All Categories: A B C D E F G H I J K L M Mc N O P Q R S T U V W Y Z Welcome Home
Local Folders.. A B C D E F G H I J K L M Mc N O P Q R S T U V W Y Z
-1 +1

"MUR" 2003 Obituary


MURDOCK  MURPHY  MURRAY  MURRELL 

MURDOCK o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-29 published
FAICHNEY, Kathryn Helena (née SIEGNER)
Kay died December 26, 2003, at Victoria Place, Kitchener, Ontario, after a period of declining health related to Alzheimer's Disease. She turned 81 on May 30 of this year.
Wife for 55 years of the late Leslie FAICHNEY. Mother of Sheila (Paul MURDOCK), John, and Jennifer (Paul MILLETT). Grandmother of Sara (Cameron SMITH) and Thomasina MURDOCK. Sister of John SIEGNER (Mary SCHAFER) and Carolyn (Stephen BURKART.) Sister-in-law of Bette FAICHNEY.
Kay grew up in Kitchener and recalled with special fondness her grandparents J.M. and Helena SCHNEIDER. She studied history and library science at MacMaster and Toronto Universities, and pursued careers as a librarian and homemaker, living in Montreal, New York State, New Jersey, Ohio, and Kitchener-Waterloo. In recent years she was active in the Canadian Federation of University Women. She found pleasure in books, theatre, and jazz, but took her greatest satisfaction in her family and Friends.
Special thanks to many devoted caregivers at Victoria Place, as well as, particularly, Bekira, Hedy, Jackie, Tania, Sarah, and Sky.
Friends will be received at the Edward R. Good Funeral Home, 171 King Street South, Waterloo, on Wednesday, December 31, 2003, from 1-2 p.m. A memorial service will be held in the chapel at 2 p.m., Margaret NALLY officiating. Interment (private) at Woodland Cemetery, Kitchener, will occur prior to the service.

  M... Names     MU... Names     MUR... Names     Welcome Home

MURDOCK - All Categories in OGSPI

MURPHY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-04-12 published
APPLEBY, Sarah
Love is not changed by death. Died peacefully at her home on April 10, 2003 in her 81st year after a valiant battle with cancer. Cherished wife for 54 years to the late Harry APPLEBY. Dear mother to Laurence and Lynda WENGER and mother-in-law to Marvin WENGER. Devoted and greatly loved grandmother to Meredith WENGER. Caring daughter to the late Isadore and Yetta GRYMEK. Survived by her brothers Lou and Sam GRYMEK and her sisters Ann COMASSAR and Shirley KREM. A wonderful mother has gone, leaving her children to remember her strong presence, graciousness and courage. For the love and happiness we shared we are truly thankful. The family acknowledges with thanks, the efforts of Dr. Joan MURPHY, the other doctors, nurses and support staff of the Princess Margaret Hospital. Also the caring attention of Dr. Russell GOLDMAN and Teresita MADRID. At Benjamin's Park Memorial Chapel, 2401 Steeles Avenue West (1 light west of Dufferin) for service on Sunday, April 13th at 3: 00 p.m. Interment Beth Tzedec Memorial Park. Shiva at 342 Spadina Road, Suite 303, Toronto, concluding Tuesday evening April 15. If desired, memorial donations may be made to the Princess Margaret Foundation, 610 University Avenue, Toronto M5G 2M9 (416) 946-6560.

  M... Names     MU... Names     MUR... Names     Welcome Home

MURPHY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-04-17 published
McCLEARY, John Raymond Walker
Passed away peacefully at Ottawa General Hospital on Tuesday, April 15, 2003 in his 41st. year. Beloved husband and best friend of Lisa, and Super Dad to Matthew and Kelsey. John was involved in an experimental stem cell program for the treatment of Multiple Sclerosis. He died from complications after the successful transplant procedure. John is survived by his parents David and Nancy McCLEARY of Orangeville, his sister Cathy and her husband Ross STEWARD/STEWART/STUART, his mother and father-in-law Clarence and Eva MURPHY of Orillia, and by his sister-in-law Sherry and her husband Dan TEETER, brother-in-law Bill MURPHY and his wife Sherry. Uncle John was always very proud of, Sarah and Jake STEWARD/STEWART/STUART, Morgan and Ryan TEETER, Sarah, Megan and Lori MURPHY and will be sadly missed. John was very special to his most cherished friend and ''brother'' Dave DENNING, and his wife Lisa and their children Alex, Larissa and Brent.
''John, We Will Cherish Our Memories Forever, And We Will Always Admire Your Courage.''
''We Love You As Big As The Universe.''
Friends may call at the Dods and McNair Funeral Home and Chapel, 21 First St. Orangeville on Monday from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Funeral Mass will be from St. Timothy Catholic Church, 42 Dawson Road, Orangeville on Tuesday, April 22, 2003 at 10: 00 a.m. Interment Forest Lawn Cemetery. As expressions of sympathy donations to the Ontario M.S. Society or Hospice Dufferin would be appreciated. A tree will be planted in memory of John in the Dods and McNair Memorial Forest at the Island Lake Conservation Area, Orangeville. A dedication service will be held on Sunday September 7, 2003 at 2: 30 p.m.

