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"MOO" 2003 Obituary


MOODY  MOONEY  MOORE 

MOODY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-08 published
MOODY, James Beer
On Wednesday February 26th, 2003 after several months of illness in his 89th year. Always a gentleman and always kind, he will be lovingly remembered by his wife of 60 years, Jean, his son and daughter-in-law John and Diane, and his grand_sons Bob and Paul. Jim was predeceased by his sister, Betty, and his beloved daughter, Janet. We all wish him happy sailing. A Memorial Service in his honour will be held at the Church of the Epiphany, 700 Kennedy Road in Scarborough (South of Eglinton) on Saturday, March 22nd, 2003 at 1: 00 p.m. If desired, donations may be made to the Canadian National Institute for the Blind, P.O. Box 32002, Station Brm B Toronto, Ontario M7Y 5R2. Arrangements entrusted to the Jerrett Funeral Home, Scarborough, (416) 266-4404.

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MOODY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-11 published
BREYFOGLE, Elizabeth ''Betty'' (née HOPWOOD)
Peacefully on March 5, 2003, at home in Victoria. Betty has gone to join her beloved husband, William A. BREYFOGLE, who died in Vermont in 1958. She is fondly remembered by her nieces and nephews, Peter and Jo BREYFOGLE, Joan and Derek BARTLETT, Christopher WILLIAMSON and their families. Many thanks go to her friend Joan MOODY and to Bruce CALE of Victoria for their Friendship and support.

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MOONEY o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-04-09 published
Leota MOONEY
At her residence in North Bay, Monday, March 31, 2003. Leota ROWE beloved wife of the late James MOONEY in her 78th year.
Dearly loved mother of Mary Rick (Francis) of Trout Creek and Paul MOONEY (Sherry) of North Bay. Lovingly remembered by grandchildren Kevin and Lisa, Rick and Patrick and Katie MOONEY. Predeceased by her parents Lydia and Clifford ROWE. Leota was a member of Corpus Christi Catholic Women's League and a retired secretary at North York General Hospital. Visitation at the McGuinty Funeral Home, was Tuesday evening 7-9 pm. Funeral mass was celebrated at Corpus Christi Church, Wednesday April 2, at 1: 30 pm. Cremation at Forest Lawn Crematorium, Tower Drive, North Bay. Interment of cremated remains at Holy Cross Cemetery, Thornhill.
McGuinty Funeral Home, 591 Cassells Street, North Bay, Ont. P1B 3Z8 705-472-8520

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MOONEY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-09-01 published
Died This Day -- Nellie McCLUNG, 1951
Monday, September 1, 2003 - Page R5
Suffragist, reformer and author born Nellie Letitia MOONEY at Chatsworth, Ontario, on October 20, 1873; raised on homestead in Souris Valley, Manitoba; did not attend school until 10; at 16, received teaching certificate and taught school; 1896, married Robert Wesley McCLUNG, a druggist in Manitou, Manitoba; she became prominent in the Woman's Christian Temperance Union; 1908, published first novel, the bestseller Sowing Seeds in Danny.

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MOORE o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-03-12 published
MOORE
-In loving memory of Albert (Abby) a special dad and grandpa who left us on March 11, 1997.
It's so lonely here without you
I miss you more each day
For life is not the same to me
Since you were called away
Days of sadness still come over me
Tears in silence flow
But memories keep you near me
Though you died 6 years
There's such a void in my life
I wish that you were here
But I know that's not possible
And you are always near.
Dad I miss you so much and I hold our memories close to my heart
-Forever loved and cherished by your daughter Darlene and grandchildren Cassie, Jordan and Megan.

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MOORE o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-03-19 published
MOORE--In loving memory of Melvin R. who passed on to a greater glory on March 24, 1998.
We miss you more and more everyday
So much left unsaid
Love that is unconditional
Is the love of family
Smiling face in the middle of a snowstorm
Words of wisdom lost
When we lost you, 5 years ago.
-We miss you and love you, Your wife, children and grandchildren.

