the original $23-million donation from Ms. RICARD and despite many disbursements, today sits at $25-million thanks to interest earned on the principal, says Mr. LANDRY.
Until her death, Mrs. RICARD was president of the board and until three months ago, continued to sign cheques, says Mr. LACROIX, who remembers Mrs. RICARD as a ''generous and kind person who helped people with problems.''
''Baxter's father would be proud of what Alma has accomplished since Baxter died. It is well along the way to what he had promoted for many years," says Mr. LACROIX.
In addition to donations in the millions of dollars over the years, Mrs. RICARD once helped out a person who couldn't handle her mortgage payments and was about to lose her home; she also donated to a religious group that raised money for the poor.
Mr. LACROIX remembers Mrs. RICARD as a woman who loved to have fun.
''From age 70 onward she didn't mind going on until 1 a.m. or 2 a.m. She enjoyed going out at night, she loved to dance," he says. ''She was also quite religious, church attendance was sacred.'' Mrs. RICARD also loved to collect hats: ''She had hundreds of hats and they were attention-getters," says Mr. LACROIX, who knew the RICARDs for more than 30 years.
Of all the recognition she received over the years, Mrs. RICARD cherished most the Officer of the Order of Canada bestowed on her in 2000, says Mr. LACROIX. Governor-General Adrienne CLARKSON travelled to Sudbury to present the honour to Mrs. RICARD in her sick bed, at her home, in September, 2002.

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RICH o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-06-17 published
HOAG, Howard Arthur
Died Sunday, June 15, 2003, at home in Toronto, surrounded by Friends. Howard will be greatly missed by his beloved bride Louise RICH and her daughter Odette HUTCHINGS, as well as by his innumerable Friends and his family, in particular his sister Sharon. Howard loved life. His humour, wit, intelligence and broad smile charmed everyone he met. Diagnosed with liver cancer in December, Howard lived the last six months with incredible courage, determination and optimism. The devotion and concern of his wide group of Friends, including those from the Toronto Racquet Club and the Toronto Scottish Rugby Club has been remarkable. The annual Robbie Burns Supper will not be the same without him. Many thanks to Dr. SIU at Princess Margaret, Drs SINGH, HUSSEIN, STEINBERG, Rosa BERG and the Palliative Care Team at Mt. Sinai and Trinity Hospice. Special thanks to Howard's friend Fred REID- WILKINSON for being there. A service to celebrate Howard's life will be held 4: 00 p.m., Saturday, June 21, East Common Room, Hart House, University of Toronto, with a reception to follow. In lieu of flowers donations may be made in Howard's name to Trinity Home Hospice, Suite 1102 - 25 King St. West, Toronto M5L 1G7.

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RICH o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-08-15 published
Howard HOAG
By Steven DENURE, Julia WOODS, Michael HOMER, Marty SILVERSTONE Friday, August 15, 2003 - Page A28
Friend, husband, father, rugby player. Born September 17, 1952, in Ottawa. Died June 15, in Toronto, of cancer, aged 50.
Friends experienced a quintessential Howard HOAG moment a few years ago on the dock at a friend's cottage at a remote spot in Georgian Bay. They had an old recurve bow and a quiver full of new arrows, and were taking turns shooting at -- and missing a floating target anchored far out in the bay. As was his lifelong habit, Howard arrived much later than anticipated. He stepped out of the boat with a nautical flourish, and, after being roundly berated for being late and bringing what looked to be only six (warm) beer, he picked up the bow and tested its pull. Then he turned and fired an arrow and hit the previously unthreatened target the first time, with a satisfying thunk, like an exclamation mark at the end of a sentence. In the moment of stunned silence that followed, he gave a withering Hoagian look. "That's how it's done," he said, and picked up his six-pack and his knapsack, which turned out to be full of wine, and headed up the hill, leaving the merry band on the dock properly put in its place.
His Friends spent so much time waiting for him that they dubbed it "Howard time." The wait was always worth it. At every party there was "before Howie" and "after Howie." With his arrival, the conversation always sparkled a little more, the wine tasted better, the room seemed to grow bigger -- plus there was his unique ability to infuriate and/or entertain everybody in the room.
Howard grew up in Trois-Rivières, Quebec, the youngest of four children born to a production manager at the mighty CIP paper mill. As a child he was a Boy Scout, soloist in the church choir and an avid canoeist. He would later tell stories about paddling around the islands in the St. Lawrence River and watching the foam from the mill make the paddles disappear.
His voice eventually changed and, when he got to Montreal's McGill University, so did the songs. Howard studied environmental biology, but his true passion was the game of rugby. In recent years, Howard was best known as the heart and soul of the Toronto Scottish Rugby Club, as well as a key organizer of its annual Robbie Burns night. In Montreal, however, he's a legend: it was his monumental gaffe (he loudly lambasted a group of football coaches while the men in question sat in the next room listening to every word) that led to the creation of the Howie Hoag Award. Since its inception in 1971, "the Hoag" has been given out weekly during the MacDonald College football season to the player who performs the most remarkable misdeed of the week.
We are comforted to know that the last several years of Howard's too-short life were the absolute best. At 48, the classic lad and confirmed bachelor met the love of his life, the incomparable Louise RICH, and her daughter, Odette HUTCHINGS. This perfect trio -- whose adopted nickname was H.R.H. -- did not have anything like the number of years they deserved together, but what they did have was packed with enough love and laughter to fill many longer lifetimes.
Tragically, last Christmas Eve, Howard, who'd battled cancer as a child, learned that the radiation treatment that had saved his life 42 years earlier had probably led to the growth of an inoperable tumour in one of his bile ducts. In early June, Howard was given only a few days to live, but survived long enough to marry Louise and spend another week with his family and the Friends he loved. He also lived long enough to die on the day and at the hour of what used to be his absolutely favourite kind of night: just after midnight on a midsummer's eve with a full moon, which Howard used to say was "God's flashlight."
Steve, Julia, Mike and Marty are Friends of Howard HOAG.

