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"PET" 2003 Obituary


PETERS  PETERSEN  PETERSON  PETHICK  PETRCICH  PETRIE  PETRINI  PETROSKI  PETROVA  PETROVIC  PETROWSKI  PETTIGREW  PETTINATO 

PETERS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-04-08 published
PRATT, R. John
In his 97th year, Robert John PRATT died peacefully at his home, ''The Hermitage'', Dorval. He so often sang and said ''You'll Get Used To It''. He is survived by his sons, Robin of Dorval and John of Hatley; by his grandchildren, Graham, Thea, and Jessie, all of Montreal; Robert (Nicky) of Vancouver, British Columbia, Julia PETERS (Tim) of Niagara Falls, New York, and Jennifer PETERS (Kirby) of Toronto, Ontario; and by his great grandchildren, Jessica, Anthony, and Gregory; Elena and Elizabeth; and Eliza. Resting at J.J. Cardinal Funeral Home, 560 Pr. Lakeshore Dr., Dorval Tel: 514-631-1511. Visitation Wednesday, April 9, from 7 to 9 p.m. Funeral Service at St-Veronica's Church, 1300 Carson, Dorval on Thursday, April 10 at 11 a.m. Memorial donations would be appreciated to The St. Patrick's Foundation c/o St. Patrick's Square, 6767 Cote St. Luc, Montreal, Qc. H4V 2Z6 or to the charity of your choice.

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PETERS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-04-12 published
REIMER, Waldemar (Wally) H., A.A.C.I.
Passed away peacefully in his sleep, at Victoria General Hospital, in Winnipeg on April 7, 2003, after a lengthy and courageous struggle with many health issues.
Beloved husband of Mary TOEWS for 50 years; dear father of Henry (who died in infancy), Hélène (Peters) and Tim Green Mississauga, Paul and Brenda REIMER of Calgary, Judy and Vic WARKENTIN and Margaret and Jeff HARASYM of Winnipeg. Opi of Lora and Neil PETERS, Paul WARKENTIN, Andrew REIMER and Stephen HARASYM. Brother to Elvera and Gerry THIESSEN; John and Annelies REIMER, Ruth and Nelson EDWARDS and Elaine REIMER. Predeceased by his parents Henry REIMER, Sara (BRAUN) Reimer PANKRATZ, step-father, Nicholas PANKRATZ, brother Victor, sisters Annie POETKER and Mary WILLMS, brother-in-law Henry POETKER.
Formerly of Waterloo, Wally was a well known member of the business community through his years at Mutual Life, various real estate and development companies and then for 26 years, as President of W.H. Reimer Limited.
Funeral services were held in Winnipeg on Friday April 11, 2003. A memorial service to celebrate Wally's life will be held at W-K United Mennonite Church in Waterloo, on Tuesday, April 15, 2003, at 10: 30 a.m. A time to visit with the family will follow the service. Interment will take place at Mount Hope Cemetery, Waterloo.
Donations to the Waterloo Adult Recreation Centre, Mennonite Central Committee, Heart and Stroke Foundation of Ontario or the Lung Association of Waterloo Region would be appreciated as expressions of sympathy and can be arranged through the Edward R. Good Funeral Home, phone (519) 745-8445 or www.edwardrgood.com

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PETERS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-04-23 published
Rolf O. KROGER, Ph.D. Professor Emeritus of Psychology University of Toronto
Rolf died, as he lived, with grace, courage, humour and dignity, at home on April 18th, 2003, of advanced prostate cancer. He was the devoted and beloved husband of Linda WOOD. He was the cherished son of Erna KROGER and son-in-law of Adele WOOD; loving brother of Harold and Jurgen KROGER; dear brother-in-law of Wilma KROGER, Edelgard DEDO, Lorraine WOOD, Robert and Deborah WOOD, and Reg WOOD; much loved uncle of Andrew KROGER and Stephen KROGER, Christina and Linda JUHASZ- WOOD, Taylor, Genna and Devon WOOD, Jonathan and Nicole WOOD, Phillippe NOEL, and Jose and David TILLETT, and nephew of Liesl WINTER, Otto WINTER and Alf and Sue MODJESKI. Rolf was born in Hamburg, Germany, on September 28th, 1931. He emigrated to Canada in 1952, and completed a B.A. in psychology at Sir George Williams College (now Concordia University) in 1957. Following his M.A. (1959) at Columbia University, New York, he received his Ph.D. in psychology from the University of California at Berkeley in 1963. His advisor, Prof. Theodore R. SARBIN (Prof. Emeritus, University of California, Santa Cruz,) has continued to be a valued colleague and dear friend, together with Rolf's fellow graduate student, Prof. Karl E. SCHEIBE of Wesleyan University and Karl's wife Wendy. Rolf joined the Department of Psychology at the University of Toronto in 1964 and continued his research and writing in social psychology after retiring in 1996. Rolf's work addressed a variety of topics concerning the individual in the social system. His articles and papers on the social psychology of test-taking, hypnosis, history, epistemology, methodology and the discipline of social psychology all reflected his dissatisfaction with the status quo combined with proposals for new directions. For more than 20 years he has worked with Linda A. WOOD (University of Guelph) on topics in language and social psychology (e.g., terms of address and politeness), and most recently on a book on discourse analysis. At the time of his death, he was working on a discursive critique of the 'Big Five' personality theory enterprise and on stories of his experiences growing up in Germany during the Second World War. Rolf also took great pleasure in teaching and greatly valued the opportunity to work for almost forty years with so many talented and enthusiastic students, both undergraduate and graduate. Rolf was privileged to have many long-lasting Friendships, and he was grateful for the encouragement, help and comfort given by so many, especially Bogna ANDERSSON, Eva and Fred BILD, Clare MacMARTIN and Bill MacKENZIE, Frances NEWMAN and Fred WEINSTEIN, Jesse NISHIHATA, Anne and Michael PETERS, Andrew and Judi WINSTON and Lorraine WOOD. We have also been sustained by the kindness of our neighbours on Walmer Road. We express our particular thanks and appreciation to family physician and friend, Dr. Christine LIPTAY. Our thanks go also to the staff of Princess Margaret Hospital, to the physicians and nurses of the Hospice Palliative Care Network Project, especially Dr. Russell GOLDMAN and nurses Francine BOHN, Joan DYKE, Dwyla HAMILTON, Lynda McKEE and Ella VAN HERREWEGHE, and to the nurses of St. Elizabeth, especially Liz LEADBEATER, Sylvia McCALLUM and Cecilia McPARLAND. Cremation was private. There will be an Open House for remembrance and celebration on Sunday, April 27th (3-7 p.m.), Monday, April 28th (4-8 p.m.) and Tuesday, April 29th (4-8 p.m.) at 98 Walmer Road, Toronto, Ontario M5R 2X7. Please direct any queries to Frances NEWMAN (416-351-0755.) In lieu of flowers, donations to Temmy Latner Centre for Palliative Care (700 University Avenue, Third Floor, Toronto, Ontario M5G 1Z5) or Amnesty International would be appreciated.

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PETERS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-05-03 published
PETERS, George
Formerly of London, Ontario, and longtime resident of Aylmer, Quebec, passed away on April 30th, 2003. His first wife, Patricia BELK, passed away in 1989. His second wife, Françoise (''Toto'') BACH- KOLLING, died in 2000. He is survived by his sister Dorothy McLAREN of London, Ontario, his stepdaughter Felicia HOUTMAN, by Gordene STEWARD/STEWART/STUART, and by his nieces and nephews. A gathering of Friends and family will take place at the Beauchamp Funeral Home, 47 Denise Friend Street, Aylmer, on Sunday, May 4th beginning at 2 o'clock. For more information, please call (819) 770-1300.

