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"MAN" 2003 Obituary


MANCHEE  MANCINI  MANDAMIN  MANDEL  MANDELA  MANDIGO  MANESE  MANITOWABI  MANN  MANNINEN  MANNING  MANNIS  MANSEAU  MANUEL  MANULA  MANUS 

MANCHEE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-07-30 published
Melva MANCHEE
By Janice MANCHEE, page A16
Wife, mother, folk music supporter, fundraiser. Born January 15, 1921, in Montreal. Died May 15 in Ottawa, of cancer, aged Melva MANCHEE had a wonderful, wry sense of humour. Even as cancer wore her away, she invited the neighbourhood children to move in if their parents bothered them too much. When her doctor visited, she'd warn him to stay healthy for his most important patient and she never forgot to remind her children that the cat inherited everything on her death. She had the eyes of a thinker, but then there was that quirky, humorous mouth.
Melva was born in Montreal. Early pictures show her on her toes pirouetting across the lawn, and in cross-country skiing gear boldly setting out across Montreal parkland. When Melva was 14, her family moved to Toronto, where her father, Joe LAING became plant manager for Canada Malting Co. She left behind two large, extended families for life in a strange city, with only her younger brother for company. In Toronto, Melva entered Havergal College, a private girls' school, as a day student.
During her Havergal years, Melva began to date Eric MANCHEE. They continued dating while she attended Trinity College at University of Toronto, where she specialized in household sciences. The Second World War only temporarily delayed their marriage until 1945. The couple's first two children, Rod and Ellen, were born in Toronto and the small family moved west to Edmonton where Eric took a job with the oil industry. A third child, Janice, was born shortly after the move.
Melva was not a big fan of either the West or the oil industry he said the wind was always blowing out there, but it was the Americanization of the West by the oil industry that really upset her. And she didn't hesitate to let her views be known.
The couple became involved in the small folk music community in Edmonton and played host to Peggy SEEGER, Pete's sister and the woman for whom the song Black is the Colour of My True Love's Hair was written. This interest in folk music and concern for Canadian culture was not particularly popular in Alberta and Melva was happy when Eric took a job with the federal government in Ottawa in the early 1960s.
This began as a period of relative tranquility for Melva, but the late 1960s changed all that. Melva patiently and lovingly supported her children as they protested for peace and against war; her daughters became "liberated women" and generally pushed the envelope, as baby boomers then did.
Melva's concern for the children of the sixties went beyond her own. At that time, medical institutions, in particular hospitals, were not providing sensitive or supportive care for young people experimenting with street drugs. As a result, young people organized to assist each other with medical problems and one of their initiatives in Ottawa was to set up a street clinic. Melva worked on findraising and providing nutritional information and resources to street kids through the diet dispensary project. Since that begining, the clinic has developed into Ottawa's Centretown Community Health Centre, a large, forward-thinking and well-respected community health service.
Melva loved words. She was one of those rare non-visual crossword players. She could sit back in her chair, close her eyes, hear the clue and the space configuration and simply give you the answer. She was an avid reader and collector of Canadian fiction. Robertson Davies and Timothy Pindlay were two of her favourite authors.
When Melva was told she had terminal cancer, she gathered and considered all the information. Then she made her decision: let nature take its course. But while nature was doing its thing, she did hers. She toured Ottawa's museums and art galleries one more time and waited for the spring flowers. In April, they came.
Janice MANCHEE is Melva's daughter.

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MANCINI o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-11-11 published
MANCINI, Frank
Of Toronto died peacefully November 10, 2003 at the age of 83. Beloved husband of Luisa, devoted father of John and Susan, loving grandfather of Kimberly, Stephanie, David, Michael and Justin and adored father-in-law of Alexandra and Paul. His memory will be cherished by all. Visitation at Heritage Funeral Centre, 50 Overlea Blvd. (416) 423-1000 will begin Tuesday, November 11 from 7 to 9 p.m. Wednesday November 12 from 2 to 4 and 7 to 9 p.m. Funeral Mass will be held at Holy Cross Church (Donlands and Cosburn) on Thursday November 13 at 10: 00 a.m. followed by entombment at Holy Cross Cemetery. If desired, donations to the Heart and Stroke Foundation or the Canadian National Institute for the Blind would be appreciated by the family.

