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"MAS" 2003 Obituary


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MASKEL o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-07-02 published
Dorothy Mary WILSON
In loving memory of Dorothy Mary WILSON of Espanola who passed away at the Espanola General Hospital on Saturday, June 28, 2003 in her 74th year.
Dorothy was a former President of the Office Workers Union at the E. B. Eddy Paper Mill and had worked on the Espanola Town Council as a Councillor, Deputy Mayor and Mayor.
Beloved wife of the late Cyril WILSON. Loving mother of Debbie MUNERA HEDGERS of Sydney, B.C. and Kathy May MASKEL (husband Walter) of Whitefish Falls.Will be sadly missed by grand_sons Dylan and Sean HEDGER. Dear sister of John SHAMESS of Elliot Lake, Alfie SHAMESS of Michigan and the late Joe SHAMESS and half-sister to Laurie LUKKARILA of Sudbury.
Visitation will be Thursday, July 3rd from 7-9 p.m. at the Bourcier Funeral Home, Espanola. A Memorial Service will be held Friday, July 4, 2003 at 10: 00 a.m. at the Calvary Baptist Church, Espanola with John FAULKNER officiating. Interment of the ashes will be in the Espanola Cemetery.

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MASKERY o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-03-26 published
Doctor Allan Bain PEEVER
Allan PEEVER, age 36, of Stratford died on Thursday, March 20, 2003 in Stratford.
Allan was born on March 18, 1967 in Sault Ste. Marie to the Reverend Canon J. Bain PEEVER and Clara Dale (CLERMONT.) From 1967 until 1996 he lived in Newfoundland, Kingston, Cornwall, London and Guelph before settling in Stratford to practice veterinary medicine at Mitchell Veterinary Services. He graduated from the University of Guelph in 1996. In 1999 Allan and Dr. Morag MASKERY were married and in May of 2002 they celebrated the birth of their daughter Erica Dale.
Allan treasured time spent canoeing, hunting and fishing. He spent many wonderful years on Lake Mindemoya, Manitoulin Island. His humour, courage, spontaneity and love of life were inspirational to everyone who knew him.
We sincerely appreciate the loving care Al received from hundreds of healthcare providers throughout the last five years. Allan will be missed by Morag, Erica, father Bain (Lynda), brother Bruce (Gina), grandmother Olga (Paul), father-in-law David (Janet), Neil (Teresa), Michael (Caragh), Jason and Liana, his aunts, uncles, nieces, cousins, many Friends and colleagues. Allan was predeceased by his mother Dale in 2001.
Visitation was held at the W.G. Young Funeral Home, 430 Huron Street, Stratford on Friday, March 21, 2003. The funeral service was held at St. James' Anglican Church, 41 Mornington Street, Stratford on Saturday, March 22, 2003. Venerable John SPENCER officiating. As expressions of sympathy, memorial donations may be made to the Erica Peever Education Trust Fund c/o St. Francis of Assisi Church, Box 166, Mindemoya, Ont. P0P 1S0

