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"PRI" 2003 Obituary


PRICE  PRIEBE  PRIETO  PRIMEAU  PRIMROSE  PRINGLE  PRIOR  PRITCHARD 

PRICE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-01-10 published
The castle lights are growing dim
Canadian television icon made his mark as star of The Hilarious House of Frightenstein
By John McKAY Canadian Press Friday, January 10, 2003, Page R11
Billy VAN, the diminutive, manic comic actor who starred in Canadian Broadcasting Corporation-Television's Nightcap in the 1960s and The Hilarious House of Frightenstein in the seventies, died Wednesday. He was 68.
Mr. VAN, who had been battling cancer for about a year and had a triple heart bypass in 1998, died at Toronto's Sunnybrook Hospital, said his former wife, Claudia CONVERSE.
While a familiar fixture on Canadian television for decades, he also worked in the United States on variety shows such as The Sonny and Cher Comedy Hour, The Ray Stevens Show and The Bobby Vinton Show.
Mr. VAN even gained fame for the Colt .45 beer commercials he made for 15 years and for which he won a Clio Award.
But he invariably returned to Toronto in shows like The Party Game, Bizarre with John Byner, The Hudson Brothers Razzle DAzzle Show and Bits and Bytes.
His wife, Susan, said that while he had opportunities in the U.S., Mr. VAN had no regrets about staying in Canada.
"He was quite happy when he came back," she said. "He had the taste of the life down there and [said] 'Okay, that's fine, I'd rather be at home.' "
Ms. CONVERSE agreed that Mr. VAN had been happy with his career and had worked non-stop until his heart bypass.
"I don't know of many Canadians that stay in Canada who get their full recognition," she said. "When he went to the States, definitely. But there isn't a star system in Canada so it's kind of difficult."
Mr. VAN -- then Billy VAN EVERA -- went into show business at the age of 12 and back in the 1950s, he and his four musically inclined brothers formed a singing group that toured Canada and Europe. Most also went on to adult careers in show business.
After his heart surgery, Mr. VAN was semi-retired but continued to do voiceover work for commercials and animated programs. His last major on-screen role was as Les the trainer in the television hockey movie Net Worth in 1995.
Mr. VAN and long-time colleagues Dave BROADFOOT and Jack DUFFY made appearances in recent years to support the fledgling Canadian Comedy Awards.
"I'm all for that enthusiasm," Mr. VAN said about the awards launch in 2000.
"Billy was one of my closest Friends," said Mr. DUFFY, who added that he called Mr. VAN several times a week after he became ill.
"We were sort of buddies under the skin. We got to know each other really well at Canadian Broadcasting Corporation and then we worked on Party Game together for a number of years. He was a close friend and I will miss him very much."
Mr. DUFFY said a lot of doors opened for Mr. VAN when he did The Sonny and Cher Show,but he was happy to come home to his native Toronto, where he was born in 1934.
"He came back and we were glad to have him back."
Entertainer Dinah CHRISTIE, with whom Mr. VAN worked on The Party Game for a decade, called him a brave and glorious person.
"He would take on anything and was . . . a totally gracious guy," she said. "I'm just going to miss him like we all are going to miss him. He soldiered through this bloody cancer thing so wonderfully. I knew he was just trying to get through Christmas."
Ms. CHRISTIE said Mr. VAN had some hideous experiences in the U.S. He had seen a man shot to death next to him in a New York hotel, and had his Los Angeles home broken into twice.
"He never felt safe there. And he was such a Canadian that he always felt safe here."
Mr. VAN's picture is on the Canadian Comedy Wall of Fame at the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation Broadcast Centre in Toronto, along with those of Al WAXMAN, Wayne and Shuster and Don HARRON.
The Hilarious House of Frightenstein starred Vincent PRICE, with Mr. VAN as host and a variety of characters, including The Count, a vampire who preferred pizza to blood and who wore tennis shoes as well as a cape. The hour-long episodes were taped at Hamilton's CHCH-Television and are still seen in syndication around the world.
Nightcap was a Canadian Broadcasting Corporation satirical show that predated Saturday Night Live by a dozen years. Its cast included Al HAMEL and Guido BASSO and his orchestra.
Mr. VAN leaves his wife, Susan, and two daughters from previous marriages, Tracy and Robyn.
A private funeral will be held in Toronto on Monday.
Billy VAN, actor and entertainer; born in Toronto in 1934; died in Toronto on January 8, 2003.

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PRICE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-02-27 published
PRICE, Kenneth A.
Born July 1, 1927 in Montreal, Quebec, died February 23, 2003 at Centenary Hospital, Scarborough, Ontario Beloved companion of 21 years of Virginia BUSSIERE. Father of Willard (Ingrid MOE,) Richmond, British Columbia and Donna (Rod DICKSON/DIXON), Newmarket, Ontario Grandfather of Evan and Reid PRICE and Shane and Troy DICKSON/DIXON. Special Baba of Payton and Matthew. Interment in spring at Mount Royal Cemetery, Montreal.

