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"MIT" 2003 Obituary


MITCHELL  MITCHENER  MITTELSTAEDT 

MITCHELL o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-05-07 published
Mary CHAMBERS McQUAY
In loving memory of Mary Chambers McQUAY, April 9, 1916 to May 3, 2003.
Mary McQuay, a resident of Mindemoya, died at her residence on Saturday, May 3, 2003 at the age of 87 years. She was born in Peterborough, daughter of the late George and Mabel (FOLEY) TURNBULL.
Mary graduated as a Registered Nurse in 1942 and worked in hospitals in Kingston, where she met Jack McQUAY, who was an intern at the same hospital. They married in 1944, and lived in Kingston before moving to Mindemoya in 1947. Jack began his medical practice in Mindemoya and Mary assisted for many years running the office. Mary had a warm, friendly manner and enjoyed socializing with her many Friends. She will be remembered for her dedication to her family and to her community. Mary participated in and supported many community activities over the years. She was accomplished in sewing, knitting and baking, and often contributed her home-made items to bazaars and bake sales. She volunteered for the Red Cross, the Mindemoya Hospital Auxiliary, Meals on Wheels, and the ambulance service. She enjoyed gardening, and participated in the Mindemoya Horticultural Society flower shows in years past. She was active in the local Women's Institute. An enthusiastic member of the Mindemoya Curling Club, she continued curling until she was well into her 80s, while in the summer she enjoyed golfing. She was an avid bridge player in the local bridge club. She was a member of St. Francis of Assisi Anglican Church, where she sang in the choir for many years, and participated in the life of the parish through the Anglican Church Women's group. Always interested in crafts, she created many beautiful pieces in pottery and paper tole crafts.
Dearly loved and loving wife of Dr. Jack McQUAY. Loved mother of Marilyn (husband Martin CHILTON) of Kingston, Paul (fiancée Marion CARROLL) of Fort McMurray, Alta, Janice McQUAY of Toronto and Mindemoya and Betty McQUAY of Toronto. Also survived by Athena McQUAY of Edmonton. Proud grandmother of Peter McQUAY, Jane HOEKSTRA (husband Terry,) Stephen McQUAY and Jim CHILTON and great grandchildren Ethan, Sydney and Liam. Dear sister of Reta CONRAN, Gladys MITCHELL (husband Charlie,) Bruce TURNBULL (wife Alice,) Norma RAYCRAFT (husband Glen,) Billie McNEIL and brother-in-law Earl HARMAN. Also survived by many nieces and nephews. Predeceased by sisters and brothers Marjorie McLEOD, Walter (Bud) TURNBULL, Ted TURNBULL, Gwen HARMAN and sister-in-law and brothers-in-law Marie TURNBULL, Alan McLEOD, Harold CONRAN and Gene McNEIL. Friends called the Saint Francis of Assisi Church in Mindemoya on Monday, May 5, 2003. The funeral service was held on Tuesday, May 6, 2003 with Reverend Canon Bain Peever officiating. Interment in Mindemoya Cemetery. Culgin Funeral Home

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MITCHELL o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-02-25 published
Agnes Elizabeth Jean HOWARD (née MITCHELL)
This most gracious lady died peacefully at her home in Stratford, February 22, 2003 in her 94th year. Agnes is predeceased by Earle, her loving and devoted husband of 51 years. Ever caring, ever supportive, she was cherished mother of David, adored grandmother of Gillian HOWARD, and treasured mother-in-law of Nicola ADAIR. She is most lovingly remembered by Andrew, son of Nicola; and Kitty HOWARD, mother to Gillian. Also by nephew Douglas GOWAN (Carol) and their sons, David (Debbie), Donald (Tana), Michael (Darla), and Paul. Agnes was born on her family's farm in 1909 at Hagersville, Ontario, daughter of Ionson and Annie MITCHELL. She completed her education with a post- secondary year at Waterford Business College before following her future husband's family to Fort Erie in 1928. Working briefly for the Bridgeburg Review, she married in 1933, residing in the home the couple built until 1989. Always passionate about her bridge, her garden, and her church, St. Andrew's Knox Presbyterian, Agnes was a proud member of the Imperial Order of the Daughters of the Empire; and ever the steadfast and unobtrusive power behind the man as she supported Earle throughout his career. Moving to St. Catharines, she continued to vigorously engage life, establishing a devoted and caring group of new Friends at age 80 in her home on Towering Heights Blvd., remaining there until 2002 when she joined her family in Stratford, reunited in her son's home, blessing all with her presence these last nine months. Agnes is best remembered for the quiet, understated grace with which she moved among her wide and committed circles of Friends, nurtured and maintained lifelong. Visitation (11: 00 a.m.) will precede funeral services at Knox Presbyterian Church, 53 Church Street, St. Catharines, Ontario, Saturday, March 1st, 12: 00 noon; interment at McAffee Cemetery. Expressions of sympathy may be directed to the Canadian Diabetic Association, St. Catharines General Hospital Foundation, Stratford General Hospital Foundation, Knox Presbyterian Church, St. Catharines, or St. Andrew's Knox Presbyterian Church, Fort Erie; donations may be facilitated by W.G. Young Funeral Home, 430 Huron St. Stratford, Ontario (519-271-7411). Stratford and area Friends are invited to remember Agnes at a reception at 90 Neal Avenue, Stratford, Ontario, Sunday, March 2nd, 2: 00 to 4:00 p.m.

