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"REI" 2003 Obituary


REID  REIJO  REILLY  REIMER  REINGOLD  REINGUETTE  REINHART  REISS 

REID o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-02-17 published
David S. (Tim) BEATTY
Loving husband, father and grandfather died peacefully, on February 13, 2003, in Toronto. A well respected entrepreneur and businessman, Tim was former president of Burns Bros. and Denton. Among his many accomplishments in life were: Honourary Colonel in Chief of the Royal Regiment of Canada, Chairman of the Board of Upper Canada College, President of the Investment Dealer's Association of Canada, Chairman of the national fundraising committee for the erection of the Prince of Wales Theatre at Upper Canada Village, and helping in the development of Spar Aerospace. In 1984, Tim was honoured to receive the Order of Canada for his contribution to Canadian figure skating. Most of all, Tim will be remembered for his sense of humour, his love of life and his selflessness. Tim is survived by his wife Eugénie (Pete,) son David R. BEATTY and his wife Debby, daughter Barb TAILOR/TAYLOR and her husband Douglas REID, grandchildren Andrew, Ken, Charlie and Deb BEATTY, Briare, Caley, Heather and Brendan TAILOR/TAYLOR, Michael and Peter REID. He was predeceased by his first wife, Ann Elise BEATTY (née ROSS.) The family will receive Friends at the Humphrey Funeral Home - A. W. Miles Chapel, 1403 Bayview Avenue (south of Eglinton Avenue East), from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. on Thursday, February 20. The funeral service will be held at Grace Church-on-the-Hill, 300 Lonsdale Road, on Friday, February 21 at 11 o'clock. In lieu of flowers, donations to Belmont House, 55 Belmont Street, Toronto M5R 1R1, would be appreciated. 'He left this world a better place.'

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REID o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-06-16 published
WRIGHT, Barbara Hermine Montizambert
Died June 13, 2003 at age 72. She is sadly missed by her husband Dr. Thomas WRIGHT; her family Doctors Janet and the Reverend Paul FRIESEN and their daughter Anya of Halifax; Ian and Kaethe (née NEUFELD) WRIGHT and their children Jonathan and Caitlin of West Vancouver Margot and Rob LINKE and their children Cameron and Chloe of Saint John, New Brunswick; her sister Dorothy REID; and by many dear Friends and relatives. After graduating from nursing programs at the Royal Victoria Hospital and U of T, she worked as a public health nurse until her children were born. She then gave her time to family and Christian ministry. Her life was marked by her relationship with Jesus Christ and her knowledge of Scripture. She lived by the words: ''If you abide in me, and my words abide in you, ask whatever you wish, and it will be done for you. My father is glorified by this, that you bear much fruit and become my Disciples.'' (John 15: 7,8). Barbara leaves behind two generations of family who love the Lord; rich Friendships and a loving marriage of 47 years. A Funeral Service will be held from St. George's Anglican Church, Lowville, at 7051 Guelph Line, on Tuesday, June 17th at 2 p.m. Visitation will take place one hour prior at the church. Donations to Middle East Christian Outreach, P.O. Box 307, Station A, Mississauga, Ontario L5A 3A1; S.I.M., 10 Huntingdale Boulevard, Toronto, Ontario M1W 2S5; or St. George's Anglican Church, 7051 Guelph Line, R.R. #1, Campbellville, Ontario L0P 1B0. Arrangements through the J. Scott Early Funeral Home, 21 James Street, Milton, Ontario L9T 2P3, (905) 878-2669.

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REID o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-06-17 published
HOAG, Howard Arthur
Died Sunday, June 15, 2003, at home in Toronto, surrounded by Friends. Howard will be greatly missed by his beloved bride Louise RICH and her daughter Odette HUTCHINGS, as well as by his innumerable Friends and his family, in particular his sister Sharon. Howard loved life. His humour, wit, intelligence and broad smile charmed everyone he met. Diagnosed with liver cancer in December, Howard lived the last six months with incredible courage, determination and optimism. The devotion and concern of his wide group of Friends, including those from the Toronto Racquet Club and the Toronto Scottish Rugby Club has been remarkable. The annual Robbie Burns Supper will not be the same without him. Many thanks to Dr. SIU at Princess Margaret, Drs SINGH, HUSSEIN, STEINBERG, Rosa BERG and the Palliative Care Team at Mt. Sinai and Trinity Hospice. Special thanks to Howard's friend Fred REID- WILKINSON for being there. A service to celebrate Howard's life will be held 4: 00 p.m., Saturday, June 21, East Common Room, Hart House, University of Toronto, with a reception to follow. In lieu of flowers donations may be made in Howard's name to Trinity Home Hospice, Suite 1102 - 25 King St. West, Toronto M5L 1G7.