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MANDAMIN o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-09-10 published
Theodore " Ted" Ernest MANITOWABI
Theodore " Ted" Ernest MANITOWABI of Wikwemikong passed away peacefully at the Manitoulin Health Centre, Little Current surrounded by his family on Wednesday, September 3rd, 2003 in his 71st year.
Beloved husband of Yvonne (née PANGOWISH) at home. Loving father of Calvin (wife Gloria) of Lansing, Michigan, Marlene (friend Gary) of Spanish, Yvette, Benita, Barbara (husband Eugene PELTIER,) Patricia (husband Mark TRUDEAU,) Mavis (friend Chuck) all of Wikwemikong.
Will be sadly missed by 13 grandchildren, Stevie Rae, Calvin Jr., James, Jacqueline, Beedahbin, Nawautin, Jewel, Elliot, Tracy, Mark Jr., Trisha, Harley and Jayden and his special pal "Otis". son of the late Samuel and Isabelle (née TRUDEAU) MANITOWABI and stepson of the late Harriet (née TRUDEAU) MANITOWABI. Son-in-law of the late Joachim and Nancy (née ROY) PANGOWISH. Dear brother-in-law of Wayne and Verna OSAWAMICK. Dear brother of Nancy RECOLLET, Rene, Julian and Louie G. MANITOWABI, Connie and Marina PITAWANAKWAT, Tina and Caroline MANDAMIN, Elizabeth ABEL, Mary WEMIGWANS, Frances SHAWANDA and the late Wildred and Gertrude MANITOWABI. Dear uncle and great uncle of many nieces and nephews. Godfather to Veda (née MANITOWABI) TRUDEAU and Louie AGOUNIE. Ted provided for his family and worked for many years with Algoma Steel, Inco and as a self employed logger. He enjoyed life to the fullest with his children and grandchildren after retiring. He loved gardening, camping, fishing, baseball, curling and hockey. He especially enjoyed watching his son and grandchildren play the game of hockey he loved so much and just being with all his grandchildren as he watched with pride, always smiling. Rested at the Holy Cross Mission Roman Catholic Church, Wikwemikong on Thursday, September 4th from 2: 00 p.m. Funeral Mass from the Holy Cross Mission Church was on Saturday, September 6th at 11: 00 a.m. with Father D. McCarthy officiating. Interment in the Wikwemikong Cemetery.

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MANDEL o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-05-03 published
MANDEL, Robert