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RICHARD o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-01-08 published
Albert George WEBB
In loving memory of Albert George WEBB, April 9, 1921 to December 24, 2002.
Albert WEBB, a resident of Providence Bay, died at the Mindemoya Hospital, on Tuesday, December 24, 2002 at the age of 81 years. He was born in Durham, and had lived on Manitoulin for the past 6 years. Previous to that, Al had lived in Elliott Lake and Armstrong. He had a great love of the north country, which led him to his job as a bush pilot He truly loved his work, and spent many enjoyable years pursuing his love of the north and of flying. Al was a veteran of WW2, having served overseas.
Survived by his beloved partner Val TAILOR/TAYLOR of Providence Bay, and her family. Will be sadly missed by Ruby CANNARD, the Mike SPRACK family, Linda and Al BAILEY, Harvey and Diane DEBASSIGE, Lloyd JACKSON and Marshall RICHARD of Elliott Lake, Ryan HUTCHINSON/HUTCHISON and Jim HARASYM. Survived by many Friends in the Armstrong, Elliott Lake and Manitoulin area. Also survived by sons Warren and Chris, and one brother in the Hamilton area.
At Al's request, there will be no funeral service. Cremation will take place.
Val TAILOR/TAYLOR would like to thank the doctors and nurses at Mindemoya Hospital for the wonderful care and concern given to Al and herself, during this time. Words cannot express the appreciation. Culgin Funeral Home

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RICHARDSON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-08 published
HAGERMAN, Florence C.
Peacefully, at Central Park Lodge, Thornhill, on Saturday, March 1, 2003, in her 98th year. Much loved wife of the late Col. Albert Robert HAGERMAN, M.C., E.D., M.D. Daughter of the late Lt. Col. T.B. RICHARDSON, M.D., F.R.C.S. (E) and the late Anna (BUTLAND) RICHARDSON. Beloved sister of Kathleen KENNEDY of Warkworth, Ontario and beloved sister-in-law of Meada RICHARDSON of Burlington, Ontario. Predeceased by sisters Marian, Edith and Evelyn, and by brothers Ralph and Hubert. Survived and remembered fondly by three nieces, three nephews, and by her great-nieces and great-nephews. Cremation has taken place. A private celebration of her life, including her talents and accomplishments in music, will be held by the family. The family is very thankful for the kind care and compassion shown by the caregivers at Central Park Lodge.