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REID o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-23 published
ZEALLEY, Mary Lenore (née BOYD) 1923-2003
Peacefully, surrounded by her three children, son-in-law Maurizio and granddaughter Victoria, at The Baycrest Hospital on Sunday, December 21, 2003. Mary Lenore ZEALLEY (née BOYD,) wife of the late Kenneth Bramwell ZEALLEY. Loving mother of Jane Elizabeth ADAMSON, wife of Andrew, Hartington, Ontario; Charlotte Ann UNGER, wife of Edward, Toronto; and John Kenneth ANDREW, life-partner of Maurizio, Toronto. Grandmother of Victoria AUSTIN, wife of Bruce; Sarah NORMAN, wife of Jason. Great-grandmother of Jonathan & Christopher AUSTIN and Brock NORMAN. Sister of Nancy REID, wife of Jim; Eleanor HOOD, wife of the late Duggan; and Carol MacPHERSON, wife of John. She died as she had lived her life - with dignity, passion, grace and courage. A person who loved her city, all arts and culture, and her family and Friends. A Memorial Service will be held at Bloor Street United Church (Bloor Street West at Huron), Wednesday, December 24 at 2 p.m. A reception will follow at the Church. Donations may be made to The Baycrest Centre for Geriatric Care, 3560 Bathurst Street, Toronto M6A 2E1, or to Bloor Street United Church, 300 Bloor Street West, Toronto M5S 1W3. Final resting place, Hillcrest Cemetery, Smiths Falls, Ontario. The family wishes to express their deepest appreciation for the compassionate care of the medical team at The Baycrest Hospital, 6 East.

