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"PAL" 2003 Obituary


PALENIK  PALIN  PALL  PALLETT  PALM  PALMER 

PALENIK o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-11-25 published
A world-class forensic scientist
Expert in hair and fibre analysis and DNA techniques helped revolutionized police investigations worldwide
By Randy RAY, Special to The Globe and Mail Tuesday, November 25, 2003 - Page R7
Ottawa -- A simple demonstration using a red pullover and an ultraviolet light during one of the United State's most infamous murder cases helped cement Barry GAUDETTE's reputation as an internationally renowned forensic scientist.
While testifying as an expert witness during the 1981 trial of Wayne WILLIAMS for the murder of several black children in Atlanta, Mr. GAUDETTE asked members of the jury to pass the sweater back and forth. Then he switched off the lights in the courtroom and shone an ultraviolet light on the jury members, revealing fibres from the pullover all over them..
His testimony made a strong connection between carpet fibres from Mr. WILLIAMS's residences and vehicles, and fibres found on several of the young victims, including some whose bodies were found submerged in water. Soon after, Mr. WILLIAMS was convicted as the first black serial killer in the U.S.
"It was a graphic, innovative and very compelling demonstration that showed how fibre transfer worked, and it led to a conviction," said Skip PALENIK, a forensic scientist and president of Microtrace in Chicago, who was involved in the WILLIAMS trial.
"Barry's demonstration helped the jury buy into the theory of fibre transfer... they were hostile to the idea that a black man could kill other blacks, but it tied WILLIAMS to the victims. It was the kind of demonstration that brought science home to a jury.'' Mr. GAUDETTE, a native of Edmonton, died in Ottawa on October 1 after a brief battle with multiple myeloma. He was At the time of the Atlanta child-murders case, Mr. GAUDETTE, a forensic scientist by training, was an expert in hair and fibre analysis. Later, he would help implement the use of DNA technology in Royal Canadian Mounted Police laboratories across Canada. His findings in hair and fibre analysis and his legwork in DNA helped revolutionize police investigative tools in Canada and around the world, so much so that his work became instrumental in tracking down society's most feared criminals.
Born in Edmonton on April 2, 1947, the oldest of six children, Mr. GAUDETTE received an honours bachelor of science degree in chemistry from the University of Calgary in 1969 and that year was hired by the Royal Canadian Mounted Police to work as a forensic scientist in its hair and fibre section in Edmonton. In 1971 he married Leslie Ann CLARK, whom he'd met while the pair worked at Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., in Pinawa, Manitoba
He worked for the Royal Canadian Mounted Police in Edmonton until 1980, during which time he wrote a groundbreaking paper and published various research articles on the high probability that human scalp hair comparisons could be used to link persons to crimes. "His work proved hair comparisons were even more conclusive than blood," said Ms. GAUDETTE, an epidemiologist for Health Canada in Ottawa.
"Barry showed for the first time scientifically that human hair comparisons were a legitimate type of examination to pursue. His work put what had been conventional wisdom onto a scientific footing," adds Mr. PALENIK, whose company provides expert scientific analysis and consultation in the area of small-particle analysis.
After undergoing a year's training with the Royal Canadian Mounted Police in hair and fibre analysis, Mr. GAUDETTE was accredited in 1970 as an expert witness and often testified in court cases in Edmonton and later across Canada and in the United States. In 1980, he was transferred to Ottawa to be the chief scientist for hair and fibre analysis at the Royal Canadian Mounted Police's central forensic laboratory.
"Barry developed the hair and fibre field and brought it to prominence in the world arena," said John BOWEN, chief scientific officer for Royal Canadian Mounted Police Forensic Laboratory Services in Ottawa, who was trained in hair and fibre analysis by Mr. GAUDETTE in the mid-1980s.
"He was an individual with a lot of vision, a world-class expert in his field.'' In the late 1980s, Mr. GAUDETTE envisioned the potential of DNA analysis in forensic science. He helped implement the technology in Royal Canadian Mounted Police labs across Canada and worked to promote the national DNA databank legislation that came into force in 1997.
"Barry did not invent DNA testing," said Mr. PALENIK, "but he saw that it was a powerful tool that could give investigators an ultimate kind of identification. Blood, semen and hair were good, but he recognized that DNA was as good as a fingerprint. He was the one who said the Royal Canadian Mounted Police should put all of its resources into developing DNA as a forensic tool. He said 'let's not waste time on our old ways.' "
It's no stretch, said Mr. PALENIK, to link Mr. GAUDETTE's work in DNA to the conviction of many criminals linked to crimes by their DNA and exoneration of others whose DNA did not match DNA samples taken from crime scenes.
"Barry GAUDETTE made a large contribution to the DNA business because it has significantly changed the investigation procedures in policing," said John ARNOLD, chief scientist for the Ottawa-based Canadian Police Research Centre, a collaboration of the National Research Council, the Royal Canadian Mounted Police and the Canadian Association of Chiefs of Police, which was set up to develop tools for use by police.
"Today, they are solving cases that could never have been solved before without this kind of technology."
In 1999, Mr. GAUDETTE became manager of the Canadian Police Research Centre, where his innovative ways continued. Before retiring in 2002, he helped develop a website, scheduled to be up and running next year, to provide Web-based training for police. He was also involved in developing a cross-Canada standard for protective equipment worn by police. The standard is expected to be in place by the end of 2004, Mr. ARNOLD said.
Even when he was in the twilight years of his career, Mr. GAUDETTE had an appetite for fieldwork and was never content to sit in a cushy office chair and watch his subordinates do all of the work.
"When some people get into management they don't want to work. They want to be the one who directs it. That wasn't Barry," Mr. ARNOLD said.
His stellar reputation led to a position on the U.S./Canada bilateral counterterrorism research and development committee from 1999 to 2002. He received numerous accolades for his pioneering forensic work. In 1996, he was awarded the government of Canada Public Service Award of Excellence, and in 2003 a Golden Jubilee Medal.
Friends and colleagues said that away from the job, Mr. GAUDETTE enjoyed time with his family and took part in community affairs.
Mr. GAUDETTE leaves his wife Leslie and children Lisa, 18, and Darrell, 22.

