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"PEA" 2003 Obituary


PEACHMAN  PEAK  PEARCE  PEARL  PEARSALL  PEARSON  PEART  PEAT 

PEACHMAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-05-17 published
STEWARD/STEWART/STUART, Gerald A.
Died peacefully of complications related to cancer on Thursday, May 15, 2003 at Ross Memorial Hospital in Lindsay, Ontario at age 70. Husband and best friend of Nelia MacMILLAN. son of the late Mabel PEACHMAN and Horace STEWARD/STEWART/STUART. Brother of Bernice STEWARD/STEWART/STUART. Father of Christopher, Lisa VEHRS and her husband Jason. Brother-in-law of Kerr MacMILLAN, the late Jim MacMILLAN and Joan MacMILLAN. Uncle of Ann MacMILLAN and Tyler MacMILLAN, his wife Jill and great-uncle of Lindsay. He was a longtime member of the MG Car Club of Canada throughout the 50s, 60s and 70s, a dedicated parent and coach at Leaside Girls' Hockey in the 80s and 90s, and for years an enthusiastic member of the executive committee at the Sturgeon Point Golf Club. A memorial service will be held in the chapel of the Morley Bedford Funeral Home, 159 Eglinton Avenue West, Toronto (2 stop lights west of Yonge Street), Wednesday, May 21, 2003, 4 p.m. If desired, please make a donation to a favourite charity.

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PEACHMAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-05-20 published
STEWARD/STEWART/STUART, Gerald A.
Died peacefully of complications related to cancer on Thursday, May 15, 2003 at Ross Memorial Hospital in Lindsay, Ontario at age 70. Husband and best friend of Nelia MacMILLAN. son of the late Mabel PEACHMAN and Horace STEWARD/STEWART/STUART. Brother of Bernice STEWARD/STEWART/STUART. Father of Christopher, Lisa VEHRS and her husband Jason. Brother-in-law of Kerr MacMILLAN, the late Jim MacMILLAN and Joan MacMILLAN. Uncle of Ann MacMILLAN and Tyler MacMILLAN, his wife Jill and great-uncle of Lindsay. He was a longtime member of the MG Car Club of Canada throughout the 50s, 60s and 70s, a dedicated parent and coach at Leaside Girls' Hockey in the 80s and 90s, and for years an enthusiastic member of the executive committee at the Sturgeon Point Golf Club. A memorial service will be held in the chapel of the Morley Bedford Funeral Home, 159 Eglinton Avenue West, Toronto (2 stop lights west of Yonge Street), Wednesday, May 21, 2003, 4 p.m. If desired, please make a donation to a favourite charity.