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REID o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-30 published
Diplomat shaped cultural policy
Art-loving ambassador to Moscow and Bucharest also served as Trudeau's press secretary and as a director of the Canada Council
By Bill GLADSTONE, Special to The Globe and Mail Tuesday, December 30, 2003 - Page R7
Peter ROBERTS, a former press secretary to Pierre Trudeau who served as Canada's ambassador to Moscow and Bucharest and as director of the Canada Council, is being remembered as a major shaper of Canadian cultural policy and a late representative of an older generation of broadly based, multitalented diplomats that has all but vanished from the scene.
A native Albertan, Mr. ROBERTS died in Ottawa on November 21 after a varied career that stretched over four decades and included stints in Washington, Hong Kong, Saigon and Brussels. He was 76.
As assistant undersecretary of state responsible for cultural affairs from 1973 to 1979, he helped Ottawa develop protective policies toward the domestic film and book-publishing industries, and was instrumental in drafting the government's nationalistic Bill C-58, which applied tariffs to American magazines sold on Canadian newsstands. He also helped to establish the National Arts Centre.
"He was a superb civil servant because he had a capacity to listen to ministers, understand their viewpoints and help them achieve what they wanted to achieve," said John ROBERTS (no relation,) who was Secretary of State when Peter ROBERTS was undersecretary. "But at the same time, he had an extraordinary passion for the arts and for culture. So he did have his own ideas about things that should be done. He stimulated you to think and to adapt your thinking."
As ambassador to the Soviet Union, Mr. ROBERTS took a keen interest in George COSTAKIS, a former junior employee of the Canadian embassy who had spent a lifetime amassing an outstanding but illegal collection of modern art, both Russian and international. Mr. ROBERTS helped arrange a major exhibition of the collection at the Musée des beaux-arts in Montreal and later wrote a full-length biography, George Costakis: A Russian Life in Art, published by Carleton University Press in 1994.
Raising Eyebrows, a book of memoirs and character sketches, was published in 2000. He also wrote a book-length profile of former Romanian dictator Nicolae Ceausescu, whom he met often during his posting in Bucharest from 1979 to 1983, and who was executed in 1989. The book, Revenge on Christmas Day: Fact and Fiction in Bucharest, is slated for publication in 2004.
"Peter was a multifaceted person who bridged the cultural world, the literary world, the academic world and the world of the foreign service," said Allan GOTLIEB, a former ambassador to Washington. "If you go back to the golden age of Canadian diplomacy, you find examples of these very broadly engaged minds. Peter joined a little later, in the 1950s, but he still seemed a part of that era."
Peter McLaren ROBERTS was born in Calgary on July 5, 1927, and grew up in Lethbridge, Alberta. His father was a locally stationed federal tax official, his mother a schoolteacher. A brilliant student, he earned an M.A. in English literature from the University of Alberta in 1951, as well as a Rhodes scholarship that enabled him to study for three years at Oxford.
Afterward, he went down to London with a group of Friends, including Mr. GOTLIEB, who convinced him to write the Canadian foreign-service exam. He did so on a whim -- and passed. He taught English literature for a year at Bishop's University in Lennoxville, Quebec, and joined the foreign service in 1955.
Initially stationed in Ottawa, Mr. ROBERTS began studying German in anticipation of a posting in Bonn or Vienna. "The department had just then begun to realize that it was an advantage for a foreign-service officer, and for Canada, if the officer knew the language of the country where he or she was working," he noted in Raising Eyebrows.
"I hear you're learning German," the personnel manager remarked to him one day.
"Yes."
"You must be interested in languages."
"Yes."
"How'd you like to learn Russian?"
Several months later he travelled by ship and train to Moscow, where he served as third-in-command of the Canadian embassy from 1955 to 1958. He was posted to Hong Kong and Vietnam in the early 1960s and to Washington for the rest of that tumultuous decade.
In 1970, the Prime Minister's Office essentially borrowed him from the Department of External Affairs, as it was then known, so he could serve as assistant press secretary to Prime Minister Pierre TRUDEAU. Returning to Canada after a nine-year absence that had included a dreary stint working for the North Atlantic Treaty Organization in Brussels, Mr. ROBERTS showed up for his first day of work -- just as the Front de libération du Québec hostage crisis was erupting. Marc LALONDE, Mr. TRUDEAU's principal secretary, asked him to represent him at a strategy-planning meeting with the Royal Canadian Mounted Police.
"I had been long enough in diplomacy to know that this was a situation in which one did not speak without instructions," Mr. ROBERTS would recall. "I had no instructions, and I hadn't the faintest idea what the prime minister's views were on this abrupt development. I promised I would listen, make notes, report, and phone everyone. That I did, but I was glad that I had not ventured to predict which way TRUDEAU would jump. It was only a few days later that the troops were in Montreal, suspects rounded up and in jail, the War Measures Act proclaimed, and the prime minister saying to the press, 'Just watch me.' By that time I was veteran and expert."
After that baptism by fire, Mr. ROBERTS became full press secretary and met daily with Mr. TRUDEAU, often advising him on issues that the Prime Minister may have considered unimportant, and sometimes having the sobering thrill of hearing his words repeated verbatim to reporters later in the day. It was Mr. ROBERTS himself who announced the Prime Minister's marriage to an "incredulous" press gallery on March 4, 1971, and the birth of a son on Christmas Day.
External Affairs reclaimed Mr. ROBERTS in 1972 and parachuted him into the cultural division of the Department of the Secretary of State. The new assistant undersecretary awoke at 4 every morning and studied for three hours before going to work, but even with a "marvellous staff" who "filled in for me when I was stupid or ignorant," he sometimes found the learning curve excessively steep.
"Gradually my diplomatic experience came into play," he would write. "Diplomacy is partly a matter of faking. If you don't know the answer, if you don't know who someone is, don't let on. Smile enigmatically, and change the subject to the situation in Peru. I did a lot of that at the Secretary of State."
Mr. ROBERTS learned Romanian before becoming that country's ambassador in 1979, and found that the effort had been worthwhile because it gave him exceptionally good access to Mr. Ceausescu, who seemed flattered that a Canadian could speak his language; the leader would dismiss his retinue of advisers and translators and meet with Mr. ROBERTS alone to discuss a variety of political issues ranging from the situation in Poland to the situation in Quebec. Mr. ROBERTS enjoyed the meetings but understood that he was dealing with "the most desperate dictator and tyrant in Europe" and one who was becoming increasingly unhinged.
Among the visitors to Bucharest during that time was Allan GOTLIEB, by then undersecretary of state for External Affairs, who recalled being feted with Mr. ROBERTS by their Romanian hosts at a deluxe and crowded restaurant, where they washed down wonderful steaks with equally wonderful wines. The next evening, seeking a place for dinner, he suggested they return to the same establishment. "He told me, 'It's not there any more -- it's not real,' " Mr. GOTLIEB recalled. "He said, 'They opened it just for you.' He took me back there and it was all boarded up. There wasn't a soul there. It was like one of those Russian Potemkin villages you hear about."
As Soviet ambassador, Mr. ROBERTS joined Prime Minister Brian MULRONEY's entourage for the funeral of general secretary Konstantin Chernenko in Moscow in 1985. Like most other world leaders present, Mr. MULRONEY was keenly interested in meeting the incoming general secretary, Mikhail Gorbachev, and so was "predictably enraged" when the appointment was abruptly cancelled because an inept bureaucrat had overfilled Mr. Gorbachev's daybook with appointments. Persuading Mr. MULRONEY to be patient, Mr. ROBERTS quickly convinced the Soviets to rectify the error, and the meeting occurred in the Kremlin as originally planned.
Six months later, Mr. MULRONEY expressed his gratitude to Mr. ROBERTS by summoning him back to Ottawa to head the Canada Council. Fascinated as always by the Soviets, Mr. ROBERTS was reluctant to go, but realized he could not refuse.
"He was sad because Gorbachev had just come to power, and things were just beginning to show signs of change," recalls his wife, Glenna ROBERTS.
"He left with a great deal of regret, because he was really interested in seeing those changes."
Mr. ROBERTS retired from the Canada Council in 1989 and was an adjunct research professor of political science at Ottawa's Carleton University from 1990. He was diagnosed about 10 years ago with the cancer that increasingly incapacitated him over the past year.
He leaves his second wife Glenna, children Frances and Jeremy and their families, sister Mary, stepchildren Graham, Brendan and Hannah REID.

