All Categories: A B C D E F G H I J K L M Mc N O P Q R S T U V W Y Z Welcome Home
Local Folders.. A B C D E F G H I J K L M Mc N O P Q R S T U V W Y Z
-1 +1

"PIC" 2003 Obituary


PICARD  PICK  PICKARD  PICKEN  PICKERING  PICKERSGILL  PICKETT 

PICARD o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-10-03 published
MEANY, Patrick Donal Anthony
Patrick was born on June 10, 1923 in Stoney Mountain, Manitoba. He died at age 80 at Trillium Hospital in Mississauga on October 2, 2003, after a determined struggle with illness.
Patrick grew up in Ireland. As a youth he attended the same two-room school that had been attended by his father, grandfather and great-grandfather. He served as an officer (rank of Captain) in the Irish Army Permanent Defence Force from 1944 to 1956. He was a book editor and director of MacMillan Company of Canada Ltd., and ran his own scholarly book publishing and distribution business for over 30 years. He served as a trustee of the Dufferin-Peel Catholic District School Board for 24 years, beginning in 1971, and was chairman of the Board for five terms. He was president of the Ontario School Trustees' Council, Ontario Catholic School Trustees' Association and Director of the Canadian Catholic School Trustees' Association. He also served on the boards of the Institute of Catholic Education and the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education. In addition, he served as chair of the Peel Drinking and Driving Committee and vice-chair of the Mississauga Traffic Safety Council, as well as many other public service committees and task forces.
Patrick will be greatly missed by his wife, Kathleen MEANY (nee QUIRKE;) his sister, Margaret; his children, Mary PICARD (Robert,) John MEANY, Anne BERRY (Lionel,) Daniel MEANY (Robin,) James MEANY, Paul MEANY (Diana) and William MEANY; and his grandchildren, Helen, David, Katharine, Cameron, Michael, Grace, Natalie and Elizabeth.
Visitations will be at Scott Funeral Home, 420 Dundas Street East (one block west of Cawthra), Mississauga 905-272-4040, on Saturday from 6 to 9 p.m.; and on Sunday from 2 to 4 p.m. and from 7 to 9 p.m. A funeral mass will be held at Saint Dominic's Roman Catholic Church, 625 Atwater Avenue (at Cawthra), Mississauga, at 10 a.m. on Monday, October 6th. In lieu of flowers, donations can be made to ShareLife, 155 Yonge Street, Toronto, Ontario M4T 1W2.