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RICHARDSON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-10-11 published
Creator of Savage God
Theatre director was a Canadian nationalist, a fan of the avant garde and a champion of playwright George Ryga. He was also seen as a kook, a dilettante and a street fighter
By Tom HAWTHORN Special to The Globe and Mail Saturday, October 11, 2003 - Page F9
John JULIANI was a provocateur in life as on stage. A man passionate about the possibilities of theatre, he roused reverence in some, antipathy in others.
His most infamous act was to challenge the Stratford Festival's newly hired artistic director to a duel. Robin PHILLIPS's offence was that he is British when Mr. JULIANI and others were certain a land as grand as Canada was capable of producing a director for its Shakespearean theatre.
What he called a "romantic gesture with tongue in cheek" earned cheers from Canadian theatre directors and sneers from much of the theatre establishment.
Mr. JULIANI, who has died at the age of 63, was an unabashed Canadian nationalist, a dedicated fan of the avant garde, an ardent defender of the right of actors to a decent living, a champion of playwright George Ryga and a tireless figure so commanding as to develop an intense loyalty among acolytes.
At the same time, he was seen as a kook, a dilettante and a street fighter. One critic called him "the Tiger Williams of Canadian theatre," his pugnacious approach earning him comparison to a notorious hockey goon. In his defence, Mr. JULIANI explained that he was merely a "true believer" with opinions on controversial subjects.
Mr. JULIANI's credits were long and varied, including spontaneous Sixties street happenings such as the staging of his own wedding as a theatrical performance and brief appearances on such 1990s television dramas as The X-Files.
From 1982 until 1997, Mr. JULIANI was executive producer of radio drama for Canadian Broadcasting Corporation Radio in Vancouver. He helped to bring to air many celebrated productions, including the brilliant and provocative Dim Sum Diaries by playwright Mark LEIREN- YOUNG.
Mr. JULIANI also possessed a head-turning beauty, with a profile as striking as a Roman bust. Radio host Bill RICHARDSON commented on his handsomeness at a raucous memorial after his death, calling him a "hunka hunka burnin' love." Some said he had the looks and bearing of a Shakespearean king.
John Charles JULIANI was born in Montreal on March 24, 1940. Raised in a working-class neighbourhood, he attended Loyola College and was an early graduate from the fledgling National Theatre School.
He spent two seasons as an actor at Stratford before being hired as a theatre teacher at Simon Fraser University in 1966. The new university atop Burnaby Mountain east of Vancouver was a hotbed of radicalism in politics and the arts. Mr. JULIANI bristled at an imposed curriculum and so infuriated the administration that he was banned from the campus in 1969.
Mr. JULIANI was heavily influenced by the writing of Antonin Artaud, a Surrealist who championed a theatre based on the imagination. He long sought to erase the barrier between scripted text and sensory impression, between performer and audience, to mixed success.
After moving to the West Coast, Mr. JULIANI launched a series of experiments in theatre. He credited these productions to Savage God, which was less a troupe in the traditional sense than a title granted to any performance involving Mr. JULIANI. The name came from William Butler Yeats's awestruck reaction to Alfred Jarry's Ubu Roi: "After us, the Savage God?"
Savage God defied explanation, though many tried and even Mr. JULIANI offered suggestions. Savage God was "an anthology of question marks," he once said. (It was, after all, the 1960s.) "Savage God is simply the Imagination," he told the Vancouver Sun, "insatiable, unrelenting, fiercely energetic, wary of categorization, fond of contradiction and inveterately iconoclastic."
In January, 1970, Mr. JULIANI married dancer Donna WONG, a ceremony conducted as a Savage God performance at the Vancouver Art Gallery. He repeated the process at the christening of his son. Ms. WONG- JULIANI would be his domestic and drama partner for more than three decades.
In 1971, the streets of Vancouver were the scene of several spontaneous and sometimes incomprehensible -- performances under the aegis of PACET ("pilot alternative complement to existing theatre.") The $18,000 project, funded by the federal government, incorporated Gestalt therapy sessions in street performances.
Theatrical events took place willy-nilly across the city, including malls, the airport, the library and Stanley Park. Admission was not charged, nor did all spectators appreciate their role as audience to avant-garde performance. A scene in which bicyclists wearing gas masks pedalled along city streets left many scratching their heads in puzzlement.
In 1974, Mr. JULIANI moved to Toronto to set up a graduate theatre-studies program at York University.
He called the program PEAK (" Performance, Example, Animation, Katharsis") and perhaps should have found an acronym for PEEK, as the instructor and his class stripped naked to protest against a lack of classroom space.
The challenge to the new Stratford artistic director in 1974 was written on a piece of parchment and delivered in London by Don RUBIN, a York colleague. Alas, Mr. RUBIN could not find a proper gauntlet and wound up ceremoniously striking Mr. PHILLIPS with a red rubber glove, an absurd note to a theatrical protest.
In 1978, Mr. JULIANI took the stage in a Toronto production of Children of Night, portraying Janusz Korczak, a doctor and teacher who ran an orphanage in the Warsaw ghetto. The critics were appalled.
Gina MALLET of the Toronto Star said Mr. JULIANI's performance sullied Dr. Korczak's memory. Jay SCOTT of The Globe and Mail, noting "the dreadfulness" of Mr. JULIANI's acting, said the production robbed the dead of their dignity.
From the stage, Mr. JULIANI challenged the Star's critic to a public debate on the aesthetics of theatre. He also wrote a letter to the editor, noting that Holocaust survivors in the audience had wholeheartedly embraced the production.
Mr. JULIANI wound up in Edmonton, where he continued to condemn the "exorbitance, elitism and museum theatre" of the establishment.
In 1982, he directed and co-wrote Latitude 55°, a feature film with just two characters -- a slick woman from the city and a Polish potato farmer -- set in a snowbound cabin. "It is filled with a passionate conviction that evaporates in pretentious pronouncements," The Globe's Carole CORBEIL wrote, "filled with truthful moments that evaporate in the desire to use every narcissistic trick in the book."
In a 1983 book examining the alternative theatre movement in Canada, author Renate USMIANI devoted most of a chapter to Mr. JULIANI, a decision that got her a scathing rebuke from a reviewer who considered him worthy of little more than a footnote.
"His works are curiosities; at best, they are worthy experiments in Artaudian theory," Boyd NEIL wrote in a Globe review. "But they are neither popular... nor influential."
Mr. JULIANI's years at Canadian Broadcasting Corporation Radio in Vancouver were both productive and successful. Among the many projects he directed was a three-part adaptation of Margaret Laurence's The Diviners; King Lear, starring John COLICOS; a 13-part series titled, Disaster! Acts of God or Acts of Man?" and, famously, Ryga's The Ecstasy of Rita Joe, with Leonard GEORGE portraying a role once assumed on stage by his late father, Chief Dan GEORGE. The surprise selection of Mr. GEORGE was typical of Mr. JULIANI's often brilliant casting.
Mr. JULIANI directed a 1989 production of The Glass Menagerie at the Vancouver Playhouse with Jennifer Phipps and Morris Panych. Globe reviewer Liam LACEY praised a production that "opens up the play like an old treasure chest, and lets in some fresh air without rearranging or disturbing the work's original grandeurs and caprices."
Four years later, Mr. JULIANI was directing a production of the mystery thriller Sleepwalker when actor Peter HAWORTH took sick shortly before opening night. The director suddenly found himself as the male lead. "Not even the most colossal egotist would want to do this," he said.
Dim Sum Diaries, a series of monologues written by Mr. LEIREN- YOUNG, received protests when aired by Canadian Broadcasting Corporation Radio in 1991. One episode, entitled The Sequoia, in which the white vendor of a luxury home launches a tirade against the Hong Kong immigrant who cuts down two rare and spectacular trees on the property, was accused of being racist. The playwright's well-intentioned exploration of stereotyping was charged with fostering those very prejudices.
After directing Dim Sum Diaries, Mr. JULIANI urged the playwright to tackle an issue that was dividing his church. Mr. LEIREN- YOUNG remembers replying: "You're talking same-sex marriage in the Anglican church and you want a straight Jewish guy to write this?"
The resulting play, titled Articles of Faith: The Battle of St. Alban's, was staged at Christ Church Cathedral in downtown Vancouver to great acclaim.
The collaborations between young playwright and veteran director succeeded in achieving Mr. JULIANI's goal of inspiring dialogue through theatre.
Mr. JULIANI had a reputation as a demanding taskmaster for novice and veteran actors alike. Rehearsals were jokingly called "Savage God Boot Camp."
He maintained a breakneck pace, both in the theatre and in the boardroom. He was artistic co-director of Opera Breve, a small company dedicated to nurturing young singers; president of the Union of British Columbia Performers (Alliance of Canadian Cinema, Television and Radio Artists); and, a former national president of the Directors Guild of Canada, among many boards on which he served.
Feeling fatigued in early August, Mr. JULIANI was diagnosed with liver cancer. The end came swiftly. He died on August 21 at Lions Gate Hospital in North Vancouver.
He leaves his wife of 33 years, Donna WONG- JULIANI, and a son, Alessandro JULIANI, an actor. He also leaves brothers Richard and Norman.
(Wit was long a part of the JULIANI mystique. The family pet, a canine named Beau Beau, was referred to in the family's paid obituary notice as a Savage Dog.)
For one who roused such passions, Mr. JULIANI felt that he led a conservative life. "I have always been a square," he once said.
A theatrical farewell to Mr. JULIANI attracted hundreds to St. Andrew's Wesley Church in Vancouver on Labour Day, a Monday and traditionally a quiet date on the theatre calendar. Those in attendance were encouraged to write remembrances on Post-It notes, which were then stuck to the church's pillars.
The City of Vancouver has declared next March 24, which would have been Mr. JULIANI's 64th birthday, to be Savage God Day.

