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"REN" 2003 Obituary


RENAUD  RENNICK  RENNIE  RENO  RENWICK 

RENAUD o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-10-29 published
Josephine "Joyce" RENAUD
In loving memory of Josephine "Joyce" RENAUD who passed away peacefully on Friday, October 24, 2003 at Manitoulin Health Centre at the age of 74 years.
Daughter of Michael Sr. and Sophie MANITOWABI (predeceased.) Predeceased by dear friend Wesley GORDON " Bud" from Sault. Ste. Marie, Michigan. Loved sister of Margaret JACKSON (Robert predeceased) of Manitowaning, Michael MANITOWABI (predeceased 1986,) Alphonse MANITOWABI of Toronto, and Betty CRACK (Mervyn) of Little Current. Joyce was like a mother to her friend Mickie GUERRA and family of Sault Ste. Marie, Michigan. Will be remembered forever by many nieces, nephews, cousins and Friends.
Visitation was held on Sunday, October 26, 2003. Funeral service was held on Monday, October 27, 2003 at Buzwah Church. Burial in Buzwah Cemetery. Island Funeral Home.

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RENAUD o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-01-17 published
June Simpson RENAUD.
By Stephen and David SWICK Friday, January 17, 2003, Page A18
Painter, mother, naturalist, soul searcher. Born June 17, 1917, in London, Ontario. Died October 4, 2002, in Trenton, Ontario, of ailments including diabetes, aged 85.
When her children were teenagers, keen to see Elvis Presley's debut on the Ed Sullivan Show, June's humour got in on the act. Just before the King came on -- the power in their house cut off. The children screamed in horror! Laughter filtered up from the basement, the power came back on, and the screams turned to groans of "Oh, Mom."
June's jokes could have an edge, but her laughter was infectious and the fun in her eyes clear. "The only kind of people I don't like," she once said, "are boring people. Even mean people are interesting. But boring people are just boring."
She practical-joked until the end. She lived with curiosity, humour, and great gratitude, but without conventional faith. She stunned her small-town Anglican minister by casually announcing that she didn't believe in hell. She professed spiritual, rather than religious beliefs. She saw God in nature, in the flow and rhythm of all life.
She worshipped accordingly. Her garden was shockingly rich -- she called it her jungle. Owls roosted there. Clans of raccoons peered down from treetops. Rabbits munched her red tulips. The hedges grew to more than 30-feet tall. June could sit and look at the wind in the trees for an hour -- not think, just look.
Nature was welcome inside, too. The indoor plants got special treatment: having read that it might help their growth, June breathed on them every night. In her sun porch she raised Monarch butterflies, from August caterpillars through the chrysalis stage, to when she would open the door and they could fly to Mexico.
Her love of nature led her to attend art school in Montreal, and to a national reputation for painting dog portraits. From the 1940s through the 1960s, her art adorned magazine advertisements and calendars across Canada. All of her life she kept dogs, too the best behaved, funniest, happiest dogs you ever saw.
While still in school June married Alec RENAUD, thrilling two mothers. June and Alec's mothers were best Friends, secretly wishing for their children to fall in love and marry. They wanted this to happen so much they never expressed it to the kids. Naturally, romance bloomed. The couple was blessed with two children, Laurie and Susan. June's second great-grandchild was born this past summer.
She read broadly and saw it as a conversation between her and the author. Although a lover of storytelling, many of her favourite authors wrote nonfiction: Thoreau, Emerson, Guy Murchie, Joseph Campbell, Thich Nhat Hanh. The right book comes to you, she believed, at the right time.
June offered life lessons while rarely saying so. She showed the power of being where you are, doing what you are doing, and doing it with heart.
Our hearts are broken a little further open now; one more lesson from June. Life seems to be about having your heart opened further and further, and that hurts. But there's nothing for it but to remain curious about it all, even death.
June would have said, "Especially death." She saw death as a big adventure, the prize at the end of the party. "Finally," she said, "you get to solve the mystery." She was so curious to see what death was like, so determined to die awake.
On a fresh, bright day in autumn, June's wish was filled. The last time we talked she said, "I have lived a wonderful life, and now I'm having a beautiful death." She continued, "I don't want to be mourned -- more than a little. I want my death to be celebrated, like my life."
We are doing our best.
Stephen and David SWICK are June RENAUD's great-nephews.

