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"NEW" 2003 Obituary


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NEWBURY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-09-05 published
SCRYMGEOUR, John Alexander, 82, died August 30, 2003 in New York. Born on August 12, 1921 in Dartmouth, Nova Scotia he was the son of Alice Rebecca NEWBURY and Charles Edward SCRYMGEOUR. He is survived by his wife, Dana H. SCRYMGEOUR; son, Jack (Ann) and their children, Carly, Christy, Devon, Rosy and Luke; great grand_sons, Nicholas and Isaac; son, Charles (Karen); son, Alexander (Julie) and their daughter, Joanna; daughter, Nancy (Leslie) and their children, Andrew and Faith; daughter, Tiffany SHEWELL (David) and their daughter, Chloe; and his sister, Shirley. A proud Nova Scotian, he received his early education in Dartmouth and attended Dalhousie University where he graduated in 1943 with a Bachelor of Commerce Degree. Following graduation, he was commissioned in the Royal Canadian Navy where he served during the Second World War. After the war, he departed for Western Canada and became a major figure in the Alberta Oil Patch - first as an executive with Home Oil and then with Commonwealth Petroleums Limited, which at the time was Canada's largest oil well drilling contractor. He expanded this enterprise into a global corporate entity and further diversified into the field of plumbing and electrical supply and distribution, forming Westburne International Industries Limited. As the founding Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of Westburne, he built one of the largest drilling, wholesale plumbing and electrical supply and distribution companies in North America with operations spanning the globe. One of John SCRYMGEOUR's crowning business achievements was when, with Texan partners, he formed SEDCO Industries to build offshore drilling rigs and directed that the construction of several floating drill rigs take place in his native province of Nova Scotia. John SCRYMGEOUR was the first Canadian to be named a Governor of the American Stock Exchange; he was granted honorary doctorates from the Technical University of Nova Scotia in 1984, Dalhousie University in 1993 and was elected to the Nova Scotia Business Hall of Fame in 2002. John SCRYMGEOUR served on many corporate boards, including Brascan, Luscar, Encal Energy, and ATCO Industries, was a director, life member and strong supporter of the Fraser Institute, and an Honorary Member of the Canadian Association of Oil Well Drilling Contractors. A lifelong supporter of the arts, he made significant contributions to the Edmonton Art Gallery, the Dalhousie Art Gallery, where the main gallery is known as the Scrymgeour Gallery and to other galleries and museums across Canada. He will be truly missed by his family, many Friends and business associates and by countless others for his quiet and discrete acts of kindness and generosity. Funeral services will be held in Bermuda at Saint John's Anglican Church. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the Canadian Cancer Society or Dalhousie Art Gallery.

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NEWELL o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-01-16 published
Bluesman made his mark
Canadian harpist's brush with greatness was frustrated by his battle with the bottle
By Bruce Farley MOWAT Special to The Globe and Mail Thursday, January 16, 2003, Page R9
He will be remembered for creating some of the high water marks in the history of popular music in Canada. Blues harpist Richard NEWELL, also known as King Biscuit Boy, has died. He was found dead at his house in Hamilton on January 5.
Richard NEWELL's story is the stuff of legend, but not legendary. The Oxford Canadian Dictionary defines legend as "a traditional story sometimes popularly regarded as historical, but unauthenticated."
Nearly all the career anecdotes surrounding King Biscuit Boy have been verified. Yes, he really was recruited for the Allman Brothers in 1969, for Janis JOPLIN's Full Tilt Boogie Band in 1970 and for a mid-seventies session with Aretha FRANKLIN. The stellar Houston blues guitarist, Albert COLLINS was recording a version of Mr. NEWELL's Mean Old Lady, before he died in 1994.
Mr. NEWELL, though, would rarely volunteer to offer up such information, unless you prodded him for it. He didn't think it was important.
He was born the son of Lily and Walter (Dick) NEWELL, an Royal Air Force airman stationed in Canada during the Second World War. Richard NEWELL developed an early interest in music, from the country of Hank WILLIAMS Sr. to the jump blues of Louis JORDAN, to the frenetic sounds of such original rock 'n' rollers as Little Richard. At age 12, he purchased his first harmonica after discovering the blues via late-night AM radio.
Mr. NEWELL spent seven years rehearsing his ever-expanding collection of blues 45s, which he purchased on regular hitchhiking forays to Buffalo. Few of his Friends at the time were even aware that he played harmonica and guitar.
In 1963, Ronnie COPPLE's sock-hop rock 'n' roll group, the Barons, recruited Mr. NEWELL as its lead singer. Mr. NEWELL had heard a recording of their instrumental original, Bottleneck, and came by with an record by the prototypical American electric blues slide guitarist, Elmore JAMES.
Within weeks of his joining, the group was transfigured into the flat-out, deep blues band, The Chessmen Featuring son Richard. The sound was guitar driven and harmonica-heavy, certainly not the type of thing you'd find at the average mid-sixties Southern Ontario teen dance. The band made it to Europe the following summer, playing successful shows at U.S. Army bases to predominantly black audiences.