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RICHER o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-06-04 published
Raymond Kenneth " Ken" HAGEN
In loving memory of Raymond Kenneth "Ken" HAGEN who passed away Monday evening, May 26th, 2003 at Mindemoya Hospital at the age of 87 years.
Beloved husband of Pearl (SEWELL) HAGEN predeceased 1982 and Florence (McCULLIGH) HAGEN of Mindemoya. Loving father of Mary BEAULIEU (husband Guil) of Toronto, George HAGEN (wife Sharon.) Bob HAGEN (wife Linda) both of Lively, Daniel HAGEN (wife Suzanne) of Calgary, Susan RICHER and infant baby Martha Jane both predeceased, stepchildren Leila THURESON (husband Peter,) Karen VANZANT (husband Clyde predeceased,) Harley BAYER (wife Lorraine) and Shirley PHILLIPS predeceased. Cherished grandfather of 24 grandchildren, 17 great grandchildren and 4 great great grandchildren. Dear son of Dan and May HAGEN, predeceased. Dear brother of Edna JACKSON of Sault Ste. Marie and Alex HAGEN predeceased. Sadly missed by many nieces and nephews. Rested at the Jackson and Barnard Funeral Home, 233 Larch St. Sudbury. Funeral service was held in the R. J. Barnard Chapel on Thursday May 29, 2003 at 1p.m. Interment was held in the Lakeview Cemetery, Meaford, Friday at 11 a.m. A memorial service was held on
Saturday, May 31 in the Mindemoya United Church.