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MASLECHKO o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-24 published
Sailor mom had Northern Magic
An early experience with skin cancer led her to contemplate her life and make the decision to set off from Ottawa on a four-year family voyage around the world
By Allison LAWLOR Monday, March 24, 2003 - Page R7
Diane STUEMER dared to dream big and in doing so she captured the country's imagination.
The Ottawa woman, who sailed around the world with her husband and three sons and captivated Canadians back home with her weekly newspaper reports from faraway places, has died of cancer. She was 43.
"She touched people, said her younger sister Linda MASLECHKO. "When you read her stories, you felt that you were part of her family. She was unabashedly human."
The family odyssey began on September 11, 1997, when Ms. STUEMER, her husband Herbert, and their three sons Michael, Jonathan and Christopher, all under the age of 12, left Ottawa in their 42-foot steel sailboat named Northern Magic and headed down the St. Lawrence River.
When they left, the sum of their sailing experience consisted of a handful of summer afternoons on the Ottawa River.
"Finally, we all wanted to leave, just to get it over with. So when every contingency had been thought of, prepared for and fretted over, when we were as ready as we ever would be, we set off. All we could do now was pray."
Over the next four years, they would visit 34 countries and travel 35,000 nautical miles. When they returned home, in the summer of 2001, 3,000 people were there to welcome them.
Throughout the trip, Ms. STUEMER wrote 218 weekly dispatches for The Ottawa Citizen, chronicling every aspect of their journey from their lost cat to seasickness to travelling through pirate waters along the coast of Somalia.
"It's been a long time since the cold grip of fear has clenched me in my gut, and I was not the only one on board to shiver beneath the touch of its icy fingers, Ms. STUEMER wrote, before heading into waters where there had been at least seven attacks on private yachts in the past 12 months, two of which involved gunfire.
Ms. STUEMER subsequently published a book about their adventures called The Voyage of the Northern Magic.
Before setting sail on their epic journey, Ms. STUEMER and her husband fantasized about travelling the world, but like a lot of people they considered putting it off until their retirement.
"In the hustle and bustle of living our lives, with the business and the home and the kids and everything else, the travel part of our ambitions just got forgotten, " she once said in a television interview.
But a brush with skin cancer in 1994 persuaded her to re-evaluate her life. She and her husband decided it was time to start following their dreams. Soon after, they sold their advertising business, rented out their Ottawa-area home, bought and renovated Northern Magic, a modest 37-year-old sailboat.
"She taught people that you have to find a way to make your own dream come true, said Diane KING, a close friend.
The STUEMERs began their journey by sailing down the eastern seaboard of North America, through the Panama Canal and across the Pacific Ocean, eventually reaching Australia. From there, they travelled to Indonesia, Thailand, Sri Lanka and across the Indian Ocean to Zanzibar. They sailed the Red Sea and up through the Mediterranean to Gibraltar, from where they set out across the North Atlantic homeward bound.
At times they travelled for weeks without seeing land. The music of Canadian folksinger Michael MITCHELL frequently echoed through Northern Magic, calming frayed nerves during stormy weather or reminding them of home as they sailed into a new port.
Back home in Canada, Mr. MITCHELL read about their trip. "I almost felt I was on the journey with them, " he said.
The family encountered many close calls on their voyage. At one point, the family boat was docked in Yemen only a few hundred metres away from where suicide bombers blew a gaping hole in the U.S.S. Cole.
The trip was not just one of adventure. Along the way they met remarkable people, many of whom were living in poverty. Touched by these people, the family set out to make a difference. Ms. STUEMER's work, along with her popular columns, has managed to raise more than $50,000 so far for humanitarian causes in Africa and Southeast Asia.
The money was raised to help pay for student tuitions and school supplies in Kenya and to help protect orangutans in the jungles of Borneo.
Diane STUEMER was born on June 23, 1959, in Sarnia, Ontario Not long after, her family moved to Edmonton. From there they moved to Calgary, where she spent her formative years. As a teenager, Ms. STUEMER was working at the Calgary Stampede when she met a young German man who would later become her husband. Born in Berlin, Herbert STUEMER came to Canada with the intention of travelling and working throughout North America. But after meeting Diane, he decided to stay put in Calgary. The couple married there in 1981.
From Calgary the couple went to Ottawa, where Ms. STUEMER studied journalism at Carleton University. After earning her degree, she went to work for the federal government in various positions, including briefing the Environment Minister for Question Period.
In 1988, she quit her government job and bought a faltering advertising company. She turned it around to become a successful business. She also wrote a biography of her grandfather, William HAWRELAK, a former mayor of Edmonton, and helped her father, Frank KING, write up his memories of his experience organizing the 1988 Calgary Winter Olympics.
"Whenever she put her mind to something, she did it intensely, Ms. MASLECHKO said.
During her life, Ms. STUEMER followed 11 basic rules. "Live your life with passion. Dare to dream big dreams, " was rule No. 1.
"Begin immediately, even if you are not ready, " rule No. 4 states.
Last Boxing Day, Ms. STUEMER became ill, and suffered from persistent headaches. But it was not until February 6 that the malignant melanoma that took her life was discovered. In the last month of her life, she was surrounded in the hospital by family and Friends, whom she kept laughing with her wonderful sense of humour, said her sister.
"She said: 'I got a wake-up call and thank goodness I listened. I changed my life. I fulfilled who I was meant to be', " her sister Ms. MASLECHKO recalled. "She made the most of it and that's a lesson to all of us."
Ms. STUEMER was recently presented with the Queen's Golden Jubilee Medal. The Medal is given to Canadians "who have made a significant contribution to their fellow citizens, their community or to Canada."
The City of Ottawa also has plans to name a park and beach area on the north shore of Petrie Island Stuemer Park, in honour of Ms. STUEMER. The Ottawa River island, close to where the STUEMERs live, is the place from which they departed on their journey and returned to four years later.
News of her death attracted a flood of messages to the family Web site (http: //www.northernmagic.com). Some admirers had followed Ms. STUEMER's exploits for years. Long-time reader Carol LAVIOLETTE wrote: "I followed your adventure from the very start; I laughed and cried through all of the stories in the Citizen. I prayed for your safe return and cried tears of joy when the five of you returned to Canada.
"I am a mother of three myself and could not imagine going on that kind of adventure, I don't have the strength of character to undertake something of such magnitude. But I lived it through your tales. Thank you and God bless you."
Ms. STUEMER died in an Ottawa hospital on March 15. She leaves her husband Herbert and their three sons Michael, 16, Jonathan, 14, and Christopher, 11, her mother and father, sister and two brothers.
"Diane was like a little girl who, in all her innocence, really truly believed she could change the world, Ms. KING wrote in a eulogy. "Who would dare tell her that she couldn't?"

