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"POW" 2003 Obituary


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POWELL o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-10-14 published
BESWICK, John Alexander, Col. (retired) M.D., C.D., F.R.C.S. (C).
Died in Toronto on Friday, October 10, 2003. Born August 17, 1916, to the late Mr. and Mrs. John Millet BESWICK, fifth generation Torontonion. Beloved husband of 54 years to the late Eileen Enid (REES.) Loving father of Debra Anne McISAAC and Philip Rees BESWICK. Dear ''Papa'' of Ryan Leonard McISAAC. Dear grandfather of Jeremy John. Predeceased by his sister Marion A. GILBERT and brother William E. BESWICK. Uncle of Barbara A. REES, Thunder Bay, and many nephews and nieces. Cousin of Wayne, Margo, June, Michael and of Martha POWELL, Peterborough. Remembered and respected by many colleagues, patients and good Friends. Served overseas 5½ years with the R.C.E. and Korea for 1½ years. Former chief of Ophthalmology of Canadian Forces Hospital, Kingston; National Defence Medical Center, Ottawa; then Chief of Ophthalmology at Scarborough Centenary Hospital, West Hill for 14 years. Dr. BESWICK took a very active part in the promotion of the Eye Bank in the early 50's and 60's at Sunnybrook Hospital, Scarborough Centenary, and other Toronto Hospitals providing a steady flow of donated eyes for transplants and research. Resident of Sunnybrook Hospital. The family would like to extend a heartfelt thanks to the staff of Sunnybrook ''K'' Wing for the dedicated and compassionate care given to ''Dad'' while he resided there. He was a remarkable man whose strength of character and gentle nature will be sadly missed by everyone. Cremation followed by interment at St. James Cemetery in the plot owned by the BESWICK family since 1874.

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POWELL o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-20 published
MEAKES, Elizabeth Joyce ''Betty'' (née POWELL)
Betty died suddenly at home in the evening on Thursday, December 18th, 2003. Betty was born in Liverpool, England and was the daughter of Evan and Alice POWELL. She was predeceased by her husband, J.R. MEAKES, former publisher of the Sudbury Star. She was also predeceased by her good friend of many years, Michael DUDOWICH. Betty was a special Aunt and like a mother to Nephew Michael MEAKES as well as Great Aunt to Meredith. Dear cousin of Joyce APPLETON and Elsi GORDON from England. After graduating from the Royal Conservatory of Music in her mid teens, Betty pursued a career in journalism. She was a long-time columnist at the Sudbury Star. Betty was a great supporter of arts and culture in the Sudbury area. She keenly followed politics at all levels of government and attended regular press events over the years. Many a person can share a story about meeting Betty and experiencing her clever sense of humour. She was a truly generous person and assisted many charities. Betty will be missed by her 'extended family' of Friends inside and outside of the Sudbury region. Resting at the Jackson and Barnard Funeral Home, 233 Larch Street, Sudbury. Funeral Mass in Christ the King Church, 30 Beech Street, Sudbury, Monday, December 22nd, 2003 at 10 a.m. Interment in the Parklawn Cemetery. Prayers 3 p.m. Sunday. Donations to 2nd Floor Acute Care Unit, St. Joseph's Health Centre would be appreciated. Friends may call 2 to 5 and 7 to 9 p.m. Sunday.

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POWER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-30 published
MELANSON, Mary Bernadine (née POWER)
Deen died peacefully at home surrounded by her family on December 28, after a wonderful Christmas. Born in Bathurst, New Brunswick on May 16, 1924, and married in May of 1948 to Gerard Joseph MELANSON (deceased 1994,) she is survived by her sister Maura POWER, her sons James (Rebecca) and Ian (Clodagh REEVES) and her loving grandchildren Eric, Owen, Patrick, and Kate. Deen was a dedicated wife, mother, and grandmother. A graduate of Mount St. Vincent College in Halifax in 1945, she also found great satisfaction in being a teacher of home economics. She was a longstanding member of the Catholic Women's League, and active in St. Gregory's parish in Islington since 1962. She will be missed by her family and her many wonderful Friends who were a source of great strength to her. A Funeral Mass will be held at St. Gregory's Church, 122 Rathburn Road, Islington, Ontario, on Wednesday, December 31 at 10 a.m., followed by a reception in the parish hall, and interment at Assumption Cemetery.

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POWERS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-05-06 published
Ken POWERS
By Leslie POWERS Thursday, May 8, 2003 - Page A22
Artist, banker, bird watcher, traveller, amateur archaeologist. Born February 4, 1925 in Ottawa. Died June 17, 2002, in Oakville, Ontario, of cancer, aged 77.
Two things usually struck people when they first met Ken: He had a way of finding something remarkable about you and passed along his observation with sincerity and a grand sense of humour, and he was a constant source of information. Ken could tell you in great detail all about the unusual bird nestled in the tree or the areas of Nova Scotia where the Mi'kmaq people settled. He was inspirational, yet humble enough to be inspired.
Ken was born in Ottawa to a single mother but was raised by his strict Irish grandparents. Barely 17 years old when the Second World War broke out, Ken, determined to serve his country, enlisted. He became a member of the Royal Air Force's 12th squadron, stationed in Lincoln, England. Remarkably, Ken made it back from every one of his 32 missions.
Prior to the war, Ken had no ambitions for higher education or a career. Upon returning to Ottawa, he had a new sense of purpose and direction and immediately enrolled in Carleton College. He later entered the college's undergraduate commerce program before completing his degree (with Honours) at Queen's University.
Shortly after graduating, Ken was hired by the Industrial Development Bank (now the Business Development Bank of Canada) and began a career that took him, his wife and two children to Winnipeg, Montreal, Halifax and Oakville. During his tenure at the bank, Ken also spent time in Ghana, Africa, teaching commerce.
Ken's wife Joan was his soulmate and constant companion. The couple met in 1954 after a performance of Swan Lake by the Royal Winnipeg Ballet. Joan was a ballerina with the Royal Winnipeg and Ken was introduced to her following a performance one spring evening. Married after nine months of courtship, Ken would often remark on how lucky he was to have met his "darling Joani."
While living in Halifax, Ken started taking art classes. Ken had always drawn, but the art classes uncovered a unique talent. Art became a focal point in Ken's life. Friends would often receive a painting to commemorate a special event. Incredibly well-versed in art and artists, Ken became an aficionado and collector of Canadian art. When living in Winnipeg, he made a special point of contacting the primitive painter, Jan WYERS. Ken befriended Mr. WYERS and corresponded with him for years. While living in Halifax, Ken contacted Nova Scotian painter Maud LEWIS, and made several trips to her tiny house in the country where everyone would gather round the wood-burning stove, discussing her art over a cup of tea.
Ken's other interests included bird watching -- a passion born out of a chance childhood meeting with Canadian ornithologist P.A. TAVERNER. Ken also liked archeology: his archeological digs took him across Canada and to the Badlands in the United States. When Ken invited Friends and their children on his archaeological digs he would often strategically place arrowheads around the site so the children would find them.
In 1980, Ken retired from the bank to pursue his many avocations. For the next 20 years, Ken and his wife travelled extensively. The places he visited became inspiration for his artwork and his paintings often portrayed images from distant lands or those closer to home, such as snow-laden pine trees in Algonquin Park or decaying totem poles on the Queen Charlotte Islands.
Shortly before his death, a close friend remarked that Ken operated the way people are supposed to be living their lives: with passion and with joy.
Leslie POWERS is Ken's daughter.

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POWERS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-27 published
ACTON, Colin
Peacefully, at Grand River Hospital, Kitchener, Ontario on Monday, December 8, 2003. Born in Brighton, England, in 1925, Colin was in active service with the British Army in France and Germany in World War 2. After the war he went to sea with Cunard Lines. He worked his way up to Staff Purser on the Queen Elizabeth and, in that role, met his future wife, Cathie WEBB, a Toronto-born Canadian traveling to Europe on Cunard Lines. After the birth of their first child they emigrated to Canada where Colin started at the bottom again as a clerk at Canada Life. He retired in 1989 as a Vice-President; quite an accomplishment on a Grade 8 education. Throughout his life, Colin was an avid reader and a prolific writer, earning extra money for his short stories and articles published in newspapers and magazines. He fully embraced the computer age, acquiring one of the first 10 Macintosh computers in Canada. Prior to retirement, Colin moved to St. Catharines where he was active in the community until disabled by Alzheimer's. He lived most recently at Leisureworld in Elmira, Ontario. Colin will be missed by his children: Janet and her husband Neil KENNEDY of Elmira, Lee ACTON and his wife Cindy of Seattle, Craig ACTON of Toronto and Maria POWERS, also of Seattle, Washington. He leaves grandchildren Kate, Thomas, Colin, Julia and Brittany. His wife, Cathie, died on June 30, 2003. Cremation has taken place. A memorial service and interment will be held in May 2004 at Little Lake Cemetery in Peterborough, Ontario. In lieu of flowers, donations to The Alzheimer Society of Canada (www.alzheimer.ca) or the Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada (www.HeartAndStroke.ca) would be greatly appreciated by the family. Stories and memories about Colin may be shared with his family by email at Colin_Acton@hotmail.com

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POWLESS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-05-27 published
POWLESS, Alex Ross September 29, 1926 - May 26, 2003.
Peacefully, surrounded by his loving family, at the Willett Hospital, in Paris, Ontario, at 5: 00 a.m., on Monday, May 26, 2003, Alex Ross POWLESS, in his 77th year, went to meet his creator after several months of illness. Ross was born in Ohsweken on the Six Nations Reserve on September 29, 1926. Ross was a devoted husband and loving father and was married to Margaret Wilma POWLESS (nee BOMBERRY) for 55 years. Together they raised 14 children, 27 grandchildren and 7 great grandchildren. Ross was predeceased by his sons: Victor in 1955, Gaylord in 2001 and Gregory in 2002, his parents: Chauncey and Jessie, and his siblings: Mary Ella and Alice Maracle, Amy and Maude Martin, and Raymond and Jean Powless.
Ross is survived by his loving wife Margaret Wilma POWLESS (nee BOMBERRY) and sister Vernice Maizie JONATHAN, and his children, including daughter in law Patti, Gail (Mark AYRES,) Gary, Audrey (Jim BOMBERRY), Harry, Arlene (Dan MARTIN), Richard (Effie PANOUSOS), Darryl (Naansii JAMIESON,) Karen (Jerry MARTIN,) Tony (Cheryle GIBSON,) Jeffery, and Jacqui baby (Ron LYNES.) Ross is a cherished uncle to many nieces and nephews.
Ross had a passion for hunting and also loved fishing, pool and playing cards. He demonstrated his love for his grandchildren in many ways. He's fondly remembered for making up nicknames for them. Ross' sense of humour and storytelling was renowned and he was often asked to speak at public functions because of it.
Ross POWLESS distinguished himself in lacrosse both as a player and a coach. He was a member of the Ontario and Canadian Lacrosse Hall of Fame and won four Mann Cups (Canadian Lacrosse Championships) with the Peterborough Timbermen from 1951 to 1954, including an Most Valuable Player award in 1953. Ross coached the Brantford Warriors to the Canadian Senior B Championship in 1968 and the Rochester Chiefs to a Can-Am Lacrosse League Championship in 1969. In 1974, Ross coached six of his sons on the Ontario First Nations Team, which captured the All Indian Nations Championship Cup.
The family will honour his life with a visitation at Styres Funeral Home, Ohsweken after 7 p.m. Tuesday, May 27. Evening prayers 7 p.m. Wednesday, May 28 where Funeral Service will be held in the chapel on Thursday, May 29, 2003 at 2 p.m. Interment: St. Paul's Anglican Cemetery, Sour Springs Road. Memorial donations to the Canadian Diabetes Association, the Iroquois Lodge or the Canadian Cancer Society can be made in lieu of flowers.

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POWLESS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-05-28 published
Lacrosse star lauded as top Indian athlete
Wednesday, May 28, 2003 - Page R7
Brantford, Ontario -- Six Nations lacrosse legend Ross POWLESS, a member of the Canadian and Ontario lacrosse halls of fame, died Monday. He was 76.
Born in Ohsweken, Ontario, Mr. POWLESS played on four Mann Cup winning teams in the early 1950s. He won the most valuable player award in 1953 and twice won the Tom Longboat Award as the top Indian athlete in Canada.
After he retired, Mr. POWLESS went on to coach the Brantford Warriors to the Canadian Senior B Championship in 1968 and a year later led the Rochester Chiefs to the Can-Am Lacrosse League title. He also coached six of his sons -- Gaylord, Gary, Greg, Harry, Richard and Darryl -- on the Ontario First Nations team that captured the All Indian Nations Championship Cup in 1974.
Canadian Press

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POWLESS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-06-28 published
Lacrosse champ endured racism
Legendary player was subjected to slurs, but he didn't respond. 'It's because you were beating them they were saying it'
By Carol COOPER Special to The Globe and Mail Saturday, June 28, 2003 - Page F9
Before every Brantford Warriors lacrosse game in 1971, Ross POWLESS, the team's former player and coach, a member of the Canadian, and later, the Ontario lacrosse halls of fame, crossed the floor to speak with coach Morley KELLS.
As they chatted, Mr. POWLESS wagged his finger at Mr. KELLS, now an Ontario Member of Provincial Parliament. To the spectators above, it looked as if he were advising the coach on the upcoming game.
"I kind of laughed, because I knew what was taking place," Mr. KELLS said. "You could always see them up in the stands nodding, thinking, 'Ross has things straightened out.' I didn't mind a bit."
Known for his sense of humour as well as his playing and coaching, Mr. POWLESS died recently at the age of 76.
From 1945 to 1961, he played intermediate and senior level lacrosse in British Columbia, New York State and Southern Ontario, scoring 294 goals and 338 assists during his Senior A career. He contributed to three Mann Cup wins, lacrosse's national championship, for the Peterborough Timbermen from 1951 to 1953.
During the 1953 Cup finals, Mr. POWLESS won the Mike Kelly Award as the most valuable player of the series. Also, he was twice given the Tom Longboat Award as the top Indian athlete in Canada.
Born a Mohawk on the Six Nations Reserve of the Grand River Territory in Southwestern Ontario, Mr. POWLESS came from a family of talented players. One of his grandfathers, his father and several uncles played on Six Nations teams or with the travelling Mohawk Stars, according to lacrosse historian Stan SHILLINGTON.
And Mr. POWLESS was patriarch to another. Four of his sons played Senior A lacrosse. One of them, Gaylord, joined him in the Canadian Lacrosse Hall of Fame in 1990, making them the only father and son pair in the hall.
Ross POWLESS played what his people call "the game the Creator gave us" with skill and ease.
"He was a great, great player," said close friend and former teammate Roger SMITH, also a member of the Canadian and Ontario lacrosse halls of fame. "He could do it all. He could play defence, offence. He scored a lot of goals, he was a great team player, a great checker, a good corner player, a good loose-ball man. He was one of the best."
A large man, standing above six feet and weighing more than 200 pounds, Mr. POWLESS played an especially strong defensive game. "He wasn't fast, but he knew where to cut you off at the pass," said Mr. KELLS, who played against him.
"Ross's attitude was that sooner or later you had to show up heading for the net, so he would be there waiting for you. If anyone had a natural understanding of how the flow of the game should be and how to control it, it was him."
Mr. POWLESS played with handmade hickory sticks, disdaining the later mass-produced plastic sticks as "Tupperware."
A gifted coach who got the best out of his players, he led many teams to divisional and national championships. One of his prouder moments came when he coached six of his sons, including Gaylord, on the 1974 Ontario First Nations Team. The team won the All-Indian Nations Lacrosse Tournament in B.C.
Born on September 29, 1926, in the log cabin his carpenter father built in Ohsweken, Ontario, Alex Ross POWLESS was one of eight children. Although the family lived without running water or hydro, he later told his children that he never felt poor because there was always food on the table.
After his mother died in 1932, Mr. POWLESS attended residential school in nearby Brantford until Grade 8 and then high school for one year. In 1945, at the age of 18, he headed to Vancouver to play on Andy PAULL's Senior North Shore Indians team.
For the next five years, Mr. POWLESS played for intermediate teams in Buffalo, Brantford and Huntsville, Ontario, taking seasonal jobs to support himself. In 1951, he joined the Senior A Peterborough Timbermen.
By 1954, Mr. POWLESS and his wife Wilma, whom he married in 1948, had moved their growing family, which would eventually number 14, back to the family homestead in Ohsweken. There, they lived without electricity until 1957 and without running water until a new house was built in 1970.
Mr. POWLESS continued playing Senior A lacrosse for Hamilton and St. Catharines, and as a pickup player for the Timbermen in the 1956 Mann Cup finals, then moved to Senior B and intermediate teams until he retired from playing in 1961.
Lacrosse was important to a lot of people, but it was extra important to him, Mr. POWLESS told Canadian Broadcasting Corporation Radio in January.
Richard POWLESS, another son from the 1974 team, said: "It opened up the world to him. Back in those days, there weren't many Indians playing in the wider world. It got him off the reserve, and he had the talent to go places, and it was recognized."
Often the wider world greeted Mr. POWLESS with racial slurs. The crowd and members of opposing teams called him blanket-ass and wagon-burner and squirted drinks on him.
"You'd get used it, it wouldn't bother you. They wouldn't be saying that if they were beating you. It's because you were beating them they were saying it," Mr. POWLESS told the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation.
Richard POWLESS said, "He didn't react to it, he didn't respond to it, it was just part of the burden he had to carry."
Still, Ross POWLESS credited lacrosse with helping him make white Friends across the country. Some of them stood up for him. Once during tryouts for the Timbermen, he entered a bar in Peterborough with some members of the team. Because he did not have a blue card indicating that he had given up his Indian status, he could not drink legally and was refused service.
The Timbermen left the bar saying, "If he's not good enough, we're not good enough neither," author Donald M. FISHER quotes Mr. POWLESS's recollection in Lacrosse: A History of the Game.
Mr. POWLESS was proud of his heritage and maintained its traditions.
However, he did not teach the Mohawk language to his children. Scarred by his experience in residential school, where he was punished for speaking his mother tongue, he and his wife decided not to pass it on. Instead, he told his children that it was a white man's world, and to live in it successfully, they needed to excel in English.
At times, Mr. POWLESS acted politically. In 1959, a group of Mohawks, including him, tried to reinstate the traditional native government. "He was a firm believer in our own system and our own way of doing things," Richard POWLESS said. "When he believed in something, it wasn't just talk and that's the way he raised us."
Mr. POWLESS had settled into carpentry after his return to Ohsweken in 1954, a trade he practised for the next 30 years.
Earning a reputation as a hard worker, he soon became a foreman and, among other projects, worked on the Burlington Skyway Bridge.
Always an avid hunter, fisherman and pool player, Mr. POWLESS worked as a building inspector on the Six Nations Reserve until his retirement in 1991, served as a band councillor for eight years and helped to start Six Nations minor lacrosse and hockey leagues. In 1997, the Ontario Municipal Recreation Association gave him a volunteer service award.
Like many players, Mr. POWLESS was buried with lacrosse sticks. He had told the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation of his intention, saying, "I want to play with my dad, my sons, my uncles and my nephews."
Mr. POWLESS died on May 26 in Paris, Ontario, of cancer. Sons Victor, Gaylord and Gregory predeceased him. He leaves Wilma, his wife of 55 years, 11 children, 27 grandchildren and seven great-grandchildren.

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POWNALL o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-09-08 published
NESBITT, Andrew Maxwell ''Mac'' (1924- 2003) President of Anderson Bros. Ltd. Veteran of World War 2, Royal Canadian Navy
Surrounded by family, Mac died peacefully at the Kingston General Hospital Friday September 5th, 2003 after a brief illness. Beloved husband of Glenna (POWNALL) NESBITT; dear father of John and his wife Maureen of Calgary; dear grandfather of Glen, Diane and Colleen. Dear brother of William and his wife Irene of Nepean and the late Dorothy WEBB; dear brother-in-law of Evelyn FUDGE and Donald WEBB. Also survived by nieces and nephews. Mac and Glenna's ''expanded family'' also includes Andree and Rejean LEMAY and their children Elyse and Matthieu of Kingston. Mac was born in his grandfathers home at the corner of Princess and Division Street; he attended Victoria Public School then Trinity College School. During World War 2, Mac served in the Royal Canadian Navy on the corvette ''Mordan''. On his return from the war, he helped rebuild the family business, Anderson Bros. Ltd; destroyed by fire that same year. For the next 50 years, Mac successfully operated four businesses from the corner of Division and Princess Street. His volunteer service includes: President of Kingston branch of the School of Convocation of Trinity College School for over 10 years, Governor of Trinity College School, and Board Member of Kingston General Hospital. Mac and Glenna recently celebrated their 50th wedding anniversary in a glorious event attended by family and many close Friends. Mac was known for his sage advice, his fabulous sense of humour and his unending passion for meeting new people and helping his Friends in whatever way he could. Mac will be sorely missed by his family and countless Friends. The family will receive Friends at the Robert J. Reid & Sons Funeral Home, 309 Johnson (at Barrie Street), Kingston, on Monday from 2-4 and 7-9. Funeral service will be held at St. George's Cathedral, King Street East (at Johnson Street), Kingston, on Tuesday, September 9 at 11: 30 a.m. Interment at Cataraqui Cemetery. As expressions of sympathy the family would appreciate memorial donations to Kingston General Hospital Foundation: Intensive Care Research.
Online Guest Book ReidFuneralHome.com (613) 548-7973

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