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MANDELA o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-11-26 published
A scholar and a gentle man
'Fine example of a great Canadian' who founded Ontario's Brock University was once private secretary to prime minister Mackenzie KING
By Ron CSILLAG, Special to The Globe and Mail Wednesday, November 26, 2003 - Page R9
In an almost Zen-like fashion, James GIBSON knew the value of not acting. In the late 1960s, when a group of student radicals seized part of Brock University, hoping to be dragged away kicking and screaming, Dr. GIBSON, who had helped found the institution a few years earlier, reacted in a way no other university president did when faced with the same problem: He did nothing. The protesters, he reasoned, may have had legitimate grievances, but their unseemly actions offended his firm sense of propriety. In time, the students simply went away.
It was an effective, though uncharacteristic, action for a man who embodied Brock's Latin motto: "Surgite," freely translated as "push on." That he did, through some 65 rich years of advancing higher education and in public service, most notably as a private secretary to former prime minister Mackenzie KING, whose penchant for soothsaying and assorted eccentricities Dr. GIBSON kept mainly to himself until later in life.
Just five days before his death in Ottawa on October 23 at the age of 91, Dr. GIBSON was doing what he loved: Watching a new group of graduates receive their diplomas at the fall convocation of Brock University in St. Catharines, Ontario, the school he had launched as founding president in 1963.
At a recent memorial service at Brock, David ATKINSON, the university's president and vice-chancellor, recalled a man whose attributes a strong moral fibre, clarity of thought and a general uprightness, all tempered by a warm and gentle touch -- harkened to a quaint, bygone era. "It's unlikely we will meet anyone like him again," Dr. ATKINSON said.
In the House of Commons on October 27, Dr. GIBSON was praised by St. Catharines Liberal member of parliament Walt LASTEWKA as "a fine example of a great Canadian."
Dr. GIBSON, whose knowledge of Canadian history and government were legend, was in the news this past summer as the oldest of over 1,000 Rhodes Scholars who flew to England for a five-day bash honouring the centenary of the trust. With his brother William, also a Rhodes Scholar, Dr. GIBSON dedicated a re-leaded stained-glass window at the chapel of Oxford's New College.
A normally discreet man, he had sharp words for former prime minister Brian MULRONEY, not an Oxford graduate, who surprised guests at the alumni dinner -- and raised a few eyebrows -- when he took a seat on the podium alongside Oxonians Bill CLINTON and Tony BLAIR, and guest Nelson MANDELA. Many alumni, Dr. GIBSON included, felt that Mr. MULRONEY, who had been invited by The Independent newspaper chain, had no business being there. Though upset, Dr. GIBSON retained his dignity, saying simply, "I was offended."
James Alexander GIBSON was born in Ottawa, in 1912, to Canadian-born parents of Irish-Scottish stock with strong Methodist and Quaker leanings. Raised in Victoria, he graduated with a B.A. in history from the University of British Columbia at age 18. Less than a year later, he was one of the youngest boys at Oxford.
"That was the real dividing line in my life," he told The Globe and Mail last July. "The economic depression was beginning to take over and some of the graduates in my year at University of British Columbia ended up digging ditches, but I had a guaranteed income for three years."
The annual stipend was only £400 but it enabled Dr. GIBSON to live comfortably and travel to the rest of Europe when he wasn't studying modern history, debating in the Oxford Union Society and keeping wicket for the New College cricket squad, the Nomads.
Back in Ottawa and armed with a doctorate in history, he joined the Department of External Affairs. On his second day on the job, he was whisked to the prime minister's office for a six-month secondment that lasted nine years. Mr. KING, who was also External Affairs minister, blocked Dr. GIBSON's promotions to postings abroad three times because "he told me I stopped him getting into trouble."
The prime minister was a notorious taskmaster, calling on his assistant to work most evenings and weekends to draft letters and speeches. Throughout, "Dad never complained about anything," said his daughter Julia MATTHEWS. " But as he got older, he loosened up a little."
According to his daughter, he came to describe the famously erratic leader as "a very grumpy man and a very lonely man, insensitive, and quite damaging to work for."
Ultimately, it occurred to the clan that perhaps the unmarried prime minister was simply jealous of Dr. GIBSON's status as a beloved family man and father of three children. "Whenever we went on a family holiday, Dad always got called back," remembered Ms. MATTHEWS.
But a high point came in the spring of 1945, when Dr. GIBSON accompanied Mr. KING and 380 other delegates to San Francisco and the founding of the United Nations. During the historic two-month conference, Dr. GIBSON got personal glimpses of such leaders as the Soviet Union's Andrei GROMYKO and Britain's Anthony EDEN, but the task at hand, he later recalled, was to keep the Canadian prime minister "on the rails."
Fearing he would never advance in the public service, Dr. GIBSON resigned in 1947 and took a teaching post at Ottawa's Carleton University, where he later served as the first dean of arts and science and deputy to the president. By the early 1960s, he was courted by a group of community leaders in the Niagara peninsula to establish Brock University. When he began as founding president, the school had seven faculty (known as "the magnificent seven"), 29 students and a "library" consisting of a shelf of books. Today, it boasts more than 15,000 students and 47,000 alumni.
His first order of business at Brock was the creation of a library.
Now housed in the campus's Schmon Tower, it has become something of a landmark on the Niagara Escarpment. Dr. GIBSON, fondly known by faculty as "James A.," remained as Brock's president until 1974. He was named to the Order of Canada in 1992, and the library was named after him in 1996.
He was also a leading figure in the Unitarian faith, serving for a time as chaplain of the Unitarian Congregation of Niagara.
Asked what dinner-table conversation was like at home, Ms. MATTHEWS sighed good-naturedly. "Oh, God. There was a lot of current events. He had all the answers. He was always lecturing, but he could be really charming." Even after his vision started to fail, he travelled, read and wrote. "He never felt old."
After moving from his beloved St. Catharines to an Ottawa retirement home, Dr. GIBSON lectured residents on "governors-general I have known."
Dr. GIBSON was predeceased by his wife of 57 years, Caroline (née STEIN,) and leaves three children, seven grandchildren, two great-grandchildren, his brother, and a sister, Isobel SEARLS.
His final days were summed up poetically by Josephine MEEKER, a former professor at Brock. After attending the university's convocation last month, Dr. GIBSON "went for a long walk, returned to his residence, went into the lounge area, took off his coat and folded it up, put it on the back of his chair, sat down, folded his hands in his lap, closed his eyes, and died."