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MASON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-04-11 published
Visionary performer waged war on trivial art
Her trademark was a experimental process that embraced dance, music, text, mime, clown, ritual and mask
By Paula CITRON Friday, April 11, 2003 - Page R13
Canada has lost a powerful force in experimental theatre and dance. Director, dancer, actor, writer and choreographer Elizabeth SZATHMARY died last month in Toronto.
While she will be remembered as a dynamic figure, her artistic life will remain a contradiction. At the beginning of her career, Ms. SZATHMARY was one of the gilded darlings of Toronto's burgeoning experimental theatre. At the end, she was seen by some as a marginalized, religious eccentric who put on plays in church basements.
To her long-time Friends and loyalists, however, Ms. SZATHMARY's life was a spiritual journey in which art, religion and morality were inextricably intertwined in a nobility of purpose.
Ms. SZATHMARY was born in New York on October 12, 1937, to Jewish-Hungarian parents. Her mother was an unhappy former opera singer and vaudeville performer and her father was a composer and arranger who wrote the theme for the popular television show Get Smart and who abandoned his family. Ms. SZATHMARY attended New York's High School of Performing Arts and later performed with the Metropolitan Opera Ballet under choreographer Antony TUDOR.
A ravishing beauty with masses of long, jet-black curls and compelling light-coloured eyes, Ms. SZATHMARY attracted followers throughout her career. She was, says Toronto choreographer David EARLE, a powerful, mysterious presence and a charismatic performer.
Another admirer was Canadian Robert SWERDLOW. Mr. TUDOR's piano accompanist, he fell in love with the beautiful young dancer and followed her to France where Ms. SZATHMARY danced with such companies as Les Ballets Classique de Monte Carlo and Les Ballets Contemporains de Paris. He was the first of many artists to be inspired by Ms. SZATHMARY.
"Elizabeth was a theatre philosopher who wanted to save the world through the beauty and truth of her art," Mr. SWERDLOW said.
The couple relocated to Montreal in the mid-sixties where Mr. SWERDLOW got a job with the National Film Board. One assignment brought him to Toronto, and it was Ms. SZATHMARY who persuaded him to settle there because of the city's "happening" dance scene. Performing under the name Elizabeth SWERDLOW, she first worked with Mr. EARLE and the future co-founders of Toronto Dance Theatre.
In 1969, Mr. SWERDLOW took an unexpected windfall of $30,000 and built his wife a performing venue of her own. In this way, Global Village Theatre emerged from a former Royal Canadian Mounted Police stable and the couple went on to became synonymous with a new wave of provocative, political, issue-oriented theatre.
Mr. SWERDLOW provided the words and music, and co-wrote the shows Elizabeth co-wrote, choreographed, directed and was the featured performer. Importantly, she was the visionary who came up with original concepts and her trademark, multidisciplinary theatrical process embraced dance, music, text, mime, clown, ritual and mask.
Among their better-known collaborations was Blue.S.A., an indictment of the "American empire," and Justine, the story of a young girl who gains wisdom through the vicissitudes of life. A huge hit, Justine went to New York where it won off-Broadway awards and enjoyed a long run.
Its success meant Global Village became a stopping place for others. Gilda RADNER, John CANDY and Salome BEY represented just some of the talent that passed through. Later, when Ms. SZATHMARY founded Inner Stage Theatre, she helped propel the early careers of Antoni CIMOLINO and Donald CARRIER of the Stratford Festival, Jeannette ZINGG and Marshall PYNKOSKI of Opera Atelier and Native American performer Raoul TRUJILLO.
In the mid-seventies, Ms. SZATHMARY experienced a religious conversion and became a devout Christian.
For Mr. SWERDLOW, it was the last straw in an already turbulent relationship. After the couple split up, Ms. SZATHMARY founded Inner Stage, a name that expressed her desire to produce art that would transform and heal through spirituality. To better strike out on her own, she also shed the SWERDLOW name. Until the 1990s, the main work of Inner Stage was a series of acclaimed morality tales -- or modern fables as Ms. SZATHMARY called them which toured schools from coast to coast. She also explored the storytelling power of Native American myths and turned to such themes as the plight of street youth or to the Holocaust from a teenager's point of view. Her final project, No Fixed Address, attempted to air the true voice of the homeless by both telling their stories and casting them as actors.
By all accounts, Ms. SZATHMARY was a true eccentric who personalized everything. Her computer, for example, was called Daisy. Her home was a living museum dominated by a family of cats who occupied their own stools at the dining table, held conversations and sent out Christmas cards to the pets of Friends. Spiritual sayings, religious art and theatre memorabilia covered every scrap of wall and floor space. On an even more personal level, Ms. SZATHMARY kept a journal of religious visions and dreams written in ornate calligraphy and illustrated in Hungarian folk-style art. What is more, she described ecstatic events and augurisms, including a personal affinity with bison, as if such occurrences were as routine as the weather.
In her work, Ms. SZATHMARY demanded perfection, which meant she often proved impossible to work alongside. Friends and colleagues Robert MASON, Julia AMES and Peter GUGELER all talk about Ms. SZATHMARY's middle-of-the-night phone calls -- and the fact that she brooked no criticism or contrary opinions. All the same, their devotion never lessened.
"She was a queen and we were her subjects," said Mr. GUGELER. "Elizabeth never left you once she got ahold of you."
Guerrilla theatre, grass-roots theatre, shoe-string theatre, theatre against all odds, a "let's-make-a-show" mentality -- that was the brave, artistic world in which Ms. SZATHMARY waged her war against what she saw as frivolous or commercial art. In 1989, Inner Stage lost its operating grant and from that time on she financed her own productions. During the last year that she was able to work, she earned a pitiful $5,000.
Ms. SZATHMARY continued to perform in all her productions, turning more to straight acting as her dancing powers declined. Even so, she never gave up the stage to anyone.
Elizabeth SZATHMARY died of rectal cancer in Toronto on March 28. A memorial service will be held at the Church of the Redeemer, 162 Bloor St. W., Toronto, at 3 p.m. on April 27.