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MITCHELL o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-24 published
Sailor mom had Northern Magic
An early experience with skin cancer led her to contemplate her life and make the decision to set off from Ottawa on a four-year family voyage around the world
By Allison LAWLOR Monday, March 24, 2003 - Page R7
Diane STUEMER dared to dream big and in doing so she captured the country's imagination.
The Ottawa woman, who sailed around the world with her husband and three sons and captivated Canadians back home with her weekly newspaper reports from faraway places, has died of cancer. She was 43.
"She touched people, said her younger sister Linda MASLECHKO. "When you read her stories, you felt that you were part of her family. She was unabashedly human."
The family odyssey began on September 11, 1997, when Ms. STUEMER, her husband Herbert, and their three sons Michael, Jonathan and Christopher, all under the age of 12, left Ottawa in their 42-foot steel sailboat named Northern Magic and headed down the St. Lawrence River.
When they left, the sum of their sailing experience consisted of a handful of summer afternoons on the Ottawa River.
"Finally, we all wanted to leave, just to get it over with. So when every contingency had been thought of, prepared for and fretted over, when we were as ready as we ever would be, we set off. All we could do now was pray."
Over the next four years, they would visit 34 countries and travel 35,000 nautical miles. When they returned home, in the summer of 2001, 3,000 people were there to welcome them.
Throughout the trip, Ms. STUEMER wrote 218 weekly dispatches for The Ottawa Citizen, chronicling every aspect of their journey from their lost cat to seasickness to travelling through pirate waters along the coast of Somalia.
"It's been a long time since the cold grip of fear has clenched me in my gut, and I was not the only one on board to shiver beneath the touch of its icy fingers, Ms. STUEMER wrote, before heading into waters where there had been at least seven attacks on private yachts in the past 12 months, two of which involved gunfire.
Ms. STUEMER subsequently published a book about their adventures called The Voyage of the Northern Magic.
Before setting sail on their epic journey, Ms. STUEMER and her husband fantasized about travelling the world, but like a lot of people they considered putting it off until their retirement.
"In the hustle and bustle of living our lives, with the business and the home and the kids and everything else, the travel part of our ambitions just got forgotten, " she once said in a television interview.
But a brush with skin cancer in 1994 persuaded her to re-evaluate her life. She and her husband decided it was time to start following their dreams. Soon after, they sold their advertising business, rented out their Ottawa-area home, bought and renovated Northern Magic, a modest 37-year-old sailboat.
"She taught people that you have to find a way to make your own dream come true, said Diane KING, a close friend.
The STUEMERs began their journey by sailing down the eastern seaboard of North America, through the Panama Canal and across the Pacific Ocean, eventually reaching Australia. From there, they travelled to Indonesia, Thailand, Sri Lanka and across the Indian Ocean to Zanzibar. They sailed the Red Sea and up through the Mediterranean to Gibraltar, from where they set out across the North Atlantic homeward bound.
At times they travelled for weeks without seeing land. The music of Canadian folksinger Michael MITCHELL frequently echoed through Northern Magic, calming frayed nerves during stormy weather or reminding them of home as they sailed into a new port.
Back home in Canada, Mr. MITCHELL read about their trip. "I almost felt I was on the journey with them, " he said.
The family encountered many close calls on their voyage. At one point, the family boat was docked in Yemen only a few hundred metres away from where suicide bombers blew a gaping hole in the U.S.S. Cole.