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MANDIGO o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-10-29 published
Betty Jane VANHORN (née HOWARD)
In loving memory of Betty Jane VANHORN (née Howard,) October 28, 1935 to October 26, 2003. Suddenly at Mindemoya Hospital on Sunday, October 26, 2003 at the age of 67 years.
Dear wife of John VANHORN of Tehkummah. Loving mother of Hector (Marilyn) of Ice Lake, Jacqueline (Ted) of Cambridge, Becky (Marvin) of Manitowaning, predeceased by Barry (1981), Gilbert (1979). Special grandmother of Tammy, D.J., Tobi (Andy), B.J., Ariana, Tyler, Benjamin, Mikala and two great grandchildren Angelica and Logan John. Will be remembered by siblings, Eleanor (Len) BOND, Tina (Roy) MANDIGO, Dorothy ALLARD, Reta (Charlie) PARKINSON, Lawrence HOWARD, Marie (John) CARRADONNA, Len (Ilene) HOWARD, Tom (Florence) HOWARD. Visitation was held on Tuesday, October 28, 2003.
Funeral Service at 2: 00 pm Wednesday, October 29, 2003 at Island Funeral Home. Burial in Elmview Cemetery.

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MANESE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-09-02 published
MANESE, William Gerald

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MANITOWABI o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-01-08 published
Donald Gregor McGREGOR
In loving memory of Donald Gregor McGREGOR, December 17, 1931 to December 20, 2002.
Donald Gregor McGREGOR Senior of Whitefish River First Nation, Birch Island who passed on to the Spirit World on Friday, December 20, 2002 at the Manitoulin Health Centre at the age of 71 years. Known for his gentle spirit and kind sense of humour, he enjoyed spending time with his family, fishing, hunting, bingo and home projects. He worked for E. B. Eddy for 20 years before retiring in 1996. He also served several terms as Band Councillor on the Whitefish River Band Council and was President of St. Gabriel's Parish Council for many years. He was honoured as an Elder and Eagle Staff Carrier of Whitefish River First Nation. He was of the Eagle Clan and his Ojibway name he proudly carried was Ogimas, given to him by his father when he was a young lad. He played many years with the Sheguiandah Bears and was an avid supporter of minor hockey. Much beloved husband of 41 years and best friend of Mary Grace (nee MANITOWABI.) Loving and cherished father of Lucy Ann (husband Donald TRUDEAU) of Blind River, Patty (husband Leon LIGHTNING) of Hobbema, Alberta, Donald (wife Sandrah RECOLLET) and Kiki (husband Stephen PELLETIER) of Birch Island and Christopher WAHSQUONAIKEZHIK (wife Carol) of Sudbury. Proud and very loving grandfather of Donnelley, Kigen, Akeshia, Paskwawmotosis, Donald, Assinyawasis, Anthony, Kihiwawasis, Kianna Rae, Waasnode, Christina, Charles and Christopher. Survived by sisters Lillian McGREGOR of Toronto, Shirley McGREGOR of Birch Island and brother Peter McGREGOR of Nova Scotia and brother-in-law Roman BILASH. Also survived by brothers-in-law David (Linda), Ron (Nikki), Dominic (Brenda), and sisters-in-law Veronica (Andrew,) Rosie GAUVREAU (Gordon) and Medora(Don). Predeceased by parents Augustine and Victoria and in-laws David and Agatha MANITOWABI. Also predeceased by brothers Robert E. McGREGOR, Allan A. McGREGOR, and sister, Mary JACKO, Colleen FONT, Estelle CYWINK, Violet BONADIO and Olive McGREGOR and sister-in-law Shirley MANITOWABI McKAY. He was also a special uncle to 67 nieces and nephews.
Rested at the Whitefish River Community Centre. Funeral Mass was held at St. Gabriel's Lalamant Church, Birch Island on Tuesday, December 24, 2002 with Father Mike STROGRE officiating. Arrangements entrusted to the Lougheed Funeral Home.