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PEAK o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-10-11 published
Creator of Savage God
Theatre director was a Canadian nationalist, a fan of the avant garde and a champion of playwright George Ryga. He was also seen as a kook, a dilettante and a street fighter
By Tom HAWTHORN Special to The Globe and Mail Saturday, October 11, 2003 - Page F9
John JULIANI was a provocateur in life as on stage. A man passionate about the possibilities of theatre, he roused reverence in some, antipathy in others.
His most infamous act was to challenge the Stratford Festival's newly hired artistic director to a duel. Robin PHILLIPS's offence was that he is British when Mr. JULIANI and others were certain a land as grand as Canada was capable of producing a director for its Shakespearean theatre.
What he called a "romantic gesture with tongue in cheek" earned cheers from Canadian theatre directors and sneers from much of the theatre establishment.
Mr. JULIANI, who has died at the age of 63, was an unabashed Canadian nationalist, a dedicated fan of the avant garde, an ardent defender of the right of actors to a decent living, a champion of playwright George Ryga and a tireless figure so commanding as to develop an intense loyalty among acolytes.
At the same time, he was seen as a kook, a dilettante and a street fighter. One critic called him "the Tiger Williams of Canadian theatre," his pugnacious approach earning him comparison to a notorious hockey goon. In his defence, Mr. JULIANI explained that he was merely a "true believer" with opinions on controversial subjects.
Mr. JULIANI's credits were long and varied, including spontaneous Sixties street happenings such as the staging of his own wedding as a theatrical performance and brief appearances on such 1990s television dramas as The X-Files.
From 1982 until 1997, Mr. JULIANI was executive producer of radio drama for Canadian Broadcasting Corporation Radio in Vancouver. He helped to bring to air many celebrated productions, including the brilliant and provocative Dim Sum Diaries by playwright Mark LEIREN- YOUNG.
Mr. JULIANI also possessed a head-turning beauty, with a profile as striking as a Roman bust. Radio host Bill RICHARDSON commented on his handsomeness at a raucous memorial after his death, calling him a "hunka hunka burnin' love." Some said he had the looks and bearing of a Shakespearean king.
John Charles JULIANI was born in Montreal on March 24, 1940. Raised in a working-class neighbourhood, he attended Loyola College and was an early graduate from the fledgling National Theatre School.
He spent two seasons as an actor at Stratford before being hired as a theatre teacher at Simon Fraser University in 1966. The new university atop Burnaby Mountain east of Vancouver was a hotbed of radicalism in politics and the arts. Mr. JULIANI bristled at an imposed curriculum and so infuriated the administration that he was banned from the campus in 1969.
Mr. JULIANI was heavily influenced by the writing of Antonin Artaud, a Surrealist who championed a theatre based on the imagination. He long sought to erase the barrier between scripted text and sensory impression, between performer and audience, to mixed success.
After moving to the West Coast, Mr. JULIANI launched a series of experiments in theatre. He credited these productions to Savage God, which was less a troupe in the traditional sense than a title granted to any performance involving Mr. JULIANI. The name came from William Butler Yeats's awestruck reaction to Alfred Jarry's Ubu Roi: "After us, the Savage God?"
Savage God defied explanation, though many tried and even Mr. JULIANI offered suggestions. Savage God was "an anthology of question marks," he once said. (It was, after all, the 1960s.) "Savage God is simply the Imagination," he told the Vancouver Sun, "insatiable, unrelenting, fiercely energetic, wary of categorization, fond of contradiction and inveterately iconoclastic."
In January, 1970, Mr. JULIANI married dancer Donna WONG, a ceremony conducted as a Savage God performance at the Vancouver Art Gallery. He repeated the process at the christening of his son. Ms. WONG- JULIANI would be his domestic and drama partner for more than three decades.
In 1971, the streets of Vancouver were the scene of several spontaneous and sometimes incomprehensible -- performances under the aegis of PACET ("pilot alternative complement to existing theatre.") The $18,000 project, funded by the federal government, incorporated Gestalt therapy sessions in street performances.
Theatrical events took place willy-nilly across the city, including malls, the airport, the library and Stanley Park. Admission was not charged, nor did all spectators appreciate their role as audience to avant-garde performance. A scene in which bicyclists wearing gas masks pedalled along city streets left many scratching their heads in puzzlement.
In 1974, Mr. JULIANI moved to Toronto to set up a graduate theatre-studies program at York University.
He called the program PEAK (" Performance, Example, Animation, Katharsis") and perhaps should have found an acronym for PEEK, as the instructor and his class stripped naked to protest against a lack of classroom space.
The challenge to the new Stratford artistic director in 1974 was written on a piece of parchment and delivered in London by Don RUBIN, a York colleague. Alas, Mr. RUBIN could not find a proper gauntlet and wound up ceremoniously striking Mr. PHILLIPS with a red rubber glove, an absurd note to a theatrical protest.
In 1978, Mr. JULIANI took the stage in a Toronto production of Children of Night, portraying Janusz Korczak, a doctor and teacher who ran an orphanage in the Warsaw ghetto. The critics were appalled.
Gina MALLET of the Toronto Star said Mr. JULIANI's performance sullied Dr. Korczak's memory. Jay SCOTT of The Globe and Mail, noting "the dreadfulness" of Mr. JULIANI's acting, said the production robbed the dead of their dignity.
From the stage, Mr. JULIANI challenged the Star's critic to a public debate on the aesthetics of theatre. He also wrote a letter to the editor, noting that Holocaust survivors in the audience had wholeheartedly embraced the production.
Mr. JULIANI wound up in Edmonton, where he continued to condemn the "exorbitance, elitism and museum theatre" of the establishment.
In 1982, he directed and co-wrote Latitude 55°, a feature film with just two characters -- a slick woman from the city and a Polish potato farmer -- set in a snowbound cabin. "It is filled with a passionate conviction that evaporates in pretentious pronouncements," The Globe's Carole CORBEIL wrote, "filled with truthful moments that evaporate in the desire to use every narcissistic trick in the book."
In a 1983 book examining the alternative theatre movement in Canada, author Renate USMIANI devoted most of a chapter to Mr. JULIANI, a decision that got her a scathing rebuke from a reviewer who considered him worthy of little more than a footnote.
"His works are curiosities; at best, they are worthy experiments in Artaudian theory," Boyd NEIL wrote in a Globe review. "But they are neither popular... nor influential."
Mr. JULIANI's years at Canadian Broadcasting Corporation Radio in Vancouver were both productive and successful. Among the many projects he directed was a three-part adaptation of Margaret Laurence's The Diviners; King Lear, starring John COLICOS; a 13-part series titled, Disaster! Acts of God or Acts of Man?" and, famously, Ryga's The Ecstasy of Rita Joe, with Leonard GEORGE portraying a role once assumed on stage by his late father, Chief Dan GEORGE. The surprise selection of Mr. GEORGE was typical of Mr. JULIANI's often brilliant casting.
Mr. JULIANI directed a 1989 production of The Glass Menagerie at the Vancouver Playhouse with Jennifer Phipps and Morris Panych. Globe reviewer Liam LACEY praised a production that "opens up the play like an old treasure chest, and lets in some fresh air without rearranging or disturbing the work's original grandeurs and caprices."
Four years later, Mr. JULIANI was directing a production of the mystery thriller Sleepwalker when actor Peter HAWORTH took sick shortly before opening night. The director suddenly found himself as the male lead. "Not even the most colossal egotist would want to do this," he said.
Dim Sum Diaries, a series of monologues written by Mr. LEIREN- YOUNG, received protests when aired by Canadian Broadcasting Corporation Radio in 1991. One episode, entitled The Sequoia, in which the white vendor of a luxury home launches a tirade against the Hong Kong immigrant who cuts down two rare and spectacular trees on the property, was accused of being racist. The playwright's well-intentioned exploration of stereotyping was charged with fostering those very prejudices.
After directing Dim Sum Diaries, Mr. JULIANI urged the playwright to tackle an issue that was dividing his church. Mr. LEIREN- YOUNG remembers replying: "You're talking same-sex marriage in the Anglican church and you want a straight Jewish guy to write this?"
The resulting play, titled Articles of Faith: The Battle of St. Alban's, was staged at Christ Church Cathedral in downtown Vancouver to great acclaim.
The collaborations between young playwright and veteran director succeeded in achieving Mr. JULIANI's goal of inspiring dialogue through theatre.
Mr. JULIANI had a reputation as a demanding taskmaster for novice and veteran actors alike. Rehearsals were jokingly called "Savage God Boot Camp."
He maintained a breakneck pace, both in the theatre and in the boardroom. He was artistic co-director of Opera Breve, a small company dedicated to nurturing young singers; president of the Union of British Columbia Performers (Alliance of Canadian Cinema, Television and Radio Artists); and, a former national president of the Directors Guild of Canada, among many boards on which he served.
Feeling fatigued in early August, Mr. JULIANI was diagnosed with liver cancer. The end came swiftly. He died on August 21 at Lions Gate Hospital in North Vancouver.
He leaves his wife of 33 years, Donna WONG- JULIANI, and a son, Alessandro JULIANI, an actor. He also leaves brothers Richard and Norman.
(Wit was long a part of the JULIANI mystique. The family pet, a canine named Beau Beau, was referred to in the family's paid obituary notice as a Savage Dog.)
For one who roused such passions, Mr. JULIANI felt that he led a conservative life. "I have always been a square," he once said.
A theatrical farewell to Mr. JULIANI attracted hundreds to St. Andrew's Wesley Church in Vancouver on Labour Day, a Monday and traditionally a quiet date on the theatre calendar. Those in attendance were encouraged to write remembrances on Post-It notes, which were then stuck to the church's pillars.
The City of Vancouver has declared next March 24, which would have been Mr. JULIANI's 64th birthday, to be Savage God Day.