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PETERS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-06-17 published
CASEY, Francis (Frank) J. b. 1912 (London, England)
On June 15th, 2003, in his 92nd year, Frank Casey died peacefully. He lived life well and joyfully, and leaves a remarkable legacy of family, business, and service to his church and community. Frank's career in insurance began in 1934 with Lloyd's in London, England. In 1937, he married Frances PETERS. Their long and happy marriage was a true partnership. Frank served as a Sergeant Major in the British Army in the Second World War before emigrating to Canada in 1948 and settling with his family in Toronto. He was the founder and president of Frank J. Casey Insurance Brokers, which for more than fifty years has been a north Toronto institution. His personal approach and dedication to the well-being of his clients made many of them into life-long Friends. He was a stalwart of his parish, St. Monica's, where he was a long-time member of the St. Vincent de Paul Society; and in the greater community he served as the first president of Sancta Maria House, which provides shelter, counselling and support for at-risk teenage girls. Frank took enormous pride and pleasure in his family, and he will be greatly missed by us all. Loving father of Patricia BINGHAM and her husband Richard; the late Catherine BOUWMEISTER and her husband John; Dr. John CASEY and his wife Therese; Anne CHEETHAM and her late husband Francis; Frank G. CASEY; and Angela BRANSCOMBE and her husband Harley. Devoted grandfather to Richard, Christopher and Deirdre BINGHAM; Paul, Janet, John Mark and Michael BOUWMEISTER; Clare, Stephanie, and Daniel CHEETHAM; and Paul, Jean, Marta-Marie and Phillippe CASEY. Great-grandfather to Andrew, Francesca-Anne, Brendan, Caitlin, Thomas and Liam. The family thanks his many caregivers and the staff at Central Park Lodge. Friends may call at the Trull Funeral Home, 2704 Yonge Street, Tuesday, June 17th from 2-4 p.m. and from 7-9 p.m. Mass of Christian burial at St. Monica's Catholic Church, 44 Broadway Avenue, on Wednesday, June 18th at 1: 30 p.m. Interment at Holy Cross Cemetery. If desired, a remembrance may be made to Sancta Maria House, 102 Bernard Avenue, Toronto M5R 1R9; (416) 925-7333. He always believed himself to be a blessed and lucky man. We were blessed to have had him.

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PETERS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-20 published
PARLEE, Alfreda Louise (née PETERS)
It is with great sadness that the family of Alfreda L. PARLEE (née PETERS) announces her passing on December 17, 2003. Alfreda died peacefully in Toronto at the age of 86. Funeral service details to be announced.

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PETERS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-27 published
PARLEE, Alfreda Louise (née PETERS)
It is with great sadness that the family of Alfreda L. PARLEE (née PETERS) announces her passing on December 17, 2003. Alfreda died peacefully in Toronto at the age of 86. Alfreda was born on April 21, 1917, the sixth of eight children born to Alexander and Katherine PETERS of Winnipeg. In her early years, Alfreda enjoyed many happy times at the family homes on Charles and Renfrew Streets in Winnipeg which were always open to Friends and family. She attended Machray and Saint John's High School in Winnipeg and by the time she reached her early 20's, she was an accomplished singer. Part of a singing trio (together with her sister Elsie), Alfreda performed at a few downtown Winnipeg night spots. During the war years, she and her partners also sang on radio for the troops at home and overseas. Alfreda worked at a variety of jobs over the years, including Great West Life, and as a volunteer at No. 2 Air Command in Winnipeg during the war. She eventually started working for the International Nickel Company, and became Executive Secretary to Jim PARLEE, the Vice-Chairman of Inco. Working for Inco, Alfreda lived in Winnipeg, Toronto, New York, and Toronto again. She married Jim PARLEE and retired in Toronto, where they forged many lasting relationships with Friends and acquaintances. Alfreda was very well- liked and her warmth, incredible generosity, and zest for life were well-known. She was active until the end, playing golf at the Toronto Hunt and bridge at the Toronto Badminton and Racquet Club and York Club. A world traveler, she knew how to live and enjoy her life, her Friends and her family, and we are all richer for having known her. She is predeceased by her husband Jim PARLEE and her sisters Mildred, Elsie, Marjory, and Lyl; and her brothers Fred and Ed. She is survived by her brother Lloyd PETERS and his wife Alma of Winnipeg. Alfreda was the beloved aunt of Diane, David, Fred, Peter, Bob, and Jim and will be greatly missed by her niece and nephews and their families. A memorial service will be held for Alfreda at 2: 00 p.m. on January 9, 2004 at Christ Church Deer Park, 1570 Yonge Street, Toronto with a reception to follow. In Alfreda's memory, donations to the Multiple Sclerosis Society of Canada, 250 Bloor Street East, Suite #1000, Toronto M4W 3P9, St. Michael's Hospital, 30 Bond Street, Toronto M5B 1W8, or a charity of one's choice would be appreciated.

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PETERSEN o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-12-10 published
Nels PETERSEN
The family announces with sorrow his death in Arizona on Sunday, November 30, 2003 at the age of 73 years.
He was born in Wadena, Saskatchewan and married Iona (née COONEY) in Sudbury in 1950. After 25 years of service with the Region of Sudbury, Nels retired in 1989 and moved with Iona to Manitoulin Island. There they spent summers at Cedar Eden with their 5 children and 14 grandchildren and enjoyed winters at Cielo Grande Park, Mesa, Arizona with many Friends and relatives. He was always happiest tending to his flower and vegetable gardens and creating projects in his workshop. Nels was a hard worker, but took time to enjoy a round of golf, a game of pool, a good glass of wine and he always had a song in his heart. He will be remembered as a devoted family man and a good friend. Dear son of Peter and Elizabeth (both predeceased). Beloved husband of Iona (COONEY) PETERSEN of Sudbury. Loving father of Ken (partner Cathy KINSMAN) of Halifax, Kathy WOLYNSKY (husband George) of Sudbury, Kirk (wife Joyce) of Montreal, Mike (wife Debra predeceased) of Sudbury and Patty LAPLANTE (husband Paul) of Lively.
Proud grandfather of Ronnie, Laura, Nick, Graham, Kim, Elizabeth, Jessica, Amy, Jayson, Angela, Andre, Michelle, Amanda and Emily. Predeceased by sisters Herta and Elsie and brothers Andreas and Hans. Survived by his brother Peter (wife Millie) and Arne and sisters Margaret (husband Wilfred predeceased), Maren (husband Gordon predeceased) and Toody (husband Ron predeceased) all of Saskatchewan. He will be sadly missed as brother-in-law and uncle to his special Friends Martti and Gloria LUOMA of Coniston. Rested at the Jackson and Barnard Funeral Home, 233 Larch Street, Sudbury. Funeral Mass at Christ the King Church on Friday, December 5, 2003. Cremation at Parklawn Crematorium.