Back in Canada, Mr. NEWELL would go on to become the lead singer of Richie Knight and The Mid Knights in 1966. He also made his debut professional recording at this time, as a session harmonica player on a recording by country singer, Dallas HARMS, best known for writing such hits as Paper Rosie for American country singer Gene WATSON.
When ex-Mid Knight and future Full Tilt Boogie band member Rick BELL was recruited for the Ronnie HAWKINS band in 1968, Mr. NEWELL's name came up. After one audition, he was hired on the spot and rechristened with the royal King Biscuit Boy moniker, a title he was never totally comfortable with.
Back in his native Arkansas, HAWKINS had rehearsed in the basement of the old KFFA radio station where blues harpist, Sonny Boy Williamson 2nd (Rice MILLER,) did his King Biscuit Flour Hour broadcasts. To HAWKINS, Mr. NEWELL must have sounded like a letter from home.
When JOPLIN scooped BELL and guitarist John TILL from HAWKINS's band early in 1970, Mr. NEWELL and drummer Larry ATAMANUIK were left with the task of re-assembling the band. That group would become the first King Biscuit Boy-led outfit, Crowbar. In a fit of pique, HAWKINS had inadvertently given the band its name in an exchange of parting shots at the Grange Tavern in Hamilton. "You guys are so dumb," he yelled, "you could fuck up the moving parts of a crowbar."
As the bandleader, singer, harmonica player and guitarist on Official Music, Mr. NEWELL was responsible for building a razor-sharp and singularly intense sound. The rehearsals for these sessions were apparently tension-laden affairs, but the payoff came when the album muscled its way on to the Canadian charts, (without the benefit of Canadian-content regulations), the fastest-selling domestic release to date.
Mr. NEWELL and the band would part ways after King Biscuit Boy and Crowbar had scored on the singles chart with the traditional piece, Corrina, Corrina. In 1971, Crowbar (without King Biscuit Boy) earned a place on the bestseller charts with a song that was to become a perennial Canuck rock anthem. Oh, What a Feeling was the first domestic single to take advantage of the newly legislated Canadian-content rules for broadcasting.
Fate intervened throughout the following years to rob Mr. NEWELL of his career momentum. The backing band he assembled to promote Good 'Uns, the 1971 followup to Official Music, was beginning to work on a third album, when the funding for it ran out.
With the momentum lost, that unit disintegrated, with guitarist Earl JOHNSON leaving to form the hard-rock outfit, Moxy.
In 1974, sessions produced by Allen TOUSSAINT, the architect of many a New Orleans Rhythm and Blues classic, would culminate in the Epic label release of a self-titled recording. Mr. NEWELL would tour the United States the following year with The Meters (featuring future members of the Neville Brothers) as his backup band. When the Epic label cleaned house later that year, though, he was one of the acts dropped.
In 1972, Mr. NEWELL wed Jacqueline WILLETTS but found that married life did not curb his increasingly frequent drinking binges. The couple divorced in 1979. Alcoholism was also the source of most of his professional woes for the better part of his life, as key shows were either cancelled, or worse, rendered into shambles. Musicians who worked with him tended to admire him, but found it incredibly frustrating that such an enormous talent was being squandered.
At several junctures in his career, Mr. NEWELL managed to quit drinking. Of the three albums he recorded and released in the eighties and nineties, two were the direct dividends of his abstinence. Those recordings earned him Juno nominations, in 1988 for Richard NEWELL aka King Biscuit Boy,and in 1996 for Urban Blues Re: NEWELL. The latter is still in print on Holger Peterson's Stony Plain label. Official Music, along with Good'Uns and Badly Bent, a best-of compilation, are available on the Unidisc label (http://www.unidisc.com). The rest of the King Biscuit Boy catalogue, including the 1980 Mouth of Steel album, is out of print.
In 2000, Mr. NEWELL's mother died and he left regular stage work, preferring the seclusion of his home in the central Mountain neighbourhood of Hamilton. His last recordings include a version of Blue Christmas, available on the Hamilton Hometown Christmas Compact Disk compilation assembled by saxophonist and long-time friend, Sonny DEL RIO. An original composition, Two Hound Blues, along with material recorded by DEL RIO and Mr. NEWELL in the late seventies (the Biscuit With Gravy sessions) is planned for release this year.
Mr. NEWELL, who leaves his father Dick, brother Walter (Randy,) and son Richard James Oddie, made his last public performance in a cameo appearance with The Little Red Blues Gang on September 12, 2002, at Mermaids Lounge in Hamilton. The 60 or so audience members present were treated to a version of his hit, Corrina, Corrina, which is strange, because he never particularly cared for that song.
Richard Alfred NEWELL, musician; born March 9, 1944, in Hamilton died in Hamilton, January 5, 2003.

