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"PAU" 2003 Obituary


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PAUL o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-05-28 published
SHIRRIFF, Barbara Jean (née SLOAN)
Died peacefully at home in Toronto, on Tuesday, May 27, 2003, having recently turned 81. Predeceased by her beloved husband Francis Colin SHIRRIFF. Dear mother of Susan, Cathie Shirriff FORSTMANN, Janet, Joan VAUGHAN (the late Steven VAUGHAN) and Barbara. Loving grandmother of Diana CABLE (Warren), Allyson WOODROOFFE (Roger PEPLER) and Kelly FORSTMANN. Great-grandmother of Kate and Julia PEPLER and Hayley, Stephanie and Scott CABLE. Survived by brothers Manson and Frank, and sisters Neva PAUL and Mary PARKER. Barbara's love, encouragement, strength and ''joie de vivre'' will be cherished always. Our very special thanks to Dr. Wendy BROWN, Dr. Russell GOLDMAN and The Temmy Latner Palliative Care Team, Ella CASE and the Victorian Order of Nurses, and caregivers Ramona and Helen. The family will receive Friends at the Humphrey Funeral Home - A. W. Miles Chapel, 1403 Bayview Avenue (south of Eglinton Avenue East), from 3-6 p.m. on Thursday, May 29. A celebration of Barbara's life will be held at Saint John's Anglican Church York Mills, 19 Don Ridge Drive at 2 p.m. on Friday, May 30. If desired, donations to The Temmy Latner Centre for Palliative Care, 700 University Avenue, Third Floor, Suite 3000 Toronto M5G 1Z5 will be much appreciated by the family.

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PAUL o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-07-17 published
Elliott McCAUGHEY
By Cyril DABYDEEN, page A20
Doctor, cancer researcher, husband, father. Born May 21, 1927, in Belfast, Northern Ireland. Died May 26, in Ottawa, of Parkinson's disease, aged 76.
He could have been a lawyer, he said: but combatting diseases became his lifelong discipline, until Dr. Elliott McCAUGHEY succumbed to Parkinson's. Grace, charm, and commitment to work characterized his life, in his uniquely Anglo-Irish way. But it was in Canada that he perhaps made his greatest contribution: In Ottawa, he was chief of laboratory medicine at the Civic Hospital and clinical professor of pathology at the University of Ottawa in a 14-year period; he also served as director of the Canadian Tumour Reference Centre.
"Everyone loved him," said staff at St. Vincent's Hospital in Ottawa, where Dr. McCAUGHEY spent his last years as a patient. His elegant use of the English language and wry humour made him "endearing and special," said Dr. John KAUFMANN, retired neuro-pathologist at the University of Western Ontario. "Elliott's particular use of the intransitive verb," added Dr. KAUFMANN, "was integral to his style, and with his logical mind he was always pleasant to listen to."
Dr. McCAUGHEY held many memberships in professional bodies in Britain and North America. His more-than-100 scholarly publications enhanced his reputation. And he was one of the first to make the link between asbestos and cancer, appearing often in U.S. courtrooms as an expert witness on this subject.
The McCAUGHEYs lived for generations in Belfast and Ballymena, as far back as c.1000, having descended from the High Kings of Ireland, according to lore. Elliott's father, William, was a senior civil servant of the Northern Ireland Government; his uncle Tom ELLIOT/ELLIOTT died in the Battle of the Somme in First World War.
After graduating from Queen's University, Belfast, Elliott McCAUGHEY worked at the Royal Victoria Hospital, where he met nurse Amy Kathleen PAUL from Kilrea, who became his bride; he then taught at Queen's University, Belfast. But his intellectual energies propelled him farther afield. in 1958, he came to Canada as assistant director of pathology, General Hospital, Saint John's, Newfoundland. In 1959, he worked for the famed Mayo Clinic in Minnesota.
Returning to Ireland, he headed the department of pathology at Dublin's prestigious Trinity College, serving from 1964 to 1972. During this time he spent six months as part of a medical research team in Nagpur, India, under the World Health Organization.
But patterns of disease in human populations and finding cures for diseases pre-occupied him. He moved back to Canada, to the University of Western Ontario, where he was most productive here he also formed some of his lasting Friendships. Then, in 1976 he came to Ottawa to continue his illustrious career. He retired after being struck by Parkinson's in 1994; around this same time his wife Amy suffered a stroke.
Dr. McCAUGHEY was well-known for his generosity. He also read widely: scientific material, politics, economics, belles-lettres. He regularly visited the National Gallery, and was an ardent listener to the short-wave radio, the British Broadcasting Corporation mainly. A whisky connoisseur he was; and he golfed in Ireland and elsewhere while travelling to conferences.
In the final months, as his mind teetered and his tremors increased because of Parkinson's, he flitted back and forth to familiar Belfast and Dublin, and to former colleagues at Queen's and Trinity: Images interspersed with life in Canada, his family especially, all in his ubiquitous consciousness. With his wife Amy and daughters by his side, Dr. McCAUGHEY showed immense courage to the end. He left behind his wife, and children Paul, Claire and Gail and five grandchildren.
Cyril is son-in-law to Elliott McCAUGHEY.

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PAUL o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-24 published
GREENBLATT, David
On Tuesday, December 23, 2003, died comfortably at home surrounded by his loving family, at the age of 84. David GREENBLATT, beloved husband of Hilda. Loving father and father-in-law of Michael and Beth, Jesse and Joyce, Steven, and Caroline. Dear brother of the late Mitzi BURK/BURKE, and Ena PAUL. Devoted Zaida of Melodie, Elisha, Adam, and Joshua. David was the proprietor of Advance Lumber and Wrecking Company. At Benjamin's Park Memorial Chapel, 2401 Steeles Avenue West (one light west of Dufferin), for service on Wednesday, December 24, 2003 at 11: 30 a.m. Interment Pride of Israel section of Mount Sinai Memorial Park. If desired, memorial donations may be made to the David Greenblatt Memorial Fund, c/o The Benjamin Foundation, 3429 Bathurst Street, Toronto M6A 2C3, (416) 780-0324.

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PAULIN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-06-13 published
Dr. Kundan S. KHERA
Research scientist, toxicologist, husband, father, golfer and writer. Born May 12, 1922, in East Punjab, India. Died April 1, 2005, in Ottawa, of heart attack, aged 80.
Clyde SANGER - page A20
When Kundan KHERA completed his memoirs at the age of 80, some Friends objected to the title, A Life of struggles. They mentioned his scientific honours. You should call them, they said, Success After a Life of struggles. But, out of devotion to the truth rather than any bitterness, he stuck to his choice.
There were times when, but for his sense of discipline, he came close to despair. In June, 1958, he returned to the Punjab from France with his doctorate from the Sorbonne and with high hopes of an immediate professor's post and plans to develop a vaccine for foot-and-mouth disease. Instead, he was told to wait for word of an appointment.
Daily for two months he walked his father's six cows through deep mud to the well in Kot Khera, the village where he was born and where 12 family members -including his own six children - were then surviving on his father's meagre pension.
Eventually, he took work as a poorly paid instructor in pathology at the Punjab Veterinary College. His career was stalled by a hostile director, who rejected his journal article on lumbar paralysis in sheep (akin to mad-cow disease), and he had to bargain his way to professor level by promising to refuse a senior post offered him in Nigeria.
Kun followed a family tradition of struggle and, as others saw it, insubordination. His father Kesar SINGH fought for the British in Mesopotamia and survived the five-month Turkish siege of Kut, and later imprisonment. But, after qualifying as a veterinary officer, he was passed over for promotion because he opposed the taking of bribes.
By 1962, Kun had tired of the bureaucracy haunting his career in India. A year's fellowship in Texas led to work in Ottawa as a pathologist in the Food and Drug Directorate. His 28 years in Health Canada were so productive that in 1988 the Society of Toxicology gave him the Arnold J. Lehmann Award for scientific excellence, and an American book listed him among its "2,000 Outstanding Scientists of the 20th Century."
His major work was in reproductive toxicity. Arriving at Health Canada just after the thalidomide disaster, his research challenged the widely held view that a mother simply channelled a toxic chemical through the placenta to the embryo or fetus. His work, originally on mice, showed that a vast majority of chemicals, if taken in large doses, first caused toxic effects in the mother or placenta, and could account for many fetal malformations. He struggled for 10 years to get his "outlandish" theory of maternal toxicity accepted, at length triumphing at a 1986 conference of the European Teratology Society. The drug industry took swift note, and regulatory agencies revised their methods of assessing human safety.
Kun had been betrothed to Rajinder at 11 and married at 15. Although they often lived at a distance, he was a caring husband and father to their four daughters and two sons, sent much of his salary back to them in India and rejoiced when his children emigrated to Ohio. They divorced in 1971, and soon after Kun met and married Claire PAULIN. Their years together, on the farm they owned near Prescott, Ontario, or on the golf courses in Ottawa, were clearly the happiest and most tranquil of his life. Every photograph shows him smiling.
Movingly, Claire's daughter Roxanne told at Kun's funeral how her stepfather had inspired her to study and to persevere. His sons, Jag and Autar, both industrial engineers, were also testament to his example. Success after a life of struggles, indeed.
Clyde SANGER is a family friend.

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PAULL o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-06-28 published
Lacrosse champ endured racism
Legendary player was subjected to slurs, but he didn't respond. 'It's because you were beating them they were saying it'
By Carol COOPER Special to The Globe and Mail Saturday, June 28, 2003 - Page F9
Before every Brantford Warriors lacrosse game in 1971, Ross POWLESS, the team's former player and coach, a member of the Canadian, and later, the Ontario lacrosse halls of fame, crossed the floor to speak with coach Morley KELLS.
As they chatted, Mr. POWLESS wagged his finger at Mr. KELLS, now an Ontario Member of Provincial Parliament. To the spectators above, it looked as if he were advising the coach on the upcoming game.
"I kind of laughed, because I knew what was taking place," Mr. KELLS said. "You could always see them up in the stands nodding, thinking, 'Ross has things straightened out.' I didn't mind a bit."
Known for his sense of humour as well as his playing and coaching, Mr. POWLESS died recently at the age of 76.
From 1945 to 1961, he played intermediate and senior level lacrosse in British Columbia, New York State and Southern Ontario, scoring 294 goals and 338 assists during his Senior A career. He contributed to three Mann Cup wins, lacrosse's national championship, for the Peterborough Timbermen from 1951 to 1953.
During the 1953 Cup finals, Mr. POWLESS won the Mike Kelly Award as the most valuable player of the series. Also, he was twice given the Tom Longboat Award as the top Indian athlete in Canada.
Born a Mohawk on the Six Nations Reserve of the Grand River Territory in Southwestern Ontario, Mr. POWLESS came from a family of talented players. One of his grandfathers, his father and several uncles played on Six Nations teams or with the travelling Mohawk Stars, according to lacrosse historian Stan SHILLINGTON.
And Mr. POWLESS was patriarch to another. Four of his sons played Senior A lacrosse. One of them, Gaylord, joined him in the Canadian Lacrosse Hall of Fame in 1990, making them the only father and son pair in the hall.
Ross POWLESS played what his people call "the game the Creator gave us" with skill and ease.
"He was a great, great player," said close friend and former teammate Roger SMITH, also a member of the Canadian and Ontario lacrosse halls of fame. "He could do it all. He could play defence, offence. He scored a lot of goals, he was a great team player, a great checker, a good corner player, a good loose-ball man. He was one of the best."
A large man, standing above six feet and weighing more than 200 pounds, Mr. POWLESS played an especially strong defensive game. "He wasn't fast, but he knew where to cut you off at the pass," said Mr. KELLS, who played against him.
"Ross's attitude was that sooner or later you had to show up heading for the net, so he would be there waiting for you. If anyone had a natural understanding of how the flow of the game should be and how to control it, it was him."
Mr. POWLESS played with handmade hickory sticks, disdaining the later mass-produced plastic sticks as "Tupperware."
A gifted coach who got the best out of his players, he led many teams to divisional and national championships. One of his prouder moments came when he coached six of his sons, including Gaylord, on the 1974 Ontario First Nations Team. The team won the All-Indian Nations Lacrosse Tournament in B.C.
Born on September 29, 1926, in the log cabin his carpenter father built in Ohsweken, Ontario, Alex Ross POWLESS was one of eight children. Although the family lived without running water or hydro, he later told his children that he never felt poor because there was always food on the table.
After his mother died in 1932, Mr. POWLESS attended residential school in nearby Brantford until Grade 8 and then high school for one year. In 1945, at the age of 18, he headed to Vancouver to play on Andy PAULL's Senior North Shore Indians team.
For the next five years, Mr. POWLESS played for intermediate teams in Buffalo, Brantford and Huntsville, Ontario, taking seasonal jobs to support himself. In 1951, he joined the Senior A Peterborough Timbermen.