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MASS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-07-03 published
Stanley GOLVIN
By Philip MASS, Thursday, July 3, 2003 - Page A26
Businessman, husband, father, and grandfather. Born August 22, 1918, in Kielce, Poland. Died May 5, in Toronto, of an apparent heart attack, aged 84.
Stanley GOLVIN was a man who had a strong impact on others: individuals who literally owe their lives and their livelihoods to him; countless Friends, colleagues, and employees to whom Stanley was a mentor and a benefactor.
Not that Stanley was always an easy guy to be with. He was complicated and a man of many contradictions. He was exacting in his expectations of himself and others. Even so, he commanded unqualified loyalty, affection, and respect from even those of whom he was most relentlessly demanding. On the whole, we will remember Stanley fondly for his penchant for ideas and for his unwavering qualities of generosity, loyalty, courage, and just plain smarts.
Stanley's life was marked forever by the devastation that the Holocaust brought to what had been a rather commonplace life in Poland. Stanley spent most of the war in the Auschwitz concentration camp. Stanley managed to survive years in the camp even as he put his life in jeopardy time and again to bring food to other starving inmates and to help fellow prisoners escape. Astonishingly, he then managed to escape himself. This period in Stanley's life was not one that he could put behind him easily, nor did he wish to; he did his part in memorializing the Holocaust in several ways, including a video testimony as part of Steven Spielberg's Shoah initiative.
Stanley emerged from the war, like so many others, without a country, without a home, without an intact family, and without material resources. He did, however, come away with one thing of incalculable value: a worldwide network of devoted Friends with whom he shared a common experience that only he and they could truly comprehend.
Not long after the war, Stanley came to New York, determined to achieve personal security. In New York he met Sharon GREEN who soon became Sharon GOLVIN. They set roots in Sharon's home city of Toronto and Stanley, with a partner, opened a furniture store. The business flourished and developed into an impressive chain of outlets. Still restless, Stanley then set out to build the real estate business: that was his passion and is his legacy to his children.
Meanwhile Stanley's family flourished as well, with the birth of Stuart and Ilene and the eventual establishment of their own families. Then, in 1992, came the second tragedy of Stanley's life: the passing of Sharon. And yet, for a second time in his life, out of devastation came rebirth. Ella LOTEM, who Stanley had first romanced in Poland some 45 years earlier, moved to Toronto from Israel to marry him. A softer and mellower Stanley started to allow himself to sit back and enjoy some of life's pleasures, particularly his five grandchildren who adored him.
Stanley shared with me recently that he never could have believed that he would live so long. He was truly amazed by his long and fruitful life, grateful for the "mazal" that had been his companion, and I believe he was now resigned that his time had come. As Stanley would say, "I'm on overtime now."
When Stanley's four-year-old grand_son Benn was told that his Zaidy had died, Benn responded uncertainly, "But he'll be alive again, right?" Intent on having Benn understand the situation, we lost sight of the wisdom in his magical thinking. Indeed Zaidy will be alive again in a very real sense as Stanley's memory and his spirit remain alive and continue to guide us for ward. But before we could affirm this notion with Benn, he uttered simply, and in a soft voice, "But I love Zaidy." As we all do.
Philip MASS is Stanley GOLVIN's son-in-law.