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PETERSON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-02-13 published
Gordon Kenneth FLEMING/FLEMMING
By Jack FORTIN Thursday, February 13, 2003, Page A30
Musician, husband, father. Born August 3, 1931, in Winnipeg. Died August 31, 2002, in Scarborough, Ontario, following a stroke, aged 71.
Gordie FLEMING/FLEMMING was a remarkable music talent, known internationally as a master of the accordion, especially in the jazz idiom. He was a life member of Local 149 of the Toronto Musicians' Association.
In show-business vernacular, Gordie was "born in a trunk." He began playing accordion when his older brother gave him lessons. His musical ability was such that he began performing publicly at the age of five. His schoolteachers often saw him being whisked away in a taxi to perform at theatres and radio stations in Winnipeg. By the age of 10, he was a working member of various bands in that city.
In 1949, Gordie lost his accordion in a fire at a Winnipeg hotel. With the insurance money, he headed for the bright lights of Montreal where he soon became an important part of that city's musical life. His accordion ability was complemented by the fact that he was also a gifted arranger and composer.
He had a marvellous ability to improvise and could string out complex bebop lines, leaving his listeners in awe. He often slipped a jazz phrase into ballads or commercial tunes, confirming that jazz was indeed his first love.
One of Montreal's busiest musicians, he wrote for local orchestras, shows, radio and television. He had perfect pitch and often wrote without reference to a keyboard. He was at home in every type of music from classics to jazz. For several years, he worked at the National Film Board as a composer and musician.
In Montreal, Gordie performed with many show business headliners: there was a wealth of home-grown talent in Montreal, such as Oscar PETERSON and Maynard FERGUSON, as well as other jazz musicians who were beginning to be noticed.
Gordie had said that when when he first heard bebop it was like entering another world. As his career indicates, he had no trouble in that world. He worked with many personalities including: Charlie PARKER, Mel TORMÉ, Hank SNOW, Lena HORNE, Englebert HUMPERDINCK, Dennis DAY, Gordon MacRAE, Cab CALLOWAY, Nat King COLE, Cat STEVENS, Rich LITTLE, Billy ECKSTEIN, Pee Wee HUNT, Arthur GODFREY and Buddy DEFRANCO.
He also performed with Tommy AMBROSE, Allan MILLS, Wally KOSTER, Tommy HUNTER, Bert NIOSI, Wayne and Shuster, Canadian Broadcasting Corporation jazz shows with Al BACULIS, and many other Canadian jazz musicians.
On Montreal's French music scene, Gordie performed on radio and television with Emile GENEST, Ti-Jean CARIGNAN, André GAGNON and Ginette RENO. He was a featured soloist with the Montreal Symphony Orchestra on several occasions.
Internationally, Gordie toured France in 1952 and performed with Edith PIAF and Tino ROSSI. He had the honour to perform for former prime minister Pierre Elliot TRUDEAU at a Commonwealth Conference.
He participated with other top Canadian musicians in a Canadian Broadcasting Corporation tour to entertain Canadian and the North Atlantic Treaty Organization troops in Europe in 1952 and 1968.
For me, a memorable experience was playing in a group with Gordie for several winters in Florida. A popular member of the Panama City Beach family of musicians, Gordie looked forward to his winter trek south. Many of the American musicians will miss him, as will the many snowbirds who looked forward to hearing him each year.
His extensive repertoire allowed Gordie to author a book called Music of the World, in which he wrote the music to 280 songs from more than 30 countries.
Gordie leaves his wife of 47 years, Joanne, and seven children.
Jack FORTIN is Gordie's friend.

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PETERSON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-04-15 published
ANSLEY, John A.
Of Peterborough, Ontario, died peacefully, on Saturday, April 12, 2003, at the age of 61 years. He leaves his beloved wife of 34 years Gail (née MADORE) and their son James. son of Mrs. Grace PETERSON (née McINTOSH) of Ottawa and the late Dr. Harold ANSLEY of Ottawa and Barrie, and his late stepfather Ted PETERSON. Also surviving are his sister Ms. Sherrill ANSLEY (Jim,) William ANSLEY of Ottawa, cousins Susan and Kenneth BURNETT of W. Vancouver, Sandy and Peter QUINN of Roberts Creek, British Columbia, and John and Cordelia McINTOSH of Victoria, British Columbia, and their families. John graduated from Ashbury College in Ottawa and attended Carleton University before becoming advertising, sales and marketing manager in the window and door industry. For many years he was active in community volunteer work with a special interest in boating. His family wishes to thank Dr. Stephan RAGAZ of Peterborough, Dr. Bryce TAILOR/TAYLOR of Toronto General Hospital and the loving nurses at the Palliative Care Unit in Peterborough.
Friends will be received on Wednesday, April 16th, 2003 from 2 to 4 and 7 to 9 p.m. at the Highland Park Visitation and Reception Centre on Bensfort Road at River Road South, Peterborough, 705-745-6984 or 1-800-672-9652. There will be a Funeral Service at the same location on Thursday, April 17th at 2 p.m. followed by a reception.
In lieu of flowers, donations to the Palliative Care Unit Peterborough Regional Health Centre would be appreciated. John will be missed by his family and Friends who respected him for his integrity, positive attitude and his humour.

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PETERSON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-05-06 published
His passion was coaching
He worked at Toronto's Hospital for Sick Children for 40 years, but his spare time was devoted to training athletes
By Allison LAWLOR Tuesday, May 6, 2003 - Page R7
An era has ended in Canadian track-and-field athletics. Don MILLS, coach, administrator and volunteer, died in Windsor, Ontario, last month. He was 75.
The folklore surrounding Mr. MILLS, who was most recently an assistant coach with the University of Toronto's track-and-field and cross-country teams, was that he never missed a meet, often attending more than one on a weekend.
Mr. MILLS was at the Canadian Interuniversity Sport championships assisting with the university's Varsity Blues team when he died peacefully in his sleep.
"For Don, track-and-field coaching and working with young people was his passion, said Carl GEORGEVSKI, head coach of Varsity Blues track and field.
Mr. MILLS's involvement in track and field began in 1963 when he co-founded the Toronto Striders Track Club. He went on to form Track West, in the city's west end, in the 1970s and was a club coach there until the end of the 2002 season. One of his highlights as a coach was the 1978 World Cross Country Championships. Three of the six Canadian junior men there were from Track West. They took home a silver medal.
"If [a runner] didn't have a coach and needed one they would saddle over to Don, said Ian ANDERSON, a friend and fellow coach at Track West and at the University of Toronto.
Known for devoting hours of his spare time to typing out the results of athletes' workouts, giving nutritional advice, supervising workouts and attending what seemed like every track-and-field and cross-country race in the country, Mr. MILLS made each of the athletes feel they were the most important.
"You thought you were his only athlete, said Paul KEMP, a runner who trained with Mr. MILLS at both Track West and at the University of Toronto. But Mr. KEMP soon realized that the same time and individual attention Mr. MILLS gave to him, he also gave to 20 other athletes.
Jerry KOOYMANS, who ran with Track West in the late 1970s and early 1980s, remembers Mr. MILLS dropping by his hotel room the night before a big race to discuss race strategy. Mr. MILLS would pull out the list of opponents and discuss their strengths and weaknesses and how to beat them.
"By the time I got to the starting line, I felt like I was the best-prepared runner in the race, Mr. KOOYMANS said in a written tribute to his old coach.
When he wasn't busy coaching, Mr. MILLS, who lived in Oakville, Ontario, west of Toronto, was volunteering with the Ontario Track and Field Association as an official or meet director. His meticulous administrative skills and painstaking attention to detail are widely remembered. It was not uncommon for Mr. MILLS to travel across the city on a Sunday night to drop off race results to an athlete or fellow coach. He received the government of Ontario's special achievement award for his work as a volunteer administrator.
Mr. MILLS joined the Varsity Blues staff in 1999, where he focused on men's middle-distance running. But his connections with the University of Toronto go back to the early 1960s, when he spent time coaching the men's boxing team. One of the young men he is reported to have coached was former Ontario premier David PETERSON.
Outside of coaching, Mr. MILLS worked at Toronto's Hospital for Sick Children for 40 years. He started out in biochemistry research in 1954 and later transferred to occupational health and safety where he was involved in purchasing radioactive materials. He routinely ate breakfast at the hospital cafeteria and, even after he retired, continued to visit the hospital daily and spend time in its library.
Don MILLS was born on August 29, 1927, in Trois-Rivières, Quebec. He lived a quiet life, never marrying or having children of his own. He acted as a father figure to many athletes and maintained connections with them. Over the holidays, he would often spend time with the families of former athletes. Not one to talk about himself, his athletes and colleagues knew little about him. Not much is known about his own athletic achievements except that he is said to have played hockey in his younger years. Mr. MILLS, however, remained fit throughout his life.
"He was very quiet, Mr. ANDERSON said. "He was never the centre of attention."
While his workouts could be tough, Mr. MILLS knew when an athlete had endured enough, Mr. KEMP said. He was not one to yell or scream.
"He was patient, he was dedicated. He was committed, Mr. GEORGEVSKI said.
Renowned for never owning a car, Mr. MILLS mastered bus and train routes from coast to coast. Being without a vehicle didn't deter him from getting to a track meet or practice session, no matter where it was held. He became legendary for his uncanny ability to get to meets without driving.
In recent years he refused to fly. Even so, that didn't stop him from attending a National Cross Country Championship in British Columbia.
In order to be with his team, Mr. MILLS left Ontario a week ahead of schedule to travel across the country by train. Two years ago, Mr. KEMP flew to Edmonton to attend a tournament only to be met by Mr. MILLS, who had arrived earlier by bus.
"He was an individual who cared deeply about all his athletes, " whether it was a young, struggling runner or one who was performing among the top at the national level, Mr. GEORGEVSKI.
A track scholarship has been established in Mr. MILLS's name at the University of Toronto. He died on March 16.