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MOORE o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-05-21 published
Flora FERGUSON
In Loving Memory of Flora FERGUSON. Peacefully at Manitoulin Centennial Manor on Sunday May 18, 2003, age 94 years.
Beloved wife of John FERGUSON. Dear sister of Reta (husband William) BRAY of Hemet, California. Predeceased by siblings Wilbert (Olive) MOORE, Carmen MOORE, Violet McLENNAN (husband Bill,) Alvin MOORE, Myrtle MEREDITH, Charles MOORE. Remembered by sister-in-law Hilda MOORE. Predeceased by all her in-laws: Maine (husband William) MARSHALL, Rueben (wife Nell) FERGUSON, Floyd (wife Pearl) FERGUSON, William (wife Cecile) FERGUSON, Lena (husband Walter) MARSHALL. Loved by many nieces and nephews. Visitation 2-4 and 7-9 pm Tuesday, May 20 at Island Funeral Home. Funeral Service 2: 00 pm Wednesday, May 21, 2003. Burial Cold Springs Cemetery.

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MOORE o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-07-09 published
MOORE
-In loving memory of a wonderful brother-in-law Stan, who passed away July 11, 2002.
Quietly remembered every day
Sadly missed along life's way.
No longer in our life to share
But in our hearts, he's always there.
-Always remembered, forever missed. Bill, Ella and family.

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MOORE o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-11-19 published
John Benjamen FERGUSON
In loving memory of John Benjamen FERGUSON who passed away peacefully at Manitoulin Centennial Manor on Sunday, November 16, 2003 at the age of 97 years.
Predeceased by his beloved wife Flora (née MOORE) on May 18, 2003. Predeceased by all his brothers and sisters, Maime (husband William) MARSHALL, Reuben (wife Nell,) Floyd (wife Pearl,) William (wife Cecil,) Lena (husband Walter) MARSHALL. Brother-in-law to Reta (predeceased) and husband William BRAY, Charles MOORE (predeceased) and wife Hilda, William and wife Olive MOORE, Carmen MOORE, Violet and Bill McLENNAN, Alvin MOORE, Myrtle MEREDITH. Loved by many nieces and nephews.
Visitation was held on Tuesday, November 18, 2003. Funeral Service at 2: 00 p.m. Wednesday,
November 19, 2003 at Little Current United Church. Burial in Cold Springs Cemetery.