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PEARCE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-01-10 published
Civil servant moonlighted as a master of municipal politics
From global matters to local logjams, he excelled at finding common ground
By Randy RAY Special to The Globe and Mail Friday, January 10, 2003, Page R11
David BARTLETT wasn't comfortable in front of a stove, and couldn't carry a tune or run a hockey practice. But he excelled at most other pursuits, whether he was drafting memos to cabinet ministers, mediating disputes between neighbours at township council, or square dancing at a local community centre.
Of local politics, he once told his wife, Betty, "I can't coach sports teams, bake cakes or sing in a choir, but I can do this."
Mr. BARTLETT, a career civil servant in the federal government and also a long-serving municipal politician, died of cancer at his home in Manotick, Ontario, on November 8, aged 76.
During a career that began in Ottawa in 1948, the Toronto native was secretary-general at the Canadian Commission for the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization, which advises the government on its relations with the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization, and coordinates its activities in Canada.
He was also secretary of the Canada Council for the Arts, the arm's-length funding agency, and was acting commercial secretary in the office of the High Commissioner for Canada in Pakistan.
He was active in municipal politics for two decades, including eights years as a member of the board of trustees of the Police Village of Manotick, and six years as mayor of Rideau Township, both south of Ottawa. During and after his mayoralty, Mr. BARTLETT was easy to locate in the community: His licence plates read "RIDEAU."
"One of the most striking things about David was that he could turn his hand to almost anything and do it well," said close friend Douglas SMALL.
Friends, family and colleagues said another of Mr. BARTLETT's strong suits was an ability to understand complicated issues and then come up with solutions satisfactory to all sides.
Bill TUPPER, a former Ottawa-area Member of Parliament and also a past mayor of Rideau Township, remembers how Mr. BARTLETT once settled a dispute between two farm families over drainage.
"The issue was who would keep the drain clear. Both parties were almost foaming with venom but David, who was mayor at the time, listened to both sides and said, 'I think I see a solution and with a little luck, it might work.' He told them his plan and the farmers looked at one another and asked, 'Is it that simple?'
"They shook hands on the way out of the meeting."
Mr. BARTLETT graduated from the University of Toronto with a degree in political science and economics. He worked with the federal Civil Service Commission for two years before winning a scholarship at the London School of Economics, where he earned a master's degree. He married Betty PEARCE in 1950.
Prior to working with the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization and the Canada Council, he was chief of the Technical Co-operation Service, Colombo Plan Administration, in Canada, precursor to the Canadian International Development Agency; and he was executive officer to the federal deputy minister of Northern Affairs and National Resources. He retired in 1986 after seven years as assistant director and secretary at the Canada Council, but continued to do contract work.
His government jobs were administrative in nature, says Mrs. BARTLETT, "but not in a routine sense. He had a variety of interesting projects," including the task of helping Governor-General Georges VANIER and his wife, Pauline, tour northern Canada.
In the early 1990s, he conceived a plan to rescue the World University Service of Canada from receivership. At the time, he was interim executive director of the organization, which is a network of individuals and institutions that foster human development and global understanding through education and training. From 1991 to 1998, he sat on World University Service of Canada's board of directors.
Mr. BARTLETT entered municipal politics in 1965 while still working for the government, which meant he often came home from work after 6 p.m., grabbed a bite to eat, and was off to a meeting that could last until after midnight. He bowed out of politics in 1985 after losing an election.
"His motivation was that he loved the work," said Mrs. BARTLETT. "He never fretted about things, there was never any tossing and turning at night. He had this talent for dealing with all things in a balanced way and coming up with a fair solution."
Mr. BARTLETT also contributed his time to a local Scout troop, and the Royal Canadian Geographical Society, and wrote columns for a local newspaper. After retiring, he was appointed to a number of task forces that studied taxi services at Pearson International Airport in Toronto, the ward boundaries in Ottawa and the workings of regional governments.
In retirement, he and his wife spent part of each year on Grand Manan Island, New Brunswick. Mr. BARTLETT leaves his wife, Betty, and sons Michael and Peter.

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PEARCE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-04-07 published
He struck gold at the old Empire games
By Tom HAWTHORN Special to The Globe and Mail Monday, April 7, 2003 - Page R7
Jim COURTRIGHT, who has died, aged 88, was one of Canada's top track-and-field athletes, winning a gold medal in the javelin throw at the 1938 British Empire Games in Sydney.
Just getting to the meet was a marathon for Mr. COURTRIGHT, an engineering student at Queen's University in Kingston, Ontario The price of a train ticket to Vancouver beyond his means, he found work as a prisoner escort, travelling cross-country in a converted box car while handcuffed to a man facing deportation.
In any event, he found his fare and went on to join the Canadian team which arrived in Australia on January 15, 1938.
In the javelin throw, Mr. COURTRIGHT faced formidable competition in Stanley LAY of New Zealand and Jack METCALFE of Australia. LAY, a sign writer by trade, had been a capable cricketer who put his arm to great success. METCALFE was a superb athlete whose specialty was the triple jump, in which he won a bronze at the Berlin Olympics in 1936 and gold at the Empire Games in 1938. In the end, it was the Canadian who prevailed, followed by LAY and METCALFE.
Despite his gold medal, Mr. COURTRIGHT was overshadowed by Eric COY of Winnipeg, who had won two medals and so was awarded the Norton H. Crowe Trophy as Canada's outstanding amateur athlete that year. Mr. COURTRIGHT also trailed Mr. COY and sculler Bob PEARCE in voting for the Lou Marsh Trophy as Canada's top male athlete, a prize open to amateurs and professionals. Mr. PEARCE won the trophy.
Later in 1938, Mr. COURTRIGHT unleashed a throw of 62.74 metres, an intercollegiate record at the time that still ranks as the third longest in Queen's University history. He broke his leg in an accident at a gold mine in Northern Ontario in the summer of 1939, yet recovered to play guard for the school's basketball team the following winter.
James Milton COURTRIGHT was born in 1914 to a civil engineer and the daughter of the town sheriff in North Bay, Ontario The family moved to Ottawa and the boy participated in football and field events at Glebe Collegiate.
Mr. COURTRIGHT placed third nationally in the javelin in 1934 while still a student at the University of Ottawa. He finished second the following year behind Mr. COY.
In 1936, the Ottawa student was the best in the land and attended the Berlin Olympics that summer. One of 28 competitors in the javelin, Mr. COURTRIGHT's best throw of 60.54 metres was too short to qualify for the final round. He finished 14th in an event won by Gerhard STOECK of Germany, whose winning toss of 71.84 metres was inspired by chanting crowds at the Olympic stadium, among them Adolf Hitler.
The disappointment of his Berlin performance spurred Mr. COURTRIGHT to greater success in throwing events. In 1937, he was Canada's intercollegiate champion in javelin and the shot put.
In July, he travelled to Dallas to compete at a 200-athlete meet organized as part of the city's Greater Texas and Pan-American Exposition. Mr. COURTRIGHT won the gold medal in javelin at the Cotton Bowl. The success of the meet inspired the organizing of the first official Pan-American Games fourteen years later.
Mr. COURTRIGHT attended postgraduate classes in engineering at Queen's, where he did double-duty as star athlete and track coach. He was also president of the student body in his final year.
After graduation, Mr. COURTRIGHT joined Shell Canada as a refinery engineer in Montreal in 1941. As he was promoted he accepted back-and-forth postings from Montreal to Toronto to Vancouver to Toronto to Montreal to Toronto, including a stint as a public-relations co-ordinator.
He became a vice-principal at Queen's in 1970, a job he held until retirement nine years later.
Mr. COURTRIGHT died on February 21, just days after the 65th anniversary of his triumph in Sydney. He leaves eight children and sister Celina COURTRIGHT of Ottawa. He was predeceased by his wife, Mary (née Roche), and three brothers.
In 1958, a moving van loaded with the family's possessions caught fire and burned, destroying many of Mr. COURTRIGHT's medals and trophies. A prize rescued from the ashes was the gold medal from the British Empire Games. It is now in the hands of a grand_son.

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PEARL o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-07 published
KIZELL, Sonia (née GITKIN)
Peacefully in Toronto, on March 5, 2003, 2 Adar 2nd 5763, beloved Mother of Gita and Gerald PEARL, Dorothy and George ROSENBERG, Rachel and Gerald SCHNEIDERMAN, loving Bubby of Gina and Mikey, Sandy and Susan, Lizzy and Stewart, Elliott, Ari and Sagit, Jordan and Sharon, Daphna, Jed and Ariel, Liza and Gary, loving Great-Grandmother of Sigal, Edi, Einav, Dana, Remi, Marlin, Allegra, Zoey, Sonny, Jasmin and Nitai. Service at the Jewish Community Chapel, 1771 Cuba Ave., in Ottawa, on Friday, March 7, 2003 at 2: 00 p.m. Interment Bank Street Cemetery. Shiva Hillel Lodge, 10 Nadolny Sachs Private, Ottawa. If desired, memorial donations may be made to the Norman and Sonia Kizell Foundation (613) 798-4696.