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RENAUD o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-08-06 published
Linda STEARNS: 1937-2003
As ballet mistress and artistic director of the esteemed Montreal company, she nurtured personality, flair and a risk-taking approach to dance
By Paula CITRON Wednesday, August 6, 2003 - Page R5
In the cutthroat, competitive world of dance, Linda STEARNS was an anomaly. As artistic director of Les Grands Ballets Canadiens, she never played games or held grudges. Whether good or bad news, she bluntly told her dancers what they had to hear, and in return, her open-door policy allowed them to vent their own feelings. National Ballet of Canada artistic director James KUDELKA, who spent almost a decade as a member of Les Grands Ballets, likens her approach to wearing an invisible raincoat upon which unhappy dancers spewed their venom. At the end of their tirades, she would serenely remove the garment and say, "Now let's talk."
Linda STEARNS died at her home in Toronto on July 4, at age 65.
She was born into privilege on October 22, 1937. Her father, Marshal, was an investment broker; her mother, Helen, was heavily involved in charity work. The family lived in the posh Poplar Plains area of central Toronto, where Ms. STEARNS attended Branksome Hall.
Despite their wealth, the STEARNS children (Linda, Nora and Marshal) were expected to earn their own livings. Helen STEARNS had studied dance in her youth, but a career was never an option. When eldest daughter Linda showed a strong talent, history might have repeated itself had not Marshal Sr. set aside his reservations after seeing his daughter perform.
After graduating from high school, Ms. STEARNS went to London and New York for advanced training. It was the great Alexandra Danilova, one of Ms. STEARNS's New York teachers, who pointed the young dancer in the direction of the upstart Les Grands Ballets Canadiens. Ms. STEARNS joined Les Grands in 1961, and was promoted to soloist in 1964. In a Who's Who of Entertainment entry, Ms. STEARNS was once listed as joining the company in 1861, and she liked to joke that, at 103 years, she held the record for the longest time spent in the corps de ballet. In fact, one of Ms. STEARNS's hallmarks was her sense of humour, much of it at her own expense.
Les Grands was known for taking dancers who did not necessarily have perfect ballet bodies, but had personality and flair, a policy Ms. STEARNS continued during her own administration.
Although Ms. STEARNS had very unballetic, low-arched feet, she was a fine classical dancer. She excelled, however, in the dramatic repertoire: Mother Courage in Richard Kuch's The Brood, or the title role in Brydon Paige's Medea. In later years, while teaching and coaching, Ms. STEARNS wore high heels to conceal her hated low arches -- while showing off her attractive ankles.
Her performing career was cut short in 1966 when artistic director Ludmilla CHIRIAEFF recognized that Ms. STEARNS would make a brilliant ballet mistress, and by 1969, Ms. STEARNS was exclusively in the studio. In fact, giving up performing was one of the great disappointments of her life, although she did in time acknowledge that she had found her true destiny. Ms. STEARNS's astonishingly keen eye allowed her to single out, in a corps de ballet of moving bodies, every limb that was out of position. She could also sing every piece of music, which saved a lot of time, because she didn't have to keep putting on the tape recorder. Because of her intense musicality, Ms. STEARNS also insisted that the dancers not just be on the count, but fill every note with movement.
Ms. STEARNS loved playing with words -- she was a crossword-puzzle addict, for example -- and gave the dancers nicknames, whether they liked them or not. Catherine LAFORTUNE was Katrink, Kathy BIEVER was Little Frog, Rosemary NEVILLE was Rosie Posie, Betsy BARON was Boops, and Benjamin HATCHER was Benjamino, to name but a few. One who escaped this fate was Gioconda BARBUTO, simply because Ms. STEARNS loved rolling out the word "G-I-O-C-O-N-D-A" in its full Italian glory. The dancers, in turn, called her Lulubelle, Mme. Gozonga and La Stearnova or, if they were feeling tired, cranky and hostile -- and were out of earshot -- Spoons (for her non-arched feet) and even less flattering names. As reluctantly as she became ballet mistress, Ms. STEARNS became artistic director, first as one of a triumvirate in 1978 with Danny JACKSON and Colin McINTYRE (when Les Grands and Brian MacDONALD came to an abrupt parting of the ways;) then with Jeanne RENAUD in 1985 and finally on her own in 1987. She retired from Les Grands in 1989. Both Mr. JACKSON and Mr. McINTRYE still refer to Ms. STEARNS as the company's backbone.
These were the famous creative years that included the works of Mr. KUDELKA, Paul Taylor, Lar Lubovitch, Nacho Duato and George Balanchine. Les Grands toured the world performing one of the most exciting and eclectic repertoires in ballet. It was a company that nurtured dancers and choreographers, many of whom reflected Ms. STEARNS's risk-taking, innovative esthetic.
She also had time to mentor choreographers outside the company, including acclaimed solo artist Margie GILLIS. Her post-Grands career included writing assessments for the Canada Council, setting works on ballet companies, coaching figure skating, and most recently, becoming ballet mistress for the Toronto-based Ballet Jörgen. When she was diagnosed with both ovarian and breast cancer two years ago, she continued her obligations to Ballet Jörgen until she was no longer able, never letting the dancers know how ill she was.
Ms. STEARNS loved huge dogs -- or what Ms. GILLIS refers to as mountains with fur -- and always had at least two. Her gardens were magnificent, as was her cooking. Her generosity was legendary, whether inviting 20 people for Christmas dinner, or hosting the wedding reception for dancers Andrea BOARDMAN and Jean-Hugues ROCHETTE at her tastefully decorated Westmount home. After leaving Montreal, whether, first, at her horse farm in Harrow, Ontario, or at the one-room schoolhouse she lovingly renovated near Campbellville, northwest of Toronto, former colleagues were always welcome.
She continued to keep in touch with her dancers, sending notes in her beautiful, distinctive handwriting. Her love of sports never left her, and after a hard day in the studio, she would relax watching the hockey game. Religion also filled her postdance life, with Toronto's Anglican Grace-Church-on-the-Hill at its epicentre. Ms. STEARNS was very discreet in her private life, although another disappointment is that neither of two long relationships resulted in marriage or children.
Ms. STEARNS was always ruthlessly self-critical, always striving for perfection, never convinced she had rehearsed a work to its full potential. As a result, she never made herself the centre of her own story. Her homes, for example, did not contain photographs glorifying the career of Linda STEARNS. Only at the end of her days, as she faced death with the same grace with which she had faced life, was she finally able to appreciate how many lives she had touched, and accept her outstanding achievements with Les Grands Ballets. Linde HOWE- BECK, former dance critic for the Montreal Gazette, sums up Ms. STEARNS perfectly when she says that she was all about love -- for her Friends and family, for life, but most of all, for dance.
Paula CITRON is dance critic for The Globe and Mail.