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REIJO o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-10-22 published
TAMMINEN, Hilja " Hilkka" (née REIJO)
At the age of 94, Hilkka died peacefully in hospital after a short illness. Beloved mother of Harold TAMMINEN (Wendy) and Eric TAMMINEN and devoted Mummo of Heather TAMMINEN. Greatly loved and missed by her dear sister Sylvi and many relatives and Friends in her homeland of Finland as well as relatives and Friends from Montreal, Toronto and elsewhere in Canada and the U.S. Predeceased by her sister, Helvi and three brothers, Toivo, Tauno and Pauli. Hilkka will always be loved and remembered for her kindness and generosity and the strength of her mind, body and spirit. A service will be held at the Agricola Finnish Lutheran Church, 25 Old York Mills Road, M2P 1B5, on Saturday, October 25, 2003 at 10: 00 am. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made, in honour of Hilkka, to the Agricola Memorial Fund at the address above. Cremation and interment to be held privately.

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REILLY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-05-02 published
O'GRADY, Dr. Walter
Walter died at home of prostate cancer on April 30th, 2003. His love and humour will be sadly missed by wife Jean, daughters Elizabeth, Jennifer and Carrie, sons-in-law Jonathan KEAN and Steven PROBST, grand_son Zachary, sister Patricia DAY and husband Harry, brother Paul and wife Frances, mother-in-law Floss REILLY and all his loving extended family. Born in Hamilton in 1933 and educated at St. Michael's College, Walter held a variety of jobs in Hamilton and Southern Ontario before returning to graduate school in Toronto. Thereafter he was a professor of English at the University of Toronto, serving as assistant chair of the English department for nine years, and becoming known both for his stimulating lectures and for his aplomb in managing a large and turbulent department. The family extends thanks to the palliative care team, nurses, and personal support workers who helped to ease his difficult last months. As Walter is donating his body to medical science there will be no funeral, but Friends may call at 487 Briar Hill Avenue, Toronto, on Sunday May 4th from 3 to 5 p.m. The Department of English will arrange a gathering later. Donations in Walter's name to a charity of your choice would be appreciated in lieu of flowers.

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REIMER o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-01-15 published
Maryann Catherine VERNER
In loving memory of Mary Ann Catherine VERNER, June 9, 1939 to January 6, 2003.
Maryann VERNER, a resident of R. R. #1, Evansville, passed away at the Manitoulin Health Centre, Mindemoya, on Monday, January 6, 2003 at the age of 63 years. She was born in Toronto, daughter of the late Wesley and Catherine DAY. Mary Ann was a graduate of the Royal Conservatory of Music, and through her talents as a musician, had a wide range of experience, having played for the Billy Graham Crusade, the People's Church in Toronto, organist at Centennial Rouge Church in Toronto for 10 years, and organist at Lyon's Memorial United Church in Gore Bay for about 12 years. Before her marriage to Harry on December 19, 1959, she had worked as an assistant at CBC, working with Norman JEWISON in Toronto and New York. She had also worked as a secretary for Eaton's and Capitol Records. She also enjoyed handcrafts, but her greatest enjoyment was her music and family. Dearly loved wife of Harry VERNER of Evansville loved mother of Catherine and husband Doug REIMER of Scarborough Gregory and wife Sherry of Sault Ste. Marie James and wife Terry of Burnt River and Amy, friend Paul MILLER of Hamilton. Proud grandmother of Stephen, Jacob, Kari, Justin, Silken, Nathan and Sarah and three great grandchildren.
The funeral service was conducted at the Burpee Mills Complex on Thursday, January 9, 2003 with Reverend Mary Jo Eckert Tracy and Mr. Erwin Thompson officiating. Spring interment in Mills Cemetery.
Culgin Funeral Home