The trip was not just one of adventure. Along the way they met remarkable people, many of whom were living in poverty. Touched by these people, the family set out to make a difference. Ms. STUEMER's work, along with her popular columns, has managed to raise more than $50,000 so far for humanitarian causes in Africa and Southeast Asia.
The money was raised to help pay for student tuitions and school supplies in Kenya and to help protect orangutans in the jungles of Borneo.
Diane STUEMER was born on June 23, 1959, in Sarnia, Ontario Not long after, her family moved to Edmonton. From there they moved to Calgary, where she spent her formative years. As a teenager, Ms. STUEMER was working at the Calgary Stampede when she met a young German man who would later become her husband. Born in Berlin, Herbert STUEMER came to Canada with the intention of travelling and working throughout North America. But after meeting Diane, he decided to stay put in Calgary. The couple married there in 1981.
From Calgary the couple went to Ottawa, where Ms. STUEMER studied journalism at Carleton University. After earning her degree, she went to work for the federal government in various positions, including briefing the Environment Minister for Question Period.
In 1988, she quit her government job and bought a faltering advertising company. She turned it around to become a successful business. She also wrote a biography of her grandfather, William HAWRELAK, a former mayor of Edmonton, and helped her father, Frank KING, write up his memories of his experience organizing the 1988 Calgary Winter Olympics.
"Whenever she put her mind to something, she did it intensely, Ms. MASLECHKO said.
During her life, Ms. STUEMER followed 11 basic rules. "Live your life with passion. Dare to dream big dreams, " was rule No. 1.
"Begin immediately, even if you are not ready, " rule No. 4 states.
Last Boxing Day, Ms. STUEMER became ill, and suffered from persistent headaches. But it was not until February 6 that the malignant melanoma that took her life was discovered. In the last month of her life, she was surrounded in the hospital by family and Friends, whom she kept laughing with her wonderful sense of humour, said her sister.
"She said: 'I got a wake-up call and thank goodness I listened. I changed my life. I fulfilled who I was meant to be', " her sister Ms. MASLECHKO recalled. "She made the most of it and that's a lesson to all of us."
Ms. STUEMER was recently presented with the Queen's Golden Jubilee Medal. The Medal is given to Canadians "who have made a significant contribution to their fellow citizens, their community or to Canada."
The City of Ottawa also has plans to name a park and beach area on the north shore of Petrie Island Stuemer Park, in honour of Ms. STUEMER. The Ottawa River island, close to where the STUEMERs live, is the place from which they departed on their journey and returned to four years later.
News of her death attracted a flood of messages to the family Web site (http: //www.northernmagic.com). Some admirers had followed Ms. STUEMER's exploits for years. Long-time reader Carol LAVIOLETTE wrote: "I followed your adventure from the very start; I laughed and cried through all of the stories in the Citizen. I prayed for your safe return and cried tears of joy when the five of you returned to Canada.
"I am a mother of three myself and could not imagine going on that kind of adventure, I don't have the strength of character to undertake something of such magnitude. But I lived it through your tales. Thank you and God bless you."
Ms. STUEMER died in an Ottawa hospital on March 15. She leaves her husband Herbert and their three sons Michael, 16, Jonathan, 14, and Christopher, 11, her mother and father, sister and two brothers.
"Diane was like a little girl who, in all her innocence, really truly believed she could change the world, Ms. KING wrote in a eulogy. "Who would dare tell her that she couldn't?"

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MITCHELL o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-04-01 published
EGAR, Shirley (née LEMON)
Died peacefully at St. Michael's Hospital, Toronto, on Monday, March 31, 2003, in her 81st year. Dear wife of Stanley. Mother of Joann (Will MITCHELL) and John (Vanessa ROSE.) Grandmother of Martha (Jaron WALDMAN,) Lauren and Shannon. Sister of the late Harris LEMON and his wife Shirley. Aunt of Cynthia (Mark LEMON) and Tim (Jackie.) A service will be held in the chapel of the Humphrey Funeral Home - A. W. Miles Chapel, 1403 Bayview Avenue (south of Eglinton Avenue East) on Thursday, April 3rd at one o'clock. A reception will follow.

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MITCHELL o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-04-05 published
HENRY, Christina (née MITCHELL)
Died Wednesday, April 2nd, 2003, in Ottawa, after a lengthy illness. She left this world as she lived her life with dignity, courage and grace. Survived by her loving family, husband, Dr. Sandy HENRY, sons Blair and Neil (Wendy,) brother Ian MITCHELL of Stornoway, Scotland and nephew Christopher MITCHELL (Karen) of Chicago. Her grandchildren Alexandra and Mitchell will dearly miss their beloved Seanny.