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PETERSON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-07-09 published
Activist established blue box program
Radical became known for putting pressure on government, corporations
By Martin MITTELSTAEDT Wednesday, July 9, 2003 - Page R7
Toronto -- One of Canada's most influential environmental activists, Gary GALLON, died Thursday in Montreal after a long battle with cancer.
Although Mr. GALLON may not have been a household name, Canadians almost everywhere will recognize one of his major achievements, the setting up of the country's first blue box recycling program in Ontario during the late 1980s.
He also had a hand during the 1970s in establishing Greenpeace, and maintained a lifelong passion for environmental causes evident in his series of twice-monthly newsletters, called the GALLON Environmental Letter.
"I've always been bothered by excess consumption and wanton destruction of habitat. Human ethics must allow space for other creatures," he said recently.
Born in the United States in 1945, Mr. GALLON moved to Canada in the late 1960s to avoid the draft during the Vietnam war. He settled in Vancouver and began working by writing newsletters promoting mining stocks listed on the Vancouver Stock Exchange.
After work, he turned to his true passion, the environment, joining the nighttime meetings of the Society for the Promotion of Environmental Conservation, a group that at the time opposed the use of the British Columbia coast for supertanker routes.
"He became concerned that what he was doing [by selling stocks] was causing environmental damage," said David OVED, a Toronto environmental consultant who worked with him in the Ontario government.
Mr. GALLON's biggest impact on the country's conservation movement occurred when he was senior policy adviser for Jim BRADLEY, Ontario's Liberal environment minister from 1985-90, one of Mr. BRADLEY's surprise hires.
It was a risky move for the new Liberal government to employ one of Canada's leading environmental radicals for such a post.
Mr. GALLON instantly became known as one of " BRADLEY's brats," the moniker given the group of dedicated environmentalists assembled by Mr. BRADLEY within the Ontario government who helped originate such programs as the blue box and the province's acid rain reduction program.
In the mid-1980s, municipal recycling had been an experimental effort in a few communities.
Mr. GALLON worked to establish the blue box across the province. Mr. OVED said Mr. GALLON could often influence opponents within the government through his use of the inventive turn of phase or image.
In one particularly bitter debate, cabinet was discussing preservation of Ontario's Temagami forest region, an area containing some of Canada's last remaining stands of towering old growth red and white pines.
Mr. OVED said some politicians were questioning why environmentalists in Toronto and elsewhere in Southern Ontario were arguing to preserve a forest in the north that they might never see.
Mr. GALLON said forest preservation was part of the ideal that Canadians held of the society they would like to be part of.
"Gary's comment was 'People here may never see those forests, but they value green spaces in their minds,' Mr. OVED said.
Mr. OVED said the turn of phase impressed then-premier David PETERSON, who began to affectionately call Mr. GALLON and Mr. BRADLEY's other environmental activists "space cadets."
Some of the biggest run-ins that Mr. GALLON had during the 1980s were with Inco, one of Ontario's major emitter of chemicals that cause acid rain.
At one testy meeting, Mr. GALLON, dressed in a pink shirt, had exchanges with Inco's former chairman, Chuck BAIRD, who was later so annoyed at being pressed on the company's pollutants, that an Inco official called Mr. BRADLEY to complain.
"I got a call the next day asking who where those young radicals in pink polo shirts asking those impertinent questions," Mr. BRADLEY said.
Television broadcaster and Greenpeace founder Robert HUNTER said that Mr. GALLON related to him that the Inco chairman "had never run into such serious sass from mere political minions."
Of his experience in government, Mr. GALLON once said "you have less room to rail but more power to get things done."
Mr. GALLON suffered from colon cancer, which had spread to his lungs and liver.
Despite the pain of the disease and its treatments, he kept up his hobby of competitive swimming, winning in his age group in a Quebec swim meet last year, according to Mr. OVED.
Last month, the Royal Canadian Geographic Society's magazine gave Mr. GALLON its national environmental award for lifetime achievement.
Mr. GALLON was picked in 1977 to be executive director of the Nairobi-based Environment Liaison Centre International, where he met his wife-to-be, another prominent Canadian environmental activist, Janine FERRETTI.
Ms. FERRETTI was executive director of the North American Free Trade Agreement Commission for Environmental Cooperation and now holds a senior position with the Inter-American Development Bank in Washington. Mr. GALLON is survived by his two children, Kalifi and Jenika.

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PETHICK o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-10-20 published
PETHICK, Llewellyn Wallace, D.F.C.
Born October 20, 1917
Died August 28, 1998
Loves last gift is remembrance.
From your wife and children.

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PETRCICH o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-02-18 published
Clayton Lynn BROWN
By Elena PETRCICH Tuesday, February 18, 2003 - Page A18
Principal, teacher, inspiration, mentor, friend. Born May 7, 1912, in Fordwich, Ontario Died April 10, 2002, in Waterloo, Ontario, of natural causes, aged 89.
A remarkable and truly dedicated educator, Clayton BROWN had studied engineering at Queen's University before transferring to the Stratford Teacher's College. He began his career in northern Ontario as a teacher of Grades 7 and 8, became principal of the Hearst Public School, and retired at age 57. (He married only after retirement.) In 1972, the school was renamed the Clayton BROWN Public School.
Mr. BROWN taught all 11 children in my family. Master of motivation, he knew our talents and our shortcomings and he recognized the effectiveness of holding up the high achievements of older siblings as a challenge for the younger ones. Quick with praise and recognition when due, he was equally quick and fair to discipline when appropriate.
We always could tell from his look when he was less than pleased with anyone. He ran a tight ship, insisting on discipline from everyone. When he told the students to stand quietly in line while waiting to enter the classroom, we obliged. He kept us all straight and focused. When necessary, he lectured our classes on the "ability to accept responsibility, " made us look up the word "responsibility" in the dictionary, and then show him how to put it into practice.
Mr. BROWN was fiercely patriotic and a great supporter of the Commonwealth. He wanted us to be proud of our heritage. At the back of his classroom hung a print of Tom Thomson's painting Northern River. He told us about the Group of Seven and other Canadian artists and their valuable contributions to art.
Every Friday afternoon, in the last hour of the school day, Mr. BROWN (who had served with the Royal Canadian Air Force during the Second World War in Quebec, Newfoundland and Labrador), passed out copies of the Patriotic Songbook. We sang songs such as: Rule Britannia, The Maple Leaf Forever, It's a Long Way to Tipperary and Waltzing Matilda. We usually finished the hour singing O Canada. If we were not standing at attention, eyes forward, singing proudly -- we started the anthem over again.
Mr. BROWN taught by example. When education dollars were tight, he declined his raise to keep the music teacher, purchase more library materials or buy much needed sports equipment. To encourage us to read, he set aside library time. We learned how to sit and focus and read quietly. One never knew when he might ask for a written or oral review of the story. Whenever there was a school dance, all the cool guys would stand in the corner each sipping coke from a bottle. Mr. BROWN would start to dance with the girls and soon the guys would follow his lead.
Mr. BROWN had an extensive stamp collection and saw the value in encouraging such a hobby. He helped us all collect stamps for our own albums. Since money was scarce in those days, his idea of a stamp trade was very generous: we brought him one stamp (and it may have been one he already had) and he let us choose 10 from his extras.
Mr. BROWN encouraged us all to pursue an education, to set goals for ourselves, to go on to higher learning, to choose a career path. He even provided financial assistance to one of our brothers in his first year at Queen's University. He always reminded us how proud our parents were of us, and encouraged us to make them even prouder. When we returned for family visits, we visited his school -- to say hello, share our accomplishments, watch for his smile of approval and receive his praise. Years later, he and his lovely wife Vera attended one of our family weddings where we had the opportunity to introduce our families and show Mr. BROWN that he had truly made a difference in our lives.
Elena was a student of Clayton BROWN.

