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"MAT" 2003 Obituary


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MATCH o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-04-30 published
BROWN, Rosemary
It is with profound sadness that we announce the sudden passing of the Honourable Dr. Rosemary BROWN, P.C., O.C., O.B.C. She died peacefully at home on April 26, 2003. She is survived by her loving husband, Dr. William T. BROWN; three children, Cleta, Gary and Jonathan; seven grandchildren, Katherine, Ashton, William, Giselle, Jonathan, Jackson and Louis and many other cherished relatives and Friends. Born in Kingston, Jamaica on June 17, 1930, she graduated from Wolmer's School and then came to Canada in 1951 to study at McGill University in Montreal where she completed her Bachelor of Arts degree in 1955. After moving to Vancouver, Rosemary completed Bachelor and Masters degrees in Social Work at the University of British Columbia. Rosemary BROWN was a member of the Privy Council, Officer of the Order of Canada, Commander of the Order of Distinction of Jamaica, Member of the Order of British Columbia, the recipient of 15 honourary doctorates, and was a Member of the Legislative Assembly in British Columbia from 1972 to 1986. She was also President of her favourite charity MATCH International, an organization dedicated to the empowerment of woman in developing nations. Rosemary was a founder of a number of socially progressive organizations including the National Black Coalition, the British Columbia Association for the Advancement of Coloured People, the Vancouver Status of Women, Multilingual Orientation Service Association for Immigrant Communities, the Canadian Women's Foundation, The Vancouver Crisis Centre and the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives. Donations may be made to MATCH International. Funeral Service will be held at St. Andrew's Wesley United Church, Burrard and Nelson, Vancouver on Monday, May 5th at 1: 30 p.m., Bishop Michael INGHAM, Dean Peter ELLIOT/ELLIOTT, and the Reverend William ROBERTS officiating. Kearney Funeral Services 604-736-0268.

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MATERI o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-09-20 published
RUHR, Sister Teresita (Mary), Institute of the Blessed Virgin Mary
Died peacefully on Thursday September 18, 2003 at Loretto Infirmary after a lengthy illness. Sister was in her 65th year as a member of the Institute of the Blessed Virgin Mary (Loretto Sisters). Daughter of the late Christian RUHR and Magdelena EXNER of Grayson, Saskatchewan. Predeceased by brothers John (Anne), Anthony (Anne), Frank (Isabel,) Brother-in-law Phil FLEGEL, and sisters Johanna (George) RIEGER and Eva (Joseph) DUCZEK. Survived by sisters Sister Rose RUHR, I.B.V.M. of Toronto, Sophie (Edward) MATERI of Grayson, Betty FLEGEL of Regina and numerous nieces and nephews. In addition to teaching at Loretto Abbey in Toronto, Sister Teresita also taught in Sedley, Saskatoon and Weyburn, Saskatchewan. Sister Teresita also served as Local Superior for fifteen years as a General Councillor for fourteen years and as a Regional Councillor for four years. Friends may call at the Loretto Abbey, 101 Mason Blvd. on Sunday from 2: 00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. and 7:00 p.m. to 9: 00 p.m. Prayers will be at 7:30 p.m. Sunday. A Mass of Christian Burial will be celebrated at Loretto Abbey Chapel on Monday September 22 at 10: 00 a.m. Interment at Mount Hope Cemetery following the Mass.