The family wish to thank the staff of the palliative home care program for their great help in maintaining Chris at home. Special thanks as well to Dr. Pippa HALL and her family General Practitioner, Dr. Brian GRIFFITHS.
Cremation. A service in memory of Christina will be held on Monday, April 7th, 2003 at 2 p.m. at the First Unitarian Church at 30 Cleary Avenue (off Richmond Road near Woodroffe) to be followed by a reception there.
Arrangements by Kelly Funeral Home, Carling Avenue (613-235-6712).

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MITCHELL o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-06-21 published
CARTWRIGHT, Joan Elizabeth
Joan Elizabeth CARTWRIGHT, 65, died on June 12th, after a long and courageous fight with breast cancer, at her daughter's home in East Hardwick, Vermont. Her daughter Deborah and son-in-law Tim were with her at her final breath. Joan was born in Toronto, Ontario, to William Bovell and Mary Elizabeth (POTTER) CARTWRIGHT. She moved to Montreal, Quebec, where she attended McGill University, and then Concordia University, from where she graduated with distinction. After marriage, she raised her family of four children living in Montreal and then again in Toronto. She moved to Wolcott, Vermont in 1992, and bought and renovated an old schoolhouse in the country. Her household consisted of several cats, all of which were orange tigers, and her beloved dog Joey, with whom she spent hours every day walking the back roads, visiting her neighbors, and playing ball. She also kept herself busy by volunteering at local libraries, was an extremely voracious reader and had a wide knowledge of books. She loved her crossword puzzles in the weekend paper, and indeed loved any type of word challenge especially Scrabble! Joan adored her grandchildren, and although she didn't see them often, never missed an opportunity to talk with Friends about them and show off photos. She was an accomplished knitter, and was pleased to give away her beautiful sweaters, dozens of which she donated to local charities. She is survived by her sister, Eleanor HUNT of Ontario; her ex-husband, L. Lamont GORDON of Toronto, Ontario; her children: Katharine GORDON and husband Chuck MITCHELL of Wolcott, Vermont, Deborah and husband Tim HARTT of East Hardwick, Vermont, James GORDON and wife Shannon McQUILLAN of Kamloops, British Columbia, and Pamela GORDON of Toronto, Ontario; her grandchildren, Keaven, Connor, Seamus, Haley, Walker, Sam, Laura and Angus; and several nieces, nephews and cousins. A memorial service will be held on Sunday, June 29th, in Toronto, Ontario. Memorial donations may be made in Joan's name, to The Frontier Animal Society of Vermont, 502 Strawberry Acres Road, Newport, Vermont 05855.

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MITCHELL o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-10 published
The backroom brain of the Canadian Football League
For 37 years, he was 'Facts Fulton,' the head-office man who made things work and who wrote the complex rules that govern the Canadian Football League
By Dan RALPH, Canadian Press; Globe and Mail files Wednesday, December 10, 2003 - Page R5
For 16 years, former Canadian Football League commissioner Jake GAUDAUR never relied on a computer to draw up the league's regular-season schedule. Instead, he looked to Greg FULTON to do it in his head.
"We used to run it [the Canadian Football League schedule] in the computer for days," said Mr. GAUDAUR, who served as league commissioner from 1968 to 1983. "But in the final analysis, Greg would always have it worked out in his mind."
Mr. FULTON, who spent 54 years with the Canadian Football League as a player, statistician and historian, died in Toronto on Monday. It was his 84th birthday. The cause of death was not provided but he reportedly suffered a stroke last week that caused him to fall into a coma from which he never emerged.
"He worked behind the scenes and received so little credit," Mr. GAUDAUR said. "There was no one in Canadian history who knew as much about the league as Greg did."
Doug MITCHELL, who succeeded Mr. GAUDAUR as Canadian Football League commissioner in 1984, marvelled at Mr. FULTON's ability to draw up a Canadian Football League schedule.
"He did it on a sort of a blackboard," he recollected. "What the computer kicked out invariably never worked but Greg's schedules always did. It really was incredible."
Current Canadian Football League commissioner Tom WRIGHT said Mr. FULTON's passion and commitment were an inspiration. "While he served our league with distinction and honour, he will best be remembered for the warmth of his smile, the wit of his stories, and the depth of his recollections."