By 1954, Mr. POWLESS and his wife Wilma, whom he married in 1948, had moved their growing family, which would eventually number 14, back to the family homestead in Ohsweken. There, they lived without electricity until 1957 and without running water until a new house was built in 1970.
Mr. POWLESS continued playing Senior A lacrosse for Hamilton and St. Catharines, and as a pickup player for the Timbermen in the 1956 Mann Cup finals, then moved to Senior B and intermediate teams until he retired from playing in 1961.
Lacrosse was important to a lot of people, but it was extra important to him, Mr. POWLESS told Canadian Broadcasting Corporation Radio in January.
Richard POWLESS, another son from the 1974 team, said: "It opened up the world to him. Back in those days, there weren't many Indians playing in the wider world. It got him off the reserve, and he had the talent to go places, and it was recognized."
Often the wider world greeted Mr. POWLESS with racial slurs. The crowd and members of opposing teams called him blanket-ass and wagon-burner and squirted drinks on him.
"You'd get used it, it wouldn't bother you. They wouldn't be saying that if they were beating you. It's because you were beating them they were saying it," Mr. POWLESS told the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation.
Richard POWLESS said, "He didn't react to it, he didn't respond to it, it was just part of the burden he had to carry."
Still, Ross POWLESS credited lacrosse with helping him make white Friends across the country. Some of them stood up for him. Once during tryouts for the Timbermen, he entered a bar in Peterborough with some members of the team. Because he did not have a blue card indicating that he had given up his Indian status, he could not drink legally and was refused service.
The Timbermen left the bar saying, "If he's not good enough, we're not good enough neither," author Donald M. FISHER quotes Mr. POWLESS's recollection in Lacrosse: A History of the Game.
Mr. POWLESS was proud of his heritage and maintained its traditions.
However, he did not teach the Mohawk language to his children. Scarred by his experience in residential school, where he was punished for speaking his mother tongue, he and his wife decided not to pass it on. Instead, he told his children that it was a white man's world, and to live in it successfully, they needed to excel in English.
At times, Mr. POWLESS acted politically. In 1959, a group of Mohawks, including him, tried to reinstate the traditional native government. "He was a firm believer in our own system and our own way of doing things," Richard POWLESS said. "When he believed in something, it wasn't just talk and that's the way he raised us."
Mr. POWLESS had settled into carpentry after his return to Ohsweken in 1954, a trade he practised for the next 30 years.
Earning a reputation as a hard worker, he soon became a foreman and, among other projects, worked on the Burlington Skyway Bridge.
Always an avid hunter, fisherman and pool player, Mr. POWLESS worked as a building inspector on the Six Nations Reserve until his retirement in 1991, served as a band councillor for eight years and helped to start Six Nations minor lacrosse and hockey leagues. In 1997, the Ontario Municipal Recreation Association gave him a volunteer service award.
Like many players, Mr. POWLESS was buried with lacrosse sticks. He had told the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation of his intention, saying, "I want to play with my dad, my sons, my uncles and my nephews."
Mr. POWLESS died on May 26 in Paris, Ontario, of cancer. Sons Victor, Gaylord and Gregory predeceased him. He leaves Wilma, his wife of 55 years, 11 children, 27 grandchildren and seven great-grandchildren.

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PAULS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-11-25 published
Autopsy done on hiker who fell to her death
Canadian Press, Tuesday, November 25, 2003 - Page A12
An autopsy was performed yesterday on the body of a woman who fell to her death while hiking near Burlington.
Angelica PAULS, 51, lost her footing near the edge of a cliff in the Mount Nemo area of the Bruce Trail on Sunday. The Grimsby woman fell 15 metres onto rocks.
Her husband ran about a kilometre to get help, but his wife had died by the time he and rescuers returned.

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