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MATHE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-07-12 published
Moms always liked him best
The Happy Gang's popular lead singer had a good reason for saying hello to his mom whenever the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation radio classic was on air
By James McCREADY Special to The Globe and Mail Saturday, July 12, 2003 - Page F10
The double knock on the door occurred every afternoon at 1.
"Who's there?"
"It's the Happy Gang."
"Well, come on in!"
Then Eddie ALLEN, Bert PEARL, Bobby GIMBY and the rest of the cast of Canada's most popular radio program would break into "Keep happy with the Happy Gang."
Mr. ALLAN, the show's main singer, accordion player and sometimes emcee, died last week, leaving Robert FARNON as the gang's sole surviving member.
Every day as many as two million Canadians tuned in The Happy Gang, which led the national ratings for most of its run on Canadian Broadcasting Corporation from 1937 to 1959. Until television came along in 1952, Mr. ALLEN and his cast mates were among the most famous people in the country.
The show was the creation of Mr. PEARL, who'd come to Toronto from Winnipeg (his real name was Bert SHAPIRA) to study medicine. To pay for his education, he started playing piano on radio with a band that included violinist Blain MATHE, organist Kay STOKES and Mr. FARNON, a trumpet player who would go on to be the most successful of them all.
The band morphed into the Happy Gang and Mr. PEARL was the driving force behind it. Eddie ALLEN was hired as the fifth member of the troupe and stayed with the program until it went off the air.
He was born Edward George ALLEN on December 24, 1920, in Toronto, and came from a family of musicians. His father, Bill ALLEN, played the trombone and was in a military band in France during the First World War. When Eddie was 10, his father asked him what instrument he wanted to play. The boy thought about it for a while and made up his mind after seeing a huge piano accordion in a music-store window.
"It was bigger than I was," Mr. ALLEN remembered, "but dad bought it anyway."
In a couple of years, he was entertaining at small events with his accordion, making $5 or $10 a week. Better than a paper route. He also won some local singing contests. When he was 17, he started singing and playing three nights a week on a radio program called The Serenader. Bert PEARL heard it and called him in.
"I auditioned him with Bert PEARL, and we liked him right away," Mr. FARNON says from his home on Guernsey in the Channel Islands. "He looked about 12 years old and could barely see over the top of his accordion. He was terribly shy, no self-confidence like the rest of us. He was very popular with the ladies, a very good-looking little chap."
What impressed most was his voice. "There really wasn't a singer in the Happy Gang until he came along. I really liked his voice."
Mr. FARNON remembers an incident from a Happy Gang rehearsal. "Eddie was about to sing a song called, I'll Take You Home Again, Kathleen, and I came up behind him and said, 'If you bring the gasoline.' He laughed so much he couldn't sing it when we went on the air."
The Happy Gang was old Canada, when the country was more rural and white skinned. It is impossible to imagine the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation mounting something so corny and wholesome. How corny was it? The host, Mr. PEARL, was known as "that slap-happy chappy, the Happy Gang's own pappy."
He also knew that sentiment sold. Mr. ALLEN would sing The Lord's Prayer on the program, two or three times a year, such as Good Friday, and during the war he sang it as an inspiration for mothers and their boys overseas.
By that time, the show's "appeal was enormous," wrote Ross MacLEAN, the late Canadian Broadcasting Corporation producer and media critic who began listening as a child. "During the war years... its influence on the nation was profound. Its almost daily performance of There'll Always Be An England helped maintain home-front resolve and stirred at least this school kid into a frenzy of tinfoil collection, war certificate sales and the knitting of various items for the navy."
Among the cast, Mr. ALLEN was the kid. He was slight, about 5-foot-6, and looked as though he were too young to shave. A newspaper reported that while he was on his honeymoon in 1942, a hotel clerk in Hamilton didn't believe he was old enough to be married and refused to rent him a room. Even some of his fans were quoted by writer Trent FRAYNE as saying, "Oh my goodness, don't tell me that little boy's married."
On air, he always sang old-fashioned ballads. "Every mother would love the stuff he sang," said Lyman POTTS, a retired broadcaster who crossed paths with some of the gang. He recalled that one of the songs Mr. ALLEN performed on a Happy Gang recording was I'm a Lonely Little Petunia in an Onion Patch. It was popular on the program, maybe because it was the perfect example of the Happy Gang's sort of cornball humour.
Another example is the line Mr. ALLEN used almost every day in the early years of the program. Mr. PEARL had told him not to let fame go to his head -- "Don't ever get the idea that you're too big to say hello to your mother." So, for his first six years, Mr. ALLEN's opening words were "Hello mom."
During the war, they dropped the shtick for fear of hurting the feelings of mothers with sons in uniform. It sparked a letter-writing campaign. "Don't let Eddie stop saying 'Hello mom,' " Liberty Magazine reported in May, 1945. "He reminds me of my own boy overseas. I wonder if he could think of all of us mothers when he says hello."
Over the years, the show appeared 195 times, always live (tape had yet to come into use when it began), in the course of an annual 39-week season, most of the time with the same cast. Its time slot was moved when the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation began running a 1 p.m. newscast, but the shift to 1: 15 EST didn't hurt the ratings. At first, it was produced in a studio on Davenport Road in Toronto and later in front of an audience of 700 to 800 on McGill Street near College and Yonge.
The program's mainstay was not talk or jokes but music, and the signature double knock on the door was an old-fashioned radio sound effect provided by Blain MATHE, who would move up to the mike and rap twice on the back of his violin.
Working together so closely did create some personality conflicts. There were practical jokes, usually aimed at the most uptight cast member: Mr. PEARL, a control freak who loved to plan the program in detail and had his own small office at the McGill Street studio.
One day, Mr. ALLEN and the other Happy Gang members set all the clocks forward by a few minutes. "We're late," they announced to Mr. PEARL, who raced into studio. After the opening, a couple of performers started to whine: "I don't want to do this."
Thinking they were actually on air, Mr. PEARL was shocked -- and didn't feel much better when he learned it was all a joke. It might have been one of the reasons he suffered a nervous breakdown (called "nervous exhaustion" for public consumption) and left the show in 1950 after 18 years and moved to the United States.
Eddie ALLEN took his place as emcee, but the incident rated an article in Maclean's by June CALLWOOD, the country's top magazine writer at the time, entitled: The Not So Happy Gang.
By then Mr. FARNON was long gone. During the war, he had joined the Canadian Army Show's band, and later led the Canadian band with the Allied Expeditionary Force, just as Glen MILLER led its U.S. ensemble. After the war he became a top arranger, working on Frank Sinatra albums and scores for such movies as Horatio Hornblower starring Gregory Peck.
Sinatra, however, was a little too flash for Eddie ALLEN, who preferred Bing Crosby. He was a sharp dresser, but his style was understated, almost always a conservative suit and muted shirt in a business where the shirt easily could have been orange.
His love of clothes gave him something to do when he left show business. Eddie ALLEN owned a men's clothing store in the west end of Toronto after he left the program. He later retired and moved to London, Ontario