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PEARL o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-07-12 published
Moms always liked him best
The Happy Gang's popular lead singer had a good reason for saying hello to his mom whenever the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation radio classic was on air
By James McCREADY Special to The Globe and Mail Saturday, July 12, 2003 - Page F10
The double knock on the door occurred every afternoon at 1.
"Who's there?"
"It's the Happy Gang."
"Well, come on in!"
Then Eddie ALLEN, Bert PEARL, Bobby GIMBY and the rest of the cast of Canada's most popular radio program would break into "Keep happy with the Happy Gang."
Mr. ALLAN, the show's main singer, accordion player and sometimes emcee, died last week, leaving Robert FARNON as the gang's sole surviving member.
Every day as many as two million Canadians tuned in The Happy Gang, which led the national ratings for most of its run on Canadian Broadcasting Corporation from 1937 to 1959. Until television came along in 1952, Mr. ALLEN and his cast mates were among the most famous people in the country.
The show was the creation of Mr. PEARL, who'd come to Toronto from Winnipeg (his real name was Bert SHAPIRA) to study medicine. To pay for his education, he started playing piano on radio with a band that included violinist Blain MATHE, organist Kay STOKES and Mr. FARNON, a trumpet player who would go on to be the most successful of them all.
The band morphed into the Happy Gang and Mr. PEARL was the driving force behind it. Eddie ALLEN was hired as the fifth member of the troupe and stayed with the program until it went off the air.
He was born Edward George ALLEN on December 24, 1920, in Toronto, and came from a family of musicians. His father, Bill ALLEN, played the trombone and was in a military band in France during the First World War. When Eddie was 10, his father asked him what instrument he wanted to play. The boy thought about it for a while and made up his mind after seeing a huge piano accordion in a music-store window.
"It was bigger than I was," Mr. ALLEN remembered, "but dad bought it anyway."
In a couple of years, he was entertaining at small events with his accordion, making $5 or $10 a week. Better than a paper route. He also won some local singing contests. When he was 17, he started singing and playing three nights a week on a radio program called The Serenader. Bert PEARL heard it and called him in.
"I auditioned him with Bert PEARL, and we liked him right away," Mr. FARNON says from his home on Guernsey in the Channel Islands. "He looked about 12 years old and could barely see over the top of his accordion. He was terribly shy, no self-confidence like the rest of us. He was very popular with the ladies, a very good-looking little chap."
What impressed most was his voice. "There really wasn't a singer in the Happy Gang until he came along. I really liked his voice."
Mr. FARNON remembers an incident from a Happy Gang rehearsal. "Eddie was about to sing a song called, I'll Take You Home Again, Kathleen, and I came up behind him and said, 'If you bring the gasoline.' He laughed so much he couldn't sing it when we went on the air."
The Happy Gang was old Canada, when the country was more rural and white skinned. It is impossible to imagine the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation mounting something so corny and wholesome. How corny was it? The host, Mr. PEARL, was known as "that slap-happy chappy, the Happy Gang's own pappy."
He also knew that sentiment sold. Mr. ALLEN would sing The Lord's Prayer on the program, two or three times a year, such as Good Friday, and during the war he sang it as an inspiration for mothers and their boys overseas.
By that time, the show's "appeal was enormous," wrote Ross MacLEAN, the late Canadian Broadcasting Corporation producer and media critic who began listening as a child. "During the war years... its influence on the nation was profound. Its almost daily performance of There'll Always Be An England helped maintain home-front resolve and stirred at least this school kid into a frenzy of tinfoil collection, war certificate sales and the knitting of various items for the navy."
Among the cast, Mr. ALLEN was the kid. He was slight, about 5-foot-6, and looked as though he were too young to shave. A newspaper reported that while he was on his honeymoon in 1942, a hotel clerk in Hamilton didn't believe he was old enough to be married and refused to rent him a room. Even some of his fans were quoted by writer Trent FRAYNE as saying, "Oh my goodness, don't tell me that little boy's married."
On air, he always sang old-fashioned ballads. "Every mother would love the stuff he sang," said Lyman POTTS, a retired broadcaster who crossed paths with some of the gang. He recalled that one of the songs Mr. ALLEN performed on a Happy Gang recording was I'm a Lonely Little Petunia in an Onion Patch. It was popular on the program, maybe because it was the perfect example of the Happy Gang's sort of cornball humour.
Another example is the line Mr. ALLEN used almost every day in the early years of the program. Mr. PEARL had told him not to let fame go to his head -- "Don't ever get the idea that you're too big to say hello to your mother." So, for his first six years, Mr. ALLEN's opening words were "Hello mom."
During the war, they dropped the shtick for fear of hurting the feelings of mothers with sons in uniform. It sparked a letter-writing campaign. "Don't let Eddie stop saying 'Hello mom,' " Liberty Magazine reported in May, 1945. "He reminds me of my own boy overseas. I wonder if he could think of all of us mothers when he says hello."
Over the years, the show appeared 195 times, always live (tape had yet to come into use when it began), in the course of an annual 39-week season, most of the time with the same cast. Its time slot was moved when the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation began running a 1 p.m. newscast, but the shift to 1: 15 EST didn't hurt the ratings. At first, it was produced in a studio on Davenport Road in Toronto and later in front of an audience of 700 to 800 on McGill Street near College and Yonge.
The program's mainstay was not talk or jokes but music, and the signature double knock on the door was an old-fashioned radio sound effect provided by Blain MATHE, who would move up to the mike and rap twice on the back of his violin.
Working together so closely did create some personality conflicts. There were practical jokes, usually aimed at the most uptight cast member: Mr. PEARL, a control freak who loved to plan the program in detail and had his own small office at the McGill Street studio.
One day, Mr. ALLEN and the other Happy Gang members set all the clocks forward by a few minutes. "We're late," they announced to Mr. PEARL, who raced into studio. After the opening, a couple of performers started to whine: "I don't want to do this."
Thinking they were actually on air, Mr. PEARL was shocked -- and didn't feel much better when he learned it was all a joke. It might have been one of the reasons he suffered a nervous breakdown (called "nervous exhaustion" for public consumption) and left the show in 1950 after 18 years and moved to the United States.
Eddie ALLEN took his place as emcee, but the incident rated an article in Maclean's by June CALLWOOD, the country's top magazine writer at the time, entitled: The Not So Happy Gang.
By then Mr. FARNON was long gone. During the war, he had joined the Canadian Army Show's band, and later led the Canadian band with the Allied Expeditionary Force, just as Glen MILLER led its U.S. ensemble. After the war he became a top arranger, working on Frank Sinatra albums and scores for such movies as Horatio Hornblower starring Gregory Peck.
Sinatra, however, was a little too flash for Eddie ALLEN, who preferred Bing Crosby. He was a sharp dresser, but his style was understated, almost always a conservative suit and muted shirt in a business where the shirt easily could have been orange.
His love of clothes gave him something to do when he left show business. Eddie ALLEN owned a men's clothing store in the west end of Toronto after he left the program. He later retired and moved to London, Ontario

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PEARSALL o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-05-03 published
PEARSALL, Lewis Clifford
Born February 27, 1921 in Australia, died April 30, 2003 in Toronto, Canada. He is survived and sadly missed by his much loved wife Cecile and his children Arlene and Bill, Philip and Gloria, Marc, Russell and Anne, LeeBari and Benjamin and his grandchildren Adam, Emily, Jesse, Cole, Molly and Jake. If desired, donations can be made to the Ralph Thornton Community Organization (Lewis Pearsall Fund) Or the Zen Buddhist Temple. A Memorial Service to celebrate his life will be held at the Zen Buddhist Temple, 297 College Street, Toronto on Friday, May 9th at 10 am.