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RENNICK o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-07-07 published
BOYD, Nancy (Muff) Graham
Born in Toronto on September 12, 1924 and died in Toronto on Saturday, July 5, 2003. She had multiple sclerosis for over forty years and her death was due to the complications resulting from this disease. She faced life and her health affliction with great courage and fortitude and never once complained. She attended school at King's Hall, Compton in Quebec in the Class of 1942. Muff served in the Royal Canadian Air Force 1944-1945 and was stationed in Montreal, Brandon and Patricia Bay. Daughter of the late John A. BOYD and Billie Buntin BOYD. Much loved sister of John A. (Sandy) BOYD and great friend of his wife, Gloria. Greatly missed by her three nieces, Nicky Cameron, Georgia (Craig RENNICK) and Ginny (Neil MacDONALD,) along with their six children: Boyd, Gillian, Rachel, David, Elise and Brianna. Cremation has taken place. A funeral service will be held at the Humphrey Funeral Home - A. W. Miles Chapel, 1403 Bayview Avenue (south of Eglinton Avenue East), on Thursday, July 10, 2003 at one o'clock. In lieu of flowers and in memory of Muff, donations may be made to either the Multiple Sclerosis Society of Canada, 250 Bloor Street East, Toronto M4W 3P9 or to Georgian Bay Land Trust, 2482 Yonge Street, P.O. Box 99, Toronto M4P 3E3.