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MATHER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-07-22 published
MATHER, Naomi
Peacefully, at her home in Waterloo, surrounded by the love of her family, Naomi died early Monday morning, July 21, 2003. She was 20. Naomi struggled with Ewing's Sarcoma since January of 2002. Her indomitable spirit sustained all who knew her. Precious daughter of Susan (COOKE) and Fred MATHER and dearest sister of John. Naomi will be lovingly remembered by her Paternal grandmother, Ivey MATHER of Perth; her special friend Marjorie MALLORY, Aunts and Uncles, Marilyn CURRY of Headingly, Minnesota, Catherine and Richard FREEMAN of Vancouver, Lorna and Jim PEDEN and Sheila PRESCOTT (Dave McGRATH) of Perth; cousins, Tyler, Jennifer and Andrew CURRY, Harry and Gabby FREEMAN, Corinne, Trent and Colin PEDEN and Patricia PRESCOTT. Naomi's life included a wide circle of Friends, especially Cara DURST. Her Scottish Terrier Ghillie and Tabby cat Tamara had a special place in her heart. She was predeceased by Maternal grandparents, Roy and Edith COOKE and her Paternal grandfather, John MATHER. In Naomi's short life, she involved herself in many activities. She was a graduate of Waterloo Collegiate Institute and was enrolled in Science studies at Queen's University when she became ill. Some of her involvements and interests included Strathyre Highland Dancers, Children's International Summer Villages, working as a lifeguard and swimming instructor and playing the piano. Friend's and relatives are invited to share their memories of Naomi with her family at the Edward R. Good Funeral Home, 171 King Street South, Waterloo from 7 to 9 pm this evening (Tuesday) and 2 to 4 and 7 to 9 pm Wednesday. A service to celebrate Naomi's life will be held on Thursday, July 24, 2003, 11 am, at Westminster United Church (The Cedars,) 543 Beechwood Drive, Waterloo, with Reverend John ANDERSON officiating. A committal service will follow in Parkview Cemetery Crematorium Chapel, Waterloo. Following the committal at the Cemetery, Friends and relatives are invited to return to Westminster United Church for refreshments and a time to visit with the family.In Naomi's memory, in lieu of flowers, donations to the Sarcoma Fund at Mount Sinai Hospital in Toronto or the Grand River Regional Cancer Centre would be appreciated as expressions of sympathy and can be arranged through the funeral home, phone (519) 745-8445 or www.edwardrgood.com

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MATHER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-07-30 published
Notice To Creditors And Others
All claims against the estate of Aston Ignatius GREEN, late of the City of Toronto and Town of Flesherton, who died on or about the 19th day of February, 2002, must be filed with the undersigned personal representatives on or before September 15, 2003, after which the estate will be distributed having regard only to the claims of which the Estate Trustees then shall have notice.
Dated at Toronto, this 25th day of July 2003.
Barbara E. GREEN
James MATHER
Wayne L. HOOEY
Estate Trustees with a Will
by: Hooey - Remus
Suite 400, Box 40
One University Avenue
Toronto, Ontario
M5J 2P1
Attention: W. Bruce DRAKE
Solicitors for the Estate Trustees
Page B8

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MATHER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-08-06 published
Notice To Creditors And Others
All claims against the estate of Aston Ignatius GREEN, late of the City of Toronto and Town of Flesherton, who died on or about the 19th day of February, 2002, must be filed with the undersigned personal representatives on or before September 15, 2003, after which the estate will be distributed having regard only to the claims of which the Estate Trustees then shall have notice.
Dated at Toronto, this 25th day of July 2003.
Barbara E. GREEN
James MATHER
Wayne L. HOOEY
Estate Trustees with a Will
by: Hooey - Remus
Suite 400, Box 40
One University Avenue
Toronto, Ontario
M5J 2P1
Attention: W. Bruce DRAKE
Solicitors for the Estate Trustees
Page B12