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MASSEY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-08-25 published
Pilot 'displayed utmost fortitude, courage and devotion to duty'
By Tom HAWTHORN Special to The Globe and Mail Monday, August 25, 2003 - Page R5
Jack KESLICK, a pilot who won a Distinguished Flying Cross for his several daring bombing missions over Germany in the Second World War, has died in Richmond Hill, Ontario He was 81.
Mr. KESLICK, a flying officer, had several scrapes with disaster, losing engines on two sorties and being hit by flak on two others.
On August 9, 1944, he lost an engine during an attack on a launch site for the V-1 flying bomb at Prouville, France, but managed to return safely to base at Leeming, Yorkshire, home of No. 429 (Bison) Squadron. The following month, he again lost an engine on a mission. Though he had yet to reach his target at Calais on the French coast, Mr. KESLICK continued with his bombing assignment before returning to England.
Four days later, on September 28, a wave of 38 Lancaster and 214 Halifax bombers was assigned to take out coastal guns at Cap Gris Nez. Many crews had to return with their bombs because of poor weather, but Mr. KESLICK was able to strike the target.
On October 12, Mr. KESLICK's Halifax was hit by flak while joining 95 others in a sortie against oil plants at Wanne-Eickel, Germany. His plane was not seriously damaged.
His crew also took part in the massive attack on the Wilhelmshaven naval base on the night of October 15-16, as 119 Halifaxes and 19 Lancasters dropped more than one million pounds of incendiaries and high explosives on the port city.
From July 28 to November 6, 1944, Mr. KESLICK logged more than 165 hours of flight on 31 sorties, but his most harrowing mission was yet to be flown. On November 24, his bomber was one of a baker's dozen on a mining operation on the Kattegat, the strait separating Denmark and Sweden. His Halifax was hit by flak, damaging the bomb bay and the starboard outer engine. He nursed his Halifax back to Scotland.
John Leask KESLICK was born in Toronto on May 25, 1922. He enlisted on July 29, 1942, and had been promoted to pilot officer by the time he left military service.
He was presented his medal at Government House in Ottawa by Governor-General Vincent MASSEY in 1953, according to research by the military historian Hugh HALLIDAY. The citation noted that Mr. KESLICK had "invariably displayed the utmost fortitude, courage and devotion to duty."
Mr. KESLICK died of congestive heart failure at Richmond Hill, Ontario, on July 15. He leaves a son, a daughter and a sister. He was predeceased by his wife, Evelyn.

