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"MAY" 2003 Obituary


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MAY o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-01-22 published
Albert Jeffrey MICHIE
(United Steel Workers of America Local 2784 Associate Member, RCL #43) In Oshawa on Sunday, January 12, 2003 in his 65th year.
Beloved husband of Carrollynn. Predeceased by his wife Theresa ROCHON. Loving father of Carol FILLION, David MICHIE (Sherri), Louise (Sue) MAY, Danny MICHIE (Andrea). Step father of Candy SHELLEY, George ATKINSON (Dianne) and Paul ATKINSON (Jennifer.) Dear brother-in-law of Bernard and Linda JONES. Lovingly remembered by his grandchildren James, Matthew, Tara, Tanya, Jennifer, Cheyenne, Chantelle, Amanda, Philip, Tess, Lisa, Corey, Renne, Danielle, Eric and by his great granddaughter Jennifer. Predeceased by his brothers Bill, John "Bud", Orton, Roland, Austin and Edward. Sadly missed by all of his family and Friends. Funeral service was held at Thornton Cemetery Chapel on Saturday, January 18, 2003. Cremation. Armstrong Funeral Home Oshawa.

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MAY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-08-26 published
MAY, Stephanie Middleton
Sculptor, Pianist, Activist, Writer, Raconteur. ''She was the first to complain.'' (what she always said she would want for an epitaph.) Born New York, April 16, 1927. Died Margaree Harbour, Nova Scotia, peacefully, unexpectedly, at home on August 23, 2003. Predeceased by parents, Thomas Hazlehurst MIDDLETON of Charleston, South Carolina, and Ruth Vincent STEPHENS of Wales and Ohio. Survived by loving husband of fifty five years, John Middleton MAY of Margaree Harbour, brother, Thomas Hazlehurst MIDDLETON (Jeannie MIDDLETON) of Los Angeles. Dearly missed by son Geoffrey Middleton MAY and his wife Rebecca-Lynne MacDONALD- MAY of Margaree Harbour and grand_son, Andrew Charles MacDONALD of Ottawa, and daughter Elizabeth Evans MAY and granddaughter Victoria Cate May BURTON of New Edinburgh, Ottawa. Stephanie MAY had a rich, rewarding and exciting life. As a young woman, she was a competitive figure skater. In the 1950s and 1960s, she became a leader in the civil rights and peace movement in the U.S. With 17 Nobel Laureates, including Bertrand Russell and Linus Pauling, she sued the governments of the U.S., United Kingdom and U.S.S.R. to stop atmospheric nuclear weapons testing. With Norman Cousins, she was a founding member of the Committee for a Sane Nuclear Policy. She addressed 100,000 people at the 1961 Aldermaston March rally in Trafalgar Square and, later, went on a six day hunger strike to oppose Soviet nuclear testing, drawing international media attention. Stephanie MAY worked with the Hartford Council of Churches to advance civil rights, social justice and urban renewal. Opposing the war in Vietnam, she helped found Dissenting Democrats, leading to the challenge by Senator Eugene McCarthy to Lyndon Johnson's presidency. Her work for peace candidates led to President Richard Nixon including her name on his infamous ''Enemies List.'' She was an accomplished portrait sculptor, having been urged to study sculpture by Eleanor Roosevelt. She was also a professional pianist. In 1973, the family moved to Cape Breton Island and Stephanie MAY applied her considerable talents and energy to establishing Schooner Village, a restaurant and gift shop on the Cabot Trail, where she played piano on board the Schooner Restaurant. Sadly, the business is no more, as it was demolished to make way for the new bridge. She also worked on environmental causes in Nova Scotia, sacrificing retirement acreage over-looking the Bras D'Or Lake to Scott Paper in a court case against the use of Agent Orange. A service to celebrate her life and praise the glory of God in whose hands she now rejoices will be held on Thursday, August 28th at 2 p.m. at the Calvin United Church in Margaree Harbour. In lieu of flowers, donations to the Sierra Club of Canada, 412-1 Nicholas Street, Ottawa, K1N 7B7, would be much appreciated.