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MATHER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-08-13 published
Notice To Creditors And Others
All claims against the estate of Aston Ignatius GREEN, late of the City of Toronto and Town of Flesherton, who died on or about the 19th day of February, 2002, must be filed with the undersigned personal representatives on or before September 15, 2003, after which the estate will be distributed having regard only to the claims of which the Estate Trustees then shall have notice.
Dated at Toronto, this 25th day of July 2003.
Barbara E. GREEN
James MATHER
Wayne L. HOOEY
Estate Trustees with a Will
by: Hooey - Remus
Suite 400, Box 40
One University Avenue
Toronto, Ontario
M5J 2P1
Attention: W. Bruce DRAKE
Solicitors for the Estate Trustees
Page B7

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MATHERS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-20 published
MATHERS, Andrew Sherlock
Died of a heart attack early Friday morning. Husband of Suzanne. Father of Drew, Mary and Jane. Andrew will be missed by his brother John (Joan); niece Janet; nephews Eric, Ian and Scott; step-siblings Susan GARRARD, John and Charles LENNOX; and by sister-in-law Jane CLAPPISON. Private Cremation. A Memorial Service will be held at a later date. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the Princess Margaret Hospital Foundation.

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MATHEWS o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-12-17 published
Deacon David Roland COLEMAN TRUDEAU
In loving memory of Deacon David Roland COLEMAN TRUDEAU at the age of 78 years Thirty years of sobriety. Died peacefully surrounded by his wife and family at the Manitoulin Health Centre on Wednesday evening December 10, 2003.
Beloved husband of Clara (FOX) TRUDEAU of Wikwemikong and first wife the late Tillie KUBUNT of Newberry, Michigan. Dear son of the late Dominic and Angeline (WASSEGIJIG) TRUDEAU of Wikwemikong. Dear step-father to Bill TUCKER, Sharon (husband Ray) Wynn and Bob TUCKER of Newberry, Michigan, Lindell MATHEWS of Wikwemikong, Annie KAY (friend Eric EADIE,) Mathew and Linda MATHEWS (predeceased.) Loving grandfather to Billy, Karen, Jimmy, Linda (friend Wayne), Ronald (friend Tracy), Maxwell, Lindsay, Michael, Darla and a few more from Newberry, Michigan (names unknown at time of printing). Predeceased by two grandchildren Linda Marie and Lucy Marie. One great granddaughter Deanna MATHEWS. Loving brother of Stella (Jim predeceased) PAVLOT of Sault, Michigan, Ursula (Bob) SCHUPP of Meza, Arizona, Elsie (John predeceased) BOWES of Shorter, Alabama. Predeceased by brothers and sisters and in-laws Tony (Margaret) TRUDEAU, Isadore (Marge) WEMIGWANS, Lena (Bova) GRENIER, and Francis (Nestor) KARMINSKI. Will be sadly missed by Godchildren Jonathon DEBASSIGE, Alison RECOLLET, Darcy SPANISH, and many nieces, nephews and cousins.
Rested at St. Ignatius Church, Buzwah. Funeral Mass was held at Holy Cross Mission, Wikwemikong on Monday, December 15, 2003 at 11: 00 a.m. with Father Doug McCarthy s.j. officiating. Cremation at the Sagamok Anishnawbek First Nations Crematorium. Lougheed Funeral Home.

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MATHEWS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-10-30 published
SMART, Worts Lennox
Len died October 29th. in his 92nd year. Born in Toronto, he attended Rosedale Public School, Trinity College School and University of Toronto. He served in the Air Force during the 2nd World War as Navigation Instructor in Manitoba. After the war he worked for many years at Gulf Oil as an accountant. His wife, Passchen (Peggy) MATHEWS predeceased him. He is survived by his brother John Lennox SMITH, his sister Anna Marie RAGSDALE, nephews David SMART and Dean SMART. A Memorial service will be held on Friday, October 31, 2003 at Mount Pleasant Crematorium Chapel, 375 Mt. Pleasant Rd., Toronto, at 2 p.m. If desired, donations may be made to the Canadian Cancer Society. (Murray E. Newbigging Funeral Directors).

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MATSUSHITA o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-03 published
MATSUSHITA, Roy (President and Founder of Norex)
On February 28, 2003 Roy, loving companion of Nancy. Beloved father of Albert and Laurie. Cherished grandfather of Darryl, Isaac, Jodie, Samantha, Timothy and the Late Lauren. Friends will be received at the Accettone Funeral Home 384 Finley Ave., Ajax (905-428-9090) on Monday March 3, 2003 from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. A private Family service will be held.