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MANITOWABI o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-02-19 published
MANITOWABI
-In memory of our dad and grandpa, Vincent, who passed away February 24, 1996.
There is a bridge of memories
From here to heaven above
That keeps you very close to us
It's called a bridge of love
As time goes on without you
and days turn into years,
They hold a million memories
And a thousand silent tears.
To us you were very special
What more is there to say,
Except to wish with all our hearts
That you were here today.
-Sadly missed by Daniel, Maxie, Richard, Mary Agnes, Veda, Mabel, Darline, Elizabeth and grandchildren

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MANITOWABI o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-09-10 published
Theodore " Ted" Ernest MANITOWABI
Theodore " Ted" Ernest MANITOWABI of Wikwemikong passed away peacefully at the Manitoulin Health Centre, Little Current surrounded by his family on Wednesday, September 3rd, 2003 in his 71st year.
Beloved husband of Yvonne (née PANGOWISH) at home. Loving father of Calvin (wife Gloria) of Lansing, Michigan, Marlene (friend Gary) of Spanish, Yvette, Benita, Barbara (husband Eugene PELTIER,) Patricia (husband Mark TRUDEAU,) Mavis (friend Chuck) all of Wikwemikong.
Will be sadly missed by 13 grandchildren, Stevie Rae, Calvin Jr., James, Jacqueline, Beedahbin, Nawautin, Jewel, Elliot, Tracy, Mark Jr., Trisha, Harley and Jayden and his special pal "Otis". son of the late Samuel and Isabelle (née TRUDEAU) MANITOWABI and stepson of the late Harriet (née TRUDEAU) MANITOWABI. Son-in-law of the late Joachim and Nancy (née ROY) PANGOWISH. Dear brother-in-law of Wayne and Verna OSAWAMICK. Dear brother of Nancy RECOLLET, Rene, Julian and Louie G. MANITOWABI, Connie and Marina PITAWANAKWAT, Tina and Caroline MANDAMIN, Elizabeth ABEL, Mary WEMIGWANS, Frances SHAWANDA and the late Wildred and Gertrude MANITOWABI. Dear uncle and great uncle of many nieces and nephews. Godfather to Veda (née MANITOWABI) TRUDEAU and Louie AGOUNIE. Ted provided for his family and worked for many years with Algoma Steel, Inco and as a self employed logger. He enjoyed life to the fullest with his children and grandchildren after retiring. He loved gardening, camping, fishing, baseball, curling and hockey. He especially enjoyed watching his son and grandchildren play the game of hockey he loved so much and just being with all his grandchildren as he watched with pride, always smiling. Rested at the Holy Cross Mission Roman Catholic Church, Wikwemikong on Thursday, September 4th from 2: 00 p.m. Funeral Mass from the Holy Cross Mission Church was on Saturday, September 6th at 11: 00 a.m. with Father D. McCarthy officiating. Interment in the Wikwemikong Cemetery.

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MANITOWABI o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-10-29 published
Josephine "Joyce" RENAUD
In loving memory of Josephine "Joyce" RENAUD who passed away peacefully on Friday, October 24, 2003 at Manitoulin Health Centre at the age of 74 years.
Daughter of Michael Sr. and Sophie MANITOWABI (predeceased.) Predeceased by dear friend Wesley GORDON " Bud" from Sault. Ste. Marie, Michigan. Loved sister of Margaret JACKSON (Robert predeceased) of Manitowaning, Michael MANITOWABI (predeceased 1986,) Alphonse MANITOWABI of Toronto, and Betty CRACK (Mervyn) of Little Current. Joyce was like a mother to her friend Mickie GUERRA and family of Sault Ste. Marie, Michigan. Will be remembered forever by many nieces, nephews, cousins and Friends.
Visitation was held on Sunday, October 26, 2003. Funeral service was held on Monday, October 27, 2003 at Buzwah Church. Burial in Buzwah Cemetery. Island Funeral Home.

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MANN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-05-20 published
STEEL, V.R.J. (Vin)
Born Durban South Africa April 23, 1926, died Toronto, February 19, 2003. Survived by daughters, Melissa and Joanne and son Graeme and brothers John and Cecil. Fondly remembered by Suzanne CURTIS, Marlene and Tin THOMAS, Rosemary MANN, Margaret and Phillip WADE and the OSTROMS.
Oh, I have slipped the surly bonds of earth,
And danced the skies on laughter
-silvered wings.

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MANN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-09-20 published
ACLAND, Virginia (née CONKLIN) 1920-2003
After a full and rich life died Friday, September 19. Ginny will be terribly missed by her immediate family - son Laurence, daughter-in-law Anne, and grandchildren Wesley and Erinn - her great buddies/sisters Barbara KENSILL and Doris MANN and their families and her many Friends and admirers. Many thanks to the caring staff at St. Michael's Hospital.