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REIMER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-04-12 published
REIMER, Waldemar (Wally) H., A.A.C.I.
Passed away peacefully in his sleep, at Victoria General Hospital, in Winnipeg on April 7, 2003, after a lengthy and courageous struggle with many health issues.
Beloved husband of Mary TOEWS for 50 years; dear father of Henry (who died in infancy), Hélène (Peters) and Tim Green Mississauga, Paul and Brenda REIMER of Calgary, Judy and Vic WARKENTIN and Margaret and Jeff HARASYM of Winnipeg. Opi of Lora and Neil PETERS, Paul WARKENTIN, Andrew REIMER and Stephen HARASYM. Brother to Elvera and Gerry THIESSEN; John and Annelies REIMER, Ruth and Nelson EDWARDS and Elaine REIMER. Predeceased by his parents Henry REIMER, Sara (BRAUN) Reimer PANKRATZ, step-father, Nicholas PANKRATZ, brother Victor, sisters Annie POETKER and Mary WILLMS, brother-in-law Henry POETKER.
Formerly of Waterloo, Wally was a well known member of the business community through his years at Mutual Life, various real estate and development companies and then for 26 years, as President of W.H. Reimer Limited.
Funeral services were held in Winnipeg on Friday April 11, 2003. A memorial service to celebrate Wally's life will be held at W-K United Mennonite Church in Waterloo, on Tuesday, April 15, 2003, at 10: 30 a.m. A time to visit with the family will follow the service. Interment will take place at Mount Hope Cemetery, Waterloo.
Donations to the Waterloo Adult Recreation Centre, Mennonite Central Committee, Heart and Stroke Foundation of Ontario or the Lung Association of Waterloo Region would be appreciated as expressions of sympathy and can be arranged through the Edward R. Good Funeral Home, phone (519) 745-8445 or www.edwardrgood.com

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REINGOLD o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-11-15 published
KOSKI, Dr. John T.
Dr. John T. KOSKI died on Friday, November 14, 2003 in Belmont House, after a long struggle with Alzheimer's disease. He is survived by his wife Evelyn, his daughters Jane and Anne, his son-in-law Paul and his sisters Rosemary and Marianne.
Following cremation, the family will receive Friends and family at the Newbigging Funeral Home, 733 Mount Pleasant Road in Toronto on Sunday, November 23, 2003 from 1: 00-5:00 p.m. A Service of Celebration is to be announced later, to be held in Toronto.
In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to one of two newly established Memorial Scholarships in Dr. John T. KOSKI's name. For Cambrian College students, donations may be sent to Brian VENDRAMIN, Executive Director, Cambrian Foundation, Suite 103, 62 Frood Road, Sudbury, Ontario P3C 4Z3. Or, for Northern College students (Kirkland Lake campus) donations may be sent to Jennifer PEARSON, Coordinator, College Foundation, Northern College, P.O.Box 3211, Timmins, Ontario P4N 8R6.
The family wishes to thank Belmont House nursing staff for their loving care of John, his private duty nurses Yo and Margaret, Dr. BIRMINGHAM and Dr. REINGOLD of Belmont House Staff, and Dr. Nathan HERMMANN of Sunnybrook Medical Centre.

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REINGUETTE o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-05-07 published
Ruby WILLSON
In loving memory of Ruby WILLSON, May 15, 1937 to April 30, 2003.
Ruby WILLSON, a resident of Ice Lake, died at the Mindemoya Hospital on Wednesday, April 30, 2003 at the age of 65 years. She was born in Kagawong, daughter of the late Nelson and Lillian (TRUDEAU) PIERCE.
Ruby was an "Adventuress" and enjoyed life to its fullest. She had worked as a hostess at Harbour Island as well as being a navigator on sail boats, and had sailed many places, including the open seas. She enjoyed many things, such as needlework, baking, reading and especially loved to entertain and host people. Her favourite place was Harbour Island. A loving wife, mother and grandmother, she will be sadly missed, but many happy memories will be cherished. Dearly loved wife and best friend of Chuc WILLSON. Loving and loved mother of Dennis BECKETT and Deanna BENOIT both of Kagawong, Rob BECKETT of Pefferlaw and Juanda GEORGE of Espanola. Proud grandmother of James, Charles, Kevin, Crestienne, Aaron, Brandon and Sheldon. Also survived by Lake WILSON and his daughter Jasmine. Dear sister of Sandra JAMES. Predeceased by husbands Robert BECKETT, Carl REINGUETTE and John PETRIE and brother Reynold PIERCE.
A private family funeral service will be conducted at the Culgin Funeral Home, followed by cremation. A public memorial service will be conducted at Lyons Memorial United Church on Thursday, May 15, 2003 at 11: 00 a.m. with Pastor Maxine McVEY officiating. If so desired, donations may be made to Strawberry Point Christian Camp or the Mindemoya Hospital Auxiliary. Culgin Funeral Home 282-2270.