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PETRIE o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-05-07 published
Ruby WILLSON
In loving memory of Ruby WILLSON, May 15, 1937 to April 30, 2003.
Ruby WILLSON, a resident of Ice Lake, died at the Mindemoya Hospital on Wednesday, April 30, 2003 at the age of 65 years. She was born in Kagawong, daughter of the late Nelson and Lillian (TRUDEAU) PIERCE.
Ruby was an "Adventuress" and enjoyed life to its fullest. She had worked as a hostess at Harbour Island as well as being a navigator on sail boats, and had sailed many places, including the open seas. She enjoyed many things, such as needlework, baking, reading and especially loved to entertain and host people. Her favourite place was Harbour Island. A loving wife, mother and grandmother, she will be sadly missed, but many happy memories will be cherished. Dearly loved wife and best friend of Chuc WILLSON. Loving and loved mother of Dennis BECKETT and Deanna BENOIT both of Kagawong, Rob BECKETT of Pefferlaw and Juanda GEORGE of Espanola. Proud grandmother of James, Charles, Kevin, Crestienne, Aaron, Brandon and Sheldon. Also survived by Lake WILSON and his daughter Jasmine. Dear sister of Sandra JAMES. Predeceased by husbands Robert BECKETT, Carl REINGUETTE and John PETRIE and brother Reynold PIERCE.
A private family funeral service will be conducted at the Culgin Funeral Home, followed by cremation. A public memorial service will be conducted at Lyons Memorial United Church on Thursday, May 15, 2003 at 11: 00 a.m. with Pastor Maxine McVEY officiating. If so desired, donations may be made to Strawberry Point Christian Camp or the Mindemoya Hospital Auxiliary. Culgin Funeral Home 282-2270.