Mr. FULTON, a Winnipeg native, moved to Calgary in 1930 and began his career as a player with the Stampeders in 1939. During the Second World War, he served with the Calgary Regiment of the First Canadian Armoured Brigade and participated in the abortive Dieppe raid on August 19, 1942.
Returning home in peacetime, he attended the University of Alberta to get a bachelor of commerce degree and soon after found a job with Revenue Canada.
So, how exactly did a Calgary tax man end up as one of the Canadian Football League's most influential people? It started with a love affair for facts and figures that first led to a part-time job in Calgary as a statistician for the Stampeders. When Clark DAVEY, who was later appointed to the Senate, was appointed in 1966 as the Canadian Football League's first full-time commissioner, he lured Mr. FULTON to Toronto.
Sen. DAVEY "made some quick enemies because he was outspoken and the job wasn't really ready for him," Mr. FULTON told former Globe and Mail sportswriter Marty YORK. So 54 days after he took the job, much of which consisted of feuding with Canadian Football League officials, Sen. DAVEY resigned. Mr. FULTON was kept on under Mr. GAUDAUR, Sen. DAVEY's successor.
"Jake usually approaches me every day to ask me something," Mr. FULTON once said in an interview. "A lot of the times, I think he knows the answers to the questions he is asking, but I think he might feel better if he hears something from me. I guess you could call me his confidant, but there are times when I do mention something that he has overlooked and that often can have an effect on the league and the fans."
What was most important, wrote Marty YORK in 1981, was Mr. FULTON's status as assistant commissioner -- a title he did not hold but a role he filled seven days a week. A walking Canadian Football League encyclopedia, he was soon nicknamed Facts Fulton. He was also known as Jake GAUDAUR's memory bank.
When Mr. GAUDAUR became commissioner, he delegated a number of the commissioner's key duties to Mr. FULTON who already administered the pension funds and had the challenging task of drawing up the Canadian Football League schedule. Consequently, the nine Canadian Football League general managers became accountable to Mr. FULTON.
He was authorized to issue orders, regulations and memoranda to all club officials, including coaches and players. Also, he was responsible for roster control, player personnel, registration of all contracts, waiver procedures, negotiation lists and draft lists.
"He did the work of three people but the last thing he wanted to do was talk about it," Mr. GAUDAUR said.
At the same time, however, Mr. FULTON was a confessed nag. "I wouldn't be doing my job if I wasn't," he once said.
Managers of Canadian Football League clubs across the country sometimes came to dread the sound of the phone ringing. "He'll bug you when he calls to remind you that you didn't do such-and-such a thing," said Montreal Alouette general manager Bob GEARY in 1981. "It gets on your nerves sometimes, but I guess if he didn't do that kind of stuff, no one would, and we'd be suffering more than we do."
Mr. FULTON was also something of a Canadian Football League policeman who had to lay down league laws. At one time, Canadian Football League clubs were strictly limited about who could attend training camps. Under the terms of an agreement with the Canadian Football League Players Association, clubs were allowed to conduct pre-training-camp practices only for rookies, quarterbacks and veterans who had surgery the previous year. Veterans were allowed to work out on their own, but coaches were forbidden to order them to participate. In a case in which the Argo felt they had good reason to start camp early, Mr. FULTON had to consult his regulations.
"I told them it was fine," he decreed. "As long as the veterans were running around on their own."
Clubs that violated pre-training-camp rules by practicing with veterans faced fines, he said.
All things considered, though, it was drawing up the schedule that was Mr. FULTON's most time-consuming job. It was also the one for which he suffered the most criticism.
"I've never yet been able to satisfy everyone with the schedule," he said. "I'm convinced that that's impossible because of the uniqueness of our league. We only have nine teams, which means that one team has to sit out every week. Also, because some of our clubs play in stadiums where baseball and soccer are played, I have to work the schedule around that too."
In 1990, Mr. FULTON received the first Commissioner's Award for his contribution to football in Canada. Five years later, he was inducted into the Canadian Football Hall of Fame in the builder's category. In 1995, he was named the honorary secretary-treasurer and was active in head office as a consultant and historian until his death.
Mr. FULTON, who was reappointed by the Canadian Football League to his primary role about 10 times eight times, sometimes felt guilty about his job because he puts it ahead of everything else in his life.
"I've never been able to take an extended holiday," he said in 1981. "But I wouldn't change it for anything in the world... I'm one of those rare people who actually enjoys his job."
To a sometimes troubled league, he was a godsend.
"Thank goodness we have a guy like him," Bob GEARY told Marty YORK. "I hate to think what would happen to us if he wasn't around."
Mr. FULTON leaves children Robert, Byrne and Rebecca. He was predeceased by wife Angela BOMBARDIERI in 1990. Funeral details are pending.

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MITCHENER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-05-22 published
J. Grant MAXWELL
June 6, 1922 - May 16, 2003.
Grant died peacefully in Victoria on May 16th, 2003 in the presence of loved ones. He is survived by his his loving and supportive family; his devoted wife of 56 years, Vivian (née MITCHENER) five children; Anne, Victoria; Mary (Bill ROBERTSON,) Saskatoon James (Marjory PORTER), Victoria; Kathleen (Darrel ANDERSON), Victoria; and, Gregory (Carrie HOLMQUIST,) Saskatoon, eight grandchildren: Joshua and Katie PENDLETON; Maxwell BRANDEL; Kristin, Melissa, and Adam MAXWELL; and, Emily and Michael MAXWELL; Vivian's surviving siblings Eileen and Cecil; and, numerous Friends across Canada, U.S.A., and Holland. Grant was predeceased by his children Thomas John, Christopher, and Christine, and by his parents Gilmour and Bridgette (ZETTA) MAXWELL of Plenty, Saskatchewan.
Grant had a dignified and distinguished career and life. He was born and raised on a farm near Plenty. After he finished high school in Plenty, he attended Saint Thomas More College, at the University of Saskatchewan in Saskatoon. While at university, he met Vivian and many life-long Friends. Grant graduated from the U of S in 1944.
From 1944-45, he served in the Royal Canadian Navy Volunteer Reserve on the Atlantic Seaboard. After completing his national duty, he and Vivian married and he began his media career and family.
A print, radio, and television, journalist for over fifty years, Grant's extensive career reflected his social conscience and ecumenical beliefs. He began his career as a radio news reporter and assistant news director with CFQC Radio (1946-48.) Moving on to newspaper journalism with the Saskatoon Star Phoenix (1949-59), he was a senior reporter and feature writer, and then the chief editorial writer for the newspaper.
Grant's deep religious faith guided him down a path that utilized his journalistic expertise while nurturing his spirit. From 1960-68, he was the Lay Director at the Saskatoon Catholic Centre. He was also a regular columnist with several Catholic newspapers, including the Prairie Messenger, Canadian Register, Western Catholic Reporter, and Our Family, between 1959-69. In the same time period, Grant and Vivian were the Canadian couple on the international writing committee of the Christian Family Movement based in Chicago. In 1967 Grant with Vivian were the Canadian delegates to the International Lay Congress of the Catholic Church. Between 1962-68, Grant was a regular panelist on the CFQC-television show ''In the Public Interest,'' and a Saskatchewan correspondent to the Globe and Mail.
In 1969 Grant and Vivian and family moved from Saskatoon to Ottawa where Grant had accepted a position as Co-Director, and later Director, of the Social Action Office, Canadian Conference of Catholic Bishops. While working at this position from 1969 - 77, Grant researched, advised, and prepared draft policy statements on national, social and religious issues, including Project Feedback, a qualitative ''sounding at the grassroots'' of religious beliefs and church concerns across Canada. Also during this time (1972-75), Grant was a Canadian consultant with the International Pontificial Commission for Justice and Peace, Vatican City: Grant and Vivian met Pope Paul 6th while in Rome.
From 1977-81, Grant worked in Ottawa as a freelance journalist and consultant for numerous and varied clients such as the Department of the Secretary of State, the Canadian Human Rights Commission, the Conserver Society Project of the Science Council of Canada, the Vanier Institute of the Family, and the Committee of National Voluntary Organizations. During this time, he wrote the book Assignment in Chekiang detailing the 1902 - 54 experience of the Scarborough Foreign Mission Society in China.
In 1981, Grant and Vivian moved from Ottawa to Toronto. From 1981-86, Grant served as founding editor of ''Compass, '' a national magazine published by the Jesuits of English-speaking Canada. During this time, he was also a member of the writing team for ''Living with Christ, '' a monthly missalette of scriptural texts and commentary circulated to most Catholic parishes across Canada.