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REINHART o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-09-16 published
Senior's death baffles neighbour
By Anthony REINHART Tuesday, September 16, 2003 - Page A16
The sight of an ambulance is nothing unusual to residents of the Kempford Apartments on Yonge Street in North York.
This is, after all, a seniors building, with many residents in declining health.
Still, no one could have anticipated the reason paramedics and police had to race here last Saturday evening, as the late-summer sun dipped behind the 14-storey building.
They arrived to find the broken body of 81-year-old Kuna EPELBAUM, a long-time resident, lying in the driveway.
And 12 storeys up, beyond the open window from which Mr. EPELBAUM had jumped, they found his mentally handicapped daughter, Sophia, strangled to death with a cord.
Police have no doubt that Mr. EPELBAUM, a retired dentist who immigrated to Canada from Eastern Europe in the 1970s, killed his 43-year-old daughter before taking his own life.
What they don't know -- and indeed, may never know with certainty is why.
Mr. EPELBAUM left no note before he leapt, nor had police ever been called to Apt. 1211 because of trouble in the past, said Detective Randy CARTER of the Toronto Police homicide squad.
The working theory, after interviews with Mr. EPELBAUM's three surviving children in the Toronto area, is that he was upset because his family was arranging to move his daughter out of his apartment to live on her own.
"I guess it's all maybe educated speculation, but our investigation showed us that the two of them had been living together for a number of years, and that was about to change," Det. CARTER said yesterday. "And something in that arrangement caused him to do what he did."
Family members declined comment yesterday, but the disturbing events were on the minds of many at the apartment building, one of several well-kept high-rises clustered on Yonge just south of Finch Avenue.
One woman, who said she had known Mr. EPELBAUM since his wife died 15 years ago, said he frequently expressed worry about Sophia's future after he, too, passed away.
"He was very concerned about this child, wondering what would happen to her if he died," she said, declining to be identified. "And it worried him to death."
Mr. EPELBAUM, known as Nick to some of his neighbours, suffered from shingles, a painful skin condition. He also had been struggling with pain from a fall several months ago, in which he broke his shoulder and arm.
"He would say many times, 'It won't be long before I'll be with my wife again,' " the woman said. "He was getting on the verge of feeling life isn't worth it, and we'd urge him on -- 'Come on, Nick, get out there and talk with the guys.'
While Det. CARTER said Mr. EPELBAUM and his daughter had lived together continuously since Mrs. EPELBAUM's death, his neighbour offered a different account.
She said Sophia moved out of her father's apartment for a time several years ago, "to give him a break," first living in an institution, then in an apartment on Bathurst Street, with help from a city social worker. She was unable to hold a paying job, but volunteered at a hospital, she said.
Then Sophia went missing from her own apartment before resurfacing at her father's place, the woman said.
Ever since, the widower and his daughter seemed to enjoy a close and caring relationship.
The woman said that when she last saw Mr. EPELBAUM a few days ago, he was worried because Sophia had not yet returned from the store.
The next thing she heard, her old neighbour was dead, and so was his daughter.
"I can't imagine him doing it," the woman said, in the building's lobby yesterday afternoon.
"He wouldn't harm a flea, and all of a sudden this happens. It's just not right."