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PRICE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-04-03 published
PRICE, Graham O.
Peacefully, at Sunnybrook and Women's College Health Sciences Centre, on 1st April, 2003, in his ninetieth year. For many years he has grieved the loss of his lovely wife Nancy who died in 1995. Go in peace to your sweetheart, Dad. Graham is mourned by his only child, Diane FROGGATT, his son-in-law, Gordon FROGGATT, his grand_son and namesake, Graham FROGGATT, his granddaughter Jackie and her husband Jonathan (EVANS) and their two children Liam and Julia. His loyal Friends, Jill BYRNE and Bill OXFORD, pray for him. A private service will be held at the Morley Bedford Funeral Home, 159 Eglinton Avenue West (at Lascelles Blvd.) Toronto. Our family would like your tokens of love and affection to benefit mental illness. Please send donations (in lieu of flowers) to the World Schizophrenia Fellowship, 24 Merton Street, Suite 507, Toronto, Ontario M4S 2Z2.

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PRICE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-08-08 published
Donald Kenneth FRISE
By Peter FRISE Friday, August 8, 2003 - Page A18
Husband, father, friend, teacher, mentor. Born July 2, 1930, in Peterborough, Ontario Died April 7 in Kingston, Ontario, of cancer, aged 72
Born as the Depression began, Don FRISE was part of a large family in a typical small Canadian city. During those tough times, Don helped his family by earning money driving a horse-drawn milk wagon at age 12 and later by working at Quaker Oats. These were not jobs for children, but Don was never afraid of hard work and he had a strong sense of duty, having to leave school early to do an apprenticeship as a test technician at Canadian General Electric. Don's meagre beginnings led to lifelong frugality and he taught his children about Registered Retirement Savings Plans (which all three started as teenagers) and the magic of compound interest.
Despite his busy schedule, Don was an excellent student. An old friend said that "it wasn't who came first at school -- it was who came second after Don." This love of learning translated into a love of teaching and mentoring young people. He enjoyed doing things such as carving a set of model submarines with his son and teaching him how to use a soldering iron. His family members were often recipients of carefully composed notes on topics ranging from how to study for exams to tips on wiring a basement.
Don had a gift for always knowing the right thing to do and then doing it well. In 1948, he bumped into an old school friend who told him that she needed a date for a nursing-school dance. He informed her that he didn't dance but would go along anyway. During the dance, she observed that he was actually a pretty good dancer and he modestly said that he was doing his best. Only many years later did he admit that he had spent much of the week's pay on dancing lessons so that he wouldn't embarrass Helen PRICE at the dance.
Helen and Don married in 1952 and had three children: Kathryn, Peter and Margaret. In 1959, Don left Canadian General Electric to attend teacher's college in Toronto, leaving a capable Helen with three small children; he returned to Peterborough to teach electricity at Kenner Collegiate in 1960. In 1963, Don and Helen moved to Richmond Hill where he became technical department head and later a vice-principal at Bayview Secondary School. As an up-and-coming educator, Don continued his own studies during the summer, earning an honours degree from Queen's University in 1969. He later took a sabbatical and earned a master's degree from York, which was not bad for a guy who had to leave school before finishing Grade 13.
He liked to travel, taking his family across Canada several times with a tent trailer; later he went to Russia as chaperone on a high-school trip. Once, in the 1960s, he told an Air Canada agent, who had rather coldly bumped his family off a flight: "If you don't get us to Florida today, you will be reading about this in Hansard tomorrow." The line was delivered calmly, politely and respectfully, but firmly -- and it worked. Later Don and Helen loved having family and Friends and their grandchildren at the cottage near Havelock. These cottage adventures were simple and gentle but Don treasured them.
Don told his son as he began his own teaching career: "Always remember that each of your students is somebody's pride and joy and deserves to be treated with compassion and respect -- no matter what their level of ability. Back home is a family who are thrilled that young Johnny or Susie is off learning how to be an engineer -- don't disappoint them."
Don believed in kindness, humour, respect for others, doing the right things and doing them right. He was an average person who had an extraordinary effect on those around him. At his funeral, several people spoke about how Don had influenced them to stay in school more than 40 years earlier and thereby changed their lives and those of their families. He is survived by his wife, his three children and his seven grandchildren
Peter FRISE is Don's son.

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PRIEBE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-11-19 published
BROWN, Kenneth, M.D., C.M., (F.R.C.S.C)
Born 1924 in Montreal, Québec, died November 18, 2003, North Bay, Ontario. Lovingly remembered by his wife, Toni and his children, Susan (Don) PRIEBE of North Bay, Pam (Tom) DAWES of Thunder Bay, Ken (Rose) BROWN of Port Perry, Heather ROBERTSON of Calgary, Alison (Bruce) MILLAR of Canmore, Toni BROWN (Dick AVERNS) of Vancouver, and Meredith BROWN (Ronnie DREVER) of Montreal. Especially loved by his grandchildren, Sarah, Nik, Heidi, Kim, Lisa, Eric, Graeme, Laura, Evan, Geoff, Cam, Aidan, Riley, Nelson, Brooke, and Lily. Also survived by his brother, James (Jean) BROWN of South Carolina. Friends may call at the Martyn Funeral Home, 464 Wyld Street, North Bay, on Thursday, November 20, 2003 from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. The funeral service will be held at 11 a.m. on Friday November 21, 2003, at Christ Church Anglican, Vimy Street, North Bay. If desired, donations to the Parkinson Society Canada would be appreciated as expressions of sympathy.
Husband * Father * Grandpa * Friend * Surgeon
We'll miss you