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NEWFIELD o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-08 published
ROWLETT, Barbara F. (née JEFFERESS)
It is with deep regret that we announce the passing of Barbara ROWLETT, in her 76th year. Beloved daughter of Stanley R. JEFFERESS, Q.C. and Edythe Vaughan JEFFERESS. Loved wife of C. Brooks ROWLETT (1997.) Loving mother of Nancy Louise NEWFIELD (Martin) of Toronto, and Jefferess (Jeff) McLELLAND of the Dominican Republic. Adored grandmother of precious Victoria (Tory) NEWFIELD. Beloved sister of Vaughan JEFFERESS (Joyce) and aunt of Cameron and Scott JEFFERESS. Missed by dear and caring friend Ted HOOVER of Burlington. A former member of the Junior League of Hamilton and longtime volunteer at the Oakville Trafalgar Memorial Hospital. Heartfelt thanks to Dr. Gerald SKUPSKY for his many years of compassionate care. If desired, donations to the Heart and Stroke Foundation or the charity of your choice would be sincerely appreciated by the family. At the family's request, there will be no visitation and a private funeral has been held.

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NEWLOVE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-26 published
John NEWLOVE was voice of Prairie poetry
Staff, Friday, December 26, 2003 - Page R2
Ottawa -- Canadian poet John NEWLOVE, who had suffered a debilitating stroke more that two years ago, died Tuesday at the age of 65 from a brain hemorrhage, his wife Susan said. Since his stroke, NEWLOVE, who won the Governor-General's award for poetry in 1972, among a number of other honours, had not been able to write, although his mind remained as "clear as a bell," his wife said.
Known as a leading voice in Canadian Prairie poetry in the 1960s and 70s, NEWLOVE's poems often portrayed the quiet of the land, while also uncovering the seemingly incidental details, a sense of constant transition and the sheer weight of history.
"Most poets would consider him really one of the most accomplished poets that Canada has ever had," said his friend, the writer and editor John METCALF. Describing NEWLOVE as a "towering" figure in Canadian poetry, METCALF nevertheless noted that NEWLOVE "really had been out of the public eye for quite a long time." Raised in Saskatchewan, NEWLOVE died in Ottawa where he had lived since the late 1980s.

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NEWMAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-20 published
MILLMAN, Doris A. (NEWMAN) (née ARNETT)
Always to be lovingly remembered by her large extended family, Doris Angelina (née ARNETT) (NEWMAN) MILLMAN died Sunday, March 9, 2003, at Lindenwood Manor, Winnipeg, at the age of 96. The second oldest of the four children of the late T.L. and Leila ARNETT (née GRANT,) Doris Angelina was born December 1, 1906 in Souris, Manitoba. In 1923 her father moved his appliance manufacturing business to Winnipeg. Doris attended Wesley College, then part of the University of Manitoba, graduating with a Bachelor of Arts degree in 1927. She played competitive ice hockey for the university women's team, and was an avid tennis player. After university, Doris worked for the Royal Bank of Canada where she met Lincoln R. NEWMAN, also of Winnipeg. They married in 1934. During the Second World War, his career took them, and their two sons, to Calgary and Toronto, and, at the end of the war, to England where Linc ran Royal Bank of Canada's London office and Doris re-established the family. In 1950 they returned to Canada to live in Montreal. After her husband's death in 1955, Doris returned to Winnipeg with family. She became an active member of the University Women's Club. In 1963, Doris married H.T. (Ted) MILLMAN, a widower, engineer, and builder of Canada Safeway stores across Western Canada. After their marriage, his three children became an important part of her life. Doris maintained her home for nearly two decades after Ted's death in 1984. Just three months ago, she moved successfully to an apartment at Lindenwood Manor, where she was happy. While highly capable and independent, Doris always appreciated the care and support of her sister, Frances BOWLES, and her brother-in-law, the late Richard S. BOWLES, former Lieutenant Governor of Manitoba; and since Ted MILLMAN's death, the continued devotion of his youngest child, Alison KENNEDY, whom Doris raised as her own daughter. Doris is also survived by her sons, print journalist Roger NEWMAN (Janice,) Gimli, Manitoba journalist and Canadian Broadcasting Corporation television broadcaster, Don NEWMAN, (Shannon DAY,) Ottawa, Ontario; stepsons, architect Hartley Vance MILLMAN (Claudia,) Ottawa, and retired school principal Bob MILLMAN (Linda CHERNENKOFF,) Winnipeg; sisters-in- law Joyce NEWMAN and Bernie ARNETT, Winnipeg; ten grandchildren; ten great-grandchildren and numerous also treasured nieces and nephews. Her memorial service was held in Winnipeg, Wednesday, March 19th, at Westminster United Church where Doris was a member for nearly 40 years. She died on her way to a church service. Doris was cremated and buried at Brookfield Cemetery between her beloved husbands. She was also predeceased by her cherished parents and brothers Tom and Sheldon ARNETT; brothers- and sisters-in-law; daughter-in-law Audrey-Ann NEWMAN and grand_son Lincoln Taylor NEWMAN. Doris Angelina Arnett Newman MILLMAN will be remembered by her family as a cheerful, positive, intelligent, independent and nurturing person. She was caring and compassionate no matter what the circumstances. In lieu of flowers, donations in Doris Millman's memory may be made to the Lincoln Taylor Newman Bursary Fund to assist promising students in need; cheques payable to Queen's University, and sent to the attention of the L.T. Newman Fund, Queen's Office of Advancement, Kingston, Ontario, K7L 3N6.