  P... Names     PI... Names     PIC... Names     Welcome Home

PICARD - All Categories in OGSPI

PICK o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-08-30 published
PICK, Archibald Roy (Archie)
After a long courageous battle with pancreatic cancer, Archie PICK died peacefully on August 23, 2003. His wife, Jeannie, was at his side.
Archie was born August 18, 1938, in a log cabin in Red Lake, Ontario. He moved to Winnipeg with his parents in 1941. He attended public schools in Winnipeg, Rathwell and Notre Dame de Lourdes, Manitoba.
He was preceded in death by his first wife, Marcia, brother, Leonard, sister, Barbara and father William. Archie is survived by his loving wife, Jeannie, his mother Mary, son David (Christine McCREADY,) daughters: Kirsten Ann GAUCHER (John) and Jennifer Marie SANCHEZ (Christopher) and grand_son Jacob GAUCHER. Archie was very proud of his family and loved them all dearly.
Archie attended the University of Manitoba and the University of North Dakota. He received his B.S. in Civil Engineering (1962) and M.S. in Civil Engineering (1966). Archie started his professional career with the Structural Division of Manitoba Hydro in 1962, and after receiving his Master's degree in 1966, he joined the Metropolitan Corporation in Greater Winnipeg (City of Winnipeg) in the Waterworks and Waste Division. In 1973, Archie moved with his family to Edmonton to join the newly formed Environment Canada as head of Water Pollution Control for the Western Region (Manitoba, Saskatchewan, Alberta, Northwest Territories). In 1976, he was appointed Chief, Environmental Conservation Branch, Western Region, Environment Canada. Subsequently, he left Public Service and joined the consulting engineering firm of James F. MacLaren Limited as General Manager of Western Canadian Operations (Alberta, Saskatchewan, Northwest Territories, Yukon). One of the highlights of this position was acting as Project Manager for the clean-up and recovery of the Russian Cosmos satellite which crashed in the Northwest Territory in the region of Great Slave Lake. In 1980, Archie became the Executive Vice President of MacLaren Plansearch, division of Lavalin. In 1982, he joined Interprovincial Pipe Line Limited (Enbridge, Inc.) and was appointed as Manager, Design and Construction, for the Norman Wells Pipeline Project, drawing on his experience in the north, engineering, and environment. The successful completion of this project was clearly the highlight of his career. His career at Interprovincial Pipe Line involved him in the company's endeavours in Canada, U.S.A., Mexico, Venezuela and Ecuador. He retired in 1998 as a result of health concerns.
At various times, Archie taught as a part time professor in the faculty of Engineering at the University of Manitoba and the University of Alberta. During his working career, he had been registered as a Professional Engineer in Manitoba, Saskatchewan, Alberta and the Northwest Territory. He was a Life Member of the Association of Professional Engineers, Geologists, and Geophysicists.
Archie, along with Marcia and his children, was an avid skier and was involved with Alpine Ski Racing throughout most of his adult life. He was a Life Member of the Edmonton Snow Valley Ski Club; a senior official of the Alberta Alpine Division of the Canadian Ski Association; served as North Zone Chairman for Canadian Ski Association-Alpine Division; was a long time member of the Edmonton Superbowl Ski team.
Archie and Jeannie were married in 1993 and lived in Edmonton until Archie's retirement in 1998. Since then they have divided their time between their cottage at Clear Lake and their home on Vancouver Island, enjoying family, Friends, and time together.
A bright, shining, steady light has gone from our lives, but will remain in our hearts forever. A memorial service was conducted in Erickson, Manitoba and another memorial service will be held on Sunday, October 19, 2003, at 2: 00 p.m. in the Knox United Church, Parksville, British Columbia.
In lieu of flowers, memoriam to Canadian Diabetes Association, Heart and Stroke Foundation or Cancer Research.
Rae's Funeral Service of Erickson, Manitoba, were in care of the arrangements. (204) 636-7727.

  P... Names     PI... Names     PIC... Names     Welcome Home

PICK - All Categories in OGSPI

PICKARD o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-02-05 published
George Eli Amos PICKARD
February 12, 1921 - January 30, 2003
George PICKARD, a resident of Gore Bay, died at the Mindemoya Hospital on Thursday, January 30, 2003 at the age of 81 years. He was born at Ice Lake, son of the late Robert and Elizabeth BRANDOW) PICKARD. George had worked for 7 years at INCO, then returned home and farmed for 46 years, retiring to Gore Bay in 1989. He was a member of the United Church, and had many interests including gardening, fishing, and doing crossword puzzles. His greatest love was his family. He thoroughly enjoyed spending time with all his family, especially his grandchildren and great grandchildren. he was a kind and caring husband, father, grandfather and great grandfather, and will be sadly missed, but many memories will be cherished. Dearly loved husband of Margaret (McARTHUR) PICKARD of Gore Bay. Loved and loving father and father-in-law of Ken and Carol PICKARD of Espanola, Sheila and Joe BRANDOW of Ice Lake and Marilyn PRIOR and friend Hector of Ice Lake. Proud grandfather of Mike and Kendal, Wendy and Steven, Patti and Maurice, Jason, Diane and Oliver, Connie and Chadwick and Sherry and great grandchildren Kyle, Matthew, Carly, Shelby and Christian. Dear brother of Alvin PICKARD of Silver Water and Elizabeth ROBERTSON of Gore Bay. Also survived by many nieces and nephews. Predeceased by sister Laura and brothers Robert, Norman, Earl, John and Cecil.
Friends called the Culgin Funeral Home after 7: 00 pm on Friday. The funeral service was conducted in the Wm. G. Turner Chapel on Saturday, February 1, 2003 at 11: 00 am with Geraldine BOULD officiating. Spring interment in Gordon cemetery.