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MOORE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-04-22 published
He founded Readers' Club of Canada
Nationalist visionary struggled financially to publish Canadian writers
By Carol COOPER Special to The Globe and Mail Tuesday, April 22, 2003 - Page R7
In the early 1960s, when writers asked Peter and Carol MARTIN where to publish their manuscripts on Canada, the couple realized how few choices there were. Inspired, the Martins, both voracious readers, staunch nationalists and founders of the Readers' Club of Canada, decided to start their own press. In 1965, Peter Martin Associates came into being. Last month, Peter MARTIN died of lung cancer in Ottawa.
In an industry overshadowed by American companies, Peter MARTIN Associates was among the first in a wave of independent publishing houses to open during a time of rising Canadian nationalism.
Launched in a downtown Toronto basement on a shoestring budget, skeleton staff, idealism and enthusiasm, the company flew by the seat of its pants. Its employees were often young and new to the business. But many, including Peter CARVER, Michael SOLOMON and Valerie WYATT, went on to become Canadian mainstays.
"It really was a time of Canadian nationalism and those of us who believed in that cause could see what Peter and Carol were doing," said Ms. WYATT, a children's editor who spent four years with the company in the seventies.
During the 16 years before its sale in 1981, Peter Martin Associates published approximately 170 works, mainly non-fiction. Its presses put out I, Nuligak, the autobiography of an Inuit man; The Boyd Gang by Marjorie LAMB and Barry PEARSON; Trapping is My Life by John TETSO; and the Handbook of Canadian Film by Eleanor BEATTIE. Others who came through their doors included Hugh HOOD, Robert FULFORD, John Robert COLOMBO, Douglas FETHERLING and Mary Alice DOWNIE -- all to have their works published.
Started with small amounts of seed money from private investors and no government funding, Peter Martin Associates constantly struggled financially. At one point, for a bit of extra cash, the office became the designated nuclear-fallout shelter for the street. Pat DACEY, once the firm's book designer, lugged suitcases of books up the street to sell at Britnell's bookstore with summer employee Bronwyn DRAINIE.
Working at Peter Martin Associates was always fun, Ms. WYATT said. "You went in to work happy and you stayed happy all day."
Still, in a time when Canadian works received little recognition, she remembers finding it difficult to get media interviews for the author of Martin-published book.
Yet another title caused trouble with its subject. The company was putting out a collection of previously published sayings of former prime minister John DIEFENBAKER, called I Never Say Anything Provocative, edited by Margaret WENTE. Mr. DIEFENBAKER heard about the project, called Mr. MARTIN and threatened to sue. Mr. MARTIN stood firm.
"He handled it with such élan," said writer Tim WYNNE- JONES, then in the art department. "He was suitably dutiful, but not in awe. Mr. DIEFENBAKER was just over the top, as was his wont."
The book went to press and Mr. DIEFENBAKER did not go to court.
Once listed along with Peter GZOWSKI in a Maclean's magazine article on "Young Men to Watch," Mr. MARTIN was born on April 26, 1934 in Ottawa to a dentist father and a mother who drove an ambulance in the First World War. The younger of two sons, he attended Trinity College School in Port Hope, Ontario and the University of Toronto, where he earned a degree in philosophy.
During a year in Ottawa as the president of the National Federation of University Students, Mr. MARTIN met his first wife Carol. They married in 1956 and moved to Toronto. Three years later, they founded the Readers' Club in Featuring one Canadian book a month, it distributed works by Mordecai RICHLER, Irving LAYTON, Morley CALLAGHAN and Brian MOORE among others, and supplied its members with coupons. While continuing to run the Readers' Club (sold in 1978 to Saturday Night Magazine and closed in 1981), the MARTINs started Peter Martin Associates.
Throughout his career, Mr. MARTIN spoke out for Canadian publishing. Alarmed by the sale of Ryerson Press and Gage Educational Press in 1970 to American firms, he called a meeting of publishers to discuss problems in the industry. Named the Independent Publishers Association, the group started in 1971 with 16 members and with Mr. MARTIN as its first president. In 1976, it was renamed the Association of Canadian Publishers and continues today with 140 members. As a result of the group's efforts, Canadian publishing began to receive federal and provincial funding.
In the late 1970s, the MARTINs went their separate ways. Afterward, Mr. MARTIN published a small newspaper, The Downtowner, and owned a cookbook store with his second wife, Maggie NIEMI. In 1983, they moved near Sudbury, Ontario, where Mr. MARTIN did freelance book and theatre reviews, then moved to Ottawa in 1985 to work as president for Balmuir Books, publisher of the magazine International Perspectives and consulting editor for the University of Ottawa Press.
After a spinal-cord injury in 1997, Mr. MARTIN was left a quadriplegic, except for limited use of his left arm. Even so, he remained active, maintained a heavy e-mail correspondence and spent time in the park reading while seated in a bright-yellow wheelchair.
Mr. MARTIN leaves his children Pamela, Christopher and Jeremy and his wife Maggie NIEMI. He died on March 15.