''Love never ends.'' (1 Corinthians 13: 8)

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NEWMAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-04-10 published
The Globe was his church'
The editor-in-chief was mentor to journalists, defender of social policies, respected by those criticized in print, and described as a man with a 'warm human touch'
By Michael VALPY Thursday, April 10, 2003 - Page R11
In his two decades as editor-in-chief of The Globe and Mail, former senator Richard (Dic) James DOYLE wielded a journalistic influence in Canadian public life matched only by that of George BROWN, the newspaper's founder.
He died yesterday in Toronto, one month past his 80th birthday. His wife of 50 years, Florence, passed away on March 20.
Senator DOYLE -- editor from 1963 to 1983 -- gave the newspaper a boldly independent voice, loosening up its then lock-step support for the Progressive Conservative Party.
Under his direction, the newspaper would praise a government one day and lambaste it the next. He was a passionate defender of civil liberties, intensely engaged in the development of Canada's social policies throughout the 1960s and 1970s and as much concerned with the powerless in Canadian society as the powerful.
"In the time I've been editor," he once said, "we've not supported any party in office. I think we make whomever we support uncomfortable. We're the kind of friend you could do without."
He once said he felt more intellectually comfortable with Pierre TRUDEAU than all the prime ministers he knew, and one of his favourite editorial cartoons was one he suggested after overhearing his daughter Judith talking to a friend in her bedroom. It showed two teenage girls sitting on a bed under a poster of Mr. TRUDEAU. One girl says to the other: "He's not 50 like your father's 50."
His views, although stamped on the editorial page, were never imposed on his reporters. He was concerned with a story's news value -- not the fallout -- and he expected his staff to act with the same concern.
He wanted The Globe to be a writer's newspaper and gave his writers autonomy, even when their views went against his own philosophies. He had a special place in his heart for columnists who expressed contradictory opinions.
The young writers invited to attend the buffet lunches he gave regularly for prime ministers, premiers and cabinet ministers, bank presidents and giants of the arts were treated to superb tutorials in the life of their nation that left an indelible mark on their minds.
Warm, funny, theatrical and gregarious, he was a mentor and model for many of Canada's best-known journalists -- among them, the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation's Michael ENRIGHT and Don NEWMAN, former Globe and Maclean's managing editor Geoffrey STEVENS, his successor as Globe editor Norman WEBSTER, and former foreign correspondent, dance critic and now master of the University of Toronto's Massey College, John FRASER.
"He was absolutely fearless," Mr. STEVENS said yesterday. "He did tough stuff. He did important stuff. And he refused to bow to pressure from business, from politicians and for that matter from journalists. I didn't always agree with him, but I always, always respected what he said."
Mr. FRASER said: "He was an editor who made young journalists' dreams come true. Like many who came under his spell at The Globe and Mail, I will go to my grave grateful for the horizons he opened up to me."
George BAIN, for years The Globe's Ottawa columnist, recalled the only time Senator DOYLE actually complained about something Mr. BAIN had written was when he filed an end-piece to a royal tour and suggested that the institution wasn't appropriate to the Canadian circumstances.
"Dic, as a devoted monarchist, was moved to say, 'Did you have to?' The fact is I felt I did -- and he, despite strong feelings, didn't say, 'You can't.' "
When Prime Minister Brian MULRONEY appointed him to the Senate in 1985, he decided to sit as a Conservative out of courtesy.
Mr. MULRONEY described him yesterday as "a marvellous man, rigorous, thoughtful, with a disciplined approach to life and a very warm human touch to everything he did.
"When he cut people up, including me, there was no malice to it, no ad hominem attack, he was never bitter or partisan in any way.'The full impact of Senator DOYLE's presence as editor was probably first felt by The Globe's readers on March 20, 1964, when a front-page editorial appeared under the heading, Bill of Wrongs.
It was prompted by legislation proposed by Ontario's Conservative attorney-general, Frederick CASS, which empowered the Ontario Police Commission to summon any person for questioning in secret deprive him of legal advice; and keep him in prison indefinitely if he refused to answer.
"For the public good," the editorial stated, the Ontario Government "proposes to trample upon the Magna Carta, Habeas Corpus, the Canadian Bill of Rights and the Rule of Law.
"Are we in... the Canada of 1964 -- or in the Germany of 1934?
"This legislation is supposed to be directed against organized crime. In fact, it is directed against every man and woman in the province."
Soon after, Mr. CASS resigned.