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MAYER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-05-20 published
MAYER, H. Bernard Q.C.
Born February 29, 1924 died on Friday, May 16, 2003. It is with great sadness that his family announces the death of their beloved cornerstone, known fondly as ''The Big Cheese''. Bernard was educated at Highgate School London and Clare College, Cambridge University. He completed a fellowship at Harvard University and came to Toronto in 1948. Until his death, he practiced the law he loved with innovative skill and dedication. Bernard was a wonderful husband and father, a great lawyer and a man of distinction and integrity. He will be missed and remembered by many close Friends and colleagues, and forever by his wife Barbara, daughter Nicola, son Paul and daughter-in-law Diana.
In keeping with Bernard's wishes a private funeral will be held. In his memory, donations may be made to The Capital Campaign of The Civic Garden Centre (The Toronto Botanical Garden), 777 Lawrence Avenue East, Toronto, M3C 1P2.

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MAYEROVITCH o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-06-11 published
AFFLECK, Betty Ann (née HENLEY) 1927-2003
Died on Monday evening, June 9th, 2003, in Montreal, at home with her family. Beloved wife of the late Raymond AFFLECK and dear companion of Harry MAYEROVITCH. Mother of Neil (Marnie STUBLEY,) Jane (John KIMBER), Gavin (Sylvie CORMIER), Ewan (Susan CHATWOOD) and the late Graham. She will be lovingly remembered by her grandchildren Alexander, Gabriel, Lucas, Shonah and Anika. Visitation will be held at Collins Clarke Funeral Home, 5610 Sherbrooke Street West, Montreal, on Wednesday, June 11th from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. A Memorial Service will be held at the Unitarian Church of Montreal (5035 de Maisonneuve Blvd. West, on Saturday, June 14th at 2 p.m. In lieu of flowers, a donation to Autism Society, Canada, P.O. Box 65, Orangeville, Ontario L9W 2Z5, would be appreciated.

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MAYNIER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-08-26 published
LAWRENCE, Bertram A.
(A Retired Managing Systems Director, Royal Bank, Active member of Kiwanis Club of Toronto and Riverside-Emery United Church)
Died peacefully at his home on Sunday, August 24, 2003. Loving father of Robyn and Marc. Cherished grandpah of Omar. Beloved ''Big Brother'' of Dorothy Sylvia Hamilton. Brother of the late Ivy Lawrence MAYNIER and Keith LAWRENCE. Dear cousin of Dora CODRINGTON and Uncle of David, Michael, Jim and Margaret. Resting at the Murray E. Newbigging Funeral Home, 733 Mt. Pleasant Rd. (South of Eglinton) on Wednesday from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Funeral and committal service in the Chapel on Thursday at 3 p.m. Cremation. If desired, donations may be made to the Kiwanis Club of Toronto or the Kiwanis Boys and Girls Club. Interment of ashes, to take place in Montreal, at a later date.

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MAYO o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-28 published
Manfred Friedrich WIRTH (November 17, 1913 - March 21, 2003)
Manfred died suddenly but peacefully exactly 1 year after his beloved Lisl. He leaves behind sadly grieving son Alfred, daughter Elizabeth (Lou FAUTEUX,) grandchildren Elizabeth and Susan WIRTH (Ali POURAZIM,) and Eric BRAND (Anita) as well as sister Beate FLUECK- WIRTH, sister-in-law Marianne MAYO and many devoted Friends & relatives around the world. Manfred was born in Vienna, Austria to Hofrat Dr. Alfred Ludwig WIRTH and Beate Karola, née PETRINI VON MONTEFERRI, and graduated with a PhD in law prior to his 23rd birthday. He was a director of the Austrian Steel Company (VOEST) before emigrating to Canada post-war, and started his Canadian working life at Algoma Steel Corporation in Sault Ste Marie, Ontario. In 1958 he founded Wirth Limited (now Wirth Steel), building the company into a major international trader. Since 1993 and until his death, he was President and Chief Executive Officer of MF Wirth Rail Corp. Manfred loved the arts, especially opera and the visual arts. He was also a history buff, and a generous donor to McGill University, the University of Alberta and Wilfred Laurier University as well as Arts Knowlton and other Canadian institutions. He was a member of various clubs and societies, a recipient of the Order of Austria, and a keen skier, swimmer and golfer. A private farewell with immediate family has taken place; a memorial service to celebrate his long and eventful life will be held in Montreal at St.Andrew's-Dominion-Douglas Church, 687 Roslyn Ave. Westmount, Quebec on Monday May 26, 2003 at 2: 00 P.M. Anyone desiring to make a donation in Manfred's memory may wish to consider McGill University: Designation Faculty of Music, 3605 de la Montagne, Montreal H3G 2M1, the Foundation of the University Women's Club Montreal Inc, 3529 Atwater Avenue, Montreal H3H 1Y2, or a charity of your choice. Condolences may be sent to 24 Somerville Avenue, Montreal, Quebec H3Z 1J2