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PETRIE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-04-12 published
'He kept a little flame of geometry alive'
Superstar University of Toronto mathematician considered himself an artist, but his seminal work inevitably found practical applications
By Siobhan ROBERTS Saturday, April 12, 2003 - Page F11
Widely considered the greatest classical geometer of his time and the man who saved his discipline from near extinction, Harold Scott MacDonald COXETER, who died on March 31 at 96, said of himself, with characteristic modesty, "I am like any other artist. It just so happens that what fills my mind is shapes and numbers."
Prof. COXETER's work focused on hyperdimensional shapes, specifically the symmetry of regular figures and polytopes. Polytopes are geometric shapes of any number of dimensions that cannot be constructed in the real world and can be visualized only when the eye of the beholder possesses the necessary insight; they are most often described mathematically and sometimes can be represented with hypnotically intricate fine-line drawings.
"I like things that can be seen," Prof. COXETER once remarked. "You have to imagine a different world where these queer things have some kind of shape."
Known as Donald (shortened from MacDonald,) Prof. COXETER had such a passion for his work and unrivalled elegance in constructing and writing proofs that he motivated countless mathematicians to pick up the antiquated discipline of geometry long after it had been deemed passé.
John Horton CONWAY, the Von Neumann professor of mathematics at Princeton University, never studied under Prof. COXETER, but he considers himself an honorary student because of the COXETERian nature of his work.
"With math, what you're doing is trying to prove something and that can get very complicated and ugly. COXETER always manages to do it clearly and concisely," Prof. CONWAY said. "He kept a little flame of geometry alive by doing such beautiful works himself.
"I'm reminded of a quotation from Walter Pater's book The Renaissance. He was describing art and poetry, but he talks of a small, gem-like flame: 'To burn always with this hard, gem-like flame, to maintain this ecstasy, is success in life.' "
Prof. COXETER's oeuvre included more than 250 papers and 12 books. His Introduction to Geometry, published in 1961, is now considered a classic -- it is still in print and this year is back on the curriculum at McGill University. His Regular Polytopes is considered by some as the modern-day addendum to Euclid's Elements. In 1957, he published Generators and Relations for Discrete Groups, written jointly with his PhD student and lifelong friend Willy MOSER. It is currently in its seventh edition.
Prof. COXETER's self-image as an artist was validated by his Friendship with and influence on Dutch artist M. C. ESCHER, who, when working on his Circle Limit 3 drawings, used to say, "I'm Coxetering today."
They met at the International Mathematical Congress in Amsterdam in 1954 and then corresponded about their mutual interest in repeating patterns and representations of infinity. In a letter to his son, Mr. ESCHER noted that a diagram sent to him by Prof. COXETER that inspired his Circle Limit 3 prints "gave me quite a shock."
He added that " COXETER's hocus-pocus text is no use to me at all.... I understand nothing, absolutely nothing of it."
While Mr. ESCHER claimed total ignorance of math, Prof. COXETER wrote numerous papers on the Dutchman's "intuitive geometry."
Though Prof. COXETER did geometry for its own sake, his work inevitably found practical application. Buckminster FULLER encountered his work in the construction of his geodesic domes. He later dedicated a book to Prof. COXETER: "By virtue of his extraordinary life's work in mathematics, Prof. COXETER is the geometer of our bestirring twentieth century. [He is] the spontaneously acclaimed terrestrial curator of the historical inventory of the science of pattern analysis."
Prof. COXETER's work with icosohedral symmetries served as a template of sorts in the Nobel Prize-winning discovery of the Carbon 60 molecule. It has also proved relevant to other specialized areas of science such as telecommunications, data mining, topology and quasi-crystals.
In 1968, Prof. COXETER added to his list of converts an anonymous society of French mathematicians, the Bourbakis, who actively and internationally sought to eradicate classical geometry from the curriculum of math education.
"Death to Triangles, Down with Euclid!" was the Bourbaki war cry. Prof. COXETER's rebuttal: "Everyone is entitled to their opinion. But the Bourbakis were sadly mistaken."
One member of the society, Pierre CARTIER, met Prof. COXETER in Montreal and became enamoured of his work. Soon, he had persuaded his fellow Bourbakis to include Prof. COXETER's approach in their annual publication. "An entire volume of Bourbaki was thoroughly inspired by the work of COXETER," said Prof. CARTIER, a professor at Denis Diderot University in Paris.
In the 1968 volume, Prof. COXETER's name was writ large into the lexicon of mathematics with the inauguration of the terms "COXETER number," " COXETER group" and "COXETER graph."
These concepts describe symmetrical properties of shapes in multiple dimensions and helped to bridge the old-fashioned classical geometry with the more au courant and applied algebraic side of the discipline. These concepts continue to pervade geometrical discourse, several decades after being discovered by Prof. COXETER.
Prof. COXETER became a serious mathematician at the relatively late age of 14, though family folklore has it that, as a toddler, he liked to stare at the columns of numbers in the financial pages of his father's newspaper.
He was born into a Quaker family in Kensington, just west of London, on February 9, 1907. His mother, Lucy GEE, was a landscape artist and portrait painter, and his father, Harold, was a manufacturer of surgical instruments, though his great love was sculpting.
They had originally named their son MacDonald Scott COXETER, but a godparent suggested that the boy's father's name should be added at the front. Another relative then pointed out that H.M.S. COXETER made him sound like a ship of the royal fleet so the names were switched around.
When Prof. COXETER was 12, he created his own language -- "Amellaibian" a cross between Latin and French, and filled a 126-page notebook with information on the imaginary world where it was spoken.
But more than anything he fancied himself a composer, writing several piano concertos, a string quartet and a fugue. His mother took her son and his musical compositions to Gustav HOLST. His advice: "Educate him first."
He was then sent to boarding school, where he met John Flinders PETRIE, son of Egyptologist Sir Flinders PETRIE. The two were passing time at the infirmary contemplating why there were only five Platonic solids -- the cube, tetrahedron, octahedron, dodecahedron and icosahedron. They then began visualizing what these shapes might look like in the fourth dimension. At the age of 15, Prof. COXETER won a school prize for an English essay on how to project these geometric shapes into higher dimensions -- he called it "Dimensional Analogy."
Prof. COXETER's father took his son along with his essay to meet friend and fellow pacifist Bertrand RUSSELL. Mr. RUSSELL recommended Prof. COXETER to mathematician E.H. NEVILLE, a scout, of sorts, for mathematics prodigies. He was impressed by Prof. COXETER's work but appalled by some inexcusable gaps in his mathematical knowledge. Prof. NEVILLE arranged for private tutelage in pursuit of a scholarship at Cambridge. During this period, Prof. COXETER was forbidden from thinking in the fourth dimension, except on Sundays.
He entered Trinity College, Cambridge, in 1926 and was among five students handpicked by Ludwig WITTGENSTEIN for his philosophy of mathematics class. During his first year at Cambridge, at the age of 19, he discovered a new regular polyhedron that had six hexagonal faces at each vertex.
After graduating with first-class honours in 1929, he received his doctorate under H. F. BAKER in 1931, winning the coveted Smith's Prize for his thesis.
Prof. COXETER did fellowship stints back and forth between Princeton and Cambridge for the next few years, focusing on the mathematics of kaleidoscopes -- he had mirrors specially cut and hinged together and carried them in velvet pouches sewn by his mother. By 1933, he had enumerated the n-dimensional kaleidoscopes -- that is, kaleidoscopes operating up to any number of dimensions.
The concepts that became known as COXETER groups are the complex algebraic equations he developed to express how many images may be seen of any object in a kaleidoscope (he once used a paper triangle with the word "nonsense" printed on it to track reflections).
In 1936, Prof. COXETER was offered an assistant professorship at the University of Toronto. He made the move shortly after the sudden death of his father and following his marriage to Rien BROUWER. She was from the Netherlnds and he met her while she was on holiday in London.
As a professor, Prof. COXETER was known to flout set curriculum. Ed BARBEAU, now a professor at the U of T, recalled that at the start of his classes, Prof. COXETER would spread out a manuscript on the desks at the front of the room. During his lecture, he would often pause for minutes at a time to make notes when a student offered something that might be relevant to his work in progress. When the work was later published, students were pleasantly surprised to find that their suggestions had been duly credited.
Prof. COXETER was also known to show up to class carrying a pineapple, or a giant sunflower from his garden, demonstrating the existence of geometric principles in nature. And he was notorious for leaping over details, expecting students to fill in the rest.
The Canadian Broadcasting Corporation's resident intellectual, Lister SINCLAIR, was one of Prof. COXETER's earliest students. He once recounted that Prof. COXETER would "write an expression on the board and you could see it talking to him. It was like Michelangelo walking around a block of marble and seeing what's in there."
Asia Ivic WEISS, a professor at York University, Prof. COXETER's last PhD student and the only woman so honoured, describes an incident that perfectly exemplifies Prof. COXETER's math myopia. Going into labour with her first child, she called him to cancel their weekly meeting. Prof. COXETER, who never acknowledged her pregnancy, said not to worry, he would send over a stack of research to keep her busy when she got home from the hospital.
Despite several offers from other universities, Prof. COXETER stayed at University of Toronto throughout his career.
Like his father, he was a pacifist. In 1997, he was among those who marched a petition to the university president's office to protest against an honorary degree being conferred on George BUSH Sr. Prof. COXETER recalled with disdain Robert PRITCHARD's telling him, "Donald, I have more important things to worry about."
After his official retirement in 1977, Prof. COXETER continued as a professor emeritus, making weekly visits to his office. These subsided only in the past several months. On the weekend before his death, he finished revisions on his final paper, which he had delivered the previous summer in Budapest.
In his last five years, he survived a heart attack, a broken hip (he sprung himself from the hospital early to drive to a geometry conference in Wisconsin) and, most recently, prostate cancer.
Considering his 96 years of vegetarianism and a strict exercise regime, he felt betrayed by his body. "I feel like the man of Thermopylae who doesn't do anything properly," he commented recently after an awkward evening out, quoting nonsense poet Edward LEAR.
Prof. COXETER died in his home, with three long last breaths, just before bed on the last day of March.
His brain is now undergoing study at McMaster University, along with that of Albert EINSTEIN. Neuroscientist Sandra WITELSON is tryng to determine whether his brain's extraordinary capacities are associated with its structure.
Prof. COXETER met with her at the beginning of March and learned that the atypical elements of Einstein's brain, compared with an average brain, were symmetrical on both right and left sides.
Prof. WITELSON said she wondered whether there might be similar findings with Prof. COXETER's brain. "Isn't that nice," he said. "I suppose that would indicate all my interest in symmetry was well founded."
Prof. COXETER leaves his daughter Susan and son Edgar. His wife died in 1999.
Siobhan ROBERTS is a Toronto writer whose biography of Donald COXETER will be published by Penguin in 2005.