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MOORE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-05-23 published
PERDUE, Canon Richard Keith
Died at Toronto on May 22nd, 2003 at the age of 94. son of the Reverend R. and Mrs. PERDUE of Walkerton. Graduated from Ridley College, St. Catharines and Trinity College, Toronto. Predeceased by his dear wife Evelyn (BILLESDON) after 59 years of happiness together. Father of Ann K. (MOORE) and Richard R. (Q.C.) and John M., all of Toronto. He will also be missed by Gordon MOORE, son-in-law, Wanda PERDUE, daughter-in-law, and grandchildren Kimberly Ann and John Keith PERDUE, and Suzanne and Jay MOORE. He was the brother of Mrs. M.B. THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON of Port Hope, Mrs. K.N. RISK of Toronto and Mr. H.M. PERDUE of British Columbia. He served parishes at Lakeview, Aurora, St. Matthew's Toronto and St. Matthew's Islington. While posted in Toronto he was long associated with the social service work of the Diocese. He also served in his retirement as an Assistant at St. Nathaniel Episcopal Church in North Port, Florida for 20 years. From 1942 to 1946 he served with the 3rd Canadian Infantry Division. Having landed in Normandy on D-Day, he served in Europe until the end of the war. He was demobilized with the rank of Major. For many years after the war he was Chaplain for the Queen's York Rangers. The service will be held at St. Matthew's Anglican Church, Islington, 3962 Bloor Street West (east of Hwy. 427) on Monday, May 26, 2003 at 11 a.m. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to Huntsville Memorial Hospital Foundation, 354 Muskoka Road 3 North, Huntsville, Ontario P1H 1H7.