  P... Names     PI... Names     PIC... Names     Welcome Home

PICKARD - All Categories in OGSPI

PICKEN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-02-19 published
SMITH, Margaret Blakely (née BURNS)
Died peacefully at the Scarborough Hospital, Grace Division, of cancer, on February 16, 2003. Daughter of Charles BURNS and Sara Margaret BLAKELY. Sister of Katharine Steele (BURNS, YOUNG) PICKEN. Beloved wife of James Edwin (Ted) SMITH and a wonderful mother to Katharine Blakely SMITH and James Charles SMITH (Cheryl.) Grandmother of Althea ALISON and Michelle Meagan SMITH, and ''Grandma'' to Robin MILLER and Ciera and Ryan GAUTREAU. Born in Ottawa, she was a graduate of Glebe Collegiate and Queen's University where she was a member of the Senior Ladies hockey and basketball teams. For five years she enjoyed teaching high school in Manotick until her marriage to Ted in 1948. The family moved from Ottawa to Toronto in 1963. A memorial service will be held at the Trinity Presbyterian Church, 2737 Bayview Avenue (south of Hwy. 401), on Saturday, February 22, 2003 at 11: 00 a.m. Spring interment of cremated remains will be held in Norway Bay, Quebec. If you wish, in lieu of flowers, please consider a donation to the Trinity Memorial Fund, 2737 Bayview Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M2L 1C5.

  P... Names     PI... Names     PIC... Names     Welcome Home

PICKEN - All Categories in OGSPI

PICKERING o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-09-24 published
McDONALD, Gordon Alexander (a Founder and President of Guelph Twines)
Died of cancer at the Freeport Health Centre, Kitchener, on Monday, September 22, 2003. Gordon Alexander McDONALD, aged 70 years, was the beloved husband of Marilyn (née PICKERING) McDONALD of Guelph. He was the loving father of Lori and her husband David THOMAS of Calgary, Alberta, Mark McDONALD and his wife Susan WAHLROTH, and Paul McDONALD, all of Guelph. Gordon was the proud grandfather of Robyn, Brynlee, Duncan, Chelsea, and Jack. He was the dear brother of Pat MILLER, Bruce McDONALD, and Judy JACKETT.
Private cremation has taken place. The family will receive Friends at Gilbert MacIntyre and son Funeral Home and Chapel, 252 Dublin St. N., Guelph, on Friday, October 3, 2003 from 7-9 p.m. A Memorial Service will take place in the chapel on Saturday, October 4, 2003 at 11 a.m. As expressions of sympathy, donations to a charity of one's choice would be appreciated by the family (cards available at the funeral home (519-822-4731) or email info@gilbertmacintyreandson.com