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REINHART o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-10-07 published
A close-knit community mourns death of National Hockey League player
Anthony REINHART visits the hometown of Dan SCHNIEDER/SNIDER/SNYDER, a kid who just wouldn't quit.
By Anthony REINHART Tuesday, October 7, 2003 - Page A3
Elmira, Ontario -- On the main street of Elmira, three slabs of polished black granite rise from a fountain in Gore Park.
The monument, erected in 2001 after a string of car accidents, bears the names of those taken too young. The name Dan Snyder will now join a list that's grown too long, too quickly for this bucolic town of 9,600, better known for its maple syrup and Mennonites.
Mr. SCHNIEDER/SNIDER/SNYDER, a 25-year-old forward with the Atlanta Thrashers of the National Hockey League, died Sunday night, six days after teammate Dany HEATLEY lost control of his speeding Ferrari and crashed on a narrow Atlanta street.
In the wider world of sport and celebrity, Mr. SCHNIEDER/SNIDER/SNYDER will be remembered, perhaps only briefly, as the latest professional athlete to die in the fast lane.
But it's different here in his hometown, a short country drive north of Kitchener-Waterloo, where community ties are drawn tight by blood and strengthened by sidewalk familiarity.
Here, Mr. SCHNIEDER/SNIDER/SNYDER will be remembered as a scrappy, hard worker who refused to listen when they said he was too skinny, too small, too whatever to play mid-level junior hockey, let alone in the National Hockey League.
"He just kept proving people wrong," his uncle, Jeff SCHNIEDER/SNIDER/SNYDER, said yesterday outside the old brick house where Mr. SCHNIEDER/SNIDER/SNYDER had lived with his parents.
"And we were hoping that he'd be able to do that again this week, but that's one battle he couldn't overcome, I guess."
The fight of Mr. SCHNIEDER/SNIDER/SNYDER's life began on the night of September 29, after he and Mr. HEATLEY, the Thrashers' 22-year-old scoring sensation, left a social gathering with the club's season-ticket holders.
Mr. HEATLEY, according to Atlanta police, was driving his 2002 Ferrari 360 Modena at about 130 kilometres an hour when he lost control and struck a fence made of brick and wrought iron.
The car was sheared apart, and both men were thrown to the pavement. Mr. HEATLEY, who suffered a broken jaw and torn knee ligaments, faces several charges. Mr. SCHNIEDER/SNIDER/SNYDER suffered a fractured skull and died of brain injuries without regaining consciousness.
People who knew him said he would have never driven so recklessly himself, that he preferred his pickup truck to the flashy cars that a fat paycheque affords.
"That's not Dan," said Bob CUMMINGS, who taught Mr. SCHNIEDER/SNIDER/SNYDER in grade school and helps manage the Junior B Elmira Sugar Kings, for which Mr. SCHNIEDER/SNIDER/SNYDER, his father and his uncle all played.
"He enjoyed life, but he respected life."
Standing in the Sugar Kings dressing room yesterday afternoon, Mr. CUMMINGS described a career rife with hints why Mr. SCHNIEDER/SNIDER/SNYDER took so little for granted.
Even the Sugar Kings, one rung down from the level where the National Hockey League drafts most of its talent, had their doubts when he arrived for the 1994-95 season.
"By the end of the season, he was probably one of the best players we had," Mr. CUMMINGS said.
His hard work caught the eye of the Junior A Owen Sound Platers (now the Attack,) but just barely; they drafted Mr. SCHNIEDER/SNIDER/SNYDER in the seventh round.
"He beat those odds and became the captain," Mr. CUMMINGS said, "probably the best captain they ever had."
Still not deemed good enough for the National Hockey League, Mr. SCHNIEDER/SNIDER/SNYDER became a free agent and landed with the Thrashers' farm teams in Chicago and Orlando, where he helped both win league championships.
Atlanta finally called him up in the latter half of last season. He scored 10 goals and four assists in 36 games. "That isn't bad for a kid at the National Hockey League level who wasn't supposed to play Junior B," Mr. CUMMINGS said.
An ankle injury, resulting in surgery last month, was expected to delay Mr. SCHNIEDER/SNIDER/SNYDER's start with the Thrashers this season. Still, he was excited, just five days before the crash, when team officials told him to find a place to live in Atlanta, his uncle said.
"He had really earned the respect of the people at the highest level of hockey in the last half of last year," Jeff SCHNIEDER/SNIDER/SNYDER said.
The people of Elmira shared in that excitement, as they have several times since the SEILING brothers (Rod and Ric) and Darryl SITTLER from nearby St. Jacobs, made the big time decades ago.
Now, they are left mourning yet another one of their young.
Matthew SHANTZ, 13, paid his respects yesterday by walking into Central Source for Sports on the main street to order a Thrashers jersey, complete with Mr. SCHNIEDER/SNIDER/SNYDER's name and number.
Matthew, who hopes to play for the Toronto Maple Leafs one day, said he met Mr. SCHNIEDER/SNIDER/SNYDER a couple of times, since his father knows the SCHNIEDER/SNIDER/SNYDER family.
"It's bad," he said simply, standing in front of the store, where plastic letters spelled out "We Remember Dan SCHNIEDER/SNIDER/SNYDER" in the window, beneath a Thrashers jersey.
Mr. SCHNIEDER/SNIDER/SNYDER's funeral will be held in Elmira on Friday.