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PEARSON o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-01-08 published
PEARSON
--In memory of my husband Tim, who passed away January 11, 2001.
We'll meet again,
beyond this earth, and starry sky,
Among the Angels, who don't
have a word that means good-bye.
A statement written by Tim himself...
This reminds me of a song...Laughing on the outside, crying on the
inside. People may think everything is wonderful and good because
they see you laughing and smiling, but how wrong they are, if the
truth be told...I love you, and miss you terribly.
Annette.

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PEARSON o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-01-08 published
PEARSON
- In memory of Tim who left us January 11, 2001.
We'll meet again
beyond this earth,
beyond this starry sky....
Among the angels,
who don't have
a word that means
good-bye.
-Sadly missed and lovingly remembered by Rick and Kathleen.

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PEARSON o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-06-11 published
PEARSON-
-In loving memory of Norris, who passed away June 14, 1982, Mike who passed away June 25, 1997, Tom who passed away Jan. 19, 1982 and Tim who passed away Jan 11, 2001.
Resting where no shadows fall
In peaceful sleep they await us all
God will link the broken chain
When one by one we will meet again.
-Sadly missed and lovingly remembered by wife and mother, Jean

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PEARSON o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-07-02 published
PEARSON
-In loving memory of a dear father, grandfather and great grandfather, Cecil, who passed away June 28, 1973.
"Dad" - No matter where we go and what we do,
We will always love and remember you.
-Ever missed and never forgotten. Mona and Bert and families.

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PEARSON o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-08-06 published
Hawley CRESS
In loving memory of Hawley CRESS who passed away peacefully at Manitoulin Health Centre on Friday, August 1, 2003 at the age of 82 years.
Predeceased by dear wife Elsie (née PEARSON.) Loving father of Larry and wife Roberta of Tehkummah, Jack and friend Julie of Mindemoya, Danny and wife Anita of Mindemoya, Beryl and husband Shane LAIDLEY of Little Current, Patsy and husband Mervin GILCHRIST of Mindemoya. Cherished grandfather of Brent and wife Pam, Jeff and wife Heather, Trevor and wife Lynn, Luke, Philippe, Michael, Melonie and friend James, Meghan, Matthew. Great grandfather of Zack, Jade, Paige, Haley, Jordan, Damion and Desaree. Remembered by brother Norman and wife Carrie and sisters-in-law Elva, Ann, Nelda and Jessie. Predeceased by brothers Harvey, Paul, William, Goldie, Cecil, Roy and sisters Nelda and Crystal. Graveside funeral service was held on Monday, August 4, 2003 in Hilly Grove Cemetery. Arrangements in care of Island Funeral Home.

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PEARSON o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-08-13 published
Emily " Lestie" Eileen McMURRAY
In loving memory of Emily "Lestie" Eileen McMURRAY who passed away at the Mindemoya Hospital on Monday, August 4, 2003 at the age of 62 years.
Loving wife of Doug McMURRAY. Loved mother of Jan McMURRAY of Little Current, Rick (Barbara) McMURRAY of Tehkummah, Debbie (Richard) KANKOWSKI of Hamilton. Fondly remembered by 9 grandchildren and 1 great grand child. Dear daughter of Mary BONIFACE of Wikwemikong Nursing Home. Loving sister to Earl KAY (Lolly predeceased) of Espanola, Harry BONIFACE of Tehkummah, Edna SARGINSON (Ron) of Ignace, Leola BONIFACE of Wikwemikong Nursing Home, Predeceased by Ken KAY, Survived by (Janet.)
Remembered fondly by Shirley (Lyle) PYETTE, Eileen (Alvin) PEARSON, Bev (Sandra) McMURRAY, Don (Joan) McMURRAY, Art (Marg) McMURRAY. Remembered by many nieces and nephews. Private Visitation. A graveside service was held on Thursday, August 7, 2003 at Hilly Grove Cemetery. Island Funeral Home.

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PEARSON o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-11-05 published
PEARSON
-In loving memory of a dear and wonderful mother and grandmother, Leona, who passed away November 9, 1977.
"Our mother and grandmother"
another word for caring
Putting others first-concern and patience
So many things that make the word so special
Just like you-too special to be forgotten.
--Lovingly missed and ever remembered by: Mona, Bert and families.

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PEARSON o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-12-10 published
Sarah Jane (Jennie) SPRY
In loving memory of Sarah Jane (Jennie) SPRY, November 14, 1912 to December 4, 2003.
Jennie SPRY, a resident of the Manitoulin Lodge for the past 5 years, and formerly of Mindemoya, passed away at the Lodge on Thursday, December 4, 2003 at the age of 91 years. She was born at Manitowaning, daughter of the late Thomas and Letitia PHILLIPS. Jennie had a variety of interests, which included gardening, cooking and quilting. Her greatest joy and love was her family. A wonderful and loving wife, mother and grandmother, sister and friend, she will be remembered fondly by all her family and all who knew her. Her beloved husband Leonard (Toot) SPRY predeceased in 1992. Cherished mother of Jean PEARSON (husband Norris predeceased,) Evelyn TAILOR/TAYLOR and husband Ted, Leonard SPRY Jr., and his wife Carol and Keith SPRY and his wife Colleen. Forever remembered by seven grandchildren, twelve great grandchildren and one great great granddaughter. Beloved sister of Alice SPRY (husband Lloyd predeceased), and Harry PHILLIPS (wife Bessie predeceased). Predeceased by grand_sons Mike, Tom and Tim and son-in-law Norris PEARSON. Friends called The Mindemoya United Church on Sunday, December 7, 2003. The funeral service was conducted at the church on Monday, December 8, 2003 with Pastor Maxine McVEY officiating. Spring interment in Mindemoya Cemetery.