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MASSEY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-11-17 published
Died This Day -- Daniel MASSEY, 1856
Monday, November 17, 2003 - Page R5
Farmer and manufacturer born at Windsor, Vt., on February 24, 1798; Farmed near Cobourg, Upper Canada; 1847, took interest in farm machinery and invested in foundry at Bond Head; 1849, moved to Newcastle to establish Newcastle Foundry and Machine Manufactory that, under son Hart MASSEY, later became Massey-Harris Co. and then Massey-Ferguson; global manufacturer of farm implements.

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MASSICOTTE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-10-02 published
He fought the Teamsters -- and won
Worker won protection for part-timers in a court battle that involved the most powerful union in North America
By James McCREADY Special to The Globe and Mail Thursday, October 2, 2003 - Page R13
Gerry MASSICOTTE was a man who didn't like being pushed around, and one of his fights made him famous, at least for a while. He won a precedent-setting case involving unfair labour practices, not just against his employer but also the Teamsters, the most powerful union in North America. The legal battle lasted about three years, in what was mostly a one-man fight in a case that was heard in the Supreme Court of Canada.
He didn't take no for an answer when the union said it wouldn't handle his grievance, insisting that he deserved better because he had paid his dues.
"His fight was based on the simple principle of taxation without representation," said Ray KUSZELEWSKI, now a Halifax lawyer but back in the late 1970s another Teamster with a problem with the union. The Teamsters not only refused to represent Mr. MASSICOTTE, but it negotiated a lower wage, from $6.85 an hour to $6, in Mr. MASSICOTTE, who has died at the age of 55, was a man who could not be pigeonholed. He had a degree in social work and worked as a professional for more than 10 years before the intensity of the work forced him to leave.
Gerald Manley MASSICOTTE was born on October 22, 1947, in Toronto. His father worked at the Post Office, his mother worked in restaurants. Eventually she ended up owning her own place, The New Brazil, at Runnymede and St. Clair in Toronto. Later, Mr. MASSICOTTE and his wife, Elaine, would take it over.
Mr. MASSICOTTE went to Runnymede Collegiate and graduated with a degree in social work from Ryerson Polytechnical Institute. He worked for many years as a social worker in group homes for children and in halfway houses. He then took on part-time work, including a stint at Humes Transport, loading refrigerated trucks. He did that for 2½ years, before he was fired.
That started his long crusade against the Teamsters. On Aug.16, 1979, he filed a grievance asking his union to protest his firing.
"I claim that I have been unjustly terminated and must be reinstated immediately," began his grievance letter to local 938 of the Teamsters. The answer came back that the union would not represent him, and that he had no protection as a part-time employee, in spite of paying union dues of $18 a month.
At the time, Mr. MASSICOTTE and others were unhappy with the way the Teamsters were run and he set out to prove that it did him wrong.
The case went to the Canada Labour Relations Board. The union argued that the safe, clean environment it negotiated with Humes Transport was a great benefit for a part-timer like Mr. MASSICOTTE. The union also informed him that his pay would be lowered so the company could pay full-time employees more. In late January, 1980, the Labour Relations Board ruled in favour of Mr. MASSICOTTE, ordering the union to pay costs. But the Teamsters wouldn't quit. The union took the case to the Federal Court of Appeal in October, 1980, but lost.
"The union and the employer have established the price of their labour, and in MASSICOTTE's case, reduced that price drastically without asking him," wrote the court.
The case went to the Supreme Court, and the Chief Justice, Bora LASKIN, confirmed the lower court's ruling in May, 1982.
"It was one of the few cases in which a union member took his union to court for not representing him," said Brian IHLER, the lawyer who worked with him on the case.
It set a precedent that all unions in Canada would have to represent all their dues-paying members.
By the time the Supreme Court ruling came down, Mr. MASSICOTTE had moved on with his life. A keen cook, he took courses at George Brown College. He also became well-known again, but for his food this time. He renamed his mother's restaurant, the Northland Truck Stop and Café.
Mr. MASSICOTTE later moved into his wife's father's business, selling and servicing small pumps, used soft-drink machines and even kidney dialysis machines. He and his wife ran the company, Potter-Blersh. He died of cancer on July 15.
Gerry MASSICOTTE leaves wife Elaine BLERSH; siblings Debbie, Jeff, Ron and Jim; and mother Joan.