  P... Names     PI... Names     PIC... Names     Welcome Home

PICKERING - All Categories in OGSPI

PICKERSGILL o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-11 published
GELBER, Sylva Malka, OC, LL.D.
93 years old, Sylva Malka GELBER, whose years of activism in pre-Israel Palestine eventually propelled her to be the first director of the Canadian Department of Labour's Women's Bureau, died on December 9th, 2003, of complications from a stroke. She was 93 and lived in Ottawa.
During the heady years of pioneering in gains for women's rights and Medicare in Canada during the 1960s and 70s, she travelled the country, never shrill and always reasoned in her campaign for equality for women in the country's labour force. She took this pragmatic approach to the United Nations where she represented Canada on the United Nations Commission for the Status of Women between 1970 - 74.
A social and industrial activist at heart, she never lost her zest for a good argument on those issues which had been part of her adult life since she left her comfortable Toronto home in the early 1930s for the turmoil of Jerusalem and Palestine. There she became the first graduate of the Va'ad Leumi School of Social Work - now the Faculty of Social Work of the Hebrew University - and took on jobs incongruous with her upbringing which had included schooling at Havergal College, a private girl's school.
She worked in Palestine during the Mandate as a family counsellor, a probation officer and medical social worker at Hadassah Hospital, and then with the Palestine Department of Labour from 1942 - 48 when she returned to Canada. The adventuresome 15 years Sylva GELBER lived in the turmoil of Palestine are chronicled with affection, awe and frankness in ''No Balm in Gilead: A Personal Retrospective of Mandate Days in Palestine'' published in 1989. By the time she moved back to Canada, she could switch effortlessly among Hebrew and Arabic and English which impressed no one in bureaucratic Ottawa, but did startle the Capital's stuffy side, she often noted mischievously.
Her deep red lipstick and nail polish when paired with her fast sports cars belied the image of the traditional Ottawa civil servant she could never be, despite distinguished and proud accomplishments in promoting federal health insurance and Medicare until they became the law of the land.
Along the way, she accepted many appointments to serve Canada at International Labour Organization conferences, the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development and the United Nations General Assembly. She was a member of the Order of Canada and was awarded honorary degrees from several universities including Queen's, Memorial, Trent, Guelph and Mount St. Vincent.
Sylva Malka GELBER was born in 1910 in Toronto to Sara (MORRIS) and Louis GELBER. Her father, a survivor of pogroms in Eastern Europe, was determined that her four brothers, all of whom attended Upper Canada College, and she, all receive worldly educations beyond their specific Jewish community. She always admired her father for this farsightedness in encouraging his children to become part of a broader society.
At the University of Toronto, she produced plays. She sang spirituals on a Toronto radio station, but her parents would have none of a show business career. She was packed off to Columbia University in New York; but even that did not satisfy her rambunctious spirit and soon she was on her way to distant Palestine.
Never domesticated as women of her day usually were, she paid little attention to her kitchen pantry when she finally settled in Ottawa; but always gregarious, she loved to entertain around the piano which she played by ear and with great gusto. Her library of records and Compact Disks, was always in use as music filled her life; and she has endowed an important annual prize through The Sylva Gelber Music Foundation, which is granted to an outstanding young Canadian musician at the early stage of his or her career.
In retirement, she energetically participated in the Canadian Institute of International Affairs and the Wednesday Luncheon Club of former cabinet ministers and civil servants, such as her neighbour, Jack PICKERSGILL, who thrashed over current political issues.
Sylva GELBER was predeceased by her four brothers, Lionel, Marvin, Arthur and Shalome Michael. She is survived by her four nieces and their husbands, Nance GELBER and Dan BJARNASON, Patty and David RUBIN, Judith GELBER and Dan PRESLEY, and Sara and Richard CHARNEY, all of Toronto; her sister-in-law, Marianne GELBER of New York; four great nephews and a great niece, Gerald and Noah RUBIN, and Adam, Andrew and Laura CHARNEY; as well as cousins Ruth JEWEL and David EISEN; David ALEXANDOR, and Ruth GELBER all of Toronto; and Ivan CHORNEY and Betsy RIGAL, both of Ottawa. At Benjamin's Park Memorial Chapel, 2401 Steeles Avenue West (1 light west of Dufferin) for service on Thursday, December 11, 2003 at 12: 00 noon. Interment Beth Tzedec Memorial Park.