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PRIETO o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-01-09 published
Double-killing suspect found dead in hotel
By Colin FREEZE Crime Reporter Thursday, January 9, 2003, Page A16
A manhunt for a suspected killer led police yesterday to a $100-a-night highway motel, where 31-year-old Joseph Braga PRIETO was found dead of an apparent suicide.
Mr. PRIETO, 31, was the main suspect in last weekend's triple shooting inside a Mississauga apartment. Two of the victims, aged 19 and 21, died.
Yesterday morning, police tracked the suspect to a Scarborough Quality Inn, where he barricaded himself for several hours. He exchanged words with police in the afternoon before gunshots were heard inside.
Police were cautious before opening the room door; the motel was evacuated, tear gas was used and a bomb-detecting robot was brought in before the suspect was found face down, dead.
The province's Special Investigation Unit, which probes cases of death or serious injury involving the police, was made aware of the situation yesterday at 3: 30 p.m. It began its investigation three hours later when Mr. PRIETO was discovered dead.
In 1997, a police officer said Mr. PRIETO "came out like a madman" when cornered during a drug bust. He grabbed a police officer's gun during the takedown. After police grabbed the gun back, he fled into a ravine, then tried to steal a cement truck. It proved to be a poor choice of getaway vehicle; he was caught.
"He's a very lucky man. Twice during the incident he could have been shot by officers," an officer said at the time.
Yesterday, the head of the Toronto Police organized-crime squad was present at the motel, though Peel Police was the lead investigating agency.
Mississauga is emerging as the Greater Toronto Area's crime hot spot. In addition to this past weekend's double homicide, Peel Police are investigating an accidental shooting in which a seven-year-old girl shot and killed her six-year-old brother while playing with a sibling's illegal handgun.
On Tuesday, Peel Police investigated a domestic murder-suicide in which a husband strangled his wife before hanging himself.
Peel Region investigated nine homicides last year. By contrast, Toronto Police investigated 60 homicides in 2002, but have yet to launch an investigation this year.

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PRIMEAU o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-03-19 published
Mary Elizabeth LANKTREE
Passed away peacefully on Sunday March 9, 2003 at the Salvation Army AR Goudie Eventide Home, Kitchener.
Mary (née MacDONALD) LANKTREE in her 85th year was the beloved wife of the late Harry LANKTREE (February 27, 1999.) Dear mother of Myrna TIDD of BC, Gloria PRIMEAU of Kitchener, June KAWA and her husband Larry of Val Caron, David LANKTREE and his wife Suzanne of Kitchener and Denise GILBERT and her husband Dana of Kitchener. Loving grandmother of twelve grandchildren and great-grandmother of nine. Dear sister of May KINSLEY, Minerva HALL, Annie McKINLEY. Predeceased by one brother Russell MacDONALD.
Mary's family received relatives and Friends on Tuesday March 11 at the Henry Walser Funeral Home, 507 Frederick Street, Kitchener. Funeral service was held on Wednesday March 12, 2003 in the chapel of the funeral home. Spring interment in Civic Cemetery, Sudbury. Visit www.obit411.com/968 for Mary's memorial.

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PRIMEAU o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-06-26 published
Died This Day -- Harvey JACKSON, 1966
Thursday, June 26, 2003 - Page R9
Hockey player born on August 19, 1911; left-winger played with the Toronto Marlboros as a junior; 1930, joined Toronto Maple Leafs; formed famous Kid Line with Charlie CONACHER and Joe PRIMEAU five-time all-star; 1932, member of Stanley Cup-winning team 1932-33, led National Hockey League in scoring.

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PRIMEAU o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-30 published
Died This Day
Charles William CONACHER, 1967
Tuesday, December 30, 2003 - Page R7
Hockey player born in Toronto on December 10, 1909; played 12 seasons in the National Hockey League, mostly with Toronto Maple Leafs; played right wing on "Kid Line" with Joe PRIMEAU and Henry (Busher) JACKSON; 1938, traded to Detroit and then to New York scored 225 goals, 173 assists in regular season, with 17 goals and 18 assists in playoffs.