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MAYS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-11-20 published
A cherished gift despite the follies
By John Bentley MAYS, Special to The Globe and Mail Thursday, November 20, 2003 - Page R1
Robert McMICHAEL's reputation was never better than it was when I first met him, around 1980. In the eyes of many people, especially outside the official art world, he was the little guy from Toronto who made good and got rich and did something good with his money, by creating the McMichael Canadian Collection of Art, in Kleinburg, Ontario
He had amassed this important collection of much-loved Canadian art and had selflessly given it to the people. If this kindly gentleman wanted to play lord of the manor in the great log cabin in Kleinburg, who could possibly object? McMICHAEL was firmly planted in popular imagination as a visionary, which he certainly was not, and a down-home Canadian original, which, in his fashion, he surely was.
Robert McMICHAEL, who died on Tuesday at age 82, came of age in Toronto in the Depression, then graduated from high school just in time for the Second World War. Stationed in Newfoundland, he worked as a war photographer. "People have the idea that we waited for the shells to fly," he told me in 1981. "I photographed things like caskets and radar." After being mustered out in 1946, McMICHAEL decided on a career in custom photography and opened a shop in Toronto's Yorkville district.
McMICHAEL had his million-dollar idea when thinking up ways to promote wedding photographs. Why not get manufacturers to donate advertising samples, then hand out boxes full of these goodies to brides-to-be as a promotional gimmick? This simple notion produced Bridal Shower, the forerunner of New Mother Packs and Travel Packs (something for employers to give to employees bound for vacation as a way to say "take care of yourself, we want you back").
By 1964, McMICHAEL was living in New York and marketing a million packs a year and 20 million samples in all 50 states. He was also getting weary of the twice-weekly commute between New York and his homestead north of Toronto, just outside Kleinburg, which he and wife Signe had established in the fifties, just after they were married.
And there was the baby to think about. The McMichaels' "baby" the word he used to describe it -- was, of course, their burgeoning collection of Canadian art. There was never any question that it was going to be a Canadian collection. "Inherently, we have a pride in the nation. That sounds corny, but that's how we felt. Between a Renoir and a Thomson, we'd take the Thomson."
The collection had been born in 1955, when the McMICHAELs bought a Lawren Harris oil landscape for $250. Soon thereafter, Robert McMICHAEL was doing a drawing class at New York's Art Students League, devouring what books on Canadian art were around in those days, and buying art, often on the instalment plan, and almost invariably of the woods-and-water Group of Seven kind.
But for the McMICHAELs, the collection was a baby in a deeper and sadder sense. A year after they were married, the couple found that they would never be able to have children. But there were these artworks for them to nurture and protect. "We thought of each new acquisition as a child, especially the early ones," McMICHAEL once told me.
The collection did not grow all by itself, however. Friends told marvellous stories -- all flatly denied by the principal figure about Robert McMICHAEL visiting the deathbeds of Group of Seven collectors and quietly, persistently, convincing them to make their last earthly act a tax-deductible bequest.
If such stories were not true, given the man's accomplishment, they were certainly believable. Assembled by whatever combination of cajoling and purchasing, the McMichael Canadian Collection is today, after the National Gallery of Canada and the Art Gallery of Ontario, our most impressive gathering of 20th-century Canadian painting.
That said, it is far from the best. Anyone familiar with the Canadian displays in the country's great museums will notice at once the McMichael's scantiness of large paintings by well-known artists. One sees much work, but not very much that is extraordinary, or illustrative of long passages in a given artist's development. But it's a massive, unique, unrepeatable, irreplaceable conglomeration of popular Group of Seven artworks. The art is housed in a crazy-quilt building that people cherish.
This affection for the McMichael Canadian Collection, I suspect, will survive long after the founder's follies have been forgotten. The latter were, unfortunately, many and famous. For much of the last 25 years of his life, you could never be quite sure what he would do next.
The first surprise came after McMICHAEL gave his 3,500-square-foot log house in Kleinburg, along with 235 Canadian artworks -- the home and core collection of the McMichael Canadian Collection to the people of Ontario in 1965. In return, Queen's Park gave him a generous tax write-off and permission to go on living in his log cabin. He somehow got it into his head the free ride on the public tab was forever. Instead of graciously moving on after a decent interval, he and his wife Signe stayed on in the house, entertaining Friends among the public's paintings and aboriginal artworks as though he still owned everything.
For more than a decade, nobody raised an objection. Then McMICHAEL's Conservative Party cronies in the Ontario government threw a lavish farewell dinner, with tributes and gratitude galore. Instead of taking the hint, loosening his grip on the gallery and surrendering control to museum professionals -- which was clearly and wisely wanted by the cultural bureaucrats at Queen's Park -- McMICHAEL still didn't budge an inch. Even after the dangerous, dilapidated physical condition of the building became public knowledge in the early 1980s, McMICHAEL continued to dismiss the fire experts and art conservationists as pointy-headed meddlers. He was finally ousted from the building in 1982, when the urgent $10.4-million overhaul of the gallery was commenced. (The pain of transition was eased by gifts of $400,000 cash and a $300,000 house from Queen's Park.)
But being off the premises only seemed to whet McMICHAEL's taste for power. Over the next two decades, he continued to plot and agitate for a comeback to personal control of the collection he had given away. He was especially vociferous about the historical scope of the central group of artworks, which curators wanted to broaden to include contemporary painting, prints and sculpture. Art-gathering had never been strictly confined to the Group of Seven, even during the heyday of McMICHAEL's control. But now the founder decided it was high time to get back to a fiction called "the original vision," and abandon the collecting of contemporary art altogether.
Few believed it would happen. But in 2000 -- to the astonishment of nobody who had watched McMICHAEL operating over the years he got his wish. The provincial Tories under Mike HARRIS slammed through a law that swept professional staff to the sidelines of crucial gallery decision-making, and gave Robert McMICHAEL a permanent say in deciding gallery policy.
The next year, he announced his intention to rid the collection of some 2,000 contemporary artworks he did not like. "or use them as opposed to... simply being wasted, sitting in storage year after year, decade after decade," he told a reporter. "I don't think there's anything demeaning about that at all. They belong in a certain type of atmosphere which is not the atmosphere that exists in Kleinburg."
With McMICHAEL's death, the chance that the gallery will be stripped of its contemporary works is much diminished. The McMichael Canadian Collection will likely remain what it has long been, despite its founder's misunderstandings and misgivings: both a shrine to the Group of Seven and their contemporaries, and a testament to the ongoing commitment of Canadian artists to portraying the Canadian land -- a commitment that, despite many changes in style, medium and strategy, remains strong in the present day.

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