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RICHERT o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-08-14 published
O'CONNELL, The Honourable Martin, Ph.D. (Privy Councilor)
Born on August 1, 1916 in Victoria, Martin O'CONNELL passed away in Toronto, on Monday, August 11, 2003. He died peacefully with his family at his side after a fight with Parkinson's disease.
Martin believed in serving the public, giving back to his country and advancing the cause of those who where not as fortunate. Throughout his full and varied life the principals of honesty, fairness, justice and humility, treating others with dignity and respect, always guided him as he set about distinguishing himself as a man to be honoured.
He leaves his wife Helen Alice O'CONNELL (born DIONNE) with whom he celebrated 58 years of marriage. Their love and dedication to each other was a model for all who knew them.
He also leaves his daughter Caryn (John JOHNSTON) and their two sons Nicholas and Kyle, his son John Martin (Martine BOUCHARD) and their two children Jean Christophe and Stéphanie. His children, their spouses and grandchildren were the pride of his life.
A brother Monsignor Michael O'CONNELL of Victoria and a sister Ellen RICHERT (widowed) of Saskatoon survive him. A sister Dr. Sheila O'CONNELL of Victoria and a brother Sgt. Johnny O'CONNELL who was killed in the battle for Caen in June 1944 predecease him.
Martin O'CONNELL started his career as a public school teacher in the British Columbia school system then completed a B.A. at Queen's University. As a veteran of the second world war (Captain, Royal Canadian Army Service Corp) he completed his education at the University of Toronto with an M.A. then PhD in political economy. His PhD dissertation studied the nationalism of Henri BOURASSA. He learned French so that he could read the documents and study the Bourassa archives in Ottawa and Montreal. Martin served on the Senate of the University of Toronto.
He left the academic world for the financial one and joined Harris and Partners in the late 1950's. In 1965, while on loan to Walter GORDON then Minister of Finance and as one of the three ''Whiz Kids'', he helped design policies, which ultimately led to the Canada Pension Plan, Medicare, and the Municipal Loan Development Fund.
Throughout the 1960's he served as the President of the Indian and Eskimo Association. During this time, he wrote many policy papers to improve aboriginal conditions and thus helped to bring attention to the difficulty that indigenous peoples where suffering.
In 1965 he ran for Parliament and failed to win a seat in Greenwood, he tried again in the federal riding of Scarborough East in 1968 and was elected. He was appointed Minister of State and later Minister of Labour in the Trudeau cabinet. He was co-chairman of the important hearings that shaped the immigration policies of this country. Defeated in 1972 he served as the Prime Minister's principal secretary throughout the minority years reshaping that office to bring the Party closer to the grass roots of Canadian society.
He was reelected in the 1974 election. He chaired the policy committee of two national conventions of the Liberal party and rejoined the cabinet as Minister of Labour late in that mandate. Defeated in 1979 he retired from politics and became Chairman of the Canadian Center For Occupational Health and Safety an entity he created while Minister of Labour.
In 1993 he was the Co-Founder and first Co-Chairman of The Canadian Foundation for the Preservation of Chinese Cultural and Historical Treasures. He served actively in this role and experienced real pleasure and pride in participating in this extraordinary work.
His many Friends will want to celebrate the life of a man who gave real meaning to the words service, integrity and honourable. He is remembered as one who pursued a life that was full and dedicated to improving the life of all Canadians. May he rest in peace.
A private family funeral will be held. All Friends are welcome to a celebration of Martin's life at the Granite Club on Bayview Avenue, Toronto on Wednesday, August 20, 2003 from 3 p.m. to 5 p.m.
Donations can be made to The Honorable Martin and Helen O'Connell Charitable Foundation can be sent in trust to his son John Martin O'CONNELL at 200 Bay Street, Suite 3900, Toronto, Ontario M5J 2J2.