  P... Names     PI... Names     PIC... Names     Welcome Home

PICKERSGILL - All Categories in OGSPI

PICKETT o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-06 published
The day the music didn't die
Beloved Toronto trumpeter credited with helping preserve a unique form of New Orleans jazz
By Sarah LAMBERT Thursday, March 6, 2003 - Page R9
Toronto -- The tightly knit world of New Orleans traditional jazz has lost one of its greats with the death, last month, of Cliff (Kid) BASTIEN, leader of Toronto's treasured Happy Pals.
The trumpeter is credited as having nothing less than single-handedly kept alive the unique, raw, New Orleans style of jazz, through his leadership and mentorship of hundreds of musicians.
Saddened fans and musicians filed into the city's Grossman's Tavern all week last month to pay tribute to Mr. BASTIEN at the long-time home of the Happy Pals, where the walls are lined with photos of his fans and musicians. It was a send-off worthy of New Orleans, birthplace of the kind of jazz Mr. BASTIEN played with his seven-piece bands, the Camelia Jazz Band and later the Happy Pals, during the 30 or so years he played at the Toronto landmark.
"He was never late. Never, never ever, said Christine LOUIE, whose family inherited Mr. BASTIEN's Saturday-afternoon gig when Al GROSSMAN sold the bar in 1975.
So it was with sinking hearts on February 8 that his loyal audience and band members watched the minute hand tick past 4 o'clock, waiting for him to arrive, brass trumpet in hand.
When he was found later that afternoon still sitting in his armchair, apparently looking up a new song in his hymn book, the Happy Pals played on and raised a glass in tribute to their leader who died as he lived, surrounded by music. He was 65 years old.
Noonie SHEARS, a long-time friend and leader of the traditional impromptu parade that would inevitably snake through Grossman's as Saturday afternoon wound down, said she thought Mr. BASTIEN was looking up I'll Fly Away, the old gospel song recently dusted off in the movie O Brother, Where Art Thou?
The band played it for the first time at Mr. BASTIEN's official memorial at Grossman's the Saturday following his death.
Born in 1937 in London's East End, Mr. BASTIEN emigrated to Canada in 1962 after a stint in New Orleans. It was there that he heard trumpeter (Kid) Thomas VALENTINE play and, experiencing a kind of epiphany, Mr. BASTIEN followed him from club to club and studied his style. It ultimately inspired a lifelong ambition to keep alive New Orleans-style traditional jazz.
A purist who drew a distinction between his chosen genre of music and the more popularized Dixieland Jazz, Mr. BASTIEN once said: "Had I never heard that music, I wouldn't have become a musician. I wouldn't play anything else."
I Like Bananas, Caledonia, All of Me and Louisiana Vie en Rose were just a few of his standards. But, as Happy Pals' trombonist Roberta TEVLIN explained, Mr. BASTIEN wasn't content to simply recycle the old chestnuts.
"Cliff kept adding songs. I've probably played 1,000 different tunes with him. He was particularly notorious for finding songs outside the standard jazz list, said Ms. TEVLIN, who joined the band 20 years ago, along with her saxophonist husband, Patrick.
Bob Dylan, Creedence Clearwater Revival, Western Swing numbers, Nigerian folk songs and Dean Martin could all tumble out during a set, said drummer Chuck CLARKE.
Mr. BASTIEN's Friends and peers point out that he was known for three primary qualities: His love of music, his scorn for fame or publicity and his mentoring of local musicians.
During the memorial at Grossman's, Downchild Blues Band headman Donny WALSH arrived from Florida to sit in with his harmonica, as he had done regularly with Mr. BASTIEN in the 1970s. Juno-nominated bluesman Michael PICKETT was there, as well as jazz singer Laura HUBERT, formerly of the Leslie Spit Treeo, pianist Peter HILL, The Nationals and many more.
From the worldwide New Orleans jazz community, among those who came to pay their respects were saxophonist Jean-Pierre ALESSI of France, trumpeter Roger (Kid Dutch) UITHOVEN of Orlando, Florida, clarinetist Kjeld BRANDT from Denmark and Toronto's Brian TOWERS, Jan SHAW and Joe VAN ROSSEM.
"I cannot imagine the Toronto traditional jazz scene without Cliff BASTIEN and his raw, emotional New Orleans-style jazz, Mr. TOWERS wrote in a notice posted on the Internet shortly after he learned of the death of his friend.
"He was probably the most popular and influential figure on the Toronto traditional jazz scene. He taught many others to play their instruments in the style and introduced thousands to the joys of New Orleans traditional jazz.
"We went to Grossman's after our own gig and Jan and I played some hymns with the Happy Pals. A sadder and more emotional scene I have rarely seen."
Toronto musician Joanne MacKELL, leader of the Paradise Rangers, wonders how things might have been if she had not met Mr. BASTIEN when she was just starting out.
"Though I was young and inexperienced, Kid would always invite me up to sing, Ms. MacKELL said, recalling how the band took her under its wing when she discovered them in the early 1970s.
"Kid didn't care about money or popular opinion. He filled Grossman's Tavern every Saturday for some 30 years because he played great music with honesty and integrity and he inspired me to try and do the same."
Until just last year, Mr. BASTIEN, who feared flying, avoided the lure of the road, taking only an annual sojourn to New Orleans for the French Quarter Festival. Finally, in the fall of 2002, he accepted an invitation to tour Scandinavia with the Danish/Swedish band New Orleans Delight, playing with George BERRY on tenor sax. A new Compact Disk is due to be released this spring.
His official recordings are few, numbering about a dozen, as Mr. BASTIEN preferred to play to an audience. Though, as Ms. TEVLIN pointed out: "There are bootleg tapes all over the place."
His legacy, the band says, is keeping the New Orleans style of jazz alive.
"Kid Thomas VALENTINE was one of the greats, and when he was gone, Kid BASTIEN carried on. Kid BASTIEN was one of the greats, and now Kid's gone. So who's going to carry the music on now? We will, said saxophonist Mr. TEVLIN on behalf of the Happy Pals, who intend to continue the Saturday-afternoon tradition at Grossman's.
In another side to his life, Mr. BASTIEN was an accomplished commercial artist whose hand-crafted signs, woodwork and acid-etched glass can be seen in many local pubs, including Toronto's Wheat Sheaf Tavern. His work can be found across Ontario, Quebec, British Columbia and California, as well as in Europe.
Mr. BASTIEN's wish was to be buried in New Orleans.