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PEARSON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-14 published
Thomas MacDONALD
By Joan ROBINSON Friday, March 14, 2003 - Page A24
Father, husband, caterer. Born November 12, 1915, in Liverpool, England. Died January 25, in Ottawa, of a stroke, aged 87.
Tom MacDONALD was the third of nine children born to William and Mary Ellen MacDONALD. The family emigrated from England to Canada in 1924 and settled in Kingston, Ontario With the outbreak of the Second World War, Tom and his four brothers joined the Armed Forces. Tom enlisted in the Canadian Army on January 25, 1940. He was assigned as batman/driver to Lieutenant-General H. D. R. CRERAR. In 1944, the Kingston Whig Standard featured a photo of "Cpl. T. McDONALD" sewing an extra pip on CRERAR's uniform, marking his promotion to full General; CRERAR was then Commander of the First Canadian Army. During those war years, Tom served with the general in Italy, Sicily, the Netherlands, Belgium, North Africa, France and Germany. One of his duties was to prepare the general's meals; he became proficient at obtaining and preparing reasonable meals with scant resources. It was during this time that he developed a keen interest in food preparation.
After the war, Tom remained in the army. Although he had no professional training, his natural flair for food preparation and presentation led to his employment in Ottawa by National Defence Headquarters as organizer and caterer of official banquets and what was known as "the cocktail party circuit." On a private basis, the United States Embassy also employed him in this capacity.
Among his effects are letters of appreciation from Ambassador Livingston MERCHANT of the U.S. Embassy and one from then-president Dwight EISENHOWER, thanking Tom for his efforts during the Second World War, as well as his contributions during two presidential trips to Ottawa. It concludes: "With best wishes to a former comrade-in-arms."
During this time he also accompanied General CRERAR on official business trips, wherein his role was to assist in the personal needs of the CRERAR family. Many of these trips were to major Canadian cities but in 1947, Tom accompanied General CRERAR on a trade development mission to Hawaii, Hong Kong, Tokyo and Manila. His last international trip took place in the 1960s when, in a similar role, he travelled to Cyprus with a delegation headed by Minister of Defence Paul HELLYER.
In 1965, he was honourably released from the army. He then assumed the position of steward at 24 Sussex Drive. He served with Prime Minister Lester PEARSON from 1965 to 1968 and with Prime Minister Pierre TRUDEAU from 1968 to 1975. He was again responsible for the organization of formal banquets and other entertainment. On one such occasion, a photo much prized by Tom's English mother shows him in formal dress, standing ready to serve the Queen Mother.
Although officially retired in 1975, he maintained his interest in cooking both in his private catering business and at home. He was a lively, fun-loving man and with his wife, Verena, hosted many memorable parties wherein his love of people and sense of humour had full rein.
Tom was proud of his country, his city and his war service. He could be moved to tears by memories of his war years and every year that he was physically able he marched in the Veteran's Day parade wearing his war medals.
In his declining years, he was comforted by the care and companionship of his family and Friends. At Uncle Tom's funeral they volunteered their special memories of him. There was much laughter and few tears as befitted the man. The music of his favourite song We'll Meet Again concluded the ceremony -- sung, of course, by Vera LYNN. He will be missed by many, including nieces, nephews, Friends and surviving comrades-in-arms.
Joan is Tom MacDONALD's niece.

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PEARSON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-04-22 published
He founded Readers' Club of Canada
Nationalist visionary struggled financially to publish Canadian writers
By Carol COOPER Special to The Globe and Mail Tuesday, April 22, 2003 - Page R7
In the early 1960s, when writers asked Peter and Carol MARTIN where to publish their manuscripts on Canada, the couple realized how few choices there were. Inspired, the Martins, both voracious readers, staunch nationalists and founders of the Readers' Club of Canada, decided to start their own press. In 1965, Peter Martin Associates came into being. Last month, Peter MARTIN died of lung cancer in Ottawa.
In an industry overshadowed by American companies, Peter MARTIN Associates was among the first in a wave of independent publishing houses to open during a time of rising Canadian nationalism.
Launched in a downtown Toronto basement on a shoestring budget, skeleton staff, idealism and enthusiasm, the company flew by the seat of its pants. Its employees were often young and new to the business. But many, including Peter CARVER, Michael SOLOMON and Valerie WYATT, went on to become Canadian mainstays.
"It really was a time of Canadian nationalism and those of us who believed in that cause could see what Peter and Carol were doing," said Ms. WYATT, a children's editor who spent four years with the company in the seventies.
During the 16 years before its sale in 1981, Peter Martin Associates published approximately 170 works, mainly non-fiction. Its presses put out I, Nuligak, the autobiography of an Inuit man; The Boyd Gang by Marjorie LAMB and Barry PEARSON; Trapping is My Life by John TETSO; and the Handbook of Canadian Film by Eleanor BEATTIE. Others who came through their doors included Hugh HOOD, Robert FULFORD, John Robert COLOMBO, Douglas FETHERLING and Mary Alice DOWNIE -- all to have their works published.
Started with small amounts of seed money from private investors and no government funding, Peter Martin Associates constantly struggled financially. At one point, for a bit of extra cash, the office became the designated nuclear-fallout shelter for the street. Pat DACEY, once the firm's book designer, lugged suitcases of books up the street to sell at Britnell's bookstore with summer employee Bronwyn DRAINIE.
Working at Peter Martin Associates was always fun, Ms. WYATT said. "You went in to work happy and you stayed happy all day."
Still, in a time when Canadian works received little recognition, she remembers finding it difficult to get media interviews for the author of Martin-published book.
Yet another title caused trouble with its subject. The company was putting out a collection of previously published sayings of former prime minister John DIEFENBAKER, called I Never Say Anything Provocative, edited by Margaret WENTE. Mr. DIEFENBAKER heard about the project, called Mr. MARTIN and threatened to sue. Mr. MARTIN stood firm.
"He handled it with such élan," said writer Tim WYNNE- JONES, then in the art department. "He was suitably dutiful, but not in awe. Mr. DIEFENBAKER was just over the top, as was his wont."
The book went to press and Mr. DIEFENBAKER did not go to court.
Once listed along with Peter GZOWSKI in a Maclean's magazine article on "Young Men to Watch," Mr. MARTIN was born on April 26, 1934 in Ottawa to a dentist father and a mother who drove an ambulance in the First World War. The younger of two sons, he attended Trinity College School in Port Hope, Ontario and the University of Toronto, where he earned a degree in philosophy.
During a year in Ottawa as the president of the National Federation of University Students, Mr. MARTIN met his first wife Carol. They married in 1956 and moved to Toronto. Three years later, they founded the Readers' Club in Featuring one Canadian book a month, it distributed works by Mordecai RICHLER, Irving LAYTON, Morley CALLAGHAN and Brian MOORE among others, and supplied its members with coupons. While continuing to run the Readers' Club (sold in 1978 to Saturday Night Magazine and closed in 1981), the MARTINs started Peter Martin Associates.
Throughout his career, Mr. MARTIN spoke out for Canadian publishing. Alarmed by the sale of Ryerson Press and Gage Educational Press in 1970 to American firms, he called a meeting of publishers to discuss problems in the industry. Named the Independent Publishers Association, the group started in 1971 with 16 members and with Mr. MARTIN as its first president. In 1976, it was renamed the Association of Canadian Publishers and continues today with 140 members. As a result of the group's efforts, Canadian publishing began to receive federal and provincial funding.
In the late 1970s, the MARTINs went their separate ways. Afterward, Mr. MARTIN published a small newspaper, The Downtowner, and owned a cookbook store with his second wife, Maggie NIEMI. In 1983, they moved near Sudbury, Ontario, where Mr. MARTIN did freelance book and theatre reviews, then moved to Ottawa in 1985 to work as president for Balmuir Books, publisher of the magazine International Perspectives and consulting editor for the University of Ottawa Press.
After a spinal-cord injury in 1997, Mr. MARTIN was left a quadriplegic, except for limited use of his left arm. Even so, he remained active, maintained a heavy e-mail correspondence and spent time in the park reading while seated in a bright-yellow wheelchair.
Mr. MARTIN leaves his children Pamela, Christopher and Jeremy and his wife Maggie NIEMI. He died on March 15.