Senator DOYLE's skills as a writer were particularly evident on an election night when the paper would present an editorial on the results between editions. Alastair LAWRIE, now retired as an editorial writer, recalled that once the results were known, Senator DOYLE would stand in silent thought for maybe a minute and a half and then start to dictate. In a matter of a few minutes, he would complete a reasoned editorial that scarcely required the addition of a comma.
Senator DOYLE preferred to work in anonymity, only accepting honorary degrees and later the seat in the Senate near the end of his newspaper career.
He sat on no boards, belonged to no important clubs, almost never appeared on television or radio, didn't sign petitions and seldom gave speeches. When he met a politician, there were usually witnesses.
He didn't hold a driver's licence and for years arrived at the old Globe office on King Street by streetcar. When The Globe moved to its present office on Front Street, Senator DOYLE took a taxi.
Retired Ottawa Citizen publisher Clark DAVEY, a former managing editor of The Globe and a close friend of Senator DOYLE, suspected "he didn't trust his Irish temper [to drive] and that was probably to the common good."
Mr. DAVEY said Senator DOYLE's low public profile "was part of his own protection against conflicts on his own part. The Globe was his church. Journalism was his religion.
"I think that Dic, in the context of his time, probably had a greater influence on Canadian journalism than any other single individual," Mr. DAVEY said.
"It was Dic's execution that made the Report on Business what it became and is. He was the moving force from within The Globe often unseen -- in the whole question of conflicts of interest as they affected journalists.
"He was really the wellspring of that kind of thinking and, of course, what The Globe did affected very directly what a lot of other organizations did."
Born in Toronto on March 10, 1923, Dic DOYLE seemed destined to get ink on his hands. He said in 1985 that he had decided on a newspaper career at age 7 and joined the Chatham Daily News as a sports reporter after he graduated from Chatham Collegiate Institute. He was promoted to sports editor, city editor and then news editor.
During the Second World War, he enlisted in the Royal Canadian Air Force and served with the 115 (Bomber) Squadron (Royal Air Force) at Ely, near Cambridge in England. He was discharged at the end of the war with the rank of flying officer.
He was 23 and felt that life was passing him by, so rather than attending university, as other returning air-force officers were doing, he returned to the Chatham paper. It was a decision he said he later regretted.
He came to The Globe in 1951, initially as a copy editor, the only job available. His first byline appeared in The Globe in December of 1952 over a story about milk bottles.
In the same year, he also wrote a book called The Royal Story, a labour of love that proved to be a standard treatment of the monarchy, and which he was the first to acknowledge, replowed already well-tilled soil.
(The Royal family had a special status at The Globe under Senator DOYLE. One former senior editor, the legendary Martin LYNCH, told of being taken off the front-page layout after he replaced a picture of Princess Margaret, which appeared in early editions, with a photograph of a prize-winning pig.
When The Globe decided to publish a weekly supplement in 1957, Senator DOYLE became its first editor, with a staff that had no experience in the weekly field. The paper was laid out on the carpet of the managing editor's office after he had gone home.
It shrunk over the years because, Mr. DOYLE said, it was ahead of its time. It died in 1971.
From there, in 1959, he became managing editor of the newspaper and then editor in 1963. He stepped aside in 1983 to take on the role of editor emeritus and to write a column -- an experience, he said two years later, that left him chastened. "The guy [columnist] out there has his problems."
Former Globe publisher A. Roy MEGARRY, said, "In my opinion, no one -- including the seven publishers that Dic has served with during his time at the paper -- had made a more positive and lasting impression on The Globe than he has."
Likely among the greatest tributes paid to him as an editor came from the Kent Commission established by the federal government in 1980 to investigate the ownership of Canada's daily newspapers after the Ottawa Journal and the Winnipeg Tribune folded in virtually simultaneous moves by the Thomson and Southam chains.
In its report, the commission credited Senator DOYLE with "adhering to an ideal of press freedom that often tends to get lost in the management of newspapers....
"To a great extent, the editor-in-chief of The Globe belongs to a breed which unfortunately is on its way to extinction.
"The Globe and Mail testifies to the influence that continues to be exerted by a newspaper with a clearly defined idea of its role and substantial editorial resources. It is read by almost three-quarters of the country's most important decision-makers in all parts of Canada and at all levels of government. More than 90 per cent of media executives read it regularly and it tends to set the pace for other news organizations."
The Globe and Mail was bought by Thomson Newspapers in 1980. Senator DOYLE made no secret of the fact that he would have preferred having the newspaper bought by R. Howard Webster, who owned it before it became part of the Financial Post chain. However, in 1985 he said that Thomson was the best alternative among the others in the field.
When Prime Minister MULRONEY named him to the Senate, he became the first active Globe journalist to receive such an appointment since George BROWN in 1873. As an editor and a columnist, Senator DOYLE had often preached Senate reform and had opposed patronage appointments.