In 1986, Grant and Vivian left Toronto and semi-retired in Victoria, British Columbia. Grant's faith and desire to write kept him involved in several projects. In 1987 - 88 Grant wrote At Your Service: Stories of Canadians In Missions. From 1989-91, he co-edited Forward in the Spirit, a popular history of the ''People Synod'' published by the Catholic Diocese of Victoria. From 1992 - 94 he co-wrote and edited a book entitled Healing Journeys: The Ka Ka Wis Experience, which described the history of the Aboriginal residential counseling centre for the Ka Ka Wis Family Development Centre, Meares Island, B.C.
Throughout his life, Grant was also actively involved in his communities. He was an executive member of the Saskatchewan Association for Human Rights; the Saskatchewan Association for Adult Education a founding member of the Downtown Churches' Association of Victoria an occasional commentator on Canadian Broadcasting Corporation Radio, Western Region; and a speaker at national, regional, and local events on both civic and religious topics.
Grant spent over twenty happy summers at Emma Lake with Vivian, his family, and many visiting Friends.
A respected journalist and community volunteer, Grant always made time for family and Friends. He was a loving husband, intellectual companion, and graceful dance partner to Vivian; a gentle, fair and compassionate teacher to his children; an affectionate, singing, cartoon-drawing storyteller to his grandchildren; and was warm and accepting of his relatives. He was a stimulating conversationalist and a loyal friend. Grant will be greatly missed by all until we meet his gentle soul again.
There will be a prayer service in Saskatoon at St. Philip's Church at 1902 Munroe Avenue (at Taylor Street) at 7 p.m. on Thursday, May 22, 2003.
The funeral and celebration of Grant's life will be held in Saskatoon at St. Philip's Church at 1902 Munroe Avenue at Taylor Street at 10 a.m. on Friday, May 213, 2003. A memorial celebration will be held in Victoria in the fall of 2003, and prior notice will be provided in this paper. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to Development and Peace and/or the Friendship Inn, Saskatoon. Arrangements are entrusted to the Saskatoon Funeral (306-244-5577).

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MITTELSTAEDT o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-05-07 published
Brockville man dies alone in hospital as severe acute respiratory syndrome keeps family out
By Martin MITTELSTAEDT Wednesday, May 7, 2003 - Page A8
As Thomas FARMER lay dying, the elderly and frail Brockville man made one phone call from hospital to his daughter, telling her that he was fading fast, was all alone and wanted his family at his side.
It was a phone call that will haunt his daughter, Aynne FARMER, forever.
She begged hospital staff on the night of April 27 to be allowed to see her father, but it was to no avail.
She was denied entry because of severe acute respiratory syndrome quarantine restrictions on family visits to the Brockville General Hospital.
Sometime that night, Mr. FARMER, who was 85 and suffered from a number of medical conditions, died.
After hospital staff discovered the death, Ms. FARMER was called and told she could view his body in his hospital bed, the first time in more than two weeks the family was able to see him.
Fighting back tears, Ms. FARMER said she has been unable to clear from her mind the haunting memories of her final words with her father as he begged for his family to be at his side and of her inability to persuade hospital staff to allow them entry into the hospital.
" 'I'm dying and I'm all alone.' That's what he said. He said: 'You have to come.' "
Ms. FARMER said senior nursing staff refused both a request made over the telephone and one made that night outside the hospital doors to be given permission to enter the medical facility.
"Nothing is going to take away the pain from the last conversation with my father, " she said.
"This man was a wonderful man. He didn't deserve it. He didn't deserve to be denied his last wish."
A spokeswoman for the hospital, Karen MATTE, vice-president of patient care, said the institution is reviewing the case.
Under the protocol developed in Ontario to stop the spread of severe acute respiratory syndrome, visits at hospitals have been severely restricted, with entry allowed only to the immediate family of patients near death or for parents visiting their sick children.
There is confusion at the hospital over Mr. FARMER's status.
Ms. Matte said the FARMER family was supposed to be on a list of people who were allowed into the hospital on compassionate grounds based on the seriousness of their father's condition.
However, Ms. MATTE also said that nursing staff felt Mr. FARMER wasn't that sick because he was well enough to be able to use the telephone to call his family.
"They didn't feel he was that critical, Ms. MATTE said of the nursing staff.
Mr. FARMER had a long list of medical conditions, according to his family, including severe aortic stenosis and pneumonia.
Mr. FARMER's son, Robert FARMER, said that the hospital bungled the request to visit through a process he is calling "complete bureaucratic stupidity."
The family had been told repeatedly from April 17 to April 24 that they couldn't visit their father in hospital because he wasn't included on the list of critically ill patients.