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MOORE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-05-24 published
He ran O'Keefe Centre in its prime
Former accountant was an innovator: He booked a show using surtitles and a play about an interracial romance
By Carol COOPER Special to The Globe and Mail Saturday, May 24, 2003 - Page F10
Late one spring night in 1963, a phone call awoke Hugh WALKER, the first managing director and president of Toronto's O'Keefe Centre for the Performing Arts. A police officer wanted to know if "we had a mad Russian called Nuri-something dancing at the O'Keefe Centre," Mr. WALKER wrote in his book, The O'Keefe Centre: Thirty Years of Theatre History.
After the opening performance of Marguerite and Armand, in which he starred with Dame Margot FONTEYN, Rudolph NUREYEV had danced up the centre of Yonge Street, attempting headstands on cars as he went. Police intervened in the interest of Mr. NUREYEV's safety, but after a scuffle, the dancer landed in jail for causing a disturbance.
Endlessly kind, courtly and patient, Mr. WALKER notified the Royal Ballet with whom Mr. NUREYEV was performing, and the dancer was released.
Mr. WALKER, the man who smoothed the way for the stars appearing at the O'Keefe as overseer of its operations and who had previously supervised its construction, has died at the age of 93.
O'Keefe Centre, now named the Hummingbird Centre, opened on October 1, 1960, with the first performance of Camelot in the country's first Broadway musical. The show starred Richard BURTON, Julie ANDREWS and Robert GOULET and played to a glittering crowd.
In The Toronto Star, Gordon SINCLAIR wrote: "A salaam to Hugh WALKER for bringing the O'Keefe Centre home on time after 30 months of strain on his patience, nerves and humour."
Mr. WALKER had, in fact, developed an ulcer during the centre's construction, and the strain didn't end with its opening. Shortly after the curtain, his wife, Shirley, smelled smoke. It turned out to be a burning escalator motor, and after the fire was extinguished, Mary JOLLIFFE, the centre's publicist, ran to a hotel across the street for air freshener. The audience came out at intermission none the wiser.
It took royalty to solve another problem. At the time, temperance sentiment remained strong in Toronto, and teetotallers criticized the fact the O'Keefe was funded by, and named for, a brewery.
Mr. WALKER set about to gain acceptance for the centre. Learning that the Queen was visiting Canada in June of 1959, he convinced her aides that she should stop briefly at the construction site and view a model of the building.
Before an audience of arts patrons and the press, the Queen inspected the model and showed such an interest that she overstayed her schedule, delaying the start of the Queen's Plate, her next stop, by half an hour.
Mr. WALKER didn't know that the Queen or the O'Keefe would be in his future when he became executive assistant to Canadian Breweries and Argus Corp. owner E. P. TAILOR/TAYLOR in 1955.
It was only after his hiring that he learned that Mr. TAILOR/TAYLOR had responded to a challenge made by Nathan PHILLIPS, then mayor of Toronto, for industry to build a desperately needed performing arts theatre in the city. For the project, Mr. TAILOR/TAYLOR gave $12-million and the services of his new assistant.
With the slogan "To bring the best of live entertainment to the greatest number of people at the lowest possible prices," the 3, 211-seat multipurpose theatre, designed by modernist architect Peter DICKINSON, quickly became a predominant Canadian venue, predating the Place des Arts in Montreal and the National Arts Centre in Ottawa.
Pre-Broadway shows, musicals, ballets and plays from around the world came to the O'Keefe and it replaced Maple Leaf Gardens as the Toronto venue for the Metropolitan Opera. International stars such as Louis ARMSTRONG, Paul ANKA, Tom JONES, Diana ROSS and Harry BELAFONTE performed there.
During one of Mr. BELAFONTE's many performances at the centre, he experimented with a wireless mike. Accidentally, he tuned into the police frequency. "The O'Keefe audience had the unusual experience of listening in on a lot of police messages, while the police were able to enjoy hearing BELAFONTE sing Ma-til-da!," Mr. WALKER wrote.
Another O'Keefe story concerned Carol CHANNING. When the performer appeared at the centre in Hello, Dolly, she needed to make a number of quick costume changes. Since there wasn't enough time for Ms. CHANNING to run backstage to her dressing room, the crew put up a roofless tent in the wings.
From the fly bridge, the stagehands looked down on Ms. CHANNING, remaining quiet while they watched her change. After her last performance, she looked up at them and said, "Well, boys, hope you've enjoyed the show. 'Bye now."
Other more critical events are associated with the O'Keefe. In 1964, while awaiting her divorce from Eddie FISHER, Elizabeth TAILOR/TAYLOR stayed with Richard BURTON while he starred in Sir John GIELGUD's production of Hamlet at the centre. One weekend between performances, the couple stole off to Montreal and married.
And in 1974, ballet dancer Mikhail BARYSHNIKOV arranged his defection from the Soviet Union at the centre.
During the early 1960s, the O'Keefe became home to the National Ballet of Canada and the Canadian Opera Company. In his book, Mr. WALKER credits the centre with allowing the companies' artistic growth.
Still, not everyone spoke so kindly about the O'Keefe. Many critics denounced its acoustics and less-than-intimate size.