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PEARSON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-07-28 published
PEARSON, Judith Lovett
Died Friday, July 25, 2003 peacefully in her sleep after a long illness. She will be missed by her children Pat, Charles, James and Andrew and their families, and also by her many Friends and relatives, especially Susan, Janet, Judy and Ann. A Funeral Service will be held in the Chapel of R.S. Kane Funeral Home (6150 Yonge Street, at Goulding, south of Steeles), at 1 p.m. on Tuesday, July 28, visitation one hour prior. A reception to follow at Sunrise Assisted Living, 9800 Yonge Street, Richmond Hill. In lieu of flowers donations may be sent to The Lung Association of Canada for I.P.F. Research.

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PEARSON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-09-19 published
NEILSON, Roger Paul, Estate of
Notice To Creditors And Others
All claims against the Estate of Roger Paul NEILSON, late of the Township of Smith-Ennismore-Lakefield, in the County of Peterborough, Province of Ontario, who died on or about the 21st day of June, 2003, must be filed with the undersigned personal representatives on or before the 10th day of October, 2003, thereafter, the undersigned will distribute the assets of the said Estate having regard only to the claims then filed.
Dated this 15th day of September, 2003.
Paul BEDFORD,
James FAULKNER
Larry PEARSON
David CLEMENTS
Estate Trustees,
by their solicitors,
Lockington Lawless Fitzpatrick
Barristers and Solicitors,
332 Aylmer Street North
P.O. Box 1146
Peterborough, Ontario K9J 7H4
Page B9

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PEARSON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-10-03 published
NEILSON, Roger Paul, Estate of
Notice To Creditors And Others
All claims against the Estate of Roger Paul NEILSON, late of the Township of Smith-Ennismore-Lakefield, in the County of Peterborough, Province of Ontario, who died on or about the 21st day of June, 2003, must be filed with the undersigned personal representatives on or before the 10th day of October, 2003, thereafter, the undersigned will distribute the assets of the said Estate having regard only to the claims then filed.
Dated this 15th day of September, 2003.
Paul BEDFORD,
James FAULKNER
Larry PEARSON
David CLEMENTS
Estate Trustees,
by their solicitors,
Lockington Lawless Fitzpatrick
Barristers and Solicitors,
332 Aylmer Street North
P.O. Box 1146
Peterborough, Ontario K9J 7H4
Page B4

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PEARSON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-10-31 published
The dean of Canadian sociology
The first chair of a new University of Toronto department trained a generation of scholars
By Carol COOPER, Special to the Globe and Mail Friday, October 31, 2003 - Page R13
In 1938, with a doctorate in political science and anxious to achieve his dream of becoming a professor, Samuel Delbert CLARK reluctantly took the only position available to him at the University of Toronto, as its first full-time lecturer in sociology.
In doing so, S.D. CLARK became one of the country's early anglophone sociologists. During his career, his immense intellect, painstaking scholarship and prolific writing brought credibility and respect to the fledgling discipline. At a time when Canadian universities had few sociology departments, Prof. CLARK trained a generation of sociologists who spread out across the country, establishing sociology departments in other centres. And as an administrator at U of T, Prof. CLARK brought leading sociologists to the school.
The first sociologist born, raised and trained here, Prof. S. D. CLARK has died at the age of 93.
Incorporating the staples theory of his mentor, leading Canadian political economist Harold INNIS, the work of American historian F. J. TURNER, and sociologists Carl DAWSON and E. C. HUGHES of McGill University, among others, Prof. CLARK developed his own approach.
He studied social change on Canada's economic frontiers such as the fur trade, Western wheat farming, and the lumber and mining industries. He traced the development of those communities as the residents there, far from the cultural and financial institutions that controlled their lives and contending with distance and poverty, took their communities through a period of simultaneous disorganization and reorganization. From the struggle emerged new organizations and religious sects, such as the Co-operative Commonwealth Federation and the Social Credit Party.
Reflecting his university training in history, sociology and political science, Prof. CLARK brought a multifaceted approach to his research.
"He looked at things that were happening in Canada almost uniquely and tried to understand them and not to reduce it to some simplistic international generalization," said William MICHELSON, the S. D. Clark professor of sociology at the University of Toronto. "He really wanted to look into a multiplicity of factors."
Not everyone liked Prof. CLARK's approach to sociology, but nor did Prof. CLARK favour the Chicago School approach then taught at McGill University. Although he later altered his research methods, Prof. CLARK at first viewed the American approach dimly, seeing it as one of doorbell-ringing in order to ask stupid questions, one that scientifically quantified what happened in the present without exploring the past. Instead, he pored over archival material, studying the development of Canadian society from a historical perspective.
Books by Prof. CLARK, such as The Social Development of Canada, drew fire from historians, who challenged his theory and said sociology and history were incompatible. But the publications brought attention to the new discipline.
Born to a farming family on February 24, 1910, in Lloydminster, Alberta., Samuel Delbert CLARK was the second of five children. The family of Northern Irish descent had been established in Ontario since 1840 until it moved West in 1905.
Showing an early aptitude for school and a strong interest in history, Prof. CLARK graduated from the University of Saskatchewan with an honours B.A. in history and political science and an M.A. in history. Brushing aside suggestions that he become a high-school teacher and politician, Prof. CLARK aimed instead for a university position.
He entered University of Toronto in 1931 to do a doctorate in political science and economic history. While the studies proved dry and disappointing, it was there that he first met Harold INNIS, read the works of Marx, Engels and North American left-wingers, and attended meetings of the radical League for Social Reconstruction. Disillusioned with his studies and short of funds, Prof. CLARK accepted a Saskatchewan Imperial Order of the Daughters of the Empire scholarship and headed for the London School of Economics in 1932. At the school, he received his first exposure to sociology, including the works of Prof. DAWSON at McGill.
After leaving London in 1933, Prof. CLARK arrived in Montreal, again strapped for cash. Hoping to collect a debt from a friend, who was then studying at McGill, Prof. CLARK stopped by his house. With the friend not home, Prof. CLARK then visited Prof. DAWSON, who offered him a research fellowship. After working on a project studying Canadian-American relations for two years and receiving an M.A. in sociology, Prof. CLARK returned to Toronto to continue his doctorate in political science.
In 1937 he accepted an appointment to teach political science and sociology at the University of Manitoba and stayed a year before returning once again to University of Toronto to complete his thesis and begin his career there.
As a proponent of a more British style of sociology, Prof. CLARK was favoured for the job over another Chicago-trained candidate, setting the academic direction for the school. Sociology was then run as a section under the department of anthropology, to be transferred a year later to the department of political economy. Except for occasional leaves, Prof. CLARK remained a fixture on campus, impeccably dressed in a woollen suit and sporting a pipe, until his retirement in 1976.
Shy and quiet, Prof. CLARK constantly cleared his throat and jingled the change in his pocket while lecturing.
"He never cracked a joke.... It was serious scholarship. You had to ask serious questions," recalled retired York University sociology professor Edward MANN, an early undergraduate student and later a doctoral student of Prof. CLARK. " Their [ INNIS and CLARK] religion was scholarship."
In that vein, Prof. CLARK never talked to the press about daily issues, saying it cheapened the discipline. And he practised rigorous scholarship.
"He had a tremendous amount of integrity," said Lorne TEPPERMAN, a University of Toronto sociology professor and former student of Prof. CLARK. " This was a guy who knew what he stood for, what he believed in. He was uncompromising. He had very high standards for himself and other people."
During the fifties, Prof. CLARK, an admirer of Lester PEARSON, exchanged his membership in the Co-Operative Commonwealth Federation for that of the Liberal Party, the one endorsed by his wife, Rosemary. A graduate in economics from Columbia University, she edited all his works. By the sixties, Prof. CLARK had begun to study social change and urbanization, writing The Suburban Society and later, The New Urban Poor. Despite altering his research methods, dropping his historical research and adopting the American style of conducting questionnaires to collect data, he stopped short of tabulating them, arguing in The Suburban Society that "to lay claim to scientific precision... would be to falsify the competence of sociology."
And the man who studied social change became buffeted by it. While the sociology section had remained small during the forties and fifties, it ballooned during the sixties, becoming an independent department in 1963 with Prof. CLARK as its appointed head.
A capable administrator, Prof. CLARK brought feistiness to the job. "He was a very honest man," said Prof. TEPPERMAN. "He wasn't afraid on an argument, he wasn't afraid of a fight. If he liked you, he really liked you and if he didn't like you, he really didn't like you."
With the huge increase in sociology-department enrolment but small number of sociology graduates, Prof. CLARK looked outside the country to fill teaching positions. Most either came from the United States, or had been trained there.
While some scholars hailed Prof. CLARK for having eschewed American-style sociology and maintaining a Canadian approach, the young and sometimes radical newcomers with a markedly different approach regarded him as an oddball and an anachronism. And as an older, white, staunch Liberal Party-supporting male at the centre of an old-boy network, he represented everything they were fighting against. Accustomed to a more democratic academic culture at other schools, the new staff agitated for a greater say in the running of the department. When Prof. CLARK resisted, he was pushed out, and the chair became an elected position. He remained at the university until his retirement in 1976.
Outside of the university, throughout his career, Prof. CLARK served as an editor of The Canadian Journal of Economics and Political Science, and as president of the Royal Society of Canada. In addition, he was appointed an Officer in the Order of Canada.
Despite the recognition he received, Prof. CLARK always felt that his older brother who took over the farm was the family success, according to his son, Edmund. And he enjoyed such simple pleasures as hockey. Once, while attending a dinner party at Claude BISSELL's house, then the president of U of T, Prof. CLARK asked where the television was and sat down to watch the hockey game. When questioned later, Prof. CLARK replied, "Anyone stupid enough to hold a party on a hockey night deserved to have the guests watch television in the den."
S.D. CLARK died on September 18. He leaves his wife, Rosemary, sons Edmund and Samuel, nine grandchildren and a sister, Grace. His daughter Ellen predeceased him.