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MANN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-10-14 published
The 'godfather' of Ottawa's retail auto industry
After more than three decades of hard work, he went on to become the first full-time executive director of the Ottawa New Car Dealers Association
By Randy RAY, Special to The Globe and Mail Tuesday, October 14, 2003 - Page R7
Ottawa -- During a career in the auto industry that spanned more than 50 years, Don MANN was tagged with his share of complimentary nicknames. As a Datsun dealer in Ottawa in the 1960s, 70s and 80s, he was known as "Don Mann, your Datsun Mann," a phrase used in his dealership's advertising.
Later, as executive director of the Ottawa New Car Dealers Association, he was often referred to as the "godfather" of the city's retail auto industry and an "ambassador" for Ottawa's new-car dealers.
When he first started in the automotive business, working with Industrial Acceptance Corporation to help dealers finance their inventory of vehicles, he had a reputation as hard-working, honest and friendly. Mr. MANN died in Ottawa on August 12. He was 76.
Born in Toronto on October 16, 1926, he spent about 15 years working for Industrial Acceptance Corporation in Sudbury, Sarnia, London and Ottawa before deciding to go into the car business for himself. In 1969, he opened Don Mann Datsun Limited in Ottawa. He sold out to an Ottawa General Motors dealer in 1983 and after a brief retirement, joined the Ottawa New Car Dealers Association, becoming the first full-time executive director of the group, which was formed in 1957 with about 25 dealers and now has more than 60 members.
"He was a great ambassador for new car dealers in Ottawa," said Pat McGURN, president of Surgenor Pontiac Buick GMC. "He was the guy who lobbied with a local college to establish training programs for our employees when there was a shortage of qualified people." Over the years, he secured more than $250,000 in dealership training dollars from government, said Mr. McGURN.
"I determine a need, find a trainer, agree upon a program, then I go to the dealers," Mr. MANN once told an interviewer, adding that dealers pay for the programs because there's less training money available from government.
In his capacity as executive director of the car-dealers association, Mr. MANN also worked with the Workplace Safety and Insurance Board to ensure dealers provided healthy and safe working conditions. He worked closely with Algonquin College in Ottawa and Georgian College in Barrie, Ontario, to set up financial awards for top graduates. In 2002, a local apprenticeship committee established a Don Mann Award, given yearly to a major contributor to Ottawa's apprenticeship program.
"Don was the glue that kept things together," said Mr. McGURN. "He made decisions that have made dealers in Ottawa stronger and made things better for consumers." Mr. MANN, who worked as a police officer in Toronto for six years before switching to the automobile business, helped launch the Ottawa-Hull International Auto Show about 20 years ago and over the past two decades built its profile to the point that it now attracts 35,000 visitors. Money raised through the show helps fund training programs, said Mr. McGURN.
Mr. MANN was known for his solid grasp of issues that affect the auto industry at the dealers' level and at the legislative level where laws are constantly changing, said Mr. McGURN, who notes that Mr. MANN's leadership and organizational skills kept local dealers working as a coherent group.
Ever the diplomat, at one point he convinced Ottawa's fiercely competitive car dealers to close on Saturdays during summer long weekends so staff could enjoy a holiday like everyone else. It was also his job to keep dealers current on legislation and guidelines dealing with used-car sales, consumer protection and advertising.
"His forte as executive director of the Car Dealers Association was his access to politicians, and on the education side, his contact with car dealers," said his son Brian of Ottawa. "He knew little about cars when he first started... It took long hours of hard work to build that knowledge.
"He was a great one for the job, he saw his role as an ambassador."
Mr. MANN was also known as someone who could bring people together to get a job done, said his son, whether it was organizing dealers to speak with one voice to governments, or to pull together a golf tournament at the Ottawa Hunt and Golf Club.
Fellow club member Gordon EDWARDS remembers Mr. MANN as an adept snooker player and golfer with great patience.
"He was able to concentrate well, ... he was deliberate and careful, always calculating each shot to make sure he got it right," said Mr. EDWARDS, who played in Mr. MANN's foursome for 17 years.
Mr. MANN leaves wife Verna and children Maureen, Brian and Bruce.