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PALIN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-20 published
PALIN, Katherine (née JEFFREY)
Died, in her 92nd year, at the Guelph General Hospital, on Saturday, December 13, 2003. Katherine (née JEFFREY) PALIN was the beloved wife of the late Harold George PALIN (November 13th, 1978.) She was the dear mother of Lawrence and his wife Patricia of Toronto, and Brian and his wife Debra of Williams Lake, British Columbia. Katherine is fondly remembered by grandchildren Kristin, Séan, Jeffrey, Jodee, Aimee, and Gregory, by two great-grand_sons Aulden and Bryn PALIN, and by her niece Janet MacDONALD of Burlington. The family thanks Katherine's close neighbours who watched over her during her latter years.
A Memorial Service was held at the Gilbert MacIntyre and son Funeral Home and Chapel, Guelph, on Saturday, December 20th, 2003. As expressions of sympathy, donations to the Foundation of Guelph General Hospital would be appreciated by the family (cards available at the Funeral Home (519-822-4731) or by e-mail info@gilbertmacintyreandson.com

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PALL o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-07-28 published
He had a passion for big cats
Canadian wildlife biologist pioneered long-running cougar project, radio-tracked lions in East Africa
By Allison LAWLOR Monday, July 28, 2003 - Page R7
Ian ROSS, a Canadian wildlife biologist whose love of big cats took him deep into the bush in East Africa, has died after his small plane crashed in central Kenya. He was 44.
Mr. ROSS was radio-tracking lions in Kenya's Laikipia district as part of a research study aimed at improving the conservation of large carnivores in Africa, when the two-seater Husky aircraft he was a passenger in crashed and burned.
The plane, which was flying at a low altitude in order to allow him to track the animals, crashed in the early evening of June 29. Mr. ROSS and the American pilot who was flying the plane were killed instantly, said Laurence FRANK, director of the Laikipia Predator Project and a research associate at the University of California at Berkeley.
Mr. ROSS, who arrived in Kenya from Calgary in January, had intended to stay there working on the project for at least a year.
"He had this real passion for big cats. He wanted to study them around the world," said Vivian PHARIS, who sits on the board of directors at the Alberta Wilderness Association, of which Mr. ROSS was a member for close to 20 years.
"Large carnivores are interesting because their populations tend to be the first to suffer from human activities," Mr. ROSS said a few years ago in a short article written on the occasion of a high-school reunion. "They require huge land areas and some of their characteristics are very similar to and conflict with our own."
Although Mr. ROSS had spent considerable time in the field researching several wild animals, including lions, grizzly bears and moose, Mr. ROSS was best known for his expertise on cougars.
In the mid-1990s, he and colleague Martin JALKOTZY, with whom he ran a small Calgary-based consulting firm called Arc Wildlife Services, completed a 14-year study on cougars.
The study, considered the longest-running cougar project and the most intensive of its kind, looked at everything from cougar population dynamics, to the effects of hunting, to food and habitat use.
The intensive fieldwork took place in the winter in the foothills of Alberta. Winter allowed the researchers to follow a cougar's tracks in the snow. Once a cat was tracked, with the help of dogs, the animal would be tranquillized before it was radio-collared and its measurements were taken.
"We worked really well as a team," Mr. JALKOTZY said. "It was something Ian did quite well."
The cougar project received wide public attention when Mr. ROSS appeared on Canadian Broadcasting Corporation Radio's Morningside with Peter GZOWSKI and Arthur BLACK, the former Canadian Broadcasting Corporation Radio host, followed along with Mr. ROSS and Mr. JALKOTZY while they radio-collared a cougar. Mr. BLACK recorded the event for his program Basic Black.
In the mid-1980s, not long after Mr. ROSS became involved in the study, he lost his friend and mentor Orvall PALL. Mr. PALL was killed in a plane crash while tracking bighorn sheep in Alberta. At the time of his death he was working with Mr. ROSS and Mr. JALKOTZY on the cougar project.