  M... Names     MU... Names     MUR... Names     Welcome Home

MURPHY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-08-16 published
MURPHY, C. Francis, Q.C.
Frank MURPHY died August 13, 2003 at St. Paul's Hospital from complications following pneumonia. He is survived by his loving wife, Jean, and his children, Caroline, Elizabeth, Adrienne (Peter HOLMGREN,) John (Leslie LEE,) Frances and Sarah, and his grandchildren, Anna HOLMGREN, Jacqueline MURPHY and Robert MURPHY. Frank and Robert were special companions. Frank is survived as well by his brothers Bud, Cal and Louis, his sister Josie BENZ, and many nephews and nieces. He was predeceased by his parents and his sisters, Mary COSTELLO and Pat MURPHY. Frank was devoted to his family and deeply committed to his community. Frank was born in 1929 in Calgary and lived most of his life in Vancouver. He loved Vancouver for its beauty and the opportunities it presented. He graduated from high school at Vancouver College in 1945, and graduated from the University of British Columbia with a Bachelor of Laws in 1950. He articled at and then practised with Campney, Owen, Murphy and Owen from 1951 to 1958. He then joined Farris, Stultz, Bull and Farris, which evolved into the firm Farris, Vaughan, Wills and Murphy. He was the managing partner there from 1978 until his retirement in 1992. He remained as associate counsel until his death. He was appointed Queen's Counsel in 1984. Frank practised primarily in areas of corporate and commercial law. He particularly enjoyed his involvement in the Greater Vancouver Regional District. He sat on many corporate boards, including British Columbia Gas Inc., Mitsui Company of Canada Ltd., Northwest Life Assurance Company, Pacific Petroleum Ltd., Westcoast Transmission, Kelly Douglas, Alberta Distillers, and Loomis (Mayne Nickless). Frank was on the board of many non-profit organizations, including the Vancouver Art Gallery, Canadian Red Cross Society, Convent of the Sacred Heart, Holy Family Hospital and St. Paul's Hospital. Frank was for many years on the board of the Catholic Children's Aid Society, serving as president from 1973 until 1980. It was an association of which he was particularly proud. Frank was active in the Canadian Bar Association and was president of the Commercial Law Section for two years. He was heavily involved in the International Bar Association and from 1972 to 1982 he was the Canadian representative to its Council. Frank's work with this organization gave Jean and him great opportunities to travel. Frank was a student of the world, interested and knowledgeable about history and world affairs. Each of his children has fond memories of trips, both at home and abroad, taken with their father. From 1995 to 2000, Frank served on the International Joint Commission, a binational Canada-United States organization. This experience gave him further opportunity to travel, including to many smaller communities in both the United States and Canada, which were experiences he enjoyed just as he did his trips to those destinations that are more traditionally favoured. In keeping with his great interest in his community, Frank was involved in politics and government affairs. He was of a liberal mind and was a member of the Liberal Party of Canada. He participated at all levels of the political process side by side with Jean and Friends, more frequently at the federal level and in particular in the riding of Vancouver-Quadra. Frank's greatest love was his family. He was a loyal and supportive son, brother, husband, father and grandfather. Frank's house at Point Roberts, certainly his favourite place on this earth, is a site of especially treasured memories. Frank was keenly involved with his children's activities. He inspired his children and others with his curiosity, his physical and intellectual energy and his commitment to principle. He lived life fully and fearlessly. He met his final illnesses and challenges in the same manner. He died within the rites of his church and with the love of his family. He is greatly missed. The MURPHY family is greatly appreciative of the care and support Frank and his family received from the staff at the I.C.U., in particular from his final nurse, David BOOTH. The Mass of Christian Burial for Frank will take place at 11: 00 a.m. on Tuesday, August 19, 2003 at Sts. Peter and Paul's Church, 1430 West 38th Avenue, with a reception to follow at noon at Shaughnessy Golf and Country Club, 4300 Southwest Marine Drive. The interment will follow the reception. Prayers will take place at Sts. Peter and Paul on Monday, August 18, 2003 at 7: 00 p.m. In lieu of flowers, please make donations to the St. Paul's Hospital Foundation at Ste 164, 1081 Burrard Street, Vancouver British Columbia, V6Z 1Y6, Charitable Registration No. 11925 7939 RR0001.

  M... Names     MU... Names     MUR... Names     Welcome Home

MURPHY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-10-29 published
KELLY, Thomas Patrick " Tim" (1922 - 2003)
Tim KELLY of Bromley Avenue, Moncton, died peacefully at the Moncton Hospital on Monday October 27, 2003. He was born in Toronto on October 18, 1922 and was the son of the late Emmett and Barbara (DOLLY) KELLY. Tim worked as a senior executive with Canadian Marconi Company, Montreal, Quebec and a business owner of the electronics distributor Keldon Electronics Limited, Pointe Claire, Quebec. In 1979 he established the Moncton, New Brunswick based consumer electronics retailer, Sounds Fantastic Atlantic Limited. As a business leader Tim had a gift for marketing and financial management. He built a strong business that grew and flourished well after his retirement in 1986, which is a legacy to his sound planning and leadership. He was one of the original believers in the United Way and was an active member of the Elks Lodge of Moncton since 1979. As well Tim served with the Royal Canadian Air Force from 1943-1945. Tim is survived by his wife of 54 years, Ivy Anita (née TRUMBLEY) and seven children: Brian (Lynne ARSENEAULT) of Peterborough, Steve of Dieppe, Jeff (Lila DONOVAN) of Moncton, Brad (Sandra THORBURN) of Edmonton, Scott (Jamie PENFOLD) of Moncton, Jan KOSHYLANYK (Terry) of Ancaster and Jill SMITH (Gary) of Riverview. He will be dearly missed by his 17 grandchildren: Kevin, Autumn, Christopher, Patrick, Jessica, Ryan, Alison, Kieran, Nicholas, Regan, Tyler, Wesley, Stephen, Kaileigh, Brandon, Morgan and Talia, as well his 2 great grand_sons Carter and William. He is also survived by his sisters Bernie KELLY of Beaconsfield and Barbara MURPHY (Ted) Uxbridge, and a brother Paul of Ottawa. He was predeceased by brothers Fred and Jim. Visiting hours will be held at Cadman's Funeral Home, 114 Alma Street, Moncton on Thursday from 2-4 and 7-9 with parish prayers to be held at the funeral home Thursday evening at 8: 30 p.m. The Funeral Mass will be held from St. Bernard's Catholic Church on Friday October 31 at 11: 00 a.m. with Father Peter McKEE officiating. The interment will take place at Our Lady of Calvary Cemetery, Dieppe. Donations to the memorial of the donor's choice would be appreciated by the family. The family would like to thank the staff at both the Dr. George L. Dumont Hospital and the Moncton Hospital for the professional and loving care that they provided to Tim, as well to our family over the last few months. There are truly many angels at both our hospitals. www.cadmansfh.com

  M... Names     MU... Names     MUR... Names     Welcome Home

MURPHY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-11-19 published
MURPHY, Reverend John Thomas
Of Heritage United Church, Musgravetown, Newfoundland, died November 16, 2003 while visiting in Ottawa. He is survived by his children Ryan, at Mount Alison University, Sackville, New Brunswick, and Erin, at L.B. Pearson United World College, Victoria, British Columbia; their mother Lori, of Lethbridge, Newfoundland and grandmother Phyllis PHILPOTT of Musgravetown, Newfoundland; by his parents Isabel and Stephen MURPHY, brother Doug (Marie KUSTERS) and aunt Mary MURPHY, all of Ottawa; and by aunt and uncle Ruth and Donald PARR of Guelph. John is also survived by cousins, a nephew and nieces in Ontario and Newfoundland. The funeral will be held at Heritage United Church, Musgravetown, Newfoundland, on Saturday, November 22 at 2: 00 p.m. with interment at the church cemetery. A service of remembrance will be held in Rideau Park United Church, 2203 Alta Vista Drive, Ottawa, on Saturday, November 29 at 10: 30 a.m. In lieu of flowers, memorial donations may be made to either the Manse Fund of Heritage United Church or to the Anniversary Scholarship Fund, c/o Heritage United Church.