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PETRIE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-13 published
WATTS, Fraser Herbert
Passed away quietly on December 10, 2003 at the Toronto Western Hospital, surrounded by his sons and daughter-in-law. Predeceased by his beloved wife of 48 years, Audrey Margaret WATTS. Loving father of Kingsley (Pearl), Rebeccah (Graham) and Jason. Gentle grandfather of Evan, Silas, Kelsey, and Jesse. Dear brother-in-law to George PETRIE, Kit McMAHON and Mandy McMAHON. Born in Toronto, Fraser attended Stanford and Yale before receiving his diploma from the Architectural Association in England where he met Audrey McMAHON. Trained as both an Architect, and as a Landscape Architect at Harvard, he practiced and taught for thirty five years at the University of Toronto and at the University of Waterloo where he served as Dean of Architecture. Perhaps most comfortable with a pencil in hand, he loved to solve visual problems through design. He was fascinated with the history of gardens, a subject he taught to a generation, or two, of Canadian architects. He loved to walk and to observe, pleasures he shared with the greatest love of his life, his wife. He read voraciously, and had a weakness for British detective novels, and Canadian Fiction writers. He listened religiously to Canadian Broadcasting Corporation's ''Ideas'' programs to the day he died. He will be remembered as a private, loving, and complex man who cared passionately for his family, and for the visual world. There will be a visitation at the Turner & Porter Funeral Home, 436 Roncesvalles Avenue on Tuesday, December 16th from 7: 00 - 9:00 p.m. In memory of his wife, donations may be made to the Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Society, 265 Yorkland Blvd., Suite 300A, North York, M2J 1S5, or at www.alsontario.org

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PETRINI o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-28 published
Manfred Friedrich WIRTH (November 17, 1913 - March 21, 2003)
Manfred died suddenly but peacefully exactly 1 year after his beloved Lisl. He leaves behind sadly grieving son Alfred, daughter Elizabeth (Lou FAUTEUX,) grandchildren Elizabeth and Susan WIRTH (Ali POURAZIM,) and Eric BRAND (Anita) as well as sister Beate FLUECK- WIRTH, sister-in-law Marianne MAYO and many devoted Friends & relatives around the world. Manfred was born in Vienna, Austria to Hofrat Dr. Alfred Ludwig WIRTH and Beate Karola, née PETRINI VON MONTEFERRI, and graduated with a PhD in law prior to his 23rd birthday. He was a director of the Austrian Steel Company (VOEST) before emigrating to Canada post-war, and started his Canadian working life at Algoma Steel Corporation in Sault Ste Marie, Ontario. In 1958 he founded Wirth Limited (now Wirth Steel), building the company into a major international trader. Since 1993 and until his death, he was President and Chief Executive Officer of MF Wirth Rail Corp. Manfred loved the arts, especially opera and the visual arts. He was also a history buff, and a generous donor to McGill University, the University of Alberta and Wilfred Laurier University as well as Arts Knowlton and other Canadian institutions. He was a member of various clubs and societies, a recipient of the Order of Austria, and a keen skier, swimmer and golfer. A private farewell with immediate family has taken place; a memorial service to celebrate his long and eventful life will be held in Montreal at St.Andrew's-Dominion-Douglas Church, 687 Roslyn Ave. Westmount, Quebec on Monday May 26, 2003 at 2: 00 P.M. Anyone desiring to make a donation in Manfred's memory may wish to consider McGill University: Designation Faculty of Music, 3605 de la Montagne, Montreal H3G 2M1, the Foundation of the University Women's Club Montreal Inc, 3529 Atwater Avenue, Montreal H3H 1Y2, or a charity of your choice. Condolences may be sent to 24 Somerville Avenue, Montreal, Quebec H3Z 1J2

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PETROSKI o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-11-08 published
PETROSKI, Harris Stanley
Born December 20th, 1929 in Jasmin, Saskatchewan died November 3rd, 2003 at the M.D. Anderson Cancer Clinic in Houston, Texas. A graduate of Applied Science from U.B.C. in 1953, he is survived by Mary, his loving wife of 48 years; his son Jim, wife Carol and sons Richard and Gregory; son Gord, wife Tammie, son Josh and daughter Marina; daughter Karen, husband Peter and son David. In lieu of flowers please make donations for Harris to the Terry Fox Foundation. Memorial Mass will be held on November 14, 2003 at 1: 00 p.m at St. Pius X, 1150 Mt Seymour Rd. North Vancouver (604-929-1404). Reception to follow.

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PETROVA o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-07-16 published
Rafael Georgieff KOLTSCHEFF
The family announces with sorrow his death, Friday, July 11, 2003, in Mindemoya, at the age of 87 years.
son of the late Georgi KOLTSCHEFF and of the late Maria KOLTSCHEFF (née PETROVA.)
Loving husband of Miroslava KOLTSCHEFF (née KRATOCHVILOVA) of Mindemoya.
Mr. KOLTSCHEFF worked in Manitoba, Sarnia and Toronto before settling in Sudbury as a supervisor for Rainbow Concrete. After his retirement in 1981, Rafael moved to Mindemoya where he took great pleasure in gardening and fishing. He was a wonderful husband and a good friend to all who knew him. A memorial service will be held at a later date in St. Francis of Assisi Anglican Church in Mindemoya. Co-operative Funeral Home, Sudbury.

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PETROVIC o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-03-12 published
Steve PETROVIC
In loving memory of Steve Petrovic who passed away Monday morning, March 3, 2003 at the Extendicare, Falconbridge at the age of 92 years.
Beloved husband of Maria (Natler) Petrovic of Sudbury. Loving father of Stephen (wife Mary Lou) of Kapuskasing. Cherished grandfather of Hannah, Marisa and Joshua. Sadly missed by many relatives in Yugoslavia, Steve was born in Tusilovic, Yugoslavia, where he worked as a police officer before enlisting in World War II as a member of the Allied Forces. He immigrated to Canada in 1949, then came to Sudbury where he worked at INCO for many years, retiring in 1976. He followed politics with a passion. Steve enjoyed gardening and spending time at his cottage on Manitoulin Island. Funeral Service was held in Church of the Resurrection, 363 Regent St. on Wednesday, March 5, 2003. Interment in the Mindemoya Cemetery.

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PETROVIC o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-10-29 published
Theodor NAGLER
In loving memory of Theodor (Ted) NAGLER, 76 years, Friday evening, October 24, 2003 at the Mindemoya Hospital, Manitoulin Island.
Beloved husband of Marie (BURT) NAGLER. Loving father of Dr. James (Faye) NAGLER,
Susan (Larry) TOBIN, Marcia (Michael) BOND. Cherished Papa and Grandpa of Emily and Lauren NAGLER, Felice, Jocelyn, Benjamin and Jacob TOBIN, and Jenna and Rebecca BOND. Dear brother of Maria PETROVIC (husband Stephan (predeceased) of Kapuskasing (formerly Sudbury) and Lydia NAGLER of Zell am See, Austria. Predeceased by his mother Maria and father Josef NAGLER of Zell am See, Austria and brother-in-law Harold (Rena) BURT. Sadly missed by nieces Anne MILLS and Mary Lynn WILSON, and nephew Stephan PETROVIC. Ted retired in 1986 as Director of Plant Maintenance after 30 years of service at Sudbury Memorial Hospital. Following his retirement he moved to Mindemoya where he enjoyed all the outdoor activities each season brings on the Island.
Visitation was held on Monday, October 27, 2003 at St. Francis of Assisi Anglican Church. Funeral service was held on Tuesday, October 28, 2003 at St. Francis of Assisi Anglican Church. Island Funeral Home

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PETROWSKI o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-08 published
PETROWSKI, Mary Anne (KENT)
At London Health Sciences Centre, Westminster Campus on Thursday, March 6, 2003 in her 73rd year. Only daughter of the late Marion (FAUNT) and Gordon KENT. She leaves behind her dearest friend and loving husband Victor. She is survived by her two cherished daughters Suzanne LEWIS of West Vancouver and Lauren TEEVAN of Toronto, their husbands Richard and Nicholas, and two darling granddaughters Jordan and Kendall LEWIS. Mary Anne was predeceased by her son G.W. Kent PETROWSKI and now goes happily to meet him with open arms. She was born and lived her entire life in London and was a third generation of the West-Kent family, business people in London from 1888-1980. She will be fondly remembered by many beloved relatives and Friends made throughout her life. She was very interested in the work of the Imperial Order of the Daughters of the Empire and May Court clubs and was a life member of Metropolitan United Church. Mary Anne had a deep love of music for pleasure, and hopefully will leave a song in the hearts of all who knew her and whom she loved.
Friends may call on Sunday from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. at the James A. Harris Funeral Home, Richmond St. at St. James, London, Ontario. A memorial service will be conducted on Monday, March 10 at 12: 00 Noon in Metropolitan United Church, Dufferin Ave. at Wellington Street, London, Ontario, by Reverend Farquhar MacKINNON. A private cremation service will be held followed by burial in Woodland Cemetery. Memorial contributions to the Children's Hospital Foundation (for Medical Genetics Research) or the London Regional Cancer Centre would be gratefully acknowledged.