Over the years, Mr. ROSS, who was described as quiet and unassuming, made a number of public presentations on the cougar study. He was especially in demand in 2001 after a woman was killed by a cougar while cross-country skiing near Banff, Alberta.
"Ian really believed in public education," believing it was the first step toward conservation, Mr. JALKOTZY said. Speaking publicly also helped to raise money, from individual donors, corporations and other sources, for the independent study.
Mr. ROSS also did a lot of work with Alberta Fish and Wildlife and was instrumental, along with Mr. JALKOTZY, in getting the province to adopt a new cougar wildlife management plan to control hunting.
Ian ROSS was born on December 16, 1958, in Goderich, Ontario He was the third of four children born to Burns and Ruth ROSS. Childhood was spent in the fields of Huron County near his home, climbing through muskrat swamps and collecting pelts and animal skulls.
After high school, Mr. ROSS left Goderich for Guelph, Ontario, where he studied wildlife biology. In 1982, he graduated from the University of Guelph with an honours degree. Soon after, he packed up his pickup truck with all his possessions and drove west to Alberta. After a short stint working as a beekeeper in the Peace River area, he was hired by a small private consulting firm in Calgary as a wildlife biologist and started studying grizzly bears and moose.
In 1984, he married Sheri MacLAREN, also from Goderich. The couple separated in January, 2002.
Over the course of his career, Mr. ROSS figured he had captured and released more than 1,000 large mammals including bighorn sheep, cougars and grizzlies, for research. Not afraid of large animals, he captured and collared his first leopard two days before he died.
Andrew ROSS recalls one time his older brother was injured by a moose when it kicked him in the face after being sedated. He was left bruised and with a cracked cheekbone.
"He was extremely meticulous and careful," Dr. FRANK said, referring to Mr. ROSS's work.
Through his consulting firm, Mr. ROSS conducted numerous environmental impact studies in western and northern Canada for the oil industry and government. The work required Mr. ROSS to spend a lot more time at his office desk instead of in the field where he felt his true talent was.
"Working with these large animals is very exciting and also very dangerous," Dr. FRANK said.
Mr. ROSS loved being in the field but hated what he had to do to the animals. He knew that by capturing the large predators he was causing them trauma, but he strongly believed that what he was doing was for the benefit of research and in the end the benefit of the animals, Dr. FRANK said.
"He was just so aware of the animal's experience, the animal's dignity, if you can put it that way," Dr. FRANK said.
Mr. ROSS spent the spring of 2002 working in northern British Columbia capturing grizzly bears for research. The job meant Mr. ROSS, a man small in stature but strong and wiry, and a pilot would fly low over an area in a helicopter trying to spot bears. Once they had, Mr. ROSS's job was to lean out of the plane, secure in his harness and dart the animal with a tranquillizer. After the animal was sedated, they would circle back, land the plane and eventually radio collar the animal.
"He had great capture skills," Mr. JALKOTZY said.
Aside from being a committed conservationist, Mr. ROSS was also an avid hunter and enjoyed hunting elk, moose and deer. But he vigorously opposed the trophy killing of wolves, bears and cougars.
Andrew ROSS recalls that when his brother went moose hunting, deep in the woods, he would only bring three bullets with him. He figured that if he couldn't kill an animal with those, he didn't deserve to get one.
"He would often get the moose with one bullet," Andrew ROSS said.
While he loved to hunt, he never went out in an area he was studying, considering that to be a conflict of interest, his brother said.
"Ian cared passionately about wildlife and wild country," and tried to do what he could to conserve it, Mr. JALKOTZY said.
Next month, Mr. ROSS's ashes will be dispersed in Alberta's Kananaskis country, where he had spent so much time with the cougars.

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PALLETT o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-10-04 published
Died This Day -- John Cameron PALLETT, 1985
Saturday, October 4, 2003 - Page F10
Lawyer and politician born in Dixie, Ontario in 1921; attended University of Toronto; during Second World War, served with Governor-General's Horse Guards in Italian campaign; 1954, Member of Parliament for Peel; chairman of Canadian delegation to the North Atlantic Treaty Organization; 1960, named parliamentary secretary to prime minister John DIEFENBAKER; 1977 to 1979, bencher of Law Society of Upper Canada.

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PALM o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-06-30 published
PALM, Nikolai - Estate of
Notice To Creditors And Others
All claims against the Estate of Nikolai PALM, late of Toronto, Ontario who died on or about the 16th day of May, 2004 must be filed with the undersigned Estate Trustees on or before the 31st day of July, 2004, after which date the estate will be distributed having regard only to claims of which the Estate Trustees then shall have notice.
Dated at Township of Strathroy-Caradoc, this 8th day of June, 2004.
William John LOMAX and Viive-Ann LOMAX,
Estate Trustees
By Their Solicitor
George E. SINKER, Barrister and Solicitor
53 Front St. W., Strathroy, Ontario N7G 1X6
Page B8

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PALMER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-05-28 published
Boris BOYKO
Born in Quill Lake, Saskatchewan on October 12, 1939 - died suddenly May 24, 2003 at Royal Jubilee Hospital. Truly one of God's special people, he leaves behind and will watch over his loving and devoted wife, Judy; beloved children, Robert and David, loving stepsons, David and Steven; adored granddaughter, Jordan Rose. Predeceased by his father, Wasyl (Bill) BOYKO (d.1974,) Boris will also be sadly missed by his loving mother, Rose, his Aunt and Uncle, Marion and Ben JOHNSTON of Cobble Hill; his Aunt, Natalka PYLATUIK of Saskatoon; Judy's Uncle and Aunt, Ron and Ann PALMER of Saanichton, and many caring Friends and family in Florida, Ontario, Saskatchewan, Alberta and British Columbia. Boris graduated with a Chemical Engineering degree from the University of Toronto and received his Masters in Sanitary Engineering from McMaster University in Hamilton. His long-term commitment to serving the people of Ontario started as a researcher with the Ontario Water Resources commission. He was promoted to lead the Waste Management Branch of the Ministry of the Environment, subsequently becoming Regional Director in Hamilton for the Ministry of the environment and concluded over 30 years of service as Assistant Deputy Minister, Ministry of Environment and Energy in Toronto. As a principled visionary and effective manager, Boris inspired all who served with him. Boris and Judy moved in August 2000 to their dream home in Arbutus Ridge on the east coast of Vancouver Island where Boris became a respected member of the Strata Council serving as head of the Civil Works Committee for two years. Visitation will be held May 28, 2003 at Sands Funeral Chapel in Duncan between 3: 00-5:00 p.m. and 7:00 - 9:00 p.m. Funeral services will be held Thursday, May 29, 2003 at The Anglican Parish of Saint John the Baptist, 3295 Cobble Hill Road, at 11: 00 a.m. followed by a luncheon reception in the Arbutus Room in Arbutus Ridge. Flowers may be sent or donations made to the Heart and Stroke Foundation or the Canadian Breast Cancer Foundation. In additional to funeral services in Cobble Hill, a memorial service to celebrate Boris' life will be held in the Toronto area this summer. The BOYKO family would like to express their sincere appreciation for the loving care shown by the doctors and nurses at Cowichan District Hospital, Duncan and the Royal Jubilee Hospital in Victoria. 'We are each of us angels with only one wing....And we can only fly embracing each other.'... Boris BOYKO

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PALMER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-08-26 published
WALKER, Barbara Catherine (née HARVEY)
Died peacefully in Toronto on Sunday, August 24, 2003 in her 93rd year. Predeceased by her husband Martin M. WALKER. Dear sister of James M. HARVEY (Dona.) Predeceased by sister Jessie SMYLIE and brothers Gordon HARVEY and Walter HARVEY. Loved aunt of Brenda ENGEL, Linda STEINER, Douglas HARVEY, James E. HARVEY, Peter HARVEY, Barbara DOLAN, Patti JOHNSON, Jane PALMER and Walter E. HARVEY. At Barbara's request there will be no visitation or service. If desired, donations may be made to the Heart and Stroke Foundation, 1920 Yonge Street, 4th Floor, Toronto, Ontario M4S 3E2 or The Arthritis Society, 1700-393 University Ave., Toronto, Ontario M4A 2E7. Scarborough Funeral Centre 416-289-2558

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PALMER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-09-12 published
FREDEEN, Frederick John Hartley
Fredeen was born in Macrorie, Saskatchewan, on September 23, 1920, and died on September 10, 2003 in Saskatoon. He is survived by his wife, Margaret Stephens NEWSHAM and their six children: Shirley (Robin, Owain and Myfanwy) of Saskatoon; Edward (Judy) and their four children (Tristan, Keisha, Caitlin, and Garrett) of Medicine Hat, Alberta; Alan (Linda) and their three children (Cara, Jonathan, and Trevor) of Truro, Nova Scotia; Kenneth (Katherine LADLY) and their three children (Connor, Patrick, and Ana) of Oakville, Ontario; Arthur (Sabine CORDES) of Prince George, British Columbia and Toronto, Ontario; and Lawrence (Andrea PASTERSHANK) and their two children (Molly and Ethan) of Prince George, British Columbia. He is survived as well by his brother Howard (Joan) of Lacombe, Alberta, Muriel of Macrorie, Saskatchewan, and Phyllis (Charles HEDLIN) of Saskatoon, brothers- and sisters-in-law Lloyd NEWSHAM (Lois) of Victoria British Columbia, Kathleen SWALM (Reece) of Kindersley, Saskatchewan., Gwendolyn Stephens NEWSHAM of Montreal, Quebec, and Ivor NEWSHAM (June) of North Battleford, as well as by numerous nieces and nephews. He was predeceased by his father Alvin Hartley FREDEEN, his mother Olive Arasmith FREDEEN, and his sister Elizabeth FREDEEN- PALMER. Hartley was a graduate of the University of Saskatchewan (B.S.A. 1943, M.Sc. 1951). He recently attended the 60th reunion of his B.S.A. graduating class. After graduation, Hartley began his career as a research scientist in entomology for Canada Agriculture. His specialty was the study of black flies and of means of controlling them. He published numerous research papers and was seconded to work in Montreal for three years prior to, and during, Expo 67 and to west Africa with World Health Organization. Through his many interests and the causes he believed in and supported, he earned the respect of many. He was an active member of Grosvenor Park United Church, member of the choir, a long time cub and scout leader, charter member of the Saskatchewan. Insitiute of Agrologists, and a member of Agricultural Institute of Canada for over 60 years. He was a charter member and past chair of the Entomological Institute of Canada, a former member of the International water Apportionment Board, past chairman of the U of S Credit Union and founding member of the Steep Hill Co-op. He was Chairman of the Memorial Society of Saskatchewan from 1986 to 1997, a long time supporter of the Wheat Pool, the Saskatoon Co-op Association and was a life time member of the New Democratic Party of Saskatchewan. He was an active bird watcher and enjoyed his membership in the Golden Eagles and supported many other causes such as the Seniors for Peace and Habitat for Humanity. Hartley was a faithful husband and friend to Margaret for over fifty years. He shared his love for the outdoors with his children, grandchildren and nieces and nephews. Ten years ago he completed a stage in the Jasper to Banff running relay as part of the Fredeen Family team. Every day will present us with the opportunity to celebrate his life and, should we choose, to act upon those beliefs he so strongly held: social justice, equality, the environment and peace. We will miss him. There are few who are so committed and true to their principles.''The true test of nationhood is not the height of its skyscraper nor the amount of its gold reserves, but rather how it cares for the weak, the downtrodden and the underprivileged.'' T.C.Douglas. A memorial service will be held on Saturday, September 13 at 1 o'clock in Grosvenor Park United Church.

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PALMER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-09-15 published
FREDEEN, Frederick John Hartley
FREDEEN was born in Macrorie, Saskatchewan, on September 23, 1920, and died on September 10, 2003 in Saskatoon. He is survived by his wife, Margaret Stephens NEWSHAM and their six children: Shirley (Robin, Owain and Myfanwy) of Saskatoon; Edward (Judy) and their four children (Tristan, Keisha, Caitlin, and Garrett) of Medicine Hat, Alberta; Alan (Linda) and their three children (Cara, Jonathan, and Trevor) of Truro, Nova Scotia; Kenneth (Katherine LADLY) and their three children (Connor, Patrick, and Ana) of Oakville, Ontario; Arthur (Sabine CORDES) of Prince George, British Columbia and Toronto, Ontario; and Lawrence (Andrea PASTERSHANK) and their two children (Molly and Ethan) of Prince George, British Columbia. He is survived as well by his brother Howard (Joan) of Lacombe, Alberta, Muriel of Macrorie, Saskatchewan, and Phyllis (Charles HEDLIN) of Saskatoon, brothers- and sisters-in-law Lloyd NEWSHAM (Lois) of Victoria British Columbia, Kathleen SWALM (Reece) of Kindersley, Saskatchewan., Gwendolyn Stephens NEWSHAM of Montreal, Quebec, and Ivor NEWSHAM (June) of North Battleford, as well as by numerous nieces and nephews. He was predeceased by his father Alvin Hartley FREDEEN, his mother Olive Arasmith FREDEEN, and his sister Elizabeth FREDEEN- PALMER. Hartley was a graduate of the University of Saskatchewan (B.S.A. 1943, M.Sc. 1951). He recently attended the 60th reunion of his B.S.A. graduating class. After graduation, Hartley began his career as a research scientist in entomology for Canada Agriculture. His specialty was the study of black flies and of means of controlling them. He published numerous research papers and was seconded to work in Montreal for three years prior to, and during, Expo 67 and to west Africa with World Health Organization. Through his many interests and the causes he believed in and supported, he earned the respect of many. He was an active member of Grosvenor Park United Church, member of the choir, a long time cub and scout leader, charter member of the Saskatchewan. Insitiute of Agrologists, and a member of Agricultural Institute of Canada for over 60 years. He was a charter member and past chair of the Entomological Institute of Canada, a former member of the International water Apportionment Board, past chairman of the U of S Credit Union and founding member of the Steep Hill Co-op. He was Chairman of the Memorial Society of Saskatchewan from 1986 to 1997, a long time supporter of the Wheat Pool, the Saskatoon Co-op Association and was a life time member of the New Democratic Party of Saskatchewan. He was an active bird watcher and enjoyed his membership in the Golden Eagles and supported many other causes such as the Seniors for Peace and Habitat for Humanity. Hartley was a faithful husband and friend to Margaret for over fifty years. He shared his love for the outdoors with his children, grandchildren and nieces and nephews. Ten years ago he completed a stage in the Jasper to Banff running relay as part of the FREDEEN Family team. Every day will present us with the opportunity to celebrate his life and, should we choose, to act upon those beliefs he so strongly held: social justice, equality, the environment and peace. We will miss him. There are few who are so committed and true to their principles.''The true test of nationhood is not the height of its skyscraper nor the amount of its gold reserves, but rather how it cares for the weak, the downtrodden and the underprivileged.'' T.C.Douglas. A memorial service will be held on Saturday, September 13 at 1 o'clock in Grosvenor Park United Church.

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