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PEARSON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-11-15 published
KOSKI, Dr. John T.
Dr. John T. KOSKI died on Friday, November 14, 2003 in Belmont House, after a long struggle with Alzheimer's disease. He is survived by his wife Evelyn, his daughters Jane and Anne, his son-in-law Paul and his sisters Rosemary and Marianne.
Following cremation, the family will receive Friends and family at the Newbigging Funeral Home, 733 Mount Pleasant Road in Toronto on Sunday, November 23, 2003 from 1: 00-5:00 p.m. A Service of Celebration is to be announced later, to be held in Toronto.
In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to one of two newly established Memorial Scholarships in Dr. John T. KOSKI's name. For Cambrian College students, donations may be sent to Brian VENDRAMIN, Executive Director, Cambrian Foundation, Suite 103, 62 Frood Road, Sudbury, Ontario P3C 4Z3. Or, for Northern College students (Kirkland Lake campus) donations may be sent to Jennifer PEARSON, Coordinator, College Foundation, Northern College, P.O.Box 3211, Timmins, Ontario P4N 8R6.
The family wishes to thank Belmont House nursing staff for their loving care of John, his private duty nurses Yo and Margaret, Dr. BIRMINGHAM and Dr. REINGOLD of Belmont House Staff, and Dr. Nathan HERMMANN of Sunnybrook Medical Centre.

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PEART o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-18 published
PEART / LEE, Margaret Eileen (née HEALY)
Died peacefully, on March 17, 2003, at St. Michael's Hospital, Toronto, at the age of 86. Dearly beloved wife of Fred PEART. Loving mother of Mary Catherine O'BRIEN (Mike,) and Rosemary DUNNING (Michael,) and Fred's children: John, Mary Lou ROBERTSON (Clyde), Peter (Marjorie), and Gord (Marianne). Grammy of 22 grandchildren, and 24 great-grandchildren. Survived by her brother Frank HEALY. Predeceased by Gerry LEE, her grand_son Matthew O'BRIEN, and her brother Wilf HEALY. A Memorial Mass will be celebrated at St. Gabriel's Church (650 Sheppard Avenue East), on Thursday morning at 10 o'clock. Reception to follow service at the family home. The family wish to thank the doctors and staff of St. Michael's Hospital.

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PEAT o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-06 published
DALGLEISH, Gordon John
Peacefully in his son's arms, at Oakville Trafalgar Memorial Hospital, on March 4, 2003. Dear husband and best friend of Suzanne (née MORRISON) and devoted father of Cameron and Suzanne Jane. Beloved brother-in-law of Sheila COLLINS and dear uncle of Catherine and Julie CIEPLY. Best buddy to MacTavish. Gord cherished the many Friends he made throughout his life. Gord's family deeply appreciates the care, love and Friendship of cardiologist Dr. Donald PEAT, Dr. Bruce MERRICK, Dr. Tom STANTON and nurses Nancy DAHMER and Patti FRANKLIN gave him so generously. For many years Gord was an enthusiastic member of the Canadian Ski Patrol, Canadian Ski Instructors Alliance and he was a ski instructor at Mansfield Skiways. Friends will be received at Saint John's United Church, 262 Randall Street, Oakville, (905) 845-0551, on Saturday, March 8, 2003 at 11 a.m. until the time of the funeral service at 12 p.m. Reception to follow the funeral service. Burial to take place at Trafalgar Lawn Cemetery, Oakville. If desired, remembrances may be made to the Heart Function Clinic at the Oakville Trafalgar Memorial Hospital.

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