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MASSON o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-07-02 published
HILLSON
-In loving memory of Maxwell Alexander "Bud" Hillson, who passed away at the age of 77 years. Husband of the late Katherine "Kay" (TURINECK,) July 4, 1999.
You had a smile for everyone
You had a heart of gold
You left the sweetest memories
This world could ever hold
No one knows how much we miss you
No one knows the bitter pain
We have suffered since we lost you
Life has never been the same
Those we love don't go away
They walk beside us every day
Unseen, unheard but always near
Still loved, still missed and very dear.
A father's legacy is not riches
possessions or worldly goods
It's the way he lived,
the lives he touched, the promises he kept
It's the man he was
Your life, Dad was a job well done
and now you have left us to be with Mom.
Loving father of Bernadine, husband Phillip HARRIS of Ottawa, Maxine, husband Ronald ALBERTS of London, Edward of Little Current, Roseanne of Calgary and Kevin of Little Current. Remembered by brothers Maxime, wife Shirley, Randolph wife Helen. By sisters Marie, husband Gene ARMOUR, Agnes CARDINAL, Rita DUNDON, Judith, husband Wifred GUAY, Georgina GAGNON and Dorothy MASSON.

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MASSUCCI o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-05-09 published
He was a daredevil footballer in the days of leather helmets
By Tom HAWTHORN Special to The Globe and Mail Friday, May 9, 2003 - Page R11
Norris LINDSAY, a teammate of Ormond BEACH and Bummer STIRLING on the storied Sarnia Imperials football team, has died in Petrolia, Ontario He was 94.
At 6-foot-3, 220-pounds, he was a big man in the era of leather helmets and earned a reputation for his flying tackles, a daredevil play that has long since fallen out of favour. In lieu of salary as a two-way player, Mr. LINDSAY and his teammates were guaranteed jobs with Canadian Oil Companies Ltd.
Mr. LINDSAY helped the Imperials win the Ontario Rugby Football Union champioship in 1933 and 1934 over Balmy Beach, St. Michael's College and the Hamilton Tigers.
In 1933, the Imperials played host to the 1933 Grey Cup championship against the Toronto Argonauts. Despite his regular-season contributions, coach Pat OUELLETTE did not have Mr. LINDSAY suit up for the big game, which was won 4-3 by Toronto in the lowest-scoring Grey Cup ever played.
Mr. LINDSAY was frustrated again the following year, when coach Art MASSUCCI did not place him on the Imperials' roster for the Grey Cup final. Sarnia defeated the Regina Roughriders 20-12 at Toronto. Among Mr. LINDSAY's teammates wearing the three-starred sweater of the Imperials were Mr. BEACH, a sensational halfback kicker Hugh (Bummer) STIRLING of Saint Thomas, Ontario; rugged snapper Boob MOLLOY; and, the speedy Norm PERRY, known as The Galloping Ghost.
Mr. LINDSAY, who was born in Tupperville, Ontario, near Chatham in southwestern Ontario, was also a gifted golfer who entered the 1940 Canadian Open. "He told me his first shot went out of bounds, said Pat SUTHERLAND, a friend. "By the time he was done, he had shot an 11 on the first hole."
Mr. LINDSAY, an amateur, shot an embarrassing 93 on the par-71 course, following with a 90. The tournament was won in a playoff by the legendary American golfer Sam SNEAD. Shortly after, Mr. LINDSAY joined the merchant marine and was a radio operator during the Second World War. In peacetime, he took over the Blue Bay Lodge near Huntsville, Ontario, which he operated until 1963.
Mr. LINDSAY golfed until late in life. When his local club opened a new clubhouse, he rented the old one and made it his home. He died on March 11 at the Lambton Meadowview Villa in Petrolia, 10 days after marking his 94th birthday. He was predeceased by his wife, Bette, who died in 1965.

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MASSY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-09-04 published
Died This Day -- 269 airline passengers, 1983
Thursday, September 4, 2003 - Page R9
All aboard Korean Air Lines flight 007 killed when plane shot down by Soviet fighter after straying into Soviet airspace; dead included nine Canadians: Mary Jane HENDRIE of Sault Ste. Marie, Ontario; George PANAGOPOULOS, Marilou COVEY, Chun Lan YEH and San-Gi LIM, all of Toronto; François DE MASSY and François ROBERT of Montreal; Larry SAYERS of Stoney Creek, Ontario; and Rev. Jean-Paul GRÉGOIRE, a Tokyo resident.