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MATTE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-05-07 published
Brockville man dies alone in hospital as severe acute respiratory syndrome keeps family out
By Martin MITTELSTAEDT Wednesday, May 7, 2003 - Page A8
As Thomas FARMER lay dying, the elderly and frail Brockville man made one phone call from hospital to his daughter, telling her that he was fading fast, was all alone and wanted his family at his side.
It was a phone call that will haunt his daughter, Aynne FARMER, forever.
She begged hospital staff on the night of April 27 to be allowed to see her father, but it was to no avail.
She was denied entry because of severe acute respiratory syndrome quarantine restrictions on family visits to the Brockville General Hospital.
Sometime that night, Mr. FARMER, who was 85 and suffered from a number of medical conditions, died.
After hospital staff discovered the death, Ms. FARMER was called and told she could view his body in his hospital bed, the first time in more than two weeks the family was able to see him.
Fighting back tears, Ms. FARMER said she has been unable to clear from her mind the haunting memories of her final words with her father as he begged for his family to be at his side and of her inability to persuade hospital staff to allow them entry into the hospital.
" 'I'm dying and I'm all alone.' That's what he said. He said: 'You have to come.' "
Ms. FARMER said senior nursing staff refused both a request made over the telephone and one made that night outside the hospital doors to be given permission to enter the medical facility.
"Nothing is going to take away the pain from the last conversation with my father, " she said.
"This man was a wonderful man. He didn't deserve it. He didn't deserve to be denied his last wish."
A spokeswoman for the hospital, Karen MATTE, vice-president of patient care, said the institution is reviewing the case.
Under the protocol developed in Ontario to stop the spread of severe acute respiratory syndrome, visits at hospitals have been severely restricted, with entry allowed only to the immediate family of patients near death or for parents visiting their sick children.
There is confusion at the hospital over Mr. FARMER's status.
Ms. Matte said the FARMER family was supposed to be on a list of people who were allowed into the hospital on compassionate grounds based on the seriousness of their father's condition.
However, Ms. MATTE also said that nursing staff felt Mr. FARMER wasn't that sick because he was well enough to be able to use the telephone to call his family.
"They didn't feel he was that critical, Ms. MATTE said of the nursing staff.
Mr. FARMER had a long list of medical conditions, according to his family, including severe aortic stenosis and pneumonia.
Mr. FARMER's son, Robert FARMER, said that the hospital bungled the request to visit through a process he is calling "complete bureaucratic stupidity."
The family had been told repeatedly from April 17 to April 24 that they couldn't visit their father in hospital because he wasn't included on the list of critically ill patients.

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MATTE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-09-17 published
Malcolm "Mac" THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON
By Beth THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON Wednesday, September 17, 2003 - Page A26
Husband, father, grandfather, entrepreneur. Born May 1, 1936, in Montreal. Died March 13, in Lindsay, Ontario, of cancer, aged From a very early age, Mac was intrigued with the workings of the world and anxious to find his place in it. It didn't take him long to land his first job, as a 12-year-old delivering telegrams on bicycle throughout hilly Montreal, and later, grocery orders, thrilled with every small tip he received. Over the course of the next few years he would hold a variety of jobs, assisting a number of uncles in their wide-ranging business ventures including one who trained horses at Blue Bonnets racetrack, one who ran a house painting company, and one who owned a cigar store on Sherbrooke Street. As the only child of John and Gertie THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON, he regaled his parents often with work anecdotes. Story-telling was a trait Mac cultivated early and called upon often throughout his life.
Growing up in the east end of Montreal, his first life lessons were learned on the street: how to speak French and how to make Friends quickly, two traits he proudly carried with him throughout his life. After graduating from Sir George Williams (now Concordia University,) he married his high-school girlfriend, Ann SCOTT, in 1958, and accepted a job with Armstrong Cork in Montreal. Two children soon followed, Steve and Beth, and then a few job transfers with Armstrong, first to Waterloo, Quebec, and then to Lindsay, Ontario, in the capacity of plant manager of Britton Carpets. It was in Lindsay that his third child, Max, was born.
He left the carpet mill in the early 1970s to begin living his real dream -- working in the hospitality industry. He built a small inn in Lindsay, the Red Carpet Inn, starting with just 12 rooms and a restaurant. Over time, and with the help of his family and business partners, he successfully grew the business to include 64 guest rooms, several banquet facilities, a restaurant and bar.
In 1988, widowed and aged 52, Mac was at a place in life where others might start to slow down. He chose to gear up. He found love again and began sharing his life with Judy MATTE, whom he married in 1990, welcoming her two grown children Dan and Julie.
By this time, Mac had sold the Red Carpet Inn and was initiating a new chapter in his career: Pizza Hut. The first franchise was built in Lindsay, and within a few years, he and his family had grown the business to include 18 stores: 11 in Ontario (including one Taco Bell and one Kentucky Fried Chicken) and seven in Quebec.
Throughout his career, Mac was active with a number of organizations, most notably serving as the charter treasurer of the Lindsay Ross Memorial Hospital Foundation from January 1989 to June 1992. He also offered his services as party treasurer of the Victoria-Haliburton Liberal Party. In a business capacity, Mac sat on numerous committees for the Pizza Hut/Tricon organization.
His efforts did not go unnoticed: he won the 1988 National Pizza Hut Franchisee of the Year Award, the 1994 Franchise Business Consultant Award and the 2001 Tricon Global Partnering Award.
Mac was not immune to tragedy, having to endure the death of his son Steve in 1999, but he bore it bravely, choosing to focus his positive energy and ever-ready sense of humour on his growing family, which had expanded to include eight grandchildren and a number of daughters- and sons-in-law.
Although many will remember Mac for his keen business sense, his real legacy is his staunch belief in the indomitability of the human spirit, never losing sight of what tomorrow had to offer. As he was fond of telling his grandchildren, "Keep the faith," a motto he himself practised until the end.
Beth THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON is Mac's daughter.