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MANN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-10-31 published
The dean of Canadian sociology
The first chair of a new University of Toronto department trained a generation of scholars
By Carol COOPER, Special to the Globe and Mail Friday, October 31, 2003 - Page R13
In 1938, with a doctorate in political science and anxious to achieve his dream of becoming a professor, Samuel Delbert CLARK reluctantly took the only position available to him at the University of Toronto, as its first full-time lecturer in sociology.
In doing so, S.D. CLARK became one of the country's early anglophone sociologists. During his career, his immense intellect, painstaking scholarship and prolific writing brought credibility and respect to the fledgling discipline. At a time when Canadian universities had few sociology departments, Prof. CLARK trained a generation of sociologists who spread out across the country, establishing sociology departments in other centres. And as an administrator at U of T, Prof. CLARK brought leading sociologists to the school.
The first sociologist born, raised and trained here, Prof. S. D. CLARK has died at the age of 93.
Incorporating the staples theory of his mentor, leading Canadian political economist Harold INNIS, the work of American historian F. J. TURNER, and sociologists Carl DAWSON and E. C. HUGHES of McGill University, among others, Prof. CLARK developed his own approach.
He studied social change on Canada's economic frontiers such as the fur trade, Western wheat farming, and the lumber and mining industries. He traced the development of those communities as the residents there, far from the cultural and financial institutions that controlled their lives and contending with distance and poverty, took their communities through a period of simultaneous disorganization and reorganization. From the struggle emerged new organizations and religious sects, such as the Co-operative Commonwealth Federation and the Social Credit Party.
Reflecting his university training in history, sociology and political science, Prof. CLARK brought a multifaceted approach to his research.
"He looked at things that were happening in Canada almost uniquely and tried to understand them and not to reduce it to some simplistic international generalization," said William MICHELSON, the S. D. Clark professor of sociology at the University of Toronto. "He really wanted to look into a multiplicity of factors."
Not everyone liked Prof. CLARK's approach to sociology, but nor did Prof. CLARK favour the Chicago School approach then taught at McGill University. Although he later altered his research methods, Prof. CLARK at first viewed the American approach dimly, seeing it as one of doorbell-ringing in order to ask stupid questions, one that scientifically quantified what happened in the present without exploring the past. Instead, he pored over archival material, studying the development of Canadian society from a historical perspective.
Books by Prof. CLARK, such as The Social Development of Canada, drew fire from historians, who challenged his theory and said sociology and history were incompatible. But the publications brought attention to the new discipline.
Born to a farming family on February 24, 1910, in Lloydminster, Alberta., Samuel Delbert CLARK was the second of five children. The family of Northern Irish descent had been established in Ontario since 1840 until it moved West in 1905.
Showing an early aptitude for school and a strong interest in history, Prof. CLARK graduated from the University of Saskatchewan with an honours B.A. in history and political science and an M.A. in history. Brushing aside suggestions that he become a high-school teacher and politician, Prof. CLARK aimed instead for a university position.
He entered University of Toronto in 1931 to do a doctorate in political science and economic history. While the studies proved dry and disappointing, it was there that he first met Harold INNIS, read the works of Marx, Engels and North American left-wingers, and attended meetings of the radical League for Social Reconstruction. Disillusioned with his studies and short of funds, Prof. CLARK accepted a Saskatchewan Imperial Order of the Daughters of the Empire scholarship and headed for the London School of Economics in 1932. At the school, he received his first exposure to sociology, including the works of Prof. DAWSON at McGill.
After leaving London in 1933, Prof. CLARK arrived in Montreal, again strapped for cash. Hoping to collect a debt from a friend, who was then studying at McGill, Prof. CLARK stopped by his house. With the friend not home, Prof. CLARK then visited Prof. DAWSON, who offered him a research fellowship. After working on a project studying Canadian-American relations for two years and receiving an M.A. in sociology, Prof. CLARK returned to Toronto to continue his doctorate in political science.
In 1937 he accepted an appointment to teach political science and sociology at the University of Manitoba and stayed a year before returning once again to University of Toronto to complete his thesis and begin his career there.
As a proponent of a more British style of sociology, Prof. CLARK was favoured for the job over another Chicago-trained candidate, setting the academic direction for the school. Sociology was then run as a section under the department of anthropology, to be transferred a year later to the department of political economy. Except for occasional leaves, Prof. CLARK remained a fixture on campus, impeccably dressed in a woollen suit and sporting a pipe, until his retirement in 1976.
Shy and quiet, Prof. CLARK constantly cleared his throat and jingled the change in his pocket while lecturing.
"He never cracked a joke.... It was serious scholarship. You had to ask serious questions," recalled retired York University sociology professor Edward MANN, an early undergraduate student and later a doctoral student of Prof. CLARK. " Their [ INNIS and CLARK] religion was scholarship."
In that vein, Prof. CLARK never talked to the press about daily issues, saying it cheapened the discipline. And he practised rigorous scholarship.
"He had a tremendous amount of integrity," said Lorne TEPPERMAN, a University of Toronto sociology professor and former student of Prof. CLARK. " This was a guy who knew what he stood for, what he believed in. He was uncompromising. He had very high standards for himself and other people."
During the fifties, Prof. CLARK, an admirer of Lester PEARSON, exchanged his membership in the Co-Operative Commonwealth Federation for that of the Liberal Party, the one endorsed by his wife, Rosemary. A graduate in economics from Columbia University, she edited all his works. By the sixties, Prof. CLARK had begun to study social change and urbanization, writing The Suburban Society and later, The New Urban Poor. Despite altering his research methods, dropping his historical research and adopting the American style of conducting questionnaires to collect data, he stopped short of tabulating them, arguing in The Suburban Society that "to lay claim to scientific precision... would be to falsify the competence of sociology."
And the man who studied social change became buffeted by it. While the sociology section had remained small during the forties and fifties, it ballooned during the sixties, becoming an independent department in 1963 with Prof. CLARK as its appointed head.
A capable administrator, Prof. CLARK brought feistiness to the job. "He was a very honest man," said Prof. TEPPERMAN. "He wasn't afraid on an argument, he wasn't afraid of a fight. If he liked you, he really liked you and if he didn't like you, he really didn't like you."
With the huge increase in sociology-department enrolment but small number of sociology graduates, Prof. CLARK looked outside the country to fill teaching positions. Most either came from the United States, or had been trained there.
While some scholars hailed Prof. CLARK for having eschewed American-style sociology and maintaining a Canadian approach, the young and sometimes radical newcomers with a markedly different approach regarded him as an oddball and an anachronism. And as an older, white, staunch Liberal Party-supporting male at the centre of an old-boy network, he represented everything they were fighting against. Accustomed to a more democratic academic culture at other schools, the new staff agitated for a greater say in the running of the department. When Prof. CLARK resisted, he was pushed out, and the chair became an elected position. He remained at the university until his retirement in 1976.
Outside of the university, throughout his career, Prof. CLARK served as an editor of The Canadian Journal of Economics and Political Science, and as president of the Royal Society of Canada. In addition, he was appointed an Officer in the Order of Canada.
Despite the recognition he received, Prof. CLARK always felt that his older brother who took over the farm was the family success, according to his son, Edmund. And he enjoyed such simple pleasures as hockey. Once, while attending a dinner party at Claude BISSELL's house, then the president of U of T, Prof. CLARK asked where the television was and sat down to watch the hockey game. When questioned later, Prof. CLARK replied, "Anyone stupid enough to hold a party on a hockey night deserved to have the guests watch television in the den."
S.D. CLARK died on September 18. He leaves his wife, Rosemary, sons Edmund and Samuel, nine grandchildren and a sister, Grace. His daughter Ellen predeceased him.