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RICHLER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-04-22 published
He founded Readers' Club of Canada
Nationalist visionary struggled financially to publish Canadian writers
By Carol COOPER Special to The Globe and Mail Tuesday, April 22, 2003 - Page R7
In the early 1960s, when writers asked Peter and Carol MARTIN where to publish their manuscripts on Canada, the couple realized how few choices there were. Inspired, the Martins, both voracious readers, staunch nationalists and founders of the Readers' Club of Canada, decided to start their own press. In 1965, Peter Martin Associates came into being. Last month, Peter MARTIN died of lung cancer in Ottawa.
In an industry overshadowed by American companies, Peter MARTIN Associates was among the first in a wave of independent publishing houses to open during a time of rising Canadian nationalism.
Launched in a downtown Toronto basement on a shoestring budget, skeleton staff, idealism and enthusiasm, the company flew by the seat of its pants. Its employees were often young and new to the business. But many, including Peter CARVER, Michael SOLOMON and Valerie WYATT, went on to become Canadian mainstays.
"It really was a time of Canadian nationalism and those of us who believed in that cause could see what Peter and Carol were doing," said Ms. WYATT, a children's editor who spent four years with the company in the seventies.
During the 16 years before its sale in 1981, Peter Martin Associates published approximately 170 works, mainly non-fiction. Its presses put out I, Nuligak, the autobiography of an Inuit man; The Boyd Gang by Marjorie LAMB and Barry PEARSON; Trapping is My Life by John TETSO; and the Handbook of Canadian Film by Eleanor BEATTIE. Others who came through their doors included Hugh HOOD, Robert FULFORD, John Robert COLOMBO, Douglas FETHERLING and Mary Alice DOWNIE -- all to have their works published.
Started with small amounts of seed money from private investors and no government funding, Peter Martin Associates constantly struggled financially. At one point, for a bit of extra cash, the office became the designated nuclear-fallout shelter for the street. Pat DACEY, once the firm's book designer, lugged suitcases of books up the street to sell at Britnell's bookstore with summer employee Bronwyn DRAINIE.
Working at Peter Martin Associates was always fun, Ms. WYATT said. "You went in to work happy and you stayed happy all day."
Still, in a time when Canadian works received little recognition, she remembers finding it difficult to get media interviews for the author of Martin-published book.
Yet another title caused trouble with its subject. The company was putting out a collection of previously published sayings of former prime minister John DIEFENBAKER, called I Never Say Anything Provocative, edited by Margaret WENTE. Mr. DIEFENBAKER heard about the project, called Mr. MARTIN and threatened to sue. Mr. MARTIN stood firm.
"He handled it with such élan," said writer Tim WYNNE- JONES, then in the art department. "He was suitably dutiful, but not in awe. Mr. DIEFENBAKER was just over the top, as was his wont."
The book went to press and Mr. DIEFENBAKER did not go to court.
Once listed along with Peter GZOWSKI in a Maclean's magazine article on "Young Men to Watch," Mr. MARTIN was born on April 26, 1934 in Ottawa to a dentist father and a mother who drove an ambulance in the First World War. The younger of two sons, he attended Trinity College School in Port Hope, Ontario and the University of Toronto, where he earned a degree in philosophy.
During a year in Ottawa as the president of the National Federation of University Students, Mr. MARTIN met his first wife Carol. They married in 1956 and moved to Toronto. Three years later, they founded the Readers' Club in Featuring one Canadian book a month, it distributed works by Mordecai RICHLER, Irving LAYTON, Morley CALLAGHAN and Brian MOORE among others, and supplied its members with coupons. While continuing to run the Readers' Club (sold in 1978 to Saturday Night Magazine and closed in 1981), the MARTINs started Peter Martin Associates.
Throughout his career, Mr. MARTIN spoke out for Canadian publishing. Alarmed by the sale of Ryerson Press and Gage Educational Press in 1970 to American firms, he called a meeting of publishers to discuss problems in the industry. Named the Independent Publishers Association, the group started in 1971 with 16 members and with Mr. MARTIN as its first president. In 1976, it was renamed the Association of Canadian Publishers and continues today with 140 members. As a result of the group's efforts, Canadian publishing began to receive federal and provincial funding.
In the late 1970s, the MARTINs went their separate ways. Afterward, Mr. MARTIN published a small newspaper, The Downtowner, and owned a cookbook store with his second wife, Maggie NIEMI. In 1983, they moved near Sudbury, Ontario, where Mr. MARTIN did freelance book and theatre reviews, then moved to Ottawa in 1985 to work as president for Balmuir Books, publisher of the magazine International Perspectives and consulting editor for the University of Ottawa Press.
After a spinal-cord injury in 1997, Mr. MARTIN was left a quadriplegic, except for limited use of his left arm. Even so, he remained active, maintained a heavy e-mail correspondence and spent time in the park reading while seated in a bright-yellow wheelchair.
Mr. MARTIN leaves his children Pamela, Christopher and Jeremy and his wife Maggie NIEMI. He died on March 15.

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RICHLER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-08 published
Anne (HETTEL) LANTHIER
By Terry (KRUPA) LANTHIER Monday, December 8, 2003 - Page A18
Volunteer, wife, mother, aunt. Born May 23, 1920, in Timisoara, Romania. Died June 12 in Brantford, Ontario, of cancer, aged Anne HETTEL was the eldest of five children, born in Timisoara, Romania. Despite the lack of modern technologies and material goods, she frequently recalled her early years in Eastern Europe as filled with the warmth of family, sibling adventures and the creative activity of childhood.
At the age of 11, Anne moved with her family to Canada. Her most vivid memory of the trip was eating a banana for the first time, without the necessary information that the peel should first be removed. The family settled in Montreal, where her father established himself as a tailor in the area of St. Urbain Street, made famous in the writings of Mordecai RICHLER.
At the age of 16, she contracted tuberculosis and was sent to "the San" at St. Agathe for two years. Anne was never one to feel victimized by her life circumstances. She had many good memories of her time in the sanitarium and developed several lifelong Friendships. Recalling how, after her discharge from St. Agathe, a young man she dated had stopped his association with her in response to her illness, Anne sighed "Oh that poor, poor man." She refused to internalize the judgments of others, or to accept intolerance.
Pictures of Anne in her early adult years, strolling confidently down the streets of Montreal, arm in arm with her two sisters, radiate happiness and self-confidence. Wearing impeccably and classically tailored suits, these beautiful young women would not be out of place in today's scene.
In 1947, Anne married Spencer LANTHIER, the son of a prominent councilman and business family, from the Town of Mount Royal. Anne joked that her future husband, a seriously picky eater, was put to the test by Sunday lunches with her family that consisted of their favourites, raw bacon, cabbage, onion and boiled potatoes. In marriage, Ann became a full-time wife, and eventually the mother of three children and the beloved Auntie Anne to many nieces and nephews.
Anne was an active member of the Town of Mount Royal community. She was involved in the ladies' auxiliary for the Protestant Church, contributing her time and energy to fundraisers and annual rummage sales. She was a member of the lawn bowling club and regularly attended meetings of a women's club.
But by far her most valued role was creating a strong sense of home, to be enjoyed by her many Friends and family. Anne took her family obligations seriously, and she nursed several close relations through prolonged and serious illnesses with kindness, compassion and love.
While Anne offered her children her constant love and support, she understood them to be individuals who needed to make their own decisions and to create their own lives. She respected this by maintaining an active and satisfying life that always included, but was not dependent on her family. With the death of her husband in 1984, she continued her travels to visit her sister in Florida, toured Europe and Canada, and tended her garden. She enjoyed young people, and confided that she would have liked to have had the opportunity to learn to swim, to rollerblade and to ice-skate.
Anne was diagnosed with cancer in the spring of 2002. She spoke of a watching a television show that had featured young people who had survived cancer. Clearly concerned about how she would manage this dreaded disease, she stated, "I thought if they could handle it so well, then I suppose I can do it, too."
Anne did manage the disease with grace and dignity. Her final gift was to assure her family that she had indeed lived a full and complete life, and that even at the end she wanted for nothing.
Terry is Anne's daughter-in-law.