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MATTHEWS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-22 published
MATTHEWS, Frederick Scott, 81, died peacefully January 17, 2003. Educated Upper Canada College and Dartmouth U., decorated United States Navy pilot, businessman, lifelong trout fisherman. He is survived by his wife Dagmar MATTHEWS of Greenwich, Connecticut, U.S.A., 3 daughters, 5 grandchildren, one great-grand_son. Burial at Stratford, Ontario. Memorial donations can be made to a Hospice or Trout Unlimited.

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MATTHEWS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-10-06 published
NÚÑEZ, Ann Matthews (née MATTHEWS)
Ann Matthews NÚÑEZ passed away unexpectedly on October 2, 2003. Ann was born in Torrance, California on May 20, 1948. Her parents were Robert Emmet (Bobby) MATTHEWS and Margaret Ann (Peggy) VINCENT. Her older sister, Kitty SALINAS, lives in San Marino, California, and her older brother Bo MATTHEWS lives in Lake Oswego, Oregon. The family lived together in Hermosa Beach, California. Her father, Bobby MATTHEWS, died in 1951. In 1956, Peggy Matthews married Donald O'NEIL. Ann's dear step-father brought them four new brothers and a sister (Tom, Mike, Steve, Jack, Molly O'NEIL.)
Ann attended the University of California at Berkeley. She graduated from Cal in 1969 and shortly after, she married José NÚÑEZ de las Cuevas of La Coruña, Spain. She and José and their growing family lived in Tiburon, California; in Buenos Aires, Argentina, in the province of Orense in the region of Galicia in Spain, and finally in Toronto. They have five children: Lucia, Mauro, Martin, Pilar, and Alvar. The NÚÑEZ children have all graduated or are presently attending Canadian universities. The entire family are contributing members of the community. Like their mother, they are devoted to their adopted country of Canada.
Ann graduated from the University of Toronto Law School in 1993. She practiced law since then and, recently, she served as Vice-Chair on the Health Professions Appeal and Review Board. She was on the Spanish-Canadian Chamber of Commerce. And she taught mediation at York University Law School.
Ann leaves behind her dear children; her mother; her brothers and sisters; a brother-in-law and sister-in-law; many beloved MATTHEWS and O'NEIL cousins, nieces and nephews; and her many wonderful and loving Friends in Toronto.
A Memorial Mass will be held at Our Lady of Perpetual Help Church (St. Clair and Mt. Pleasant), on Monday, October 6, 2003, at 7: 00 p.m.