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MASTEN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-05-22 published
Died This Day -- Four Ontario boaters, 1986
Thursday, May 22, 2003 - Page R7
Toronto police abandon search for 16-foot boat and occupants lost off Scarborough on Lake Ontario; Mark SMITH, 28, Patricia HEYS, 21, James MASTEN, 20, and Kim MASTEN (Mark's sister,) 20, last seen early May 4, 1986, when boat launched at local marina official and longer private search inexplicably found only a washed-up jacket and a cooler.

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MASTROMARTINO o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-11-04 published
HEFFERON, Margaret Jane
Died suddenly on Monday, November 3, 2003 in her 72nd year, at St. Michael's Hospital, Toronto, Ontario. Survived by her husband Dennis, sons Michael (wife Kathleen) and Thomas (wife Patricia), her daughter Kathleen (husband Jed LIPPERT) and her 2 loving grandchildren Colin and Rory. She is also survived by 3 sisters, Maureen (husband Ted LORIMER,) Patricia (husband Robert RIDDELL) and Linda (husband Mario MASTROMARTINO) and 2 brothers, Jim KERNAGHAN (wife Carol) and John KERNAGHAN (wife Michelle.) Her life was devoted to the care of people in her career as a nurse (Toronto East General Hospital) and as a public health nurse (Durham Region). Since her retirement she helped found the Caring Alliance to help the homeless and was a dedicated visitor to and supporter of housing for disadvantaged families living in motels. She will be sorely missed by her family, her Friends and the many whose lives she touched. Visitation will be held at the ''Scarborough Chapel'' of McDougall and Brown, 2900 Kingston Road (east of St. Clair Avenue East), on Wednesday, November 5th from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Funeral service will be held on Thursday, November 6th at 11 a.m. from Washington United Church. Interment will be private. As expressions of sympathy, donations made to St. Michael's Hospital Foundation would be appreciated.

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MASTROUTUCCI o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-02-22 published
CURRIE, Alda Christina (née MAIR)
(1932-2003) We regret to announce the death of our mother and friend, she died peacefully at home surrounded by family and Friends. She was predeceased by her husband James CURRIE (1991.) Alda was a loving, caring, compassionate person and will be missed by many her children Bob (Charlotte YATES,) Andy (Rose CHAN,) Mary (John WOOD), Stewart, John (Elizabeth MASTROUTUCCI), and her seven much loved grand children, and her siblings, Arlington MAIR and Kathleen BURSEY, and much loved by her in-laws. During her illness Alda was cared for by her cousin Mary Ann DEACON and her sister Kathleen, and supported by her family and Friends. A Service to celebrate Alda's life will be held at the Beaconsfield United Church, 202 Woodside Road, Beaconsfield, Quebec at 1 p.m. on Monday, February 24, 2003. Donations in her name may be made to the Canadian Cancer Society, and the Victoria Order of Nurses, and Child Haven.

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MASUHARA o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-29 published
Sheila Anne HAMILTON Sept. 18, 1930 - Feb. 26, 2003
Sheila Anne HAMILTON died unexpectedly in her daughter's Ocala, Florida home following surgery on a broken leg. She lived until the 1970s in Hamilton and Ancaster, Ontario, where her family owned Royal Oak Dairy. She is survived and greatly missed by her son Scott McKEE of Courtenay, British Columbia, her daughter Jane HAMILTON and Jane's spouse Joy MASUHARA, both of Vancouver, her granddaughters Sarah HAMILTON of Japan and Meghann HAMILTON of Vancouver, and her daughter Sally McKEE and grand_son Corey THOMAS of Ocala, Florida, along with her brother, Donald HAMILTON and his wife Pat HAMILTON of Burlington, Ontario, several cousins, her late sister Jane's husband, Fred WRIGHT and their five children, especially Liza ALLAN. She was an Registered Nurse Anesthetist and Licensed Practical Nurse as well as a master seamstress with her own business selling children's heirloom clothing. She was keenly interested in interior design and was a master chef along with a skilled gardener who most loved red roses. She had an infectious sense of humour and a true zest for living. Services were private. Cremation was followed by the scattering of her ashes at sea off Key Largo. Donations in lieu of flowers may be made to the Humane Society.

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