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RICHMOND o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-05 published
ALLAN, Stewart (Stew) Rae
Born in 1926 in Eramosa Township, brother of Helen DUFFIELD, Stew had a great life. He married Reta RICHMOND of Guelph and headed to Markham to start a career and a family. Stew spent 35 years at the Massey Ferguson Engineering Test Track. A long time member of the Markham Unionville Lions, Stew was the recipient of the Melvin Jones Fellow Award. The ''Monday Nighters'' card games were a tradition that span four decades and served as a model of camaraderie. When Stew retired from Massey, he started his second career as an entrepreneur of surplus equipment. Stew's pride and joy was his family. Always a big supporter and builder of their confidence with just the right words, Rae, Katharine (Kate), Gregg and Bruce, were the special ones in his life. With Sarah, the first grandchild, Stew became known as Pa, a name and role he cherished with the rest of the grandchildren (Eric, Ann-Marie, Ian, Mark and Bryce) and with Ruth, Andy, Wendy, and Lori. Stew the unique person -- always with a positive attitude. He touched and inspired many people. Stew would want to say Thanks to all the people that made his life so special and rewarding. Visitation will be at the Dixon-Garland Funeral Home, 166 Main Street, North (Hwy. 48) Markham on Wednesday 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. The service will be Thursday at 1: 30 p.m. at St. Andrews Presbyterian Church, 143 Main Street, North, Markham. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the Ontario Heart and Stroke Foundation or the Cancer Society.

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RICHMOND o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-08-02 published
DAVIS, Curtiss Gridley
Born August 31, 1916 in Rochester, New York died after a long and courageous battle, on July 31, 2003 at the Guelph General Hospital. He was a resident for the past year at St. Joseph's Health Centre, Guelph. Predeceased by his first wife Grace TURNER. Lovingly remembered and missed by his wife Audrey LIVERNOIS. Dearly loved father of Natasha VAN BENTUM (Henri) and Bruce Gridley DAVIS (Janet WRIGHT,) of Vancouver. Stepfather of John LIVERNOIS of Guelph, and Laurie STATHER of Belleville; dear brother of Joyce LOVETT (Bob) of Kitchener and Jim DAVIS (Mary) of Maple grandfather of Rachel DAVIS, Celine and Jacob RICHMOND, Nicole STATHER, Michael STATHER (Tabitha), Ryan STATHER, and Ali and Becky LIVERNOIS; and great grandfather of four. Fondly remembered by many nieces, nephews, family and Friends. During World War 2, he served with the Toronto Scottish Regiment in England and Europe. He will be remembered for his thirst for knowledge and as a gifted writer and reader. A memorial service will be held on Wednesday, August 6, 2003, at 1: 30 p.m. at Knox Presbyterian Church, 20 Quebec Street, Guelph, with the Reverend Thomas KAY officiating. In lieu of flowers memorial contributions may be made to Knox Church, or to the charity of your choice. (Arrangements entrusted to Wall-Custance Funeral Home and Chapel, 206 Norfolk Street, Guelph (416) 822-0051 or www.wallcustance.com).

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RICHMOND o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-08-06 published
DAVIS, Curtiss Gridley
Born August 31, 1916 in Rochester, New York died after a long and courageous battle, on July 31, 2003 at the Guelph General Hospital. He was a resident for the past year at St. Joseph's Health Centre, Guelph. Predeceased by his first wife Grace TURNER. Lovingly remembered and missed by his wife Audrey LIVERNOIS. Dearly loved father of Natasha VAN BENTUM (Henri) and Bruce Gridley DAVIS (Janet WRIGHT,) of Vancouver. Stepfather of John LIVERNOIS of Guelph, and Laurie STATHER of Belleville; dear brother of Joyce LOVETT (Bob) of Kitchener and Jim DAVIS (Mary) of Maple grandfather of Rachel Davis, Celine and Jacob RICHMOND, Nicole STATHER, Michael STATHER (Tabitha), Ryan STATHER, and Ali and Becky LIVERNOIS; and great grandfather of four. Fondly remembered by many nieces, nephews, family and Friends. During World War 2, he served with the Toronto Scottish Regiment in England and Europe. He will be remembered for his thirst for knowledge and as a gifted writer and reader. A memorial service will be held on Wednesday, August 6, 2003, at 1: 30 p.m. at Knox Presbyterian Church, 20 Quebec Street, Guelph, with the Reverend Thomas KAY officiating. In lieu of flowers memorial contributions may be made to Knox Church, or to the charity of your choice. (Arrangements entrusted to Wall-Custance Funeral Home and Chapel, 206 Norfolk Street, Guelph (416) 822-0051 or www.wallcustance.com).