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MATTHEWS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-10-25 published
GIBSON, James Alexander, C.M., M.A., M.Litt., (D.Phil.Oxon,) LL.D President Emeritus, Brock University
After a long and useful life, clear-headed to the end, died in Ottawa on October 23, 2003. Born in Ottawa in 1912, elder son of John Wesley GIBSON and Belle Crawford McGEE; school and college in Victoria, Rhodes Scholar from British Columbia in 1931; Foreign Service Officer, Department of External Affairs (1938-47); served with the Prime Minister on missions to Washington, Quebec Conferences, San Francisco, London and Paris.
Original member of Faculty of Carleton College, (1942); from 1952, first Dean of Arts and Science, Carleton University; later Dean of Arts and Deputy to the President; in 1963, named Founding President of Brock University.
A founding member of the Canadian Association of Rhodes Scholars, he held various offices and served as editor of the newsletter for 19 years. For over 60 years, he was a member of the Canadian Historical Association and of the Canadian Institute for International Affairs, as well as national and regional voluntary organizations.
He is survived by his daughters, Julia MATTHEWS and Eleanor S. JOLY (Gerald,) and his son Peter James; grandchildren Alison MATTHEWS- DAVID (Jean Marc), Colin MATTHEWS (Nathalia), Micheline, Nina (Jean-Marc BERNIER) and Gerald JOLY, Anna GIBSON (Robert) and Hilary TERHUNE (Peter;) two great-grandchildren. His wife Caroline died in 1995; also surviving are his brother William and his sister Isobel SEARLS in Victoria.
Memorial services will be held in Ottawa (December) and in St. Catharines at Brock University on November 7th, at 3 p.m. If desired, memorial remembrances may be made to the James A. Gibson Library, Brock University, St. Catharines, Ontario L2S 3A1.

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MATTHEWS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-11-26 published
A scholar and a gentle man
'Fine example of a great Canadian' who founded Ontario's Brock University was once private secretary to prime minister Mackenzie KING
By Ron CSILLAG, Special to The Globe and Mail Wednesday, November 26, 2003 - Page R9
In an almost Zen-like fashion, James GIBSON knew the value of not acting. In the late 1960s, when a group of student radicals seized part of Brock University, hoping to be dragged away kicking and screaming, Dr. GIBSON, who had helped found the institution a few years earlier, reacted in a way no other university president did when faced with the same problem: He did nothing. The protesters, he reasoned, may have had legitimate grievances, but their unseemly actions offended his firm sense of propriety. In time, the students simply went away.
It was an effective, though uncharacteristic, action for a man who embodied Brock's Latin motto: "Surgite," freely translated as "push on." That he did, through some 65 rich years of advancing higher education and in public service, most notably as a private secretary to former prime minister Mackenzie KING, whose penchant for soothsaying and assorted eccentricities Dr. GIBSON kept mainly to himself until later in life.
Just five days before his death in Ottawa on October 23 at the age of 91, Dr. GIBSON was doing what he loved: Watching a new group of graduates receive their diplomas at the fall convocation of Brock University in St. Catharines, Ontario, the school he had launched as founding president in 1963.
At a recent memorial service at Brock, David ATKINSON, the university's president and vice-chancellor, recalled a man whose attributes a strong moral fibre, clarity of thought and a general uprightness, all tempered by a warm and gentle touch -- harkened to a quaint, bygone era. "It's unlikely we will meet anyone like him again," Dr. ATKINSON said.
In the House of Commons on October 27, Dr. GIBSON was praised by St. Catharines Liberal member of parliament Walt LASTEWKA as "a fine example of a great Canadian."
Dr. GIBSON, whose knowledge of Canadian history and government were legend, was in the news this past summer as the oldest of over 1,000 Rhodes Scholars who flew to England for a five-day bash honouring the centenary of the trust. With his brother William, also a Rhodes Scholar, Dr. GIBSON dedicated a re-leaded stained-glass window at the chapel of Oxford's New College.
A normally discreet man, he had sharp words for former prime minister Brian MULRONEY, not an Oxford graduate, who surprised guests at the alumni dinner -- and raised a few eyebrows -- when he took a seat on the podium alongside Oxonians Bill CLINTON and Tony BLAIR, and guest Nelson MANDELA. Many alumni, Dr. GIBSON included, felt that Mr. MULRONEY, who had been invited by The Independent newspaper chain, had no business being there. Though upset, Dr. GIBSON retained his dignity, saying simply, "I was offended."
James Alexander GIBSON was born in Ottawa, in 1912, to Canadian-born parents of Irish-Scottish stock with strong Methodist and Quaker leanings. Raised in Victoria, he graduated with a B.A. in history from the University of British Columbia at age 18. Less than a year later, he was one of the youngest boys at Oxford.
"That was the real dividing line in my life," he told The Globe and Mail last July. "The economic depression was beginning to take over and some of the graduates in my year at University of British Columbia ended up digging ditches, but I had a guaranteed income for three years."
The annual stipend was only £400 but it enabled Dr. GIBSON to live comfortably and travel to the rest of Europe when he wasn't studying modern history, debating in the Oxford Union Society and keeping wicket for the New College cricket squad, the Nomads.
Back in Ottawa and armed with a doctorate in history, he joined the Department of External Affairs. On his second day on the job, he was whisked to the prime minister's office for a six-month secondment that lasted nine years. Mr. KING, who was also External Affairs minister, blocked Dr. GIBSON's promotions to postings abroad three times because "he told me I stopped him getting into trouble."
The prime minister was a notorious taskmaster, calling on his assistant to work most evenings and weekends to draft letters and speeches. Throughout, "Dad never complained about anything," said his daughter Julia MATTHEWS. " But as he got older, he loosened up a little."
According to his daughter, he came to describe the famously erratic leader as "a very grumpy man and a very lonely man, insensitive, and quite damaging to work for."
Ultimately, it occurred to the clan that perhaps the unmarried prime minister was simply jealous of Dr. GIBSON's status as a beloved family man and father of three children. "Whenever we went on a family holiday, Dad always got called back," remembered Ms. MATTHEWS.
But a high point came in the spring of 1945, when Dr. GIBSON accompanied Mr. KING and 380 other delegates to San Francisco and the founding of the United Nations. During the historic two-month conference, Dr. GIBSON got personal glimpses of such leaders as the Soviet Union's Andrei GROMYKO and Britain's Anthony EDEN, but the task at hand, he later recalled, was to keep the Canadian prime minister "on the rails."
Fearing he would never advance in the public service, Dr. GIBSON resigned in 1947 and took a teaching post at Ottawa's Carleton University, where he later served as the first dean of arts and science and deputy to the president. By the early 1960s, he was courted by a group of community leaders in the Niagara peninsula to establish Brock University. When he began as founding president, the school had seven faculty (known as "the magnificent seven"), 29 students and a "library" consisting of a shelf of books. Today, it boasts more than 15,000 students and 47,000 alumni.
His first order of business at Brock was the creation of a library.
Now housed in the campus's Schmon Tower, it has become something of a landmark on the Niagara Escarpment. Dr. GIBSON, fondly known by faculty as "James A.," remained as Brock's president until 1974. He was named to the Order of Canada in 1992, and the library was named after him in 1996.
He was also a leading figure in the Unitarian faith, serving for a time as chaplain of the Unitarian Congregation of Niagara.
Asked what dinner-table conversation was like at home, Ms. MATTHEWS sighed good-naturedly. "Oh, God. There was a lot of current events. He had all the answers. He was always lecturing, but he could be really charming." Even after his vision started to fail, he travelled, read and wrote. "He never felt old."
After moving from his beloved St. Catharines to an Ottawa retirement home, Dr. GIBSON lectured residents on "governors-general I have known."
Dr. GIBSON was predeceased by his wife of 57 years, Caroline (née STEIN,) and leaves three children, seven grandchildren, two great-grandchildren, his brother, and a sister, Isobel SEARLS.
His final days were summed up poetically by Josephine MEEKER, a former professor at Brock. After attending the university's convocation last month, Dr. GIBSON "went for a long walk, returned to his residence, went into the lounge area, took off his coat and folded it up, put it on the back of his chair, sat down, folded his hands in his lap, closed his eyes, and died."