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PRIMROSE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-06 published
MacLELLAN, Robert Gordan Primrose April 6, 1919 - March 2, 2003
Robert G. P. MacLELLAN, of Calgary, Alberta retired General Counsel of the Husky Oil Company, died on Sunday, March 2, 2003 of pneumonia, at Rockyview General Hospital in Calgary. He was a month short of his 84th birthday. Born in Lunenburg, Nova Scotia, on April 6, 1919, Robert was the only child of Dr. Robert Gordon MacLELLAN and Hazel Carré Primrose MacLELLAN. His father died in 1930, and his mother in 1937. An aunt helped his widowed mother raise him. Robert attended local schools and university in Halifax, Nova Scotia, graduating in law from Dalhousie University, Halifax, after World War 2. Robert enlisted in the Canadian Army in 1942 until 1946, as a Lieutenant in the British Columbia Dragoons (the 9th Canadian Armoured Regiment), serving in Italy, Belgium and Holland. He served as General Counsel of the Husky Oil Limited, the parent company with its two wholly-owned subsidiaries, Husky Oil Company, and Husky Oil Canadian Operations, for 35 years, based in Calgary, until he retired in the early l980's. Robert, (his Friends called him 'Bob'), enjoyed the Friendship of his colleagues at Husky Oil and after his retirement, he and others formed a dining club, the Husky Dining Club. It still operates at the Hospitality Inn.A bachelor, he enjoyed life at his Riverdale Avenue bungalow, where he had a large library. A fall and a stroke weakened him five years ago, and he entered Scottish Extendicare on 25th Avenue South West. Due to its imminent closure, Robert was moved to the Colonel Belcher nursing facility in February. Robert came from a distinguished Nova Scotian family. His paternal grandfather, for whom he and his father were named, Robert MacLELLAN, a distinguished educator, was Principal of Pictou Academy from 1889 to 1923. The elder MacLELLAN helped to prepare young minds for the challenges of the 20th century. Pictou Academy, through its principals and graduates had strong links to Dalhousie University. Robert's maternal grandfather was Senator Clarence PRIMROSE, also of Pictou. Robert is survived by several cousins, among them, Janet Maclellan TOOLE of Fredericton, New Brunswick, Judith Ann (MacLELLAN) GIBSON, of Saint John's, Newfoundland, and Ann MacLELLAN of Amherstview, Ontario. His family is greatly indebted to the care-giving services of 'Tip' Pornthip WONGTHONGLUA, whose intelligence, gentleness and devotion were always exceptional, during his stay at Scottish, Colonel Belcher and Rockyview Hospital. A committal service in Nova Scotia will take place in the summer. Friends who wish to pay their respects to Robert's memory and sign the memorial book may visit Mcinnis and Holloway's 'Fish Creek Chapel' (14441 Bannister Road S.E., Calgary, Alberta). To e-mail expressions of sympathy: condolences@mcinnisandholloway.com Subject Heading: Robert MacLELLAN. In living memory of Robert MacLELLAN, a tree will be planted at Fish Creek Provincial Park by Mcinnis & Holloway Funeral Homes, 'Fish Creek Chapel', 14441 Bannister Rd. S.E. Calgary, Alberta Tel: (403) 256-9575

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PRINGLE o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-12-10 published
John Ellsworth SEABROOK
In loving memory of John Ellsworth SEABROOK July 18, 1923 to November 30, 2003.
John Ellsworth SEABROOK, known as "Jack" passed away suddenly at 80 years, on November 30, 2003.
He was born in Chatsworth, July 18, 1923 and made his home in Mindemoya, Manitoulin Island, since 1931. He leaves to remember him, his beloved wife Marion. His cherished kids: Cathy, Deb, John, Diana, Mark and Vanda. Their spouses: David, Cheryl, Keith and Michelle. His treasured grandchildren: Brent, Brady, Logan, Meg, Kate, Sarah, Jenny, Ben, Philip, A.J., Josh, Lyric, Jasmine, Morgan and Jessie. His one beautiful great grandchild Teigan. His sisters: Ella (Peggy) HAHN and Lois CHALLINOR. Predeceased Maxine PRINGLE and Fern SEABROOK. His brother, Archie. Predeceased Bill. His sisters-in-law: Joanne
SMITH, Millie SEABROOK and Aletha SEABROOK. Predeceased Lorene STANLEY. His brothers-in-law: Jim HAHN, Jim SMITH and George STANLEY. Predeceased Hugh PRINGLE. His nieces and nephews: Clay, Susan, Bill, Beth, Robert, Paul, David, Charlie, John, Geoff, Mark, Kevin and Tara. Predeceased Lynn. All will miss him dearly. He was an original. He realized his own dreams of becoming a machinist, a master mechanic, a carpenter, the developer of the Brookwood Brae Golf Course, windmill designer, gentleman farmer (all animals at his farm died of old age) and curator and creator of Jack's Agriculture Museum. We all knew and loved him and he became our example to follow our dreams. His colourful, warm character shone at auctions, plays, card games, and church committees. He was the crank shaft and spark plug of our family. He loved Massey Harris tractors, Triumph motorcycles, Blue Jay games, yellow wooden shoes, novels by Louis L'Amour, movies with John Wayne, grape juice and certo (for arthritis), raisin pie and ice cream - and us!
"Everyday you're breathin' is a good day." This philosophy was reflected in his love for his wife, his kids, his grandkids, his Friends and his community. His love will shine in those he's left behind. Friends called the Mindemoya United Church on Wednesday, December 3, 2003. Funeral service was held on Thursday, December 4, 2003 with Reverend Mary Jo ECKERT TRACY officiating. Cremation to follow. Culgin Funeral Home

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PRIOR o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-02-05 published
George Eli Amos PICKARD
February 12, 1921 - January 30, 2003
George PICKARD, a resident of Gore Bay, died at the Mindemoya Hospital on Thursday, January 30, 2003 at the age of 81 years. He was born at Ice Lake, son of the late Robert and Elizabeth BRANDOW) PICKARD. George had worked for 7 years at INCO, then returned home and farmed for 46 years, retiring to Gore Bay in 1989. He was a member of the United Church, and had many interests including gardening, fishing, and doing crossword puzzles. His greatest love was his family. He thoroughly enjoyed spending time with all his family, especially his grandchildren and great grandchildren. he was a kind and caring husband, father, grandfather and great grandfather, and will be sadly missed, but many memories will be cherished. Dearly loved husband of Margaret (McARTHUR) PICKARD of Gore Bay. Loved and loving father and father-in-law of Ken and Carol PICKARD of Espanola, Sheila and Joe BRANDOW of Ice Lake and Marilyn PRIOR and friend Hector of Ice Lake. Proud grandfather of Mike and Kendal, Wendy and Steven, Patti and Maurice, Jason, Diane and Oliver, Connie and Chadwick and Sherry and great grandchildren Kyle, Matthew, Carly, Shelby and Christian. Dear brother of Alvin PICKARD of Silver Water and Elizabeth ROBERTSON of Gore Bay. Also survived by many nieces and nephews. Predeceased by sister Laura and brothers Robert, Norman, Earl, John and Cecil.
Friends called the Culgin Funeral Home after 7: 00 pm on Friday. The funeral service was conducted in the Wm. G. Turner Chapel on Saturday, February 1, 2003 at 11: 00 am with Geraldine BOULD officiating. Spring interment in Gordon cemetery.

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PRITCHARD o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-02-12 published
Man of peace died with his boots on
Christian-based, stop-the-war mission to southern Iraq ended in tragedy for Canadian peace activist
By Allison LAWLOR Wednesday, February 12, 2003, Page R7
He was an educator who tried to stop a war before it began. Instead, George WEBER, a former Ontario high-school teacher who was touring Iraq as part of an effort to stave off a war, died there in a road accident. He was 73.
Mr. WEBER was killed instantly when the vehicle he was travelling in as a passenger rolled on an Iraqi highway between Basra and Baghdad.
When the left rear tire blew out of the Chevrolet Suburban, the truck hit the shoulder of the road and flipped over before rolling to a stop upside-down beside the road, said Doug PRITCHARD, Canadian co-ordinator for the Christian Peacemaker Teams, a church-based group dedicated to non-violent activism.
Mr. WEBER, who was travelling in the back seat, was thrown from the vehicle and sustained massive head injuries. Two other activists with the group were injured in the accident.
An investigation has shown that on the day of the accident, the vehicle was in excellent condition, the tires were new and the truck was travelling on a six-lane, lightly travelled highway on a clear day, Mr. PRITCHARD said.
Mr. WEBER, a retired high-school history teacher from the town of Chesley in southwestern Ontario, was among 17 Canadian and American peace activists who arrived in Iraq on December 29. They were committed to living up to a mission statement of the Christian Peacemaker Teams of reducing violence by "getting in the way," Mr. PRITCHARD said.
The group travelled to the country despite warnings from the Department of Foreign Affairs advising Canadians to stay away from Iraq for security reasons. With war looming there, antiwar activists from around the world have been heading to Iraq to act as "human shields" if the bombs start falling, and in solidarity with Iraqis.
"He was a student of world politics," said Reverend Anita Janzen of the Hanover Mennonite Church, where Mr. WEBER and his wife Lena attended. "He was very upset [by] the threat of war [in Iraq]."
Mr. WEBER felt he wouldn't be able to live with himself if war broke out in Iraq and he had failed to do anything, she said.
Yet, when people told him they thought his actions were courageous, his reply was: " 'I'm no hero,' " said his wife Lena. "It was what he felt he needed to do," she said.
In Iraq, Mr. WEBER and the Christian Peacemaker Team visited hospitals, farms and schools to talk to Iraqis about the Persian Gulf war, the United Nations sanctions and the current possible U.S.-led war.
Shortly after arriving in Baghdad, he made a trip to the marketplace to have a local tailor make him a suit. He had planned to pick it up after his trip to Basra but he never made it back to the marketplace. But someone else did. Mr. WEBER wore the suit at his funeral.
Having the suit made in Baghdad fit with Mr. WEBER's personal philosophy of trying to help those most in need. It was not uncommon on his various travels to developing countries to seek out the most decrepit taxi, saying it was that driver who was the most in need of the fare, Lena WEBER said.
"He was really kind of an unassuming and a genuinely humble man who in a quiet way lived his beliefs," said Jim LONEY, a fellow Canadian who was in the truck but escaped serious injuries. Mr. LONEY accompanied Mr. WEBER's body back to Canada from Iraq. Mr. WEBER had been scheduled to return home on January 9. "He was a deeply committed Christian, and deeply committed to peace."
Mr. WEBER's trip to Iraq wasn't his first with the Christian Peacemakers Team. After retiring from teaching, he applied to take part in a Peacemakers mission to Chiapas, Mexico. In his application in 1999, he noted that throughout his life he had been interested in current events and was aware that it was the poor and disadvantaged people in the world who end up suffering the most.
"I think that most of the calamities that befall ordinary folk could be alleviated if it were not for the selfishness and greed that motivate the power structures, which are in place throughout the world.
"But there are also many people of goodwill who wish to treat everyone fairly and with charity. I try to be among this group," he wrote.
He was part of a two-week delegation to Chiapas in February, 2000. This trip was followed by another six-week mission to Hebron in the West Bank in 2001, and another six weeks there in 2002.
In the West Bank, Mr. WEBER was particularly moved by the plight of the Palestinian children and would accompany them to school through military checkpoints ensuring that they arrived safely.
Mr. WEBER had also been a member of the Peace Justice and Social Concerns Committee of the Mennonite Conference of Eastern Canada between 1994 and 1998.
George WEBER was born on July 28, 1929, and grew up on a farm near Elmira, Ontario He was the fifth of seven children born to Ion and Geneva WEBER. After his father died when he was in his 50s, George was left to take over the family farm. A young man, just 20, he helped his mother raise his younger siblings.
When George felt one of his younger siblings was able to take over the farm, he got on a boat headed for Europe. It was during his travels that he decided he would like to one day attend university.
He returned to Canada in his mid-20s and enrolled in the history department at the University of Toronto. After graduating with a degree, he went into teaching. His first job was teaching history at Western Technical-Commercial School in Toronto.
It was through the Mennonite church that he met Lena FREY. The couple married in 1959 and not long afterward went to Africa. Mr. WEBER taught in Ghana and Nigeria during the 1960s for the Mennonite Board of Missions teaching school and his wife worked as a nurse.
After returning to Canada, he taught at a Toronto high school before settling in Chesley, Ontario, where he taught history at a local high school, farmed and was active in the Hanover Mennonite Church.
"George was a very critical thinker," said Barry WOODYARD, a retired vice-principal at Chesley District High School. "He used to challenge his students not to accept anything they heard on the news," or from politicians. "He felt they needed to do their own thinking."
A quiet, hard-working man, he was known among his colleagues for having a particular talent for forming relationships with the difficult students the other teachers often didn't want to deal with.
"If people needed help he would help them," Mr. WOODYARD said.
Mr. WEBER leaves his wife Lena, children Reginald and Tania and four grandchildren. He also leaves two brothers and one sister.
George WEBER, teacher, farmer, missionary, born on July 28, 1929, in Elmira, Ontario; died near Basra, Iraq, on January 6, 2003.

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PRITCHARD o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-04-12 published
'He kept a little flame of geometry alive'
Superstar University of Toronto mathematician considered himself an artist, but his seminal work inevitably found practical applications
By Siobhan ROBERTS Saturday, April 12, 2003 - Page F11
Widely considered the greatest classical geometer of his time and the man who saved his discipline from near extinction, Harold Scott MacDonald COXETER, who died on March 31 at 96, said of himself, with characteristic modesty, "I am like any other artist. It just so happens that what fills my mind is shapes and numbers."
Prof. COXETER's work focused on hyperdimensional shapes, specifically the symmetry of regular figures and polytopes. Polytopes are geometric shapes of any number of dimensions that cannot be constructed in the real world and can be visualized only when the eye of the beholder possesses the necessary insight; they are most often described mathematically and sometimes can be represented with hypnotically intricate fine-line drawings.
"I like things that can be seen," Prof. COXETER once remarked. "You have to imagine a different world where these queer things have some kind of shape."
Known as Donald (shortened from MacDonald,) Prof. COXETER had such a passion for his work and unrivalled elegance in constructing and writing proofs that he motivated countless mathematicians to pick up the antiquated discipline of geometry long after it had been deemed passé.
John Horton CONWAY, the Von Neumann professor of mathematics at Princeton University, never studied under Prof. COXETER, but he considers himself an honorary student because of the COXETERian nature of his work.
"With math, what you're doing is trying to prove something and that can get very complicated and ugly. COXETER always manages to do it clearly and concisely," Prof. CONWAY said. "He kept a little flame of geometry alive by doing such beautiful works himself.
"I'm reminded of a quotation from Walter Pater's book The Renaissance. He was describing art and poetry, but he talks of a small, gem-like flame: 'To burn always with this hard, gem-like flame, to maintain this ecstasy, is success in life.' "
Prof. COXETER's oeuvre included more than 250 papers and 12 books. His Introduction to Geometry, published in 1961, is now considered a classic -- it is still in print and this year is back on the curriculum at McGill University. His Regular Polytopes is considered by some as the modern-day addendum to Euclid's Elements. In 1957, he published Generators and Relations for Discrete Groups, written jointly with his PhD student and lifelong friend Willy MOSER. It is currently in its seventh edition.
Prof. COXETER's self-image as an artist was validated by his Friendship with and influence on Dutch artist M. C. ESCHER, who, when working on his Circle Limit 3 drawings, used to say, "I'm Coxetering today."
They met at the International Mathematical Congress in Amsterdam in 1954 and then corresponded about their mutual interest in repeating patterns and representations of infinity. In a letter to his son, Mr. ESCHER noted that a diagram sent to him by Prof. COXETER that inspired his Circle Limit 3 prints "gave me quite a shock."
He added that " COXETER's hocus-pocus text is no use to me at all.... I understand nothing, absolutely nothing of it."
While Mr. ESCHER claimed total ignorance of math, Prof. COXETER wrote numerous papers on the Dutchman's "intuitive geometry."
Though Prof. COXETER did geometry for its own sake, his work inevitably found practical application. Buckminster FULLER encountered his work in the construction of his geodesic domes. He later dedicated a book to Prof. COXETER: "By virtue of his extraordinary life's work in mathematics, Prof. COXETER is the geometer of our bestirring twentieth century. [He is] the spontaneously acclaimed terrestrial curator of the historical inventory of the science of pattern analysis."
Prof. COXETER's work with icosohedral symmetries served as a template of sorts in the Nobel Prize-winning discovery of the Carbon 60 molecule. It has also proved relevant to other specialized areas of science such as telecommunications, data mining, topology and quasi-crystals.
In 1968, Prof. COXETER added to his list of converts an anonymous society of French mathematicians, the Bourbakis, who actively and internationally sought to eradicate classical geometry from the curriculum of math education.
"Death to Triangles, Down with Euclid!" was the Bourbaki war cry. Prof. COXETER's rebuttal: "Everyone is entitled to their opinion. But the Bourbakis were sadly mistaken."
One member of the society, Pierre CARTIER, met Prof. COXETER in Montreal and became enamoured of his work. Soon, he had persuaded his fellow Bourbakis to include Prof. COXETER's approach in their annual publication. "An entire volume of Bourbaki was thoroughly inspired by the work of COXETER," said Prof. CARTIER, a professor at Denis Diderot University in Paris.
In the 1968 volume, Prof. COXETER's name was writ large into the lexicon of mathematics with the inauguration of the terms "COXETER number," " COXETER group" and "COXETER graph."
These concepts describe symmetrical properties of shapes in multiple dimensions and helped to bridge the old-fashioned classical geometry with the more au courant and applied algebraic side of the discipline. These concepts continue to pervade geometrical discourse, several decades after being discovered by Prof. COXETER.
Prof. COXETER became a serious mathematician at the relatively late age of 14, though family folklore has it that, as a toddler, he liked to stare at the columns of numbers in the financial pages of his father's newspaper.
He was born into a Quaker family in Kensington, just west of London, on February 9, 1907. His mother, Lucy GEE, was a landscape artist and portrait painter, and his father, Harold, was a manufacturer of surgical instruments, though his great love was sculpting.
They had originally named their son MacDonald Scott COXETER, but a godparent suggested that the boy's father's name should be added at the front. Another relative then pointed out that H.M.S. COXETER made him sound like a ship of the royal fleet so the names were switched around.