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MANNINEN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-11 published
TERDIK, Joseph (Superintendent, Peel Regional Police, Ret'd) Joe died December 9th, with dignity, in the warmth of his family's love. He was most proud of his service to the community of Mississauga/Peel the officers he commanded and his warm Friendship with Hazel. An Federal Bureau of Investigation Graduate (Pres. Fit. Award), Medal of Bravery (Miss. Disaster, Personnel Deployment) Exemplary Service Award, Exec. Officer to the Chief, Cmdr. 11 Div., Cmdr. Spec. Services, Crim. Intel. Bureau, Cdn Police College Lecturer, Author: Mgmt. Audit Manual, founding Pres. Sr. Officers Assoc. Born Windsor, March 1943, resident in Peel till 1997, adoring husband of Barbara DOWDALL- TERDIK, father of Robert (Jessica, Meaghan, Ashley); Jodey (Paul) LITTLE (Caleb, Taelor); Susan CORNWELL; Proud son of John (dec.) and Irene TERDIK, brother of Bill (Karen;) John (Donna) Irene (Aimo) MANNINEN. Cherished brother-in-law to David (Paul); Susan (Shane); Peggy (Don, Tom, Mimi) Catherine (Rob, Graeme, Iain, Allison, Colleen) and special Joanna DOWDALL. Friends will be received at the C. Stuart Sykes Funeral Home, 91 Division St. S., Kingsville from 2: 00 to 4:00 p.m. and 7: 00 to 9:00 p.m., Friday. Funeral service from the funeral home Saturday, December 13th at 11: 00 a.m. Remembrances: Palliative Care, Hotel-Dieu Grace Hospital, 1030 Ouellette Ave., Windsor, Ontario N9A 1E1

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MANNