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"POT" 2003 Obituary


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POTE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-09 published
GILL, Martha Elizabeth (née BARBER)
Formerly of Montreal and King City, Ontario, died peacefully at The Maple Health Centre, on December 7, 2003. Beloved wife of the late Frederick P. (Perc). She will be missed by her many Friends, especially Cathy Goodier POTE and Sally O'Neill LEWIS. Cremation has taken place. Interment in Mount Royal Cemetery, Montreal, Quebec. If desired, memorial donations to the Ontario Humane Society would be appreciated. A celebration of Martha's life will be held at a later date.

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POTTER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-04-10 published
POTTER, Kent Morey
Died suddenly from illness, at home, March 22, 2003, at age 52.
Kent leaves behind family and Friends who loved him, and who will miss his intellect, insight, open-mindedness, and loyalty. Kent's family is his Aunt, Mrs. Kathryn ELLIG (Mrs. George William POTTER,) his cousin Mrs. Darla MILLER (POTTER,) her husband James, their children Erin, Bryan, and Jonathan, and his cousin Robert ISLAND.
In his career as a travel writer and editor, Kent worked for 'The Toronto Star' and Maclean Hunter's 'Canadian Travel Courier'. More recently, Kent worked as a freelance editor.
Cremation has taken place. A memorial service will be held Saturday, April 12, 1 p.m. at St. David's Anglican Church, 49 Donlands Avenue, opposite the Donlands subway station.
Memorial donations may be made to the animal shelter/rescue organization of your choice.

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POTTER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-06-21 published
CARTWRIGHT, Joan Elizabeth
Joan Elizabeth CARTWRIGHT, 65, died on June 12th, after a long and courageous fight with breast cancer, at her daughter's home in East Hardwick, Vermont. Her daughter Deborah and son-in-law Tim were with her at her final breath. Joan was born in Toronto, Ontario, to William Bovell and Mary Elizabeth (POTTER) CARTWRIGHT. She moved to Montreal, Quebec, where she attended McGill University, and then Concordia University, from where she graduated with distinction. After marriage, she raised her family of four children living in Montreal and then again in Toronto. She moved to Wolcott, Vermont in 1992, and bought and renovated an old schoolhouse in the country. Her household consisted of several cats, all of which were orange tigers, and her beloved dog Joey, with whom she spent hours every day walking the back roads, visiting her neighbors, and playing ball. She also kept herself busy by volunteering at local libraries, was an extremely voracious reader and had a wide knowledge of books. She loved her crossword puzzles in the weekend paper, and indeed loved any type of word challenge especially Scrabble! Joan adored her grandchildren, and although she didn't see them often, never missed an opportunity to talk with Friends about them and show off photos. She was an accomplished knitter, and was pleased to give away her beautiful sweaters, dozens of which she donated to local charities. She is survived by her sister, Eleanor HUNT of Ontario; her ex-husband, L. Lamont GORDON of Toronto, Ontario; her children: Katharine GORDON and husband Chuck MITCHELL of Wolcott, Vermont, Deborah and husband Tim HARTT of East Hardwick, Vermont, James GORDON and wife Shannon McQUILLAN of Kamloops, British Columbia, and Pamela GORDON of Toronto, Ontario; her grandchildren, Keaven, Connor, Seamus, Haley, Walker, Sam, Laura and Angus; and several nieces, nephews and cousins. A memorial service will be held on Sunday, June 29th, in Toronto, Ontario. Memorial donations may be made in Joan's name, to The Frontier Animal Society of Vermont, 502 Strawberry Acres Road, Newport, Vermont 05855.

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POTTER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-07-03 published
POTTER, Douglas Briant
died in Toronto on Sunday, June 29, 2003 after a prolonged struggle with Alzheimer's. Douglas is survived by his wife Josephine his son John and partner Mark KENNY; granddaughter Natasha, and her mothers Dr. Andrea NEMETH and Dr. Samantha KNIGHT of Oxford England. He was born in Leeds, England in 1925 to William Clifford POTTER and Francis (NEWTON) POTTER. Predeceased by his brother Jack who died tragically at age of 12. He served in the British Army where he was stationed in Italy. Following his time in the forces he immigrated to Canada in 1950. Douglas married Josephine DAGNALL in 1952, and later went on to found Industrial Process Equipment. We wish to thank the staff at the Laughlen Centre and Fudger House for all their support through Douglas's long illness. The family will have a private Service officiated by the Reverend Jeannie LOUGHREY. In his memory we will be planting a tree in the garden of the house he loved. If desired, donations may be made for Alzheimer Research through the Alzheimer Society of Ontario.

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POTTER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-09-17 published
POTTER, Ralph A., B.A.Sc., P.Eng
On Sunday evening, September 14th, 2003 Ralph died peacefully at Mount Sinai Hospital. Dear son of the late Florence and Raymond POTTER. Beloved father of Karen LADA (Ted) and Grant (Nadine) of Calgary. Loving grandfather of Christopher and Kimberly LADA. Brother of Norma CRAIG (George) and Pauline WRONG of London, Ontario. Fondly remembered by many nieces and nephews. Upon Ralph's wishes, cremation has taken place and a family memorial will be held at a later date. Ralph was a '48 graduate in Mechanical Engineering at the University of Toronto. He spent his professional career in the paper industry. The family wishes to thank all those at the Intensive Care Unit in Mount Sinai Hospital and Pamela and Margaret, his caregivers for their kindnesses to Ralph. Memorial Donations to the Mount Sinai Clinical Care Unit or the Huntsville Humane Society would be greatly appreciated. Arrangements entrusted to The Simple Alternative Funeral Centres, 416-441-1580.

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POTTER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-11-15 published
GENSER, Bonnie
It is with great sadness that we announce the death of our mother, grandmother, and great-grandmother, Bonnie GENSER, who died on Sunday, November 29th, 2003. She died peacefully, without pain, with her family by her side. She was predeceased by her husband Harold GENSER who died in 1980, and her siblings Rebecca JAUVOISH, Lottie BECKMAN, Bessie MELEMADE, David LEVIN, Rosie LEVIN, Esther POLLOCK and Harry LEVIN. She leaves to grieve her death and celebrate her life, three daughters, Naomi COHEN (Jared SABLE,) Toronto, Barbara BUTLER, Winnipeg, Susan STARR (Don STARR), Toronto, London, six grandchildren, 6 great-grandchildren. In addition to her immediate family, she is remembered by her sisters-in-law Esther Genser KAPLAN, Myrna LEVIN, Beverley LEVIN and Marion Vaisley GENSER, and many nieces and nephews.
Bonnie served in a leadership capacity in various areas of the community; president of the Bride's group, National Council of Jewish Women, president of Lillian Frieman Chapter of Hadassah, founder of the Shaarey Zedek Girl Guides, and later as a commissioner of the Manitoba Girl Guides. During her many visits to Israel she served as a volunteer in areas of agriculture, education, archaelogy, and social services.
She lived life to the fullest, and will be remembered for her dynamic personality, wit, charm, generosity, and infectious smile which made everyone feel special.
We wish to thank Vangie, Claire, Amy, and Ruth for their loving care.
Pallbearers were her grand_sons Scott COHEN, Paul RAYBURN, Josh BUTLER, Sheldon POTTER, granddaughters Hally and Misha STARR, and nephews Michael and Daniel LEVIN. Honorary pallbearers were Don STARR, Jared SABLE, Perry RAYBURN, and Mayer LAWEE.
Rabbi Allan GREEN officiated and her granddaughter Leanne POTTER spoke on behalf of the family. Donations in Bonnie's memory may be made to The Bonnie Genser Fund in the Women's Endowment Fund of the Jewish Foundation of Manitoba, C-400-123 Doncaster Street, Winnipeg, Manitoba, R3N 2B2, (204) 477-7525 or www.jewishfoundation.org or the charity of your choice.

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POTTINGER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-06-23 published
GILLESPIE, Harriet Louise (née MORTON)
Died peacefully on June 21, 2003. Harriet was born May 24, 1926 in Glace Bay, Nova Scotia, daughter of Edith L. and W. Douglas MORTON. Devoted wife of John B. GILLESPIE, Q.C., Toronto, for almost 55 wonderful years. Loving mother of Joan (Andrew POTTINGER,) Jill, Jay (Lili HOFSTADER) and Susan (Paul NICHOLAS). Grandmother of Leigh and Drew POTTINGER of W. Vancouver, Ben and Claire SCOTT of Sydney, Australia, Sean and Jackie GILLESPIE of Toronto and Hattie NICHOLAS of Ottawa. Sister of Douglas B. MORTON and Scott MORTON, Nova Scotia. Service will be held on Wednesday, June 25, 2003 at 3 p.m. at St. Leonard's Anglican Church, 25 Wanless Avenue. No visitation is planned. In lieu of flowers, donations in Harriet's memory may be made to either Sunnybrook Hospital or The Canadian Cancer Society.

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POTTS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-05-19 published
POTTS, Jason Gareth Thomas
Born May 13, 1990, died peacefully at home May 17, 2003. Beloved son of Christie Thomas POTTS and Joe POTTS. Dear brother of Trevor, Joanna and the late Gavin. Dear grand_son of Hallie THOMAS and Dawn and Joe POTTS. He will be sadly missed and lovingly remembered by his many aunts, uncles, cousins and Friends. The family wish to thank Dr. Russell GOLDMAN and his team at the Temmy Latner Centre for Palliative Care and the Trinity Hospice for their wonderful care. The family will receive Friends at the Humphrey Funeral Home - A. W. Miles Chapel, 1403 Bayview Avenue (south of Eglinton Avenue East), from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. on Tuesday, May 20. Service at Rosedale United Church (159 Roxborough Drive) on Thursday, May 22 at 2 o'clock, with a reception to follow in the church hall. Donations in Jason's memory may be made to Brainchild, c/o The Hospital for Sick Children, 555 University Avenue, Toronto M5G 1X8

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POTTS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-06-15 published
Radio pioneer built network
He founded Ontario's first French-language radio station in 1951 when his local station denied francophones airtime.
By Randy RAY Special to The Globe and Mail Monday, June 16, 2003 - Page R7
He started in business as a butcher, and later was a soldier and a hotelier, but Conrad LAVIGNE's first love was show business. Whether he was operating the television stations in Northern Ontario that became the largest privately owned television broadcast system in the world, appearing at the staid proceedings of the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission, or at conventions, Mr. LAVIGNE often delighted those within earshot with jokes, stories, witty comments -- even singing.
Like the time he sang grace during the annual meeting of the Association for French Language Broadcasters in the 1970s.
"Members of the head table, including myself and Premier Bill DAVIS, walked into the room and stood behind our chairs," recalls Pierre JUNEAU, chairman of the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission from 1968 to 1975.
"Mr. LAVIGNE, who was chairman of the French-language broadcasters group, began singing grace in French, and with his very strong voice. People felt sort of strange with this."
When he was done, Mr. LAVIGNE looked at Premier DAVIS and quipped: "Well, Mr. Premier, this is to show you that when you are chairman, you can do whatever you like."
J. Lyman POTTS, former vice-president of Standard Broadcasting, remembers the time in the early 1960s when Mr. LAVIGNE appeared before the Board of Broadcast Governors -- predecessor of the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission -- in support of a radio or television station licensing application.
At the beginning of his presentation, Mr. LAVIGNE expressed his regrets that Board of Broadcast Governors member Bernard GOULET had died at few days earlier. Then, without skipping a beat, he looked toward the ceiling and said: "If Bernie were here today, I think he would vote for my application."
"It broke up the room," says Mr. POTTS. "If ever a meeting got dull he'd liven things up. It was a joy to find him at meetings. He was a unique personality."
Mr. LAVIGNE, who was born in the small town of Chénéville, Quebec, on November 2, 1916, and raised in Cochrane, Ontario, died in Timmins, Ontario on April 16 following a lengthy battle with emphysema. He was 86.
Friends, family and business associates say Mr. LAVIGNE had show business in his blood in his late teens. On many evenings, the young man who moved to Timmins from Cochrane at age 18 to open a small grocery store and butcher shop with his uncle would act in plays in the hall of a local church. But he didn't get into the entertainment business in a big way until after he helped Canada's war effort, got married and started his life as an entrepreneur in the hotel business.
In 1942, he sold his butcher shop and enlisted in the Canadian infantry. He became a commando training officer while stationed at Vernon, British Columbia, and in 1944 headed overseas. While on a furlough from Vernon he returned to Timmins and married Jeanne CANIE. The couple raised seven children.
Mr. LAVIGNE returned to Canada in 1946 and bought the Prince George Hotel in Kirkland Lake, Ontario, which at the time was a booming gold-mining town. He sold the business in 1950.
He entered the world of media and entertainment by founding CFCL, the first French-language radio station in Ontario in 1951, in what, essentially, was his way of ensuring the area's large French-speaking population had a voice in the North.
Michelle DE COURVILLE NICOL of Ottawa said her father launched the station after a group of francophones that he was part of in Kirkland Lake was told by the manager of an English-language radio station that they would no longer be given regular air time to discuss issues of interest to French people.
"He was very proud of being a francophone," says Ms. DE COURVILLE NICOL. " When he was told that his compatriots would no longer be welcome on the local station he said, 'Oh, ya!' and got the idea of starting a French-language radio station. He moved to Timmins, applied for a licence and got it."
CFCL soon attracted a faithful audience, especially in Northwestern Quebec, where it could be heard more clearly than French stations in Montreal.
In a 1988 interview with Northern Ontario Business, Mr. LAVIGNE remembered the time he hired a relative unknown named Stompin' Tom CONNORS to perform live on CFCL. The radio station was located above a jewellery store and the pounding from Mr. CONNORS's size-11 boots caused china to fall off the shelves in the store below.
Radio was his first love until the mid-1950s when, on a business trip to southern Ontario, he saw his first television broadcast, on WHAM from Rochester, New York He fell for the concept of television and he and an engineer friend drove to Rochester and learned everything they could about the magic medium of television.
Back in Timmins, Mr. LAVIGNE bought a hill in the north end of the town, named it Mont Sacré-Coeur, built a road to the foot of his hill, and began blasting rock and working in earnest to put a television station on the air. By 1956, CFCL-television was a reality.
"There was always the fear of failure because of the sparse population," Mr. LAVIGNE said at the time. "But we had an engineer with us named Roch DEMERS, who later became president of Telemedia, and together we started putting up rebroadcasting stations between 1957 and 1962."
Kapuskasing's rebroadcasting station was the first such facility in Canada, and it added another portion of the sparsely populated northeastern Ontario market to the growing station's network. Eventually, Mr. LAVIGNE built rebroadcasting stations in Chapleau and Moosonee, Ontario and Malartic, Quebec, and by the time expansion was completed, CFCL-television served 1.5 million people. Eventually, he built the station into the world's largest privately owned system.
For many years he appeared on a very popular CFCL program known as the President's Corner, during which he would sit on camera in a comfortable chair and read and respond to letters from viewers.
Between 1962 and 1970, Mr. LAVIGNE's television network entered the world of high technology with its own microwave network. Mr. LAVIGNE had the northeastern Ontario television market virtually all to himself for about 20 years until the Canadian Television Network (CTV) arrived on the scene. He reacted by building new stations in North Bay and Sudbury with a rebroadcasting station in Elliot Lake to serve Manitoulin Island. Expansion continued in 1976 with the purchase of a bankrupt television station in Pembroke, in the Ottawa Valley. Eventually, Mr. LAVIGNE's private network stretched from Moosonee to Ottawa, and from Hearst to Mattagami, Quebec
"When we first started we had the market all to ourselves," he told Northern Ontario Business. "We had 20 hours a week of local programming, and it was beautiful. We gave the North a unified voice. One time, during a forest fire near Chapleau, our messages arranged for accommodations for 1,000 people in Timmins."
Mr. LAVIGNE divested himself of his broadcasting holdings in 1980, primarily because he was refused permission to operate a cable television service in the North. He remained a director of Mid-Canada Television, the network that grew from his little Timmins station in 1956, and was chairman of the board of Northern Telephone Ltd. For a number of years, he served on the board of the National Bank of Canada, and for 10 years served on the board of ICG Utilities (formerly Inter City Gas.)
His life after broadcasting also included 20 years as a property developer in the Timmins area.
"He was always a physically active person," says Ms. DE COURVILLE NICOL. "In the years he was setting up his television stations he would often go out with the engineers. He was not as happy sitting behind his desk."
Mr. LAVIGNE was elected to the Canadian Broadcasting Hall of Fame in 1990. His wife died in 1995. He leaves Ms. DE COURVILLE NICOL and six other children, Marc, Andrée, Nicole, Jean-Luc, Pierre and Marie-France.

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POTTS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-06-25 published
DINGLE, Lloyd Egerton
It is with great sorrow and sadness that the family announce the passing of Lloyd Egerton DINGLE on Tuesday, June 24, 2003, in his 92nd year. Lloyd died peacefully at York Central Hospital Continuing Care. Predeceased by his mother Marjorie and sisters Marjorie and Ruth. Lloyd had a long distinguished career at Colgate Palmolive and served his country proudly during World War 2 as part of the Royal Canadian Air Force Radar Division. He was an avid outdoorsman and an expert gardener specializing in prize peonies. ''Unc's'' love and devotion to family and generous heart will be lovingly remembered and sadly missed by his niece Nancy M. POTTS, nephew Peter A. BICK and wife Diana Liberty BICK: great nieces and great nephews Marisa, Jennifer, Jesse, Andrew, Kelsey, Paisley and Blayne. Visitation on Thursday, June 26, at the R. S. Kane Funeral Home (6150 Yonge Street at Goulding, south of Steeles) from 1: 30 p.m. with the funeral service to follow at 2: 30 p.m. Interment York Cemetery.
''Forever remembered, Forever missed''
If desired donations in Lloyd's memory may be made to York Central Hospital Continuing Care.

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POTTS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-07-12 published
Moms always liked him best
The Happy Gang's popular lead singer had a good reason for saying hello to his mom whenever the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation radio classic was on air
By James McCREADY Special to The Globe and Mail Saturday, July 12, 2003 - Page F10
The double knock on the door occurred every afternoon at 1.
"Who's there?"
"It's the Happy Gang."
"Well, come on in!"
Then Eddie ALLEN, Bert PEARL, Bobby GIMBY and the rest of the cast of Canada's most popular radio program would break into "Keep happy with the Happy Gang."
Mr. ALLAN, the show's main singer, accordion player and sometimes emcee, died last week, leaving Robert FARNON as the gang's sole surviving member.
Every day as many as two million Canadians tuned in The Happy Gang, which led the national ratings for most of its run on Canadian Broadcasting Corporation from 1937 to 1959. Until television came along in 1952, Mr. ALLEN and his cast mates were among the most famous people in the country.
The show was the creation of Mr. PEARL, who'd come to Toronto from Winnipeg (his real name was Bert SHAPIRA) to study medicine. To pay for his education, he started playing piano on radio with a band that included violinist Blain MATHE, organist Kay STOKES and Mr. FARNON, a trumpet player who would go on to be the most successful of them all.
The band morphed into the Happy Gang and Mr. PEARL was the driving force behind it. Eddie ALLEN was hired as the fifth member of the troupe and stayed with the program until it went off the air.
He was born Edward George ALLEN on December 24, 1920, in Toronto, and came from a family of musicians. His father, Bill ALLEN, played the trombone and was in a military band in France during the First World War. When Eddie was 10, his father asked him what instrument he wanted to play. The boy thought about it for a while and made up his mind after seeing a huge piano accordion in a music-store window.
"It was bigger than I was," Mr. ALLEN remembered, "but dad bought it anyway."
In a couple of years, he was entertaining at small events with his accordion, making $5 or $10 a week. Better than a paper route. He also won some local singing contests. When he was 17, he started singing and playing three nights a week on a radio program called The Serenader. Bert PEARL heard it and called him in.
"I auditioned him with Bert PEARL, and we liked him right away," Mr. FARNON says from his home on Guernsey in the Channel Islands. "He looked about 12 years old and could barely see over the top of his accordion. He was terribly shy, no self-confidence like the rest of us. He was very popular with the ladies, a very good-looking little chap."
What impressed most was his voice. "There really wasn't a singer in the Happy Gang until he came along. I really liked his voice."
Mr. FARNON remembers an incident from a Happy Gang rehearsal. "Eddie was about to sing a song called, I'll Take You Home Again, Kathleen, and I came up behind him and said, 'If you bring the gasoline.' He laughed so much he couldn't sing it when we went on the air."
The Happy Gang was old Canada, when the country was more rural and white skinned. It is impossible to imagine the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation mounting something so corny and wholesome. How corny was it? The host, Mr. PEARL, was known as "that slap-happy chappy, the Happy Gang's own pappy."
He also knew that sentiment sold. Mr. ALLEN would sing The Lord's Prayer on the program, two or three times a year, such as Good Friday, and during the war he sang it as an inspiration for mothers and their boys overseas.
By that time, the show's "appeal was enormous," wrote Ross MacLEAN, the late Canadian Broadcasting Corporation producer and media critic who began listening as a child. "During the war years... its influence on the nation was profound. Its almost daily performance of There'll Always Be An England helped maintain home-front resolve and stirred at least this school kid into a frenzy of tinfoil collection, war certificate sales and the knitting of various items for the navy."
Among the cast, Mr. ALLEN was the kid. He was slight, about 5-foot-6, and looked as though he were too young to shave. A newspaper reported that while he was on his honeymoon in 1942, a hotel clerk in Hamilton didn't believe he was old enough to be married and refused to rent him a room. Even some of his fans were quoted by writer Trent FRAYNE as saying, "Oh my goodness, don't tell me that little boy's married."
On air, he always sang old-fashioned ballads. "Every mother would love the stuff he sang," said Lyman POTTS, a retired broadcaster who crossed paths with some of the gang. He recalled that one of the songs Mr. ALLEN performed on a Happy Gang recording was I'm a Lonely Little Petunia in an Onion Patch. It was popular on the program, maybe because it was the perfect example of the Happy Gang's sort of cornball humour.
Another example is the line Mr. ALLEN used almost every day in the early years of the program. Mr. PEARL had told him not to let fame go to his head -- "Don't ever get the idea that you're too big to say hello to your mother." So, for his first six years, Mr. ALLEN's opening words were "Hello mom."
During the war, they dropped the shtick for fear of hurting the feelings of mothers with sons in uniform. It sparked a letter-writing campaign. "Don't let Eddie stop saying 'Hello mom,' " Liberty Magazine reported in May, 1945. "He reminds me of my own boy overseas. I wonder if he could think of all of us mothers when he says hello."
Over the years, the show appeared 195 times, always live (tape had yet to come into use when it began), in the course of an annual 39-week season, most of the time with the same cast. Its time slot was moved when the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation began running a 1 p.m. newscast, but the shift to 1: 15 EST didn't hurt the ratings. At first, it was produced in a studio on Davenport Road in Toronto and later in front of an audience of 700 to 800 on McGill Street near College and Yonge.
The program's mainstay was not talk or jokes but music, and the signature double knock on the door was an old-fashioned radio sound effect provided by Blain MATHE, who would move up to the mike and rap twice on the back of his violin.
Working together so closely did create some personality conflicts. There were practical jokes, usually aimed at the most uptight cast member: Mr. PEARL, a control freak who loved to plan the program in detail and had his own small office at the McGill Street studio.
One day, Mr. ALLEN and the other Happy Gang members set all the clocks forward by a few minutes. "We're late," they announced to Mr. PEARL, who raced into studio. After the opening, a couple of performers started to whine: "I don't want to do this."
Thinking they were actually on air, Mr. PEARL was shocked -- and didn't feel much better when he learned it was all a joke. It might have been one of the reasons he suffered a nervous breakdown (called "nervous exhaustion" for public consumption) and left the show in 1950 after 18 years and moved to the United States.
Eddie ALLEN took his place as emcee, but the incident rated an article in Maclean's by June CALLWOOD, the country's top magazine writer at the time, entitled: The Not So Happy Gang.
By then Mr. FARNON was long gone. During the war, he had joined the Canadian Army Show's band, and later led the Canadian band with the Allied Expeditionary Force, just as Glen MILLER led its U.S. ensemble. After the war he became a top arranger, working on Frank Sinatra albums and scores for such movies as Horatio Hornblower starring Gregory Peck.
Sinatra, however, was a little too flash for Eddie ALLEN, who preferred Bing Crosby. He was a sharp dresser, but his style was understated, almost always a conservative suit and muted shirt in a business where the shirt easily could have been orange.
His love of clothes gave him something to do when he left show business. Eddie ALLEN owned a men's clothing store in the west end of Toronto after he left the program. He later retired and moved to London, Ontario

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