His acceptance prompted a flow of letters to the editor that favoured and disapproved of the appointment in about equal measure.Senator DOYLE is survived by his children Judith and Sean and his granddaughter Kaelan MYERSCOUGH. Funeral arrangements have not been announced.

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NEWMAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-04-23 published
Rolf O. KROGER, Ph.D. Professor Emeritus of Psychology University of Toronto
Rolf died, as he lived, with grace, courage, humour and dignity, at home on April 18th, 2003, of advanced prostate cancer. He was the devoted and beloved husband of Linda WOOD. He was the cherished son of Erna KROGER and son-in-law of Adele WOOD; loving brother of Harold and Jurgen KROGER; dear brother-in-law of Wilma KROGER, Edelgard DEDO, Lorraine WOOD, Robert and Deborah WOOD, and Reg WOOD; much loved uncle of Andrew KROGER and Stephen KROGER, Christina and Linda JUHASZ- WOOD, Taylor, Genna and Devon WOOD, Jonathan and Nicole WOOD, Phillippe NOEL, and Jose and David TILLETT, and nephew of Liesl WINTER, Otto WINTER and Alf and Sue MODJESKI. Rolf was born in Hamburg, Germany, on September 28th, 1931. He emigrated to Canada in 1952, and completed a B.A. in psychology at Sir George Williams College (now Concordia University) in 1957. Following his M.A. (1959) at Columbia University, New York, he received his Ph.D. in psychology from the University of California at Berkeley in 1963. His advisor, Prof. Theodore R. SARBIN (Prof. Emeritus, University of California, Santa Cruz,) has continued to be a valued colleague and dear friend, together with Rolf's fellow graduate student, Prof. Karl E. SCHEIBE of Wesleyan University and Karl's wife Wendy. Rolf joined the Department of Psychology at the University of Toronto in 1964 and continued his research and writing in social psychology after retiring in 1996. Rolf's work addressed a variety of topics concerning the individual in the social system. His articles and papers on the social psychology of test-taking, hypnosis, history, epistemology, methodology and the discipline of social psychology all reflected his dissatisfaction with the status quo combined with proposals for new directions. For more than 20 years he has worked with Linda A. WOOD (University of Guelph) on topics in language and social psychology (e.g., terms of address and politeness), and most recently on a book on discourse analysis. At the time of his death, he was working on a discursive critique of the 'Big Five' personality theory enterprise and on stories of his experiences growing up in Germany during the Second World War. Rolf also took great pleasure in teaching and greatly valued the opportunity to work for almost forty years with so many talented and enthusiastic students, both undergraduate and graduate. Rolf was privileged to have many long-lasting Friendships, and he was grateful for the encouragement, help and comfort given by so many, especially Bogna ANDERSSON, Eva and Fred BILD, Clare MacMARTIN and Bill MacKENZIE, Frances NEWMAN and Fred WEINSTEIN, Jesse NISHIHATA, Anne and Michael PETERS, Andrew and Judi WINSTON and Lorraine WOOD. We have also been sustained by the kindness of our neighbours on Walmer Road. We express our particular thanks and appreciation to family physician and friend, Dr. Christine LIPTAY. Our thanks go also to the staff of Princess Margaret Hospital, to the physicians and nurses of the Hospice Palliative Care Network Project, especially Dr. Russell GOLDMAN and nurses Francine BOHN, Joan DYKE, Dwyla HAMILTON, Lynda McKEE and Ella VAN HERREWEGHE, and to the nurses of St. Elizabeth, especially Liz LEADBEATER, Sylvia McCALLUM and Cecilia McPARLAND. Cremation was private. There will be an Open House for remembrance and celebration on Sunday, April 27th (3-7 p.m.), Monday, April 28th (4-8 p.m.) and Tuesday, April 29th (4-8 p.m.) at 98 Walmer Road, Toronto, Ontario M5R 2X7. Please direct any queries to Frances NEWMAN (416-351-0755.) In lieu of flowers, donations to Temmy Latner Centre for Palliative Care (700 University Avenue, Third Floor, Toronto, Ontario M5G 1Z5) or Amnesty International would be appreciated.

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NEWMAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-09-19 published
NEWMAN, Jeffrey C.
Of Uxbridge formerly of Scarborough. Died suddenly at his home to the deep sadness of all who knew him, we lost Jeff on Tuesday, September 16, 2003 at the young age of 51. He is survived by his mother Joan (Charlie) and predeceased by his father Edgar. He also leaves his wife Teresa, sons Kevin and Ryan, daughter Lara, siblings Brad (Jeiley), Jan (Gary), Barb (Max) and many aunts, uncles, cousins, nieces, nephews, Friends, and clients. Jeff was a chartered accountant for 25 years, a good husband, father, and friend to many. We shall miss him greatly and was loved by all. The family will receive Friends on Saturday, September 20 from 2-5 p.m. and Sunday, September 21 from 4-7 p.m. at the Highland Funeral Home, 3280 Sheppard Avenue East, west of Warden Avenue, Scarborough. Funeral service will be held on Monday, September 22 at 11 a.m. in the chapel. Interment Highland Memory Gardens. Donations may be made to a charity of your choice.