  M... Names     MU... Names     MUR... Names     Welcome Home

MURPHY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-22 published
Joseph Patrick BURK/BURKE
By Kevin MURPHY, Monday, December 22, 2003 - Page A20
Defence lawyer, father, friend, Red Sox fan. Born August 27, 1949, in Boston, Massachusetts. Died September 29 in Ottawa, from an adverse reaction to Interferon, aged 54.
When Joe BURK/BURKE swore the barrister's oath at his call to the Ontario Bar in 1992, he held an eagle feather in his hand and eschewed the Law Society's formal pledge of allegiance to Her Majesty the Queen. No self-respecting expatriate Irish-Catholic from West Roxbury, Massachusetts., could have done otherwise.
In a world filled with cynics and manipulators, Joe BURK/BURKE was a diehard idealist. All who spent time with him, whether at the ballpark or in the courthouse cafeteria, loved him for his lack of pretension. When the high-and-mighty blustered, Joe BURK/BURKE dug in his heels and held the line.
Joe came by his idealism honestly. His coming of age as a social activist brought him from parochial roots in Boston to a slew of college campuses across North America. There he became a fervent anti-war protester and draft opponent in the 1960s and 1970s. While attending the University of Arizona, Joe once parked himself at an Reserve Officer Training Corps booth and handed out antiwar pamphlets.
A mature graduate from Queen's University Law School, Joe took his political convictions and Friendships to heart. He had a strong sense of social justice and he saw himself as a force for change in a criminal justice system in which the poor and the disadvantaged, the aboriginal and persons of colour, were too often marginalized. Joe's law office walls bore posters that championed Hurricane Carter, Angela Davis and poverty law causes. An active member of the Law Union of Ontario -- an organization of activist lawyers - -- Joe advocated for prisoners' rights inside and out of the Canadian corrections system.
Joe was well-read in diverse disciplines. His bookshelf accommodated the works of Karl Marx as readily as Eugene O'Neill and Rumpole of the Bailey. Joe immersed himself in the musical soundtracks of his times and was a regular and keen patron of the folk-music scene in Canada. He counted works by David Wiffen, Jesse Winchester and Fred Eaglesmith as selections in his voluminous record library, and he travelled the summer festival circuit.
Canada adopted Joe BURK/BURKE as much as the other way round. He worked in the Quebec health-care system for many years as a perfusionist a specialist responsible for a patient's blood circulation during cardiac surgery. While a hospital worker in Montreal, Joe met and married his now ex-wife, Luce, with whom he had a son, Jerome, now 19 and a college football prospect who shares his father's stubborn allegiance to underdog New England sports franchises.
In the mid-1960s Joe had a motorcycle accident that required surgery. He contracted hepatitis C from a blood transfusion and struggled for the rest of his life to overcome deteriorating health. When he finally succumbed on the last weekend of September, he was also battling diabetes and the side-effects of Interferon therapy.
Long before Nick Nolte made it fashionable, blue hospital scrubs were Joe's off-hours casual wear of choice at "the Hacienda," his third-storey walk-up in downtown Ottawa. It was a warm and welcoming venue where Trivial Pursuit, pizza and beer were the usual late-night pastimes and seats around Joe's snug dining room table were coveted.
Joe's law-office answering machine greeting pretty much captured his left-leaning sentiments and adopted sense of national pride: a snippet of Buddy Guy singing followed by a friendly admonition to prospective defendants delivered in a warm, bilingual Boston brogue: "If you are calling from police custody, please do not make any statements. Merci."
Kevin MURPHY is a friend of Joe BURK/BURKE.

  M... Names     MU... Names     MUR... Names     Welcome Home

MURPHY - All Categories in OGSPI

MURRAY o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-01-08 published
Donald Arthur CASSIDY
In loving memory of Donald Arthur CASSIDY " Hop" at Manitoulin Health Centre in Little Current on Monday January 6, 2003 in his 75th year.
Beloved husband of Lillian (née FLAHERTY.) Predeceased by parents Ernest and Helen CASSIDY. Brother of Eunice SCOBIE of Dundas and Beatrice WHITE/WHYTE of Columbia, South Carolina. Predeceased by brother Leonard and sister Madeline. Cherished father of Janice BOOKER of Ridgeway, William (Bill) of Port Colborne, Ruth WILSON (Bruce) of Little Current, Beverly CASSIDY (Scott MURRAY) of Welland and Roger of Little Current.
Beloved grandfather of Derek, Tammy, Scott, Gregory, Joshua, Sarah, Valerie, Brett, and Brian. Great grandfather of three. Uncle of many nieces and nephews. Visitation from 2: 00 until Memorial service at 3: 30 p.m. Wednesday January 8, 2003 at Grace Bible Church.

  M... Names     MU... Names     MUR... Names     Welcome Home

MURRAY o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-05-14 published
Elwood (Ted) MURRAY
Passed away peacefully on Manitoulin Island on Friday, May 2, 2003, Elwood William John (Ted), formerly of Brantford. Born February 12, 1915, son of the late Thomas and Ethel WORDEN MURRAY of St. Paul's. Beloved husband of the late Barbara Isabel WOOD MURRAY of Saint Mary's. Dear father of James (Mame) and the late Thomas, and grandfather of Michael and Adrian MURRAY of Manitoulin Island. Service and interment at Saint Mary's Cemetery, Saint Mary's, Ontario, Tuesday, May 6. If desired, memorial donations may be made to the local charity of your choice.

  M... Names     MU... Names     MUR... Names     Welcome Home

MURRAY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-03 published
MAHONEY, Leo James, C.M., B.A., M.D., M.I., Fellow of the Royal College of Surgeons of Canada, F.A.C.S.
It is with great sadness that the family of Dr. Leo MAHONEY announces his peaceful passing, surrounded by his family, on February 27, 2003, at Princess Margaret Hospital.
The son of Dr. James Leo and Esther MAHONEY (BEAUPRE,) Leo was born in Niagara Falls, New York, on September 17, 1920. Predeceased by his children Helen and Joseph, he is survived by his loving wife of 57 years, Dr. Margaret MAHONEY (née YOUNG) and his children: Dr. Jim (Mary Anne) of Toronto; Dr. Bill (Mary Margaret) of Dundas, Ontario; Tom (Jeanne) of Oakville; Mary of Toronto; Peggy (Byron) of Victoria, British Columbia; Anne of Toronto; Dr. John (Karen) of Ottawa; David (Camilla) of Truro, Nova Scotia; Katy (David) of Toronto; Jenny (Craig) of Toronto and his 21 grandchildren. He is also survived by his brothers and sisters Eileen MURRAY of Toronto; Hugh of St. Catharines; Jack of London, Ontario Earl of Castro Valley, California; Anne HALL of Renfrew, Ontario, and his many nephews and nieces.
Leo received his medical degree and his Master of Surgery, from the University of Toronto. He served during World War 2 as a Surgeon-Lieutenant in the Royal Canadian Naval Volunteer Reserve, and as Surgeon-Lieutenant Commander on the H.M.C.S. Micmac. A R.S. McLaughlin Fellowship gave him the opportunity to travel and study in England and Sweden in 1953 and 1954 respectively.
After returning to Canada in 1954, he joined St. Michael's Hospital as a staff surgeon and became head of the Division of General Surgery. For almost half a century, Leo has dedicated his career to improving the techniques of early detection and treatment of breast cancer as a surgeon, clinician, teacher and researcher.
He was the founder, director emeritus and senior consultant of the St. Michael's Hospital Breast Centre. Established in 1972 to improve the quality of life and the treatment for women with breast disease and breast cancer. The Breast Centre still maintains the gold standard for all such centres in Canada. He was also a consultant surgeon at Princess Margaret Hospital and associate professor of surgery at the University of Toronto and received the coveted Bruce Tovee award in 1992 for excellence in undergraduate teaching in the Department of Surgery.
One of his many great moments was receiving the Order of Canada in 2001 and the Queen's Golden Jubilee Medal in 2002. He was also appointed a lifetime member of the O.M.A. and C.M.A. and was designated an honorary consultant of St. Michael's Hospital in 2003.
Leo was also a member of the Janes Surgical Society, the Breast Committee of the National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project, the Canadian Oncology Society, Canadian Association of General Surgeons, Canadian Society of Colon and Rectal Surgeons, Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons, The Rocky Mountain Trauma Society and was a consultant with Canadian Trauma Consultant Inc.
He was also a member of the Franklin Club, The Badminton and Racquet Club of Toronto and the Hillsboro Club (Florida). Leo was a living example of one who lived each day to its fullest and shared his love for fishing, skiing, tennis and windsurfing with his children, grandchildren, colleagues and Friends.
Leo believed in striving for excellence in everything that he did. His love of life and pursuit of greater achievement is a legacy that will live on in those who love him and remember him as a husband, father, grandfather, brother, uncle, physician, teacher and exceptional friend.
Visitation will take place at the Rosar-Morrison Funeral Home & Chapel, 467 Sherbourne Street (south of Wellesley), on Sunday, March 2nd from 2 to 9 p.m. The Funeral Mass will be held at Holy Rosary Church at 10 a.m. Monday, March 3rd with interment at Fairview Cemetery, Niagara Falls. In lieu of flowers, the family would appreciate donations to the St. Michael's Hospital Breast Centre Fund, 30 Bond Street, Toronto, Ontario M5B 1W8.
Special thanks to the doctors and staff at Princess Margaret Hospital.

  M... Names     MU... Names     MUR... Names     Welcome Home

MURRAY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-05 published
MacLEOD, Sarah Kirkwood
Died on Thursday, February 27, 2003, of an unexpected heart attack following successful hip surgery at Kingston General Hospital. She was in her 95th year. Predeceased by her loving husband, Calum MURRAY, in 1990, and lovingly remembered by her sons Alistair and Morry and daughters-in-law Ruth and Carol, grandchildren Colin (Avigail), Fiona (Tim), Alison (Andrew), Gavin, David and Kip, and great-grandchildren Stefan, Sarah, Phoebe and Zoe. Sarah will be missed for her lively mind, strong personality, and concern for others. Memorial Service to be announced in April.

  M... Names     MU... Names     MUR... Names     Welcome Home

MURRAY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-26 published
BROADHEAD, William ''Bill'' David
Died in the early hours of the morning, on March 24, 2003 at St. Michael's Hospital. In his 87th year, David's health had been failing for some time. It was his greatest wish to depart peacefully. Predeceased by his first wife Kathleen (née MURRAY) and by his son Paul. David will be greatly missed by his second wife, Hazel LOIS and by his three children Anne (Joseph,) Nora ANDERSON (Robert) and John (Ana.) Also survived by his eight grandchildren and three great-grandchildren. Dear brother to Marjory GEORGE of Chatham, Ontario. David, a graduate of McMaster University, was the last of the great Dickensians, having read most of the great classics. He had a particular fondness for Charles Dickens and Thomas Hardy. He wrote short stories and at the age of 70, continued to take courses at U. of T. Up until the end of his life, David took great pleasure in continuing to write fiction. Friends may call the Rosar-Morrison Funeral Home and Chapel, 467 Sherbourne Street (South of Wellesley Street) on Wednesday, from 3-5 and 7-9 p.m. A funeral Mass will be celebrated on Thursday March 27, at 10: 30 a.m. at Our Lady of Lourdes Church (Sherbourne and Earl Street). Cremation to follow. In lieu of flowers, donations in David's name to either Covenant House or Interval House would be greatly appreciated.
''Dad was a man of honour and integrity. His sense of humour was a great delight to all who met him.''

  M... Names     MU... Names     MUR... Names     Welcome Home

MURRAY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-29 published
WRIGHT, W. J. Chaplin ''Bud''
Died of heart failure in Naples, Florida on March 25th, 2003, in his 81st year. He was the son of Alma CHAPLIN and Edward E. H. WRIGHT of St. Catharines. He was born and raised in St. Catharines, with summers spent at their cottage in Niagara-on-the-Lake. He attended Ridley College and graduated in Chemical Engineering from U. of T. Bud served with the submarine chasers, the corvette arm of the navy in World War 2.
As a chemical engineer, he worked for Stelco, Dupont and Galtex. Then he worked for over 25 years with Merrill Lynch as a financial advisor, a career that became his real love.
He was dearly loved and will be greatly missed by his wife of 53 years, Jane MURRAY, their four children: son Ken and wife Jill; three daughters, Marsha and Don SADOWAY, Ellen and Paul EDWARDS, and Leah Ann; by his sister Briar SMITH, wife of the late Larry SMITH, as well as three young grandchildren, Sam, Nathan and Caaryn. Bud is predeceased by his sister, Mary Elizabeth HUME.
Next to his family was his love for a good competitive game of squash, tennis and bridge. Many happy family holidays were spent at the cottage in Southampton, and that is where his final resting place will be.
Bud led his family by example with uncompromising integrity, loyalty, humour, a zest for life, and love.
Cremation took place in Naples. A Memorial Service will be announced at a later date, to be held at Saint Mark's Church, Niagara-on-the-lake. Donations to Historic Saint Mark's Anglican Church (est. 1792) Niagara-on-the-Lake or Arthritis Society.

  M... Names     MU... Names     MUR... Names     Welcome Home

MURRAY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-04-07 published
MURRAY, James Findlay, M.D., Fellow of the Royal College of Surgeons of Canada
A much respected, much loved and wonderful man has died. Peacefully but suddenly on April 4, 2003 in his 83rd year. Beloved husband of Shirley for 57 years, dearest father to John (Jenny), Bill (Stephanie), Claire and Hugh, adored grandfather to Amy and Katie (Milne), Robert and Olivia (Murray) and Scott and Cameron (Murray). Dear brother to Betty LAMBERT and the late Margaret PHOENIX, and cherished by his nieces, nephews and many relatives and Friends. He loved life with a passion, and deeply touched the hearts of countless people through the myriad organizations and endeavours he undertook. Born in Toronto, Jim attended Oakwood Collegiate, and University of Toronto where he graduated from medical school in 1943 as the permanent class president and Valedictorian, and recipient of the George Biggs Trophy. From 1944-46 he served as Captain in the Royal Canadian Army Medical Corps, and subsequently undertook his surgical training at the University of Toronto and at McGill University in Montreal. In 1953 he joined the Toronto East General and Orthopaedic Hospital, where he became head of Plastic Surgery and later Surgeon-in-Chief. He organized a specialized hand clinic, and was then appointed the consultant Hand Surgeon at the Ontario Workers' Compensation Board. Jim MURRAY is considered one of the pioneers of modern hand surgery in Canada. In 1983, he founded and became the first director of the Hand Service at Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, and in 1985 he was bestowed the honour of Professor Emeritus, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto. Over the years he held numerous professional positions including the Presidencies of the Canadian Society of Plastic Surgeons, The Canadian Society for Surgery of the Hand, and the American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Where he was known as ''Doc'', Jim served as team doctor for the Toronto Maple Leafs during the ''glory years'' from 1948-1964, and liked to claim he led them to 5 Stanley Cups. He was head doctor for Team Canada's 1972 Canada-Russia Hockey Series. This remarkable man who is sadly missed has brought warmth, love, humour, magic and a human touch to so many people, and above all to his Friends and dear family. The family will receive Friends and relatives at the Humphrey Funeral Home - A. W. Miles Chapel, 1403 Bayview Avenue (south of Eglinton Avenue East), from 7 to 9 p.m. Wednesday. There will be a memorial service to mark Jim's passing and celebrate his life on Thursday, April 10 at 11 o'clock at Lawrence Park Community Church, 2180 Bayview Avenue. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the Alzheimer Society of Ontario, 1200 Bay Street, Suite 202, Toronto M5R 2A5.

  M... Names     MU... Names     MUR... Names     Welcome Home

MURRAY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-04-24 published
MURRAY, Marjorie Eleanor (née HUGHES)
Died peacefully at Toronto on April 23, 2003. Beloved wife of R. Gordon for 61 years. Loving mother to John (Elizabeth), Scott (Janice), Janet (John DILL), Sheila (David DICKINSON) and Cameron (Marie) and proud grandmother of 12. Survived by her sister Janet (John FOREMAN) and her sister-in-law Inez HUGHES. Marjorie was a graduate of University College, U of T, a member of Gamma Phi Beta, and a longtime member of the Toronto Cricket, Skating and Curling Club and the Garden Club of Toronto. Friends may call at the Morley Bedford Funeral Home, 159 Eglinton Avenue West (two lights west of Yonge) on Saturday, April 26 from 2-4 p.m. Funeral Service on Sunday at 4 p.m. from The Church of St. Timothy, 100 Old Orchard Grove, Toronto. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the charity of your choice.

  M... Names     MU... Names     MUR... Names     Welcome Home

MURRAY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-05-03 published
Leafs trusted their doctor
Talented M.D. specialized in hand surgery. 'He had a unique technical approach. That's what made him different from other surgeons.'
By Carol COOPER Special to The Globe and Mail Saturday, May 3, 2003 - Page F10
Nothing about Jim MURRAY's hands indicated that he was a surgeon. Large and gnarled with undulating fingernails, those hands played bagpipes, patched up Toronto Maple Leafs and Team Canada players and restored form and function to other hands.
Dr. MURRAY, a plastic surgeon who was the first Canadian doctor to devote his practice to hand surgery, died last month at the age of 82.
"His hands looked more like those of a prize fighter than a surgeon. His fingers were bent, "said Robert McFARLANE, a retired plastic surgeon with a special interest in hands and a close friend of Dr. MURRAY. "It didn't seem to make a difference. He had tremendous skill."
In 1983, Dr. MURRAY brought together plastic and orthopedic surgeons to form a hand unit at Toronto's Sunnybrook Health Science Centre, the city's first. "His concept was to pull together the expertise of different surgeons, "said Paul BINHAMMER, once a student of Dr. MURRAY and now a plastic surgeon at the hospital, now part of the Sunnybrook and Women's College Health Sciences Centre.
Dr. MURRAY assembled a highly skilled team. Among them were orthopedic surgeon Robert McMURTRY, who went on to become dean of medicine at the University of Western Ontario, and plastic surgeon and nerve expert Susan MacKINNON, who is now a professor in the United States.
But before rising to prominence in the field of hand surgery, Dr. MURRAY gained fame in hockey circles. Serving as one of the Toronto Maple Leafs team doctors from 1948 to 1964, he was greatly trusted by players. When cut during games on the road, they left their wounds unstitched until he could tend to them at home.
"He'd come at you with those fingers and they were just so big, you'd wonder how he was ever able to stitch as neat as he did," said former Leaf defenceman Bobby BAUN, who played professional hockey for 17 years.
Mr. BAUN estimates that Dr. MURRAY put in half of his 143 career stitches.
Under instructions from Leaf owner Conn SMYTHE, injured players were not to be rushed back into the lineup, according to Hugh SMYTHE, another Leaf doctor and Mr. SMYTHE's son. "This was a heavy and not always popular role, "he said.
During the 1964 Stanley Cup finals, it became especially challenging.
Entering Game 6, the Detroit Red Wings led the series against the Leafs 3-2. Playing in Detroit on April 23, with the scored tied at 3-3 in the third period, Mr. BAUN first was hit on his right leg by a slapshot from Gordie HOWE and then, after a faceoff, spun on the leg, which gave way.
X-rays delayed at Mr. BAUN's insistence showed a small broken bone, just above the ankle. He spent six weeks in a cast.
But that came after the series ended. During its sixth game, Mr. BAUN was tended to by Dr. MURRAY and other team doctors. After being carried off the ice, he asked Dr. MURRAY if he could hurt his leg any more. The doctor replied no. "Having someone like Jim tell me that, I could believe him, "Mr. BAUN said.
With his leg taped and frozen, Mr. BAUN continued playing. Within the first two minutes of the first overtime period, he scored the winning goal and kept the Leafs in the series.
Mr. BAUN didn't miss a shift during Game 7, and neither did teammate Red KELLY, who had torn knee ligaments during the previous game. The Leafs won the seventh game 4-0 and the Stanley Cup, their third in a row and their fifth during Dr. MURRAY's time with the team.
That year, Dr. MURRAY resigned and 20 years later joked to The Toronto Star that it was he who had led them to the five Stanley Cups.
If he took the connection between his presence and the Leafs' wins lightly, Punch IMLACH, then the team's coach, did not. Mr. IMLACH had become convinced that Dr. MURRAY brought the team good luck, the doctor told the Star in a 1972 story.
The newspaper was interviewing Dr. MURRAY about his appointment as a doctor to Team Canada for the Canada-Russia hockey series. In the article headlined "Good luck charm for Team Canada, " he recalled how during the 1967 Stanley Cup playoffs, Mr. IMLACH invited him to a Leaf game in Chicago, believing that he would bring the team good luck.
"If it had been anybody else but Punch, I'd have dismissed it as a joke. But he really needed to win and he honestly believed my presence would make a difference, "Dr. MURRAY was quoted as saying.
The Leafs won not only that game, but, with Dr. MURRAY in attendance for the remainder of the series, the Stanley Cup. The Leafs haven't won a Stanley Cup since.
And the Star's headline proved prophetic. Team Canada won the Canada-Russia series when Paul HENDERSON scored with 34 seconds left in the eighth game.
Born in Toronto on May 14, 1920, James Findlay MURRAY was the youngest of three children. His father ran a store at Yonge and Queen Streets in downtown Toronto and died before the birth of his third child.
Dr. MURRAY attributed his curvy fingernails to his mother's malnutrition when she was pregnant with him, said his youngest son Hugh. Within a few years, she had remarried, and his stepfather helped to raise him.
An avid athlete, Dr. MURRAY played football during his high school and university days, so much so that once, when forbidden by his mother to play for his high-school team because he had had pneumonia, he practised and played in secret.
That lasted until his picture appeared in the Star running for a touchdown. He was immediately placed on the disabled list.
Awarded the George Biggs trophy for sportsmanship, leadership and scholarship, Dr. MURRAY graduated from medical school in 1943 and spent two years in the Royal Canadian Medical Corps, finishing as a captain.
After a year of general practice in Belleville, Ontario, he trained in plastic surgery at the Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto with A. W. FARMER, whom many consider to be the father of Canadian hand surgery.
A humble man, who drove less-than-fancy cars, Dr. MURRAY was known for his ability to relate to everyone. "He was a doctor and an esteemed member of society, but it didn't matter to him," Hugh MURRAY said. "He considered himself an everyday person. He was as comfortable, if not more comfortable, dealing with just working guys."
In 1953, Dr. MURRAY joined the Toronto East General and Orthopedic Hospital as head of plastic surgery and organized a specialized hand clinic, according to Bernd NEU, another former student of Dr. MURRAY and now a plastic surgeon at North York General Hospital.
"It's because the hand is such an important part of the body, not just physically, but aesthetically, "Dr. MURRAY, a specialist in soft tissue and the reconstruction of flexor tendons, said in 1984 to explain the dedication of hand surgeons.
In 1983, Dr. MURRAY left Toronto East General, where he had been surgeon-in-chief since 1976, to head the hand unit at Sunnybrook Medical Centre, taking a cut in pay to do so.
At the time, plastic surgeons could earn $2,000 for a face-lift and $106.50 for a carpal-tunnel release.
Dr. MURRAY derived great satisfaction from the help his hands gave others. Once in a clinic at Toronto East General, he and Dr. NEU came upon a patient with only a thumb and little finger on one hand.
"This is a wonderful hand, "he told Dr. NEU. " Look at how dirty and callused it is."
After several surgeries, Dr. MURRAY had restored the worker's hand to the point where the man could use it once again to earn a living.
"What to other people would look like a devastating loss, to Dr. MURRAY and the patient, this was a hand to be proud of, Dr. NEU said.
As a hand consultant beginning in 1974 at the Downsview Rehabilitation Centre of the Workers' Compensation Board, Dr. MURRAY treated those injured in industrial accidents, often surmounting language barriers to do so.
"He could speak to them [the patients] in basic English, so they could understand how seriously he took their problems, and how everything was being done that could be done for them, "Dr. NEU said.
In a 1996 letter to Dr. MURRAY, another of his former residents recalled how once on rounds, the doctor lifted the sheets to examine a paraplegic patient, only to find the man soiled. Instead of calling for hospital staff to clean the man, Dr. MURRAY performed the task himself.
"That little lesson reminded me that being a doctor is not just being a cutter, "the physician wrote.
Not only did he have a natural way with people, Dr. MURRAY was a gifted surgeon.
"He was a talented person with original ways of doing things," Dr. McFARLANE said. "He had a unique technical approach. That's what made him different from other surgeons."
Appointed a lecturer at the University of Toronto in 1953, Dr. MURRAY was first an assistant and associate professor, becoming a full professor in 1979. He developed the first hand surgery fellowship training program in Canada in 1981, Dr. NEU said.
As well as teaching at the university, Dr. MURRAY trained surgeons during two trips to Southeast Asia as a volunteer with Cooperative for American Relief Everywhere, Inc. Medico and led a group of hand surgeons to study techniques in micro-surgery in China during the late 1970s.
At the medical meetings Dr. MURRAY often attended, he impressed Dr. McFARLANE with his ability to discuss surgery. "He had a very common-sense approach to a surgical problem, and when everyone had something to say about a problem, he would get up and clarify it very nicely, "Dr. McFARLANE said.
A founder of MANUS Canada, a society of hand surgeons, once a president of the Canadian Society of Plastic Surgeons and the American Society for Surgery of the Hand, Dr. MURRAY was honoured by the U.S. society at "Murray Day" in 1990 with tributes from past presidents.
Stricken with Alzheimer's disease toward the end of his life, Dr. MURRAY died in Collingwood, Ontario, on April 4. He leaves his wife of 57 years, Shirley, and his children, John, Bill, Claire and Hugh.

  M... Names     MU... Names     MUR... Names     Welcome Home

MURRAY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-05-08 published
HARLEY, Constance Aileen (née MURRAY)
Born July 21, 1905, in Saint John, New Brunswick, the youngest of nine children, died peacefully at the age of 97 on May 3, 2003, at Briar Crest Retirement Home in Toronto. Beloved wife of the late Edward B. HARLEY of Rothesay, New Brunswick (1894-1987.) Loving mother of Tim (1929-1992), David and Roger and grandmother of Sharon, Brenda, Ted, Susan GAIL, Richard, Robert, Anne, Nicholas and Rannoch, great-grandmother to 13 children. The family is grateful to all those at Briar Crest who gave her loving care over the past seven years. A memorial service will be held at St. Paul's Anglican Church, Rothesay, New Brunswick, on Monday, May 26, 2003, at 3 p.m. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the Canadian Red Cross, New Brunswick Branch, or the charity of your choice.

  M... Names     MU... Names     MUR... Names     Welcome Home

MURRAY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-06-27 published
Edwin Neyle MURRAY
By Jean MURRAY Friday, June 27, 2003 - Page A20
Adventurer, husband, father. Born March 20, 1903, in Saint John's, Newfoundland. Died March 6 in Ottawa, of natural causes, aged Neyle MURRAY was an adventurer, a man of integrity, a dreamer with strong self-discipline, an avid photographer, a cat lover, a trout fisherman. Most of all, he was a proud Newfoundlander.
He was born a century ago in Saint John's, when Newfoundland was still a British colony. Neyle, his brother and four sisters were all active in "The Kirk," where he was the first scoutmaster of the church's Boy Scout troop. The MURRAY family kept sober Scottish traditions, but there was plenty of time for social activities and fun, including picnic excursions, dances and sports. Neyle and his brother Arthur were among the first to bring cross-country skis to Saint John's. On social occasions, Neyle always looked after his sisters, ensuring their dance cards were full before seeking partners of his own. Nevertheless, by the time he enlisted in the army, he himself had already been engaged twice.
All the MURRAYs were educated in England, and Neyle developed an abiding love of travel. Returning to Saint John's to join his father in the family provision merchants' business, he imported British motorcycles as a sideline, and in 1938 undertook a motorcycle tour of England and Germany. He learned one German phrase -- "Do you have a room with two beds?" -- which he used for the rest of his life on any unsuspecting German he met.
When he was 37 and the Second World War broke out, Neyle joined the all-volunteer 166th Newfoundland Regiment of the British Army. He became a dispatch rider, and saw service in England, North Africa and Italy. An avid photographer, he took photographs throughout the war (frequently in defiance of official orders), often with film purloined from mysterious sources. Many of his photos were subsequently used in two books on the "Fighting Newfoundlanders."
Neyle met a vivacious English girl, Susan, and within three months they were married. He was smitten when he walked into a chemist's shop and saw her sitting on the counter having her legs painted with a homemade dye to resemble nylon stockings, unobtainable in wartime England. She fell in love with him because he spoke of his mother with such respect and love. After the war, Neyle took Susan back to Newfoundland, where their only child, Jean, was born.
In 1949, the family returned to England, where Neyle and Susan ran grocery shops, beach cafés and an off-licence, the latter shocking the teetotalling MURRAYs back home.
Neyle had an entrepreneurial spirit, whether it was developing a supermarket on a new housing estate or introducing prepackaged bacon to the shop.
But for Neyle, Newfoundland was always home and the family vacationed there frequently, travelling by ship. Neyle always loved the sea, although one of his most vivid memories was, at the age of 9, seeing the bodies of the Titanic victims being brought into Saint John's. When unable to get back to Newfoundland, Neyle intrepidly explored the Norfolk Broads' waterways.
After Susan's death in 1982, Neyle settled in Ottawa, to be close to Jean and her family. He vacationed frequently in Europe, Barbados and Newfoundland, although he was indignant that he had to visit some old Friends in the graveyard -- they were not of strong MURRAY stock.
Although congratulations on his impending 100th birthday were coming in from the Queen, the Governor-General, the Prime Minister and the Premier of Newfoundland, Neyle died as he had lived, on his own schedule. As he would have paraphrased it: Home is the sailor, home from the sea, and the hunter, home from the hill -- for his tea.
Jean MURRAY is Neyle's daughter.

  M... Names     MU... Names     MUR... Names     Welcome Home

MURRAY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-11-21 published
FOGARTY, James Patrick ''Pat'' September 9, 1920 Consort, Alberta - November 16, 2003 Victoria, British Columbia
Died peacefully at Sandringham Hospital after a long struggle with Progressive Supranuclear Palsy. He was predeceased by eldest son, John (1953 - 1973) and by siblings, Arthur, Margaret Dulsrud HOWELL and Edna KOVACH. Pat is survived by his wife, Helen, sons Richard and David and daughter Claire and two sisters, Florence MURRAY (Edmonton) and Joyce SPENCER (Lethbridge) and by nieces and nephews and their families. In 1940, Pat joined the Royal Canadian Air Force becoming an aero-engine mechanic and later a flight engineer seconded to the Royal Air Force Transport Command. After World War 2, received his M.S.W. from University of British Columbia. He worked at various social agencies in Vancouver before becoming a director in the Saskatchewan Dept. of Welfare until 1966. He completed his career in the federal Department of the Environment. A memorial service will be held at 2: 00 p.m. Wednesday, November 26 at St. Aidan's United Church Victoria, British Columbia. Memorial Society of Vancouver Island.

  M... Names     MU... Names     MUR... Names     Welcome Home

MURRAY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-11-28 published
MURRAY, Mari-Ellen
It is with great sorrow that we announce the death of Mari-Ellen MURRAY on Saturday, November 22nd, 2003 while vacationing in South Africa. A vibrant and determined woman, Mari-Ellen lived life as a perpetual adventure, unaltered by her battle with breast cancer. She died quickly and mercifully while pursuing her love of travel with her cherished husband Andrew BISHOP. Beloved daughter of Norman and Nerina MURRAY; granddaughter of Luigia SINELLI, sister of Jacqueline, Stephanie and Rob WATSON, Marisa and Paul GRETHER, and Christine; treasured Aunt Mimi of Madeleine and Cole WATSON; much-loved daughter-in-law of Trevor and Barbara BISHOP; sister-in-law of Timothy and Michael. Our inspiration and pillar of strength, she will be sorely missed by all who knew her. Visitation at Kopriva Taylor at 64 Lakeshore Road West in Oakville from 2: 00 to 5:00 p.m. and 7:00 to 9:00 p.m. on Sunday, November 30th, 2003. The Funeral Mass will take place on Monday, December 1st at 1: 30 p.m. at St. Basil's Church, 50 St. Joseph Street at Bay Street in Toronto. In lieu of flowers, donations to The Princess Margaret Hospital, 610 University Ave. Toronto, M5G 2M9 or Willow Breast Cancer Support and Resource Services, 785 Queen Street East, Toronto, M4M 1H5 would be greatly appreciated.

  M... Names     MU... Names     MUR... Names     Welcome Home

MURRAY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-01 published
ENGLEBERT, Margaret Winifred Lade (née MURRAY)
born Kilmacolm, Scotland, died in Vancouver, November 27th, 2003. Predeceased by husband Renny, survived by Susan (Joe STOTT) and Michael (Donna) and grandchildren Rob and Johanna. There will be no service. In lieu of flowers please donate to the Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals or a charity of your choosing.

  M... Names     MU... Names     MUR... Names     Welcome Home

MURRAY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-20 published
Ottawa bids STANFIELD goodbye
'He was a sage.... He was quite extraordinary,' Charest says at funeral
By Kim LUNMAN, Saturday, December 20, 2003 - Page A9
Ottawa -- Robert STANFIELD was fondly remembered yesterday as a sage statesman.
The former Nova Scotia premier and federal Progressive Conservative leader remained one of the country's most respected politicians even years after leaving the national arena, Tory Senator Lowell MURRAY told more than 100 mourners yesterday at Mr. STANFIELD's funeral in Ottawa.
"There has survived perhaps only the kernel of something, but its essence in the Canadian consciousness -- that once, uniquely, there was STANFIELD, leader of a major party, a man of such civility, such humanity, such integrity, who adorned our national life," Mr. MURRAY said
Mr. STANFIELD, who suffered a stroke several years ago, died Tuesday in Ottawa. He was 89.
At the private ceremony at St. Bartholomew's Anglican Church, he was remembered as a respected politician with a dry wit. He will be buried today in Halifax's Camp Hill cemetery.
Politicians of all stripes attended the service to pay tribute. Outside the church, Prime Minister Paul MARTIN told reporters his father and Mr. STANFIELD were "great Friends. My father had huge admiration for Mr. STANFIELD. And I actually shudder to think what the two of them are doing up there right now, the amount of discussions that are going on."
Mr. MARTIN said he remembered Mr. STANFIELD for his "great sense of decency, integrity, and his deep, deep love of country." Progressive Conservative Leader Peter MacKAY said Canada has lost "one of its greatest statesmen, a person who raised the standard of politics and public service.... He was very much substance over style."
"He was a sage," Quebec Liberal Premier Jean Charest, the former federal Tory leader, said. Mr. STANFIELD "looked at life with a bit of a smile, I think. He was quite extraordinary."
Governor-General Adrienne CLARKSON called Mr. STANFIELD remarkable, "a man of deep conviction, a man who was decent and fair and honest and very funny." Other political colleagues at the funeral included former Tory prime ministers Kim CAMPBELL and Joe CLARK and former Tory cabinet minister Flora MacDONALD.
Mr. STANFIELD married three times. His first wife died in a crash in 1954 and his second wife died of cancer in 1976. He married his third wife, Anne Henderson AUSTIN, in 1978. He had four children.
Even as the service was going on in Ottawa, hundreds of people filed into the Nova Scotia legislature in Halifax to sign a book of condolence next to a portrait of the former premier, who led the province for 11 years, from 1956 to 1967.
Mr. STANFIELD led the federal Progressive Conservatives from 1967 to 1976 against Pierre TRUDEAU and was known within the party as the greatest prime minister Canada never had.
In his later years, he was regarded as the Conservatives' conscience, representing the party's progressive side on social issues. He supported Mr. TRUDEAU's Official Languages Act despite a revolt by his fellow Tory members of parliament and also backed abolishing the death penalty.
He was born in Truro into a family famous for its underwear business and became a lawyer before turning to politics.
Bespectacled and known for his slow-speaking style, Mr. STANFIELD conveyed an awkward image that contrasted sharply with the youthful, charismatic Mr. Trudeau, costing the party every election it fought under his leadership.
But he came within two seats of office in the 1972 election when the Liberals defeated the Conservatives by 109 to 107 seats.
Two years later, the Liberals regained their majority and Mr. STANFIELD announced his decision to step down. He was succeeded by Mr. CLARK in 1976.

  M... Names     MU... Names     MUR... Names     Welcome Home

MURRAY - All Categories in OGSPI

MURRELL o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-18 published
WRIGHT, Ruth Bailey Murrell, October 13, 1907-December 13, 2003
Died in Arnprior and District Memorial Hospital on Saturday evening, Ruth Murrell WRIGHT of Cedar Cove (R.R.#2 White Lake, Ontario) in her 97th year, beloved wife of the late Gilbert Owen Murrell WRIGHT (1980,) dear mother of Peter Murrell WRIGHT (Satu Repo) of Toronto, James Robert Murrell WRIGHT of Cedar Cove, Margaret May (Gordon) McKEITH of Bjorkdale, Saskatchewan, John Cohoe WRIGHT of Cedar Cove and David Edgar (Theresa) MURRELL- WRIGHT of Ottawa, dear grandmother of Daniel Peter (Megan), Susan Marie, Laura Ruth, Joan Murrell (David), Michael Gilbert, Brian Albert, Allan Wesley, Owen Robert (Karen), Mary Ruth (Paul), Leslie Anne and Robert David, great-grandmother of Christine, Jennifer, Kyle, Michael, Dominic, Thomas and Quinn.
Ruth was raised and educated in Eastern Canada and the United States graduating from the University of Rochester in 1931, shortly after her marriage to Gilbert they moved to Edmonton in 1933, on to Camrose in 1941 and to Saskatoon in 1945, they survived the depression while raising their children. One of Ruth's finest achievements was as the matron of the Saskatoon Convalescent Home from 1959 to 1981. In 1986 she returned to Ontario where she was one of the owners of Cedar Cove on White Lake near Arnprior. During her last years she courageously coped with blindness and very much appreciated the talking books provided by the Canadian National Institute for the Blind Resting at The Boyce Funeral Home, Chapel, Visitation and Reception Centre, 138 Daniel St. N., Arnprior where Friends may pay their respects on Wednesday, December 17, 2003 after 10: 30 a.m., funeral service will be conducted in The Boyce Chapel at 11: 30 a.m. with Reverend Bill SIMONS officiating. Interment of cremated remains will be in Woodlawn Cemetery, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan. In memoriams to The Canadian National Institute for the Blind would be appreciated by her family.

  M... Names     MU... Names     MUR... Names     Welcome Home

MURRELL - All Categories in OGSPI