When Prof. COXETER was 12, he created his own language -- "Amellaibian" a cross between Latin and French, and filled a 126-page notebook with information on the imaginary world where it was spoken.
But more than anything he fancied himself a composer, writing several piano concertos, a string quartet and a fugue. His mother took her son and his musical compositions to Gustav HOLST. His advice: "Educate him first."
He was then sent to boarding school, where he met John Flinders PETRIE, son of Egyptologist Sir Flinders PETRIE. The two were passing time at the infirmary contemplating why there were only five Platonic solids -- the cube, tetrahedron, octahedron, dodecahedron and icosahedron. They then began visualizing what these shapes might look like in the fourth dimension. At the age of 15, Prof. COXETER won a school prize for an English essay on how to project these geometric shapes into higher dimensions -- he called it "Dimensional Analogy."
Prof. COXETER's father took his son along with his essay to meet friend and fellow pacifist Bertrand RUSSELL. Mr. RUSSELL recommended Prof. COXETER to mathematician E.H. NEVILLE, a scout, of sorts, for mathematics prodigies. He was impressed by Prof. COXETER's work but appalled by some inexcusable gaps in his mathematical knowledge. Prof. NEVILLE arranged for private tutelage in pursuit of a scholarship at Cambridge. During this period, Prof. COXETER was forbidden from thinking in the fourth dimension, except on Sundays.
He entered Trinity College, Cambridge, in 1926 and was among five students handpicked by Ludwig WITTGENSTEIN for his philosophy of mathematics class. During his first year at Cambridge, at the age of 19, he discovered a new regular polyhedron that had six hexagonal faces at each vertex.
After graduating with first-class honours in 1929, he received his doctorate under H. F. BAKER in 1931, winning the coveted Smith's Prize for his thesis.
Prof. COXETER did fellowship stints back and forth between Princeton and Cambridge for the next few years, focusing on the mathematics of kaleidoscopes -- he had mirrors specially cut and hinged together and carried them in velvet pouches sewn by his mother. By 1933, he had enumerated the n-dimensional kaleidoscopes -- that is, kaleidoscopes operating up to any number of dimensions.
The concepts that became known as COXETER groups are the complex algebraic equations he developed to express how many images may be seen of any object in a kaleidoscope (he once used a paper triangle with the word "nonsense" printed on it to track reflections).
In 1936, Prof. COXETER was offered an assistant professorship at the University of Toronto. He made the move shortly after the sudden death of his father and following his marriage to Rien BROUWER. She was from the Netherlnds and he met her while she was on holiday in London.
As a professor, Prof. COXETER was known to flout set curriculum. Ed BARBEAU, now a professor at the U of T, recalled that at the start of his classes, Prof. COXETER would spread out a manuscript on the desks at the front of the room. During his lecture, he would often pause for minutes at a time to make notes when a student offered something that might be relevant to his work in progress. When the work was later published, students were pleasantly surprised to find that their suggestions had been duly credited.
Prof. COXETER was also known to show up to class carrying a pineapple, or a giant sunflower from his garden, demonstrating the existence of geometric principles in nature. And he was notorious for leaping over details, expecting students to fill in the rest.
The Canadian Broadcasting Corporation's resident intellectual, Lister SINCLAIR, was one of Prof. COXETER's earliest students. He once recounted that Prof. COXETER would "write an expression on the board and you could see it talking to him. It was like Michelangelo walking around a block of marble and seeing what's in there."
Asia Ivic WEISS, a professor at York University, Prof. COXETER's last PhD student and the only woman so honoured, describes an incident that perfectly exemplifies Prof. COXETER's math myopia. Going into labour with her first child, she called him to cancel their weekly meeting. Prof. COXETER, who never acknowledged her pregnancy, said not to worry, he would send over a stack of research to keep her busy when she got home from the hospital.
Despite several offers from other universities, Prof. COXETER stayed at University of Toronto throughout his career.
Like his father, he was a pacifist. In 1997, he was among those who marched a petition to the university president's office to protest against an honorary degree being conferred on George BUSH Sr. Prof. COXETER recalled with disdain Robert PRITCHARD's telling him, "Donald, I have more important things to worry about."
After his official retirement in 1977, Prof. COXETER continued as a professor emeritus, making weekly visits to his office. These subsided only in the past several months. On the weekend before his death, he finished revisions on his final paper, which he had delivered the previous summer in Budapest.
In his last five years, he survived a heart attack, a broken hip (he sprung himself from the hospital early to drive to a geometry conference in Wisconsin) and, most recently, prostate cancer.
Considering his 96 years of vegetarianism and a strict exercise regime, he felt betrayed by his body. "I feel like the man of Thermopylae who doesn't do anything properly," he commented recently after an awkward evening out, quoting nonsense poet Edward LEAR.
Prof. COXETER died in his home, with three long last breaths, just before bed on the last day of March.
His brain is now undergoing study at McMaster University, along with that of Albert EINSTEIN. Neuroscientist Sandra WITELSON is tryng to determine whether his brain's extraordinary capacities are associated with its structure.
Prof. COXETER met with her at the beginning of March and learned that the atypical elements of Einstein's brain, compared with an average brain, were symmetrical on both right and left sides.
Prof. WITELSON said she wondered whether there might be similar findings with Prof. COXETER's brain. "Isn't that nice," he said. "I suppose that would indicate all my interest in symmetry was well founded."
Prof. COXETER leaves his daughter Susan and son Edgar. His wife died in 1999.
Siobhan ROBERTS is a Toronto writer whose biography of Donald COXETER will be published by Penguin in 2005.