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RENNIE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-07-10 published
GROSSO, Dr. Roberto
Born in Rome, Italy on November 11th, 1928. Died on Tuesday, July 8th, 2003 at home surrounded by loved ones. He is survived by his loving wife Caroline (née PANCARO,) his four daughters, Cristina GAGE, Francesca GROSSO, Beth GROSSO and Sylvia RENNIE his three sons-in-law, Brian GAGE, Steve PAIKIN, and Scott RENNIE, and his four grandchildren, Alessandra and Robert GAGE, Matthew RENNIE and Giulia PAIKIN. Dear brother of Maria Grazia Grosso ROSSI (husband Filippo) of Rome, Italy and Gian Carlo GROSSO, predeceased (wife Alessandra of Rome, Italy).
Visitation to be held at the Jackson and Barnard Funeral Home, 233 Larch Street, Sudbury, Sunday, July 13th from 2: 00 to 6:00 p.m. Prayers 3: 00 p.m. Sunday. Funeral Mass to take place at Christ the King Church, 30 Beech Street, Sudbury on Monday, July 14th at 10: 00 a.m.
In lieu of flowers, donations to the ''Dr. Roberto Grosso Memorial Fund'' for St. Joseph's Villa would be appreciated.

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RENO o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-02-13 published
Gordon Kenneth FLEMING/FLEMMING
By Jack FORTIN Thursday, February 13, 2003, Page A30
Musician, husband, father. Born August 3, 1931, in Winnipeg. Died August 31, 2002, in Scarborough, Ontario, following a stroke, aged 71.
Gordie FLEMING/FLEMMING was a remarkable music talent, known internationally as a master of the accordion, especially in the jazz idiom. He was a life member of Local 149 of the Toronto Musicians' Association.
In show-business vernacular, Gordie was "born in a trunk." He began playing accordion when his older brother gave him lessons. His musical ability was such that he began performing publicly at the age of five. His schoolteachers often saw him being whisked away in a taxi to perform at theatres and radio stations in Winnipeg. By the age of 10, he was a working member of various bands in that city.
In 1949, Gordie lost his accordion in a fire at a Winnipeg hotel. With the insurance money, he headed for the bright lights of Montreal where he soon became an important part of that city's musical life. His accordion ability was complemented by the fact that he was also a gifted arranger and composer.
He had a marvellous ability to improvise and could string out complex bebop lines, leaving his listeners in awe. He often slipped a jazz phrase into ballads or commercial tunes, confirming that jazz was indeed his first love.
One of Montreal's busiest musicians, he wrote for local orchestras, shows, radio and television. He had perfect pitch and often wrote without reference to a keyboard. He was at home in every type of music from classics to jazz. For several years, he worked at the National Film Board as a composer and musician.
In Montreal, Gordie performed with many show business headliners: there was a wealth of home-grown talent in Montreal, such as Oscar PETERSON and Maynard FERGUSON, as well as other jazz musicians who were beginning to be noticed.
Gordie had said that when when he first heard bebop it was like entering another world. As his career indicates, he had no trouble in that world. He worked with many personalities including: Charlie PARKER, Mel TORMÉ, Hank SNOW, Lena HORNE, Englebert HUMPERDINCK, Dennis DAY, Gordon MacRAE, Cab CALLOWAY, Nat King COLE, Cat STEVENS, Rich LITTLE, Billy ECKSTEIN, Pee Wee HUNT, Arthur GODFREY and Buddy DEFRANCO.
He also performed with Tommy AMBROSE, Allan MILLS, Wally KOSTER, Tommy HUNTER, Bert NIOSI, Wayne and Shuster, Canadian Broadcasting Corporation jazz shows with Al BACULIS, and many other Canadian jazz musicians.
On Montreal's French music scene, Gordie performed on radio and television with Emile GENEST, Ti-Jean CARIGNAN, André GAGNON and Ginette RENO. He was a featured soloist with the Montreal Symphony Orchestra on several occasions.
Internationally, Gordie toured France in 1952 and performed with Edith PIAF and Tino ROSSI. He had the honour to perform for former prime minister Pierre Elliot TRUDEAU at a Commonwealth Conference.
He participated with other top Canadian musicians in a Canadian Broadcasting Corporation tour to entertain Canadian and the North Atlantic Treaty Organization troops in Europe in 1952 and 1968.
For me, a memorable experience was playing in a group with Gordie for several winters in Florida. A popular member of the Panama City Beach family of musicians, Gordie looked forward to his winter trek south. Many of the American musicians will miss him, as will the many snowbirds who looked forward to hearing him each year.
His extensive repertoire allowed Gordie to author a book called Music of the World, in which he wrote the music to 280 songs from more than 30 countries.
Gordie leaves his wife of 47 years, Joanne, and seven children.
Jack FORTIN is Gordie's friend.