  P... Names     PI... Names     PIC... Names     Welcome Home

PICKETT o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-08-06 published
Laura Barbara DICKSON/DIXON
By Ruth TAILOR/TAYLOR Wednesday, August 6, 2003 - Page A16
Mother, grandmother, poet. Born May 7, 1907, in Nelson Township, Ontario Died July 6, in Eden Mills, Ontario, of natural causes, aged 96.
Born Laura Barbara PRUDHAM on the family farm, my mother was the daughter of Charles and Anna (PICKETT) PRUDHAM. She was a fifth-generation Canadian, a grand-niece of Laura SECORD. She was the middle child of a family of five, with two older brothers and two younger sisters. Proud of her heritage, Laura was destined to become the family historian.
Laura had many wonderful memories of her childhood: of Christmas trees lit with real candles, of rides over the crisp snow to church, sleigh bells jingling all the way. She had vivid memories of the first automobile, the first airplane. She lived through two world wars and the Great Depression, saw man walk on the moon.
The farm was a busy place, with everyone contributing: Laura raised chickens, milked cows, made butter, sold produce at the Hamilton Market. They left the farm at 2: 30 a.m. to travel through the snowy roads in winter. Bricks were heated in the wood stove, put in the bottom of the horse-drawn sleigh box for warmth. Buffalo robes helped keep them warm on that long dark trip. In summer, they worked the farm fields from dawn until dusk; the only day of rest, Sunday.
It was Laura's dream to go on to high school after passing the entrance exam, but it was not to be; she was required at home. A determined young lady, she took courses, and studied independently. She won two scholarships for short courses at the Macdonald Institute, now the University of Guelph.
Laura taught Sunday School, she played the church organ after teaching herself to play the piano, she sang in the choir. Along with her sister, Anna, they became a popular singing duo in the area. Tea Meetings, and young people's groups were a part of her life within the church. Laura and Friends produced plays to entertain and compete in the area.
Laura met her husband, Lorne DICKSON/DIXON, at a community dance. They dated, and were married February 14, 1940. They resided on the DICKSON/DIXON family farm, Limestone Hall, near Milton, Ontario, where they farmed until 1961. Lorne and Laura's children, Ruth and Robert, grew up on that farm, a wonderful place for children.
Laura's many hobbies included watercolour and oil painting, photography, gardening, baking, and most of all, writing. Walks in the spring wildflowers inspired her first lines of poetry. Later she wrote: "I took a walk in the woods today / Down winding paths where I used to play." She had three books of poetry published, including Changing Seasons in 1997. She won the Milton Heritage Writing Award in 1998 for her collective works. Her poetry was chosen in 2001 to be part of a diary of new and established Canadian poets.
Laura was a life member of the Women's Institute, and lived by their motto "For Home and Country." She was a life member of the Women's Missionary Society, a member of the Milton Horticulture Society, and the Milton Historical Society.
In later years, after Lorne passed away, her greatest love became her grandchildren; they gave her many years of joy. She loved to play, and led them on adventures to the mall, travelling all over on the bus, supplying treats as only grandmothers can. She listened to their dreams, gave encouragement. All the while, she continued to record her life in poetry.
She loved her family, her community, her country -- she was one of that special group of women, born around the turn of the 20th century, who had to create their own opportunities, find their way in a world that was not quite ready to give equality to women. Laura accomplished a great many things, and through it all, she remained a lady, loved and respected by all who had the pleasure of knowing her.
Ruth TAILOR/TAYLOR is Laura's daughter.

  P... Names     PI... Names     PIC... Names     Welcome Home

PICKETT - All Categories in OGSPI