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PRITCHARD o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-11-14 published
McCAULEY, Jack Clark (December 21, 1922 - November 11, 2003.)
After a full and cherished life, Jack McCAULEY died peacefully on Remembrance Day in his 80th year. For 46 years, he was the deeply loved husband of Joan. Jack was the dearly loved father, father-in-law, and grandfather of: Lyn and her children Carmen, Lisa and Sarah; Laurel and her husband Guy PRITCHARD; Patrick and Justine SEGAL and his children Roxanne, Ryan, and Jasmine John; Brian; and Gordon and his wife Catherine and their children Peter, Heather and Jay. His many, many Friends and relatives were very important members of Jack's life.
After graduation from Etobicoke Collegiate and the University of Western Ontario (Kappa Alpha '49), and honourable service to his country as a Lieutenant in the Royal Canadian Navy, Jack enjoyed much success in business through leadership roles with prominent marketing and sales organizations.
More important, however, was the pleasure he ultimately found in his family, and coaching and counseling others. Jack came to appreciate that the essence of community service was the enormous inspiration he received from the simple act of helping others.
Jack left life as he lived it, the source of wisdom and counsel to many, with a warm smile and handshake to all, and always with a funny story to pass along.
In celebration of his life, Jack's family invite all with a happy memory to join them at a reception at St. George's Golf and Country Club, 1668 Islington Avenue, on Monday, November 17, 2003 from 5: 00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m. In lieu of flowers, the family respectfully suggests donations to your favourite charity, and that you be certain today to cherish those you love.

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