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MATTIS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-11-27 published
Self-inflicted wound kills man who shot housemate
A man who police say shot a woman he was living with and then turned the gun on himself died in hospital yesterday.
Pauline MATTIS, 50, was shot in the face on Tuesday at the business she and Frank PERREIRA owned. She remains in hospital.
Mr. PERREIRA was found shot in the head with a handgun beside him.
CFTO news reported last night that Mr. PERREIRA was living with four women at the same time.
"He wasn't coming home. He never spent 24 hours with me. He always had big plans, big lies. He's on the road... this business trip or that business trip," said Carol LABAS.
She said she met Mr. PERREIRA on an Internet dating service and that he owed her $87,000.
John LANCASTER, CFTO News
Page A12

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MATUSZEWSKA o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-06 published
GNIADEK, Irena
Peacefully on March 3, 2003 at Copernicus Lodge, Toronto. Beloved wife of the late Edward GNIADEK. Irene was the dearly loved mother of Krystyna WIELGOSZ and her husband George, and the beloved grandmother of James and Joanna WIELGOSZ. She is survived by one sister, Mary SIENKIEWICZ of London, England, sister-in-law Laverne TWOREK, her nephew and niece Walter and Emilia ORLOWSKI of Vancouver, British Columbia and their family, a niece in Poland Ewa TWOREK- MATUSZEWSKA, a nephew Jacek TWOREK in Poland, and many other family members and Friends. Predeceased by siblings Zygmunt, Henry, Edward and Genowefa. The family will receive Friends at the Humphrey Funeral Home - A. W. Miles Chapel, 1403 Bayview Avenue (south of Eglinton Avenue East) from 7-9 p.m. Friday. Mass of Christian Burial 10: 30 o'clock on Saturday morning at Our Lady of Perpetual Help Church, 78 Clifton Road. Interment Mount Hope Cemetery. If desired, donations to Copernicus Lodge, 66 Roncesvalles Avenue, Toronto M6R 3A7 would be appreciated.

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