For that, Mr. WALKER had a ready answer. In 1985, Herbert WHITTAKER, then The Globe and Mail's drama critic, wrote: "Against the fading chorus of these ancient complaints, I hear an echo, the rather quiet British tones of Hugh WALKER: 'We know it [O'Keefe Centre] is too large for legitimate theatre, Herbert, but think of all the things Toronto would have missed if E. P. TAILOR/TAYLOR hadn't built it when he did?' "
Born on March 2, 1910, in Scotland to Brigadier-General James Workman WALKER, who fought in the Middle East during the First World War, and Jane STEVENSON, Hugh Percy WALKER was the middle of three children. After earning a B.A. at Cambridge University, he became a chartered accountant.
Mr. WALKER worked with firms in London, Palestine, Quebec, Scotland and Michigan before being employed by Mr. TAILOR/TAYLOR.
Although a great lover of theatre, upon his appointment as the O'Keefe's managing director, Mr. WALKER had little experience with its business side. This led to some innocent faux pas, such as when he booked a photo shoot with the Camelot stars at 10 in the morning, impossibly early for actors. In response, Mr. BURTON exclaimed: "What, in the middle of the night?" Ms. JOLLIFFE said.
Still, director and theatre critic Mavor MOORE said Mr. WALKER dealt with difficulties well. "He was very smooth," Dr. MOORE said. "He was very expert at handling people and situations. He was a calm man."
Mr. WALKER trusted his staff, Ms. JOLLIFFE said. "He was willing to take direction from staff people who had already been in the business, and that was unusual."
And he was gracious and courteous. "He gave great dignity to the performing arts profession and he treated people wonderfully," Ms. JOLLIFFE said. "He was a perfect model of a former era of English gentlemen."
Known for his hospitality, Mr. WALKER always visited the stars in their dressing rooms before opening night and entertained them afterward at First Nighters' parties with Mrs. WALKER.
When the WALKERs took Leonard BERNSTEIN to the Rosedale Country Club, Mr. WALKER tolerated Mr. BERNSTEIN's sending back the wine three times, Ms. JOLLIFFE said.
Along with bringing in commercial performances from the United States and Britain, Mr. WALKER showed some daring in booking shows. In 1961, Kwamina, the story of a romantic relationship between a white woman and a black man, played the O'Keefe.
Acknowledging Toronto's Italian population, Mr. WALKER arranged for Rugantino, the biggest musical hit in Italian history, to play at the O'Keefe in 1963. It was the first foreign-language attraction in North America to use "surtitles," and although plagued with technical difficulties, it played to 60-per-cent capacity.
Things changed for Mr. WALKER and O'Keefe Centre in the late 1960s. Initially, the centre had been a subsidiary of the O'Keefe Brewing Co., owned by Canadian Breweries, and was never intended to make a profit. The company wrote off its operating losses and property taxes.
When Mr. TAILOR/TAYLOR retired in 1966, directors of Canadian Breweries decided that they could not continue to pay the O'Keefe's high taxes. To resolve the situation, Metropolitan Toronto was given the centre in 1968.
A new and inexperienced board of directors brought a new way of doing things, and the centre's losses began to mount.
Mr. WALKER wrote that after the disastrous 1971-72 season, "what followed was not the happiest part of my 15 years at the O'Keefe Centre, and I would like to forget some of the things that happened."
In his final working years, Mr. WALKER dealt with both the centre's internal changes and rising competition from the Royal Alexandra Theatre, the St. Lawrence Centre and emerging alternative theatres.
After his retirement in 1975, he spent 10 years at the Guild of All Arts in Scarborough, Ontario, as the director of Guildwood Hall, curating former Guild Inn owner Spencer CLARK's historical architectural collection of artifacts, writing and illustrating a booklet on them, curating Mr. CLARK's art collection, making a film and lecturing.
He and his wife lived on the Guild's grounds for four years in the now-demolished Corycliff, where they hosted parties whose guests included many stars from the O'Keefe days.
Along with writing the O'Keefe Centre history while in his 80s, Mr. WALKER golfed.
Sue NIBLETT, who worked with him at the Guild, recalls seeing Mr. WALKER nattily attired in golf clothing and Wellingtons standing in two feet of snow driving balls into Lake Ontario.
"He had a love of life that I've never experienced or met in anybody before," Ms. NIBLETT said. "He didn't waste a day of his life as far as I could see."
Mr. WALKER died on May 2 and leaves daughters Katrina PARKER and Zoë ALEXANDER and two grandchildren. Another daughter, Sarah CHENIER/CHENÉ, and his wife, Shirley, predeceased him.

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MOORE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-10-29 published
STATTEN, Mary (MOORE)
Died on Monday, October 27, 2003 at Shelburne Hospital. Beloved wife of the late Ernest STATTEN. Survived by sons Joseph and William and grandchildren Jason, Susan, Michael, Nicholas, Christopher, and Jacqueline. Cremation and private service. If desired, donations may be made to Abbeyfield Houses of Canada or Abbeyfield Houses of Caledon, 427 Bloor Street West, Toronto, Ontario M5S 1X7 or a charity of your choice.

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