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RICHTHAMMER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-02 published
Jeanette Katherine Emily (Ma) LINDOKKEN
By John RICHTHAMMER, Tuesday, December 2, 2003 - Page A24
Nurse, grandmother, leader, merchant. Born August 9, 1910, in McTavish, Manitoba Died April 2, 2003, in Winnipeg, after a stroke, aged 92.
After more than 71 consecutive years in Northwestern Ontario, Jeanette "Ma" LINDOKKEN returned to her childhood home of Winnipeg to be near her family. Within a week of her arrival, Jeanette's hip shattered. Undaunted, she started therapy for recovery -- which was ultimately not to be.
Jeanette's prairie roots were deep. She was born in a southern Manitoba hamlet to a family who began homesteading there in 1876. Although she idolized her father James for his gentleness, the home was ruled by her distant, undemonstrative mother, Sarah Annie WESTGATE. Even in old age, Jeanette fondly spoke of her younger sister, Ethel, who had died from juvenile diabetes in Jeanette finished high school in Petersfield, Manitoba, where the family had moved to farm, and at the outset of the Depression, enrolled in a three-year nursing program. Then she took nursing jobs in Winnipeg, and in a tuberculosis sanatorium in Saskatchewan.
In 1932, at 21, Jeanette travelled by canoe to return an infant to a remote Anishinaape community in Northwestern Ontario. En route, she washed diapers in the lakes and cooked over open fires. The experience forever changed Jeanette's life and began seven decades of Friendship and work with First Nations people.
In the Northern Ontario community of Deer Lake, Jeanette met a Norwegian-born trapper and prospector Oskar LINDOKKEN. The Beaver magazine described him as "a figure who might have stepped out of... the stirring days of beaver hats, freight canoes and singing voyageurs." He became her rugged partner-in-life for the next 47 years.
They married in 1933 in Winnipeg, and then returned to Deer Lake to build a log home. Their meals were fish, moose, rabbit, and bannock. Jeanette fished, trapped, hunted, and made campfires, as well as cooked, sewed and made clothing, often from hide she skinned and stretched. Despite her small, lithe frame, she often carried heavy loads.
Jeanette used her nursing skills in every aspect of health care, from tuberculosis treatment to midwifery to palliative care. She nursed several generations of families, saved lives, and also treated injured animals, which she fed with baby bottles.
Assuming charge of a situation, Jeanette often tread on toes. But if she had a reputation for bossiness and brutal honesty, everyone knew it stemmed from her caring intensely about others' welfare. She was known as "Ma." Her defence of the underdog was the stuff of local legend. In honour of her 50 years of nursing there, the Deer Lake community nursing station was named after Jeanette, and the Ontario government presented her with a medal of service.
The LINDOKKENs also operated a general trading post, tourist camp, and commercial fishing and flying enterprises. Oskar was the garrulous, savvy front man, while Jeanette, a natural manager, did everything else. Their store was a community gathering place.
Deeply religious, Jeanette laughingly described herself as "probably the only Scottish Presbyterian Mennonite in the world." Her unshakeable faith guided her through tragedies such as the death of her only child, Jimmy, in an aircraft crash nearly 40 years ago, the death of her beloved Oskar, and her own oncoming blindness. Despite these hardships, the tiny-framed woman who withstood every rigour of the remote North remained indomitable and engaged to the end.
John RICHTHAMMER was considered an adopted grand_son by Jeanette.

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RICKETT o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-11-19 published
THOMASSON, Edna (née RUSHTON)
Edna THOMASSON, beloved wife of the late Frank James THOMASSON, died peacefully in her sleep, at home, on November 16, 2003. Edna will be fondly remembered by her children and their spouses: Linda STEVENSON and John STEVENSON, Clive THOMASSON and Deborah ZWICKER, Andrew THOMASSON and Amanda RICKETT; and by her grandchildren Julia, Pippa, Simon, Freya and Sian.
Edna was born in 1928 in Bolton, England, the oldest child of Thomas and Linda RUSHTON and sister of Jim, Leonard, Arnold and Tom. Following an early career in business, she trained as a teacher and continued to further her education, pursuing studies at Wilfred Laurier University while, at the same time, raising her family. In retirement from teaching business studies at Thistletown Collegiate Institute in Toronto, Edna continued to pursue her love of traveling, spending her time between her brothers in England, her grandchildren in Australia and always returning home to her family in Canada.
Edna's family will receive Friends in the Mount Pleasant Cemetery Chapel from 10: 30 to 11:30 a.m. on Friday, November 21, 2003. A short ceremony will be held at 11: 30 at the graveside.

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