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"MET" 2003 Obituary


METCALF  METCALFE  METRICK 

METCALF o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-26 published
John NEWLOVE was voice of Prairie poetry
Staff, Friday, December 26, 2003 - Page R2
Ottawa -- Canadian poet John NEWLOVE, who had suffered a debilitating stroke more that two years ago, died Tuesday at the age of 65 from a brain hemorrhage, his wife Susan said. Since his stroke, NEWLOVE, who won the Governor-General's award for poetry in 1972, among a number of other honours, had not been able to write, although his mind remained as "clear as a bell," his wife said.
Known as a leading voice in Canadian Prairie poetry in the 1960s and 70s, NEWLOVE's poems often portrayed the quiet of the land, while also uncovering the seemingly incidental details, a sense of constant transition and the sheer weight of history.
"Most poets would consider him really one of the most accomplished poets that Canada has ever had," said his friend, the writer and editor John METCALF. Describing NEWLOVE as a "towering" figure in Canadian poetry, METCALF nevertheless noted that NEWLOVE "really had been out of the public eye for quite a long time." Raised in Saskatchewan, NEWLOVE died in Ottawa where he had lived since the late 1980s.

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METCALFE o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-12-17 published
Bradley James METCALFE
June 19, 1962 to December 6, 2003
With deep regret the family announces the sudden death of Bradley James Metcalfe of Haliburton. Sadly missed by his mother Wilma LOVE- METCALFE of Mindemoya, father Gordon METCALFE and step-mother Lois of Toronto, brothers Gregory of Haliburton, Ryan and Drew and numerous aunts, uncles, nieces, nephews and cousins. A memorial service was held December 13, 2003 at the Haliburton Community Funeral Home.

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METCALFE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-04-07 published
He struck gold at the old Empire games
By Tom HAWTHORN Special to The Globe and Mail Monday, April 7, 2003 - Page R7
Jim COURTRIGHT, who has died, aged 88, was one of Canada's top track-and-field athletes, winning a gold medal in the javelin throw at the 1938 British Empire Games in Sydney.
Just getting to the meet was a marathon for Mr. COURTRIGHT, an engineering student at Queen's University in Kingston, Ontario The price of a train ticket to Vancouver beyond his means, he found work as a prisoner escort, travelling cross-country in a converted box car while handcuffed to a man facing deportation.
In any event, he found his fare and went on to join the Canadian team which arrived in Australia on January 15, 1938.
In the javelin throw, Mr. COURTRIGHT faced formidable competition in Stanley LAY of New Zealand and Jack METCALFE of Australia. LAY, a sign writer by trade, had been a capable cricketer who put his arm to great success. METCALFE was a superb athlete whose specialty was the triple jump, in which he won a bronze at the Berlin Olympics in 1936 and gold at the Empire Games in 1938. In the end, it was the Canadian who prevailed, followed by LAY and METCALFE.
Despite his gold medal, Mr. COURTRIGHT was overshadowed by Eric COY of Winnipeg, who had won two medals and so was awarded the Norton H. Crowe Trophy as Canada's outstanding amateur athlete that year. Mr. COURTRIGHT also trailed Mr. COY and sculler Bob PEARCE in voting for the Lou Marsh Trophy as Canada's top male athlete, a prize open to amateurs and professionals. Mr. PEARCE won the trophy.
Later in 1938, Mr. COURTRIGHT unleashed a throw of 62.74 metres, an intercollegiate record at the time that still ranks as the third longest in Queen's University history. He broke his leg in an accident at a gold mine in Northern Ontario in the summer of 1939, yet recovered to play guard for the school's basketball team the following winter.
James Milton COURTRIGHT was born in 1914 to a civil engineer and the daughter of the town sheriff in North Bay, Ontario The family moved to Ottawa and the boy participated in football and field events at Glebe Collegiate.
Mr. COURTRIGHT placed third nationally in the javelin in 1934 while still a student at the University of Ottawa. He finished second the following year behind Mr. COY.
In 1936, the Ottawa student was the best in the land and attended the Berlin Olympics that summer. One of 28 competitors in the javelin, Mr. COURTRIGHT's best throw of 60.54 metres was too short to qualify for the final round. He finished 14th in an event won by Gerhard STOECK of Germany, whose winning toss of 71.84 metres was inspired by chanting crowds at the Olympic stadium, among them Adolf Hitler.
The disappointment of his Berlin performance spurred Mr. COURTRIGHT to greater success in throwing events. In 1937, he was Canada's intercollegiate champion in javelin and the shot put.
In July, he travelled to Dallas to compete at a 200-athlete meet organized as part of the city's Greater Texas and Pan-American Exposition. Mr. COURTRIGHT won the gold medal in javelin at the Cotton Bowl. The success of the meet inspired the organizing of the first official Pan-American Games fourteen years later.
Mr. COURTRIGHT attended postgraduate classes in engineering at Queen's, where he did double-duty as star athlete and track coach. He was also president of the student body in his final year.
After graduation, Mr. COURTRIGHT joined Shell Canada as a refinery engineer in Montreal in 1941. As he was promoted he accepted back-and-forth postings from Montreal to Toronto to Vancouver to Toronto to Montreal to Toronto, including a stint as a public-relations co-ordinator.
He became a vice-principal at Queen's in 1970, a job he held until retirement nine years later.
Mr. COURTRIGHT died on February 21, just days after the 65th anniversary of his triumph in Sydney. He leaves eight children and sister Celina COURTRIGHT of Ottawa. He was predeceased by his wife, Mary (née Roche), and three brothers.
In 1958, a moving van loaded with the family's possessions caught fire and burned, destroying many of Mr. COURTRIGHT's medals and trophies. A prize rescued from the ashes was the gold medal from the British Empire Games. It is now in the hands of a grand_son.

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METCALFE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-11-01 published
Died This Day -- William Henry DRAPER, 1877
Saturday, November 1, 2003 - Page F12
Politician and judge born in London, England, on March 11, 1801 1836, as young lawyer, entered politics to turn the old Family Compact that ran Upper Canada into a political party; served as attorney-general for Sir Charles METCALFE and Lord CATHCART 1847, forced out of power by right wing of his own party and appointed to judiciary; ideas adopted by Disciple John A. MacDONALD credited with founding Conservative Party.

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METRICK o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-11-20 published
John Edward Burns (Ted) HOWELL
By Frank GARDINER Thursday, November 20, 2003 - Page A26
Father, husband, Sunday School teacher, fisherman, sports enthusiast, Crown Attorney. Born June 26, 1934, in Goderich, Ontario Died August 11, in Omemee, Ontario, of cancer, age 69.
Ted HOWELL, through all of his life, was a little man with a big heart and a giant intellect.
During his early years growing up in Goderich, Ted displayed an early love of academic excellence mixed with a fun sense of competitiveness in all endeavours from table tennis and hockey, to debating contests sponsored by the local Lion's Club.
As part of his 1950 high-school election campaign for treasurer, Ted and his loyal cohorts dressed up as members of the Mafia. Ted in his zoot suit, trench coat and oversized fedora imitated a smaller version of Chicago gangster Al Capone with a campaign slogan: "Vote for me. I need the money." Ted won.
Ted loved a physical challenge. Few could beat him at his favourite sport of table tennis. Many fell prey to his quick eye and cunning strategies and years later Ted won several table tennis championships with the Scarborough Kings Table Tennis Club.
Another field of Ted's early expertise was lawn croquet. On the large lawn of their home, the HOWELL family had a grand lawn croquet court. Ted, as usual, took this game very seriously and had little patience with anyone who did not do the same. Ted was an expert at the double-ball knock out.
These traits also made him a memorable boys' Sunday School teacher at North Street United Church where he creatively handled -- some might say "civilized" -- some lads bigger than himself, all tough, key members of the "Church Street gang." With his leadership, he earned their life-long respect.
Ted graduated at the top of his high-school class and went off to University of Toronto and then on to Osgoode Law School where he earned an award for outstanding contribution to school life.
He was called to the bar in 1960.
Jack BATTEN's book titled Lawyers quotes Ted: 'But from the time I started reading Erle Stanley Gardner as a kid, around grade seven, I wanted to be a courtroom lawyer.' HOWELL won a public speaking award in high school, and an essay he wrote about Canada's role in the United Nations took him on an all-expenses-paid weekend to Ottawa, where he proudly shook hands with Prime Minister Louis SSAINTURENT. HOWELL was a diligent student and he was headed for law.
"Ted HOWELL is, in almost every respect, a perfect servant of the Crown. He is an admirably correct man. There is no stuffiness in his make-up but he sends out the message that he values propriety and turns off at bad manners. He conducts himself according to such old verities."
Visiting a summer camp, Ted met the woman who was to become his wife and soul-mate for 40 special years. Ted and Theresa (TIFF) were married in 1963. This was Ted's greatest project and he is the proud father of Thomas (and his wife Andrea METRICK) and Michael. Ted was the grandfather of Ashley HOWELL.
Ted HOWELL's many legal accomplishments and Friendships over 40 years embraced eminent legal associates and Friends as well as Goderich pals. He was a proud Goderich character. He was a long-time resident of Scarborough, Ontario, as well as his family's cottage and country home in Omemee, Ontario
Ted is missed and remembered.
Frank GARDINER is a one-time Sunday school pupil of Ted HOWELL.

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