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MITTELSTAEDT o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-07-09 published
Activist established blue box program
Radical became known for putting pressure on government, corporations
By Martin MITTELSTAEDT Wednesday, July 9, 2003 - Page R7
Toronto -- One of Canada's most influential environmental activists, Gary GALLON, died Thursday in Montreal after a long battle with cancer.
Although Mr. GALLON may not have been a household name, Canadians almost everywhere will recognize one of his major achievements, the setting up of the country's first blue box recycling program in Ontario during the late 1980s.
He also had a hand during the 1970s in establishing Greenpeace, and maintained a lifelong passion for environmental causes evident in his series of twice-monthly newsletters, called the GALLON Environmental Letter.
"I've always been bothered by excess consumption and wanton destruction of habitat. Human ethics must allow space for other creatures," he said recently.
Born in the United States in 1945, Mr. GALLON moved to Canada in the late 1960s to avoid the draft during the Vietnam war. He settled in Vancouver and began working by writing newsletters promoting mining stocks listed on the Vancouver Stock Exchange.
After work, he turned to his true passion, the environment, joining the nighttime meetings of the Society for the Promotion of Environmental Conservation, a group that at the time opposed the use of the British Columbia coast for supertanker routes.
"He became concerned that what he was doing [by selling stocks] was causing environmental damage," said David OVED, a Toronto environmental consultant who worked with him in the Ontario government.
Mr. GALLON's biggest impact on the country's conservation movement occurred when he was senior policy adviser for Jim BRADLEY, Ontario's Liberal environment minister from 1985-90, one of Mr. BRADLEY's surprise hires.
It was a risky move for the new Liberal government to employ one of Canada's leading environmental radicals for such a post.
Mr. GALLON instantly became known as one of " BRADLEY's brats," the moniker given the group of dedicated environmentalists assembled by Mr. BRADLEY within the Ontario government who helped originate such programs as the blue box and the province's acid rain reduction program.
In the mid-1980s, municipal recycling had been an experimental effort in a few communities.
Mr. GALLON worked to establish the blue box across the province. Mr. OVED said Mr. GALLON could often influence opponents within the government through his use of the inventive turn of phase or image.
In one particularly bitter debate, cabinet was discussing preservation of Ontario's Temagami forest region, an area containing some of Canada's last remaining stands of towering old growth red and white pines.
Mr. OVED said some politicians were questioning why environmentalists in Toronto and elsewhere in Southern Ontario were arguing to preserve a forest in the north that they might never see.
Mr. GALLON said forest preservation was part of the ideal that Canadians held of the society they would like to be part of.
"Gary's comment was 'People here may never see those forests, but they value green spaces in their minds,' Mr. OVED said.
Mr. OVED said the turn of phase impressed then-premier David PETERSON, who began to affectionately call Mr. GALLON and Mr. BRADLEY's other environmental activists "space cadets."
Some of the biggest run-ins that Mr. GALLON had during the 1980s were with Inco, one of Ontario's major emitter of chemicals that cause acid rain.
At one testy meeting, Mr. GALLON, dressed in a pink shirt, had exchanges with Inco's former chairman, Chuck BAIRD, who was later so annoyed at being pressed on the company's pollutants, that an Inco official called Mr. BRADLEY to complain.
"I got a call the next day asking who where those young radicals in pink polo shirts asking those impertinent questions," Mr. BRADLEY said.
Television broadcaster and Greenpeace founder Robert HUNTER said that Mr. GALLON related to him that the Inco chairman "had never run into such serious sass from mere political minions."
Of his experience in government, Mr. GALLON once said "you have less room to rail but more power to get things done."
Mr. GALLON suffered from colon cancer, which had spread to his lungs and liver.
Despite the pain of the disease and its treatments, he kept up his hobby of competitive swimming, winning in his age group in a Quebec swim meet last year, according to Mr. OVED.
Last month, the Royal Canadian Geographic Society's magazine gave Mr. GALLON its national environmental award for lifetime achievement.
Mr. GALLON was picked in 1977 to be executive director of the Nairobi-based Environment Liaison Centre International, where he met his wife-to-be, another prominent Canadian environmental activist, Janine FERRETTI.
Ms. FERRETTI was executive director of the North American Free Trade Agreement Commission for Environmental Cooperation and now holds a senior position with the Inter-American Development Bank in Washington. Mr. GALLON is survived by his two children, Kalifi and Jenika.

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