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PETTIGREW o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-01-08 published
Elizabeth Fay (Beth) BARTLETT
In loving memory of Elizabeth Fay (Beth) BARTLETT who passed away suddenly at her home on Friday, January 3, 2003. Beth AINSLIE in her 86th year, beloved wife of George BARTLETT. Loving mother of George and Anne of Stittsville, Mary and David PETTIGREW of Alliston, and the late Tom BARTLETT. Dear mother-in-law of Marion BARTLETT of Churchville. Loved by her 7 grandchildren and 2 great grand_sons. Dear sister of Naomi, Leone (Joe,) Norton and the late Bernard (Sandy) AINSLIE. Rested at Rod Abrams Funeral Home, Tottenham on Sunday, January 5, 2003. Funeral service was held in the chapel on Monday, January 6, 2003 followed by cremation.
A springtime memorial and interment service will be held in Elizabeth Bay United Church and Cemetery.

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PETTIGREW o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-11 published
Pint-sized scrapper 'liked wrestling more than eating'
Stellar career in the ring was marred only by the near-miss loss of an Olympic medal
By Tom HAWTHORN, Special to The Globe and Mail Thursday, December 11, 2003 - Page R11
He was a Regina stonecutter who used his strength to good effect in the wrestling ring. Vern PETTIGREW, who has died at 95, was an athlete whose career was marred only by the near-miss loss of an Olympic medal.
Competing for Canada, Mr. PETTIGREW finished in fourth place in the featherweight division of the freestyle-wrestling competition at the Berlin Olympics in 1936. The 28-year-old stonecutter with a chiselled physique had dominated his Swedish opponent when the match suddenly ended with Mr. PETTIGREW disqualified for using an illegal hold. The Swede went on to claim the bronze medal, while Mr. PETTIGREW spent the next 67 years contemplating the unfairness of a verdict that denied him Olympic glory.
"One call made all the difference," he told The Regina Leader-Post in 1996. "You can't quarrel, but it was terrible. It was a legal hold, but they said it was illegal. I could have been standing on the podium, but you can't cry about it."
Even before the devastating verdict, Canadian wrestlers had expressed their unhappiness with the officiating at the tournament.
The team felt European officials, versed in the more rigid dictates of the Greco-Roman discipline, were unfamiliar with the rules of freestyle, or catch-as-catch-can, wrestling. For instance, the Canadians relied heavily on leg holds, only to discover the judges did not award points for the manoeuvre. Canada claimed only one of 18 freestyle medals awarded at the 1936 Games, a bronze for Joseph SCHLEIMER, a lightweight from Toronto.
Mr. PETTIGREW retained his amateur status after returning from the Games, continuing to dominate his weight class in Canada. He stepped away from the mat as a competitor in 1940, having won five national championships. He was also known as an eager participant in exhibition matches, willing to take on all comers.
"I liked wrestling more than eating," he once said.
John Vernon PETTIGREW was born on March 30, 1908, in Durham, Ontario He moved with his family to Biggar, Saskatchewan., two years later, before settling in Regina in 1919.
Wrestling was perhaps a natural sport for a pint-sized boy born as part of a baker's dozen brood of PETTIGREWs. He learned the formal rules and tactics of the sport at the old Young Men's Christian Association in Regina, "a stinkin' Y with a pool as big as my kitchen," he told the Leader-Post.
Wrestling was conducted in a small basement room reached by a long flight of stairs. "It was never washed. No wonder we got big scabs on our knees."
He claimed his first Dominion featherweight crown in 1933 and dominated his weight division in Saskatchewan, where he won 10 provincial championships.
He was accompanied on the long journey by train and ocean liner to Germany in 1936 by fellow Regina wrestler George CHIGA. A 210-pound (95-kilogram) heavyweight, Mr. CHIGA dwarfed his featherweight friend, who weighed closer to 134 pounds (61 kilograms).
One of the more memorable experiences in the athlete's camp was Mr. PETTIGREW's first viewing of that science-fiction dream called television. He also met the great American track athlete Jesse OWENS, whose humility and friendliness in trying circumstances Mr. PETTIGREW never forgot. Like many of the athletes, however, Mr. PETTIGREW remained unaware of, or unconcerned about, the intentions of the Nazi regime, for which the Games were a propaganda exercise.
A first-round victory over Karel KVACEK of Czechoslovakia impressed Canadian Press correspondent Elmer DULMAGE, who wrote that Mr. PETTIGREW "gives a pretty fair imitation of lightning."
The Regina wrestler defeated Marco GAVELLI of Italy and Hector RISKE of Belgium, but was pinned at two minutes, 13 seconds of a fourth-round match by Francis MILLARD of the United States. The controversial disqualification against Gosta JONSSON of Sweden eliminated Mr. PETTIGREW from the medals. Kustaa PIHLAJAMAKI of Finland won the featherweight gold, while Mr. MILLARD took silver and Mr. JONSSON got bronze.
Mr. PETTIGREW retired from wrestling not long after joining the Regina fire department in 1939. He retired as battalion fire chief in 1973. He then worked part-time at a local funeral home, which years later would handle his remains.
Mr. PETTIGREW, who died in Regina on October 29, leaves a daughter and two sons. He was predeceased by his wife Jean; by his eldest son, Robert; and by all 12 of his siblings.
In all the years since leaving Berlin, he never quite overcame the sense that he had been robbed of a chance for an Olympic medal. "It always bugs you," he said.

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PETTINATO o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-10-22 published
ARDIEL, Ruth Winnifred (née FRANCIS) 89 years.
Died peacefully at Windsor Regional Hospital-Western Campus on Tuesday, October 21, 2003. Dearest wife of the late J.R. ARDIEL (1973.) Beloved mother of Joan DUFF, Karen MEYERS and Susan and David RUCH. Dearest sister of June and Fred ROEMMELE. Loving grandmother of Melissa MEYERS and Jim DONOHUE, Jay MEYERS and Tina ROBBINS, Allison RUCH and Ryan SMITH, Dave RUCH and Anne Marie PETTINATO, Julie SANDO, and John PECARARO, Jackie and Frank HAMILTON, Michelle and Joe GRECO and Natalie DUFF. Great grandmother of Max and Miranda PECARARO, Scott and Mathew HAMILTON and Kaity and Nicholas GRECO. Dear Aunt to her special nieces, nephews, great nieces and nephews. Remembered by several cousins in London and Toronto. Born on a homestead in Marengo, Saskatchewan to the late Anne and Alfred FRANCIS; pre-deceased by brothers Lloyd (1912), Bruce (Royal Canadian Air Force, 1943) and her sister Dorothy HENDERSON (1964.) Ruth was a long-standing member of Beach Grove Golf and Country Club, Windsor and Tamarac Golf and Country Club, Fort Lauderdale, Florida. Visiting in the Walter D. Kelly Funeral Home and Cremation Centre, 1969 Wyandotte St. East, Windsor, Ontario on Thursday 3-5 and 7-9 p.m. The complete funeral service will be held in the chapel on Friday, October 24, 2003 at 11: 00 a.m. Reverend William GALLAGHER officiating. Cremation with interment later in Greenlawn Memorial Cemetery. In kindness memorial tributes to the charity of you choice, Heart and Stroke Foundation or the Canadian Cancer Society would be appreciated.

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