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RENWICK o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-09-03 published
Albert John RENWICK
By Shane RENWICK Wednesday, September 3, 2003 - Page A22
Father, grandfather, carpenter, steward of the land. Born June 6, 1917 in Dalkeith, Ontario Died August 15, in Ottawa, of Lou Gehrig's disease, aged 86.
Albert (Bert) John RENWICK was born on the family farm near Vankleek Hill in eastern Ontario. He was a middle child of seven born into a family that lived off the land during hard economic times. Dad's upbringing generated the themes of his life -- love of family and the land, and a deep appreciation of nature.
My sisters, Donna and Karen, and I grew up listening to tales of Dad's early life. There was rarely money, he said, but there was always plenty to eat, lots to celebrate and a supportive family. Dad kept us spellbound with stories of his days in a one-room schoolhouse; plowing fields with the team of horses working in the sugar bush; making regular trips by horse and wagon to the cheese factory and the sawmill; going to barn dances and making trips to "The Hill" in a sleigh over snow when "the drifts were as high as the telegraph wires."
Early experiences had a profound influence on my father's life. He developed independence, a dedication to hard work, frugality and morality; and a desire to work with his hands. Dad's shy and gentle nature, sense of humour, enthusiasm and generosity were formed in those early years and endeared him to all, especially his grandchildren.
As a young man, Dad took the practical skills he learned on the farm and put them to use. He moved to Ottawa in the 1940s to work at Vendall Machines building navigation equipment for the military. In 1952, he started a carpentry business, married Geraldine BOWN and built his own house. He worked as his own boss in the building and renovation business in the Ottawa area for the next 30 years.
Dad's many loyal customers were impressed not only by the quality of his workmanship but by how hard he worked. It seemed fitting that the three-year-old son of one of Dad's customers, who loved noisy power tools but had some difficulty with surnames, used to exclaim when he saw Dad's vehicle pull into the laneway: "Mom, look! Here comes Mr. Racket!"
Dad was proud of his work. Nothing made his eyes sparkle more than to recall a customer saying, "Mr. RENWICK, you did a lovely job!" or a neighbour complimenting him on his award-winning flower garden. It touched him when the fruits of his labour made others happy.
Dad's pride and joy was Rideau Trail Farm, a 19th-century homestead on the Rideau River near Merrickville that he and Mom bought in the late 1950s. This property became a focus for his energy and a summer home for his three children and 11 grandchildren. He restored the gingerbread-brick house and log sheds; built split-rail fences and a horse barn and bird houses; grew organic berries that are still famous in the area; planted native conifers by the thousands; and carved riding and ski trails out of the woods. "The farm" lit a pioneer spirit in Dad and made him feel honoured to be the steward of a piece of Ontario history.
Trees were special in Dad's life. Trees provided the wood with which he made his living, connected him to nature and allowed him to influence the future. Planting and tending to trees were Dad's passions right to his final days. He would remind us often that our lives are short compared with those of trees and that we should be humbled by this. Dad knew that by planting trees he would leave a living legacy on Earth for centuries after he was gone.
Dad died peacefully surrounded by his family after a courageous battle with a cruel disease that robbed him of his mobility but left his senses intact.
He passed away knowing that we were proud of the way he tended to his family and his land.
Shane is Bert's eldest son.

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