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NEWMARCH o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-10-16 published
LENNOX, Rosamond Cicely-Joan (née NEWMARCH)
Died peacefully on Friday, October 10, 2003 after a brief illness at McMaster University Medical Centre in Hamilton. Much loved and devoted wife of Harvey A. LENNOX for 61 years, she will be greatly missed and remembered by her children, Susan, Peter and John, their spouses William, Lynne and Geri, and grandchildren, Richard and wife Jayne, Mark, Andrew, Amy, Michael and Kimberely. Cicley was born in Parksville, British Columbia to Henry and Rosamond NEWMARCH (both deceased.) Her brother Oliver, now deceased, is survived by wife Helen and children Robert and Patricia. In keeping with Cicely's wishes, a Private family Funeral has been held. A Memorial Service in celebration of Cicely's life will be held at St. Paul's Presbyterian Church (70 James Street South, Hamilton) on Friday, October 24th at 4: 00 p.m. followed by a reception at the Hamilton Golf and Country Club, 232 Golf Links Road (at Halson), Ancaster. In lieu of flowers, Cicely requested that donations be made to the Canadian Red Cross International Relief Children's Fund in Africa c/o Canadian Red Cross, Hamilton Branch, 400 King Street East, Hamilton, Ontario, L8N 1C4 or to the charity of your choice. Cicely was involved with many charities and organizations over the years, including St. Paul's Presbyterian Church, Meals on Wheels Victorian Order of Nurses, the Junior League of Hamilton, Big Sisters and Hamilton Golf and Country Club, where she was an active member for over 30 years. Cicely will be remembered for her kindness, generosity of spirit, humour, devotion to family, and fondness and loyalty to Friends. She will be sadly missed.

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NEWSHAM o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-09-12 published
FREDEEN, Frederick John Hartley
Fredeen was born in Macrorie, Saskatchewan, on September 23, 1920, and died on September 10, 2003 in Saskatoon. He is survived by his wife, Margaret Stephens NEWSHAM and their six children: Shirley (Robin, Owain and Myfanwy) of Saskatoon; Edward (Judy) and their four children (Tristan, Keisha, Caitlin, and Garrett) of Medicine Hat, Alberta; Alan (Linda) and their three children (Cara, Jonathan, and Trevor) of Truro, Nova Scotia; Kenneth (Katherine LADLY) and their three children (Connor, Patrick, and Ana) of Oakville, Ontario; Arthur (Sabine CORDES) of Prince George, British Columbia and Toronto, Ontario; and Lawrence (Andrea PASTERSHANK) and their two children (Molly and Ethan) of Prince George, British Columbia. He is survived as well by his brother Howard (Joan) of Lacombe, Alberta, Muriel of Macrorie, Saskatchewan, and Phyllis (Charles HEDLIN) of Saskatoon, brothers- and sisters-in-law Lloyd NEWSHAM (Lois) of Victoria British Columbia, Kathleen SWALM (Reece) of Kindersley, Saskatchewan., Gwendolyn Stephens NEWSHAM of Montreal, Quebec, and Ivor NEWSHAM (June) of North Battleford, as well as by numerous nieces and nephews. He was predeceased by his father Alvin Hartley FREDEEN, his mother Olive Arasmith FREDEEN, and his sister Elizabeth FREDEEN- PALMER. Hartley was a graduate of the University of Saskatchewan (B.S.A. 1943, M.Sc. 1951). He recently attended the 60th reunion of his B.S.A. graduating class. After graduation, Hartley began his career as a research scientist in entomology for Canada Agriculture. His specialty was the study of black flies and of means of controlling them. He published numerous research papers and was seconded to work in Montreal for three years prior to, and during, Expo 67 and to west Africa with World Health Organization. Through his many interests and the causes he believed in and supported, he earned the respect of many. He was an active member of Grosvenor Park United Church, member of the choir, a long time cub and scout leader, charter member of the Saskatchewan. Insitiute of Agrologists, and a member of Agricultural Institute of Canada for over 60 years. He was a charter member and past chair of the Entomological Institute of Canada, a former member of the International water Apportionment Board, past chairman of the U of S Credit Union and founding member of the Steep Hill Co-op. He was Chairman of the Memorial Society of Saskatchewan from 1986 to 1997, a long time supporter of the Wheat Pool, the Saskatoon Co-op Association and was a life time member of the New Democratic Party of Saskatchewan. He was an active bird watcher and enjoyed his membership in the Golden Eagles and supported many other causes such as the Seniors for Peace and Habitat for Humanity. Hartley was a faithful husband and friend to Margaret for over fifty years. He shared his love for the outdoors with his children, grandchildren and nieces and nephews. Ten years ago he completed a stage in the Jasper to Banff running relay as part of the Fredeen Family team. Every day will present us with the opportunity to celebrate his life and, should we choose, to act upon those beliefs he so strongly held: social justice, equality, the environment and peace. We will miss him. There are few who are so committed and true to their principles.''The true test of nationhood is not the height of its skyscraper nor the amount of its gold reserves, but rather how it cares for the weak, the downtrodden and the underprivileged.'' T.C.Douglas. A memorial service will be held on Saturday, September 13 at 1 o'clock in Grosvenor Park United Church.