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REINHART o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-11-25 published
In praise of humble, decent princess
By Anthony REINHART, Tuesday, November 25, 2003 - Page A12
She took many a meal at Swiss Chalet, where she had her own booth and the wait staff called her Candy Lady. Louise LIEVEN, you see, always had a handful of Werther's Originals for the people she loved, and in her world, that meant just about everyone.
Others called her Mom, since Mrs. LIEVEN was always ready with a wise word or a $20 bill for a neighbour in need.
Few ever called her by her official title -- Her Serene Highness Princess Louise Marie -- but then, neither did she. Mrs. LIEVEN, who died a week ago at 90, knew more than most about hardship and humility, and to her mind, deeds carried more weight than words.
Her impact on those close to her was evident yesterday, when about 100 people crammed a Toronto funeral chapel to pay tribute to the Latvian-born woman who came by her title through marriage to her "Prince Johnny" -- Charles Jean Christophe LIEVEN -- in Toronto in the late 1970s.
"She embraced people without regard for their racial or ethnic background," Mrs. LIEVEN's niece, Laila EBERHARDT, told the gathered crowd, many of them neighbours from the East York high-rise where she died last week.
Mrs. LIEVEN's appreciation for decency was hard won.
Born in 1913 to a wealthy family, the young Louise VON DZIENGEL enjoyed a privileged upbringing in Riga, the Baltic nation's capital, and counted young Prince John LIEVEN among many Friends. She married another man, however, and as the winds of war blew across Europe, gave birth to a daughter in March, 1940.
Everything changed three months later, when Stalin's Red Army rolled into Latvia, made it a Soviet republic, and began deporting the upper classes to Russia -- people like the VON DZIENGELs and the LIEVENs, who shared a Germanic background and Christian faith.
Louise's father sought refuge in Germany, while her mother and aunt stayed behind to mind the family assets. Her father soon died of a heart attack, while her mother and aunt were shipped to Siberia.
Fearing for the life of her child, she left her husband and fled with the baby to Sweden -- only to lose her little girl to pneumonia months later.
"Louise was alone, in a foreign land, without any means of supporting herself," Ms. EBERHARDT told the congregation yesterday. "But Louise was a survivor."
As the war raged, she continued to drift farther from her Eastern European home, to Denmark, then to Spain, Argentina and Mexico in the years that followed. She was working alone as a seamstress in Mexico City when her mother, released after 15 years in a Siberian prison camp, joined her.
When her mother died, Louise "was looking to reconnect and reach out to people dear to her," and that's when she learned, from a friend in Germany, that John LIEVEN was living in Toronto.
She contacted him and learned he, too, had his first marriage blown in separate directions by the Second World War. The prince visited Mexico and the rest was history: the pair, well into their 60s by then, fell madly in love. They settled in Toronto, where John was a salesman for a food distributor.
Mrs. LIEVEN lost her prince in December, 1996, after a series of strokes. But she did not lose her love of people.
That much was apparent at yesterday's funeral, where 10 people shared their thoughts of Mrs. LIEVEN.
One neighbour spoke of the coffee parties she organized for the building's seniors last winter, and how she'd always kiss him on both cheeks, one for him, the other for his wife. Another recalled how she bought Christmas gifts for three young boys whose father had died. A woman, widowed around the same time as Mrs. LIEVEN, talked about how they'd meet each afternoon for mutual support: "We'd have a little drink and we'd settle all the world's problems," she said.
And Sandy SRIPATHY, her neighbour across the hall, talked through tears about the lady she called Mom.
A few weeks ago, Mrs. LIEVEN confided that she might not make it to Christmas, as she was feeling ill.
She told Mrs. SRIPATHY to watch her door, and to check on her if the newspaper was still hanging from the knob by late morning.
Last Tuesday, Mrs. SRIPATHY watched the princess fetch her paper as usual, but later that day, she learned that her neighbour had died.
After a brief reception upstairs, the guests filed from the funeral home, but not before making one last stop: at a crystal candy bowl, perched by the door.

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REISS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-09-08 published
McFARLANE, Geoffrey Bruce (1951 -- 2003)
Died suddenly, on September 5th, 2003, after a short, fierce struggle with cancer, borne with bravery and dignity. He was the much loved eldest son of Isabel and the late Dr. Douglas McFARLANE. Geoffrey will be remembered always by his siblings Paul (Sue), Kim NIKALSON, Perci, Breck, Dr. Rene and Connie his nieces and nephews Daley, Kelda, Colin, Kaarina, Fraser, Amica, Sophie and Emmett; his aunt Mrs. Norma REISS (Claude) and uncle Dr. Bruce McFARLANE (Connie,) and, of course, his Friends. Special thanks to the medical team at St. Michael's Hospital for their knowledge and sensitivity. Funeral service will be at St. Leonard's Anglican Church (Wanless and Yonge), on Friday, September 12 at 3 p.m. The family will be at home for Friends after the service at 71 Buckingham Avenue. No flowers please, but if desired, donations would be appreciated to the Toronto Humane Society.
Rest in peace, Geoffrey

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