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NEWSHAM o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-09-15 published
FREDEEN, Frederick John Hartley
FREDEEN was born in Macrorie, Saskatchewan, on September 23, 1920, and died on September 10, 2003 in Saskatoon. He is survived by his wife, Margaret Stephens NEWSHAM and their six children: Shirley (Robin, Owain and Myfanwy) of Saskatoon; Edward (Judy) and their four children (Tristan, Keisha, Caitlin, and Garrett) of Medicine Hat, Alberta; Alan (Linda) and their three children (Cara, Jonathan, and Trevor) of Truro, Nova Scotia; Kenneth (Katherine LADLY) and their three children (Connor, Patrick, and Ana) of Oakville, Ontario; Arthur (Sabine CORDES) of Prince George, British Columbia and Toronto, Ontario; and Lawrence (Andrea PASTERSHANK) and their two children (Molly and Ethan) of Prince George, British Columbia. He is survived as well by his brother Howard (Joan) of Lacombe, Alberta, Muriel of Macrorie, Saskatchewan, and Phyllis (Charles HEDLIN) of Saskatoon, brothers- and sisters-in-law Lloyd NEWSHAM (Lois) of Victoria British Columbia, Kathleen SWALM (Reece) of Kindersley, Saskatchewan., Gwendolyn Stephens NEWSHAM of Montreal, Quebec, and Ivor NEWSHAM (June) of North Battleford, as well as by numerous nieces and nephews. He was predeceased by his father Alvin Hartley FREDEEN, his mother Olive Arasmith FREDEEN, and his sister Elizabeth FREDEEN- PALMER. Hartley was a graduate of the University of Saskatchewan (B.S.A. 1943, M.Sc. 1951). He recently attended the 60th reunion of his B.S.A. graduating class. After graduation, Hartley began his career as a research scientist in entomology for Canada Agriculture. His specialty was the study of black flies and of means of controlling them. He published numerous research papers and was seconded to work in Montreal for three years prior to, and during, Expo 67 and to west Africa with World Health Organization. Through his many interests and the causes he believed in and supported, he earned the respect of many. He was an active member of Grosvenor Park United Church, member of the choir, a long time cub and scout leader, charter member of the Saskatchewan. Insitiute of Agrologists, and a member of Agricultural Institute of Canada for over 60 years. He was a charter member and past chair of the Entomological Institute of Canada, a former member of the International water Apportionment Board, past chairman of the U of S Credit Union and founding member of the Steep Hill Co-op. He was Chairman of the Memorial Society of Saskatchewan from 1986 to 1997, a long time supporter of the Wheat Pool, the Saskatoon Co-op Association and was a life time member of the New Democratic Party of Saskatchewan. He was an active bird watcher and enjoyed his membership in the Golden Eagles and supported many other causes such as the Seniors for Peace and Habitat for Humanity. Hartley was a faithful husband and friend to Margaret for over fifty years. He shared his love for the outdoors with his children, grandchildren and nieces and nephews. Ten years ago he completed a stage in the Jasper to Banff running relay as part of the FREDEEN Family team. Every day will present us with the opportunity to celebrate his life and, should we choose, to act upon those beliefs he so strongly held: social justice, equality, the environment and peace. We will miss him. There are few who are so committed and true to their principles.''The true test of nationhood is not the height of its skyscraper nor the amount of its gold reserves, but rather how it cares for the weak, the downtrodden and the underprivileged.'' T.C.Douglas. A memorial service will be held on Saturday, September 13 at 1 o'clock in Grosvenor Park United Church.

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NEWTON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-07-03 published
POTTER, Douglas Briant
died in Toronto on Sunday, June 29, 2003 after a prolonged struggle with Alzheimer's. Douglas is survived by his wife Josephine his son John and partner Mark KENNY; granddaughter Natasha, and her mothers Dr. Andrea NEMETH and Dr. Samantha KNIGHT of Oxford England. He was born in Leeds, England in 1925 to William Clifford POTTER and Francis (NEWTON) POTTER. Predeceased by his brother Jack who died tragically at age of 12. He served in the British Army where he was stationed in Italy. Following his time in the forces he immigrated to Canada in 1950. Douglas married Josephine DAGNALL in 1952, and later went on to found Industrial Process Equipment. We wish to thank the staff at the Laughlen Centre and Fudger House for all their support through Douglas's long illness. The family will have a private Service officiated by the Reverend Jeannie LOUGHREY. In his memory we will be planting a tree in the garden of the house he loved. If desired, donations may be made for Alzheimer Research through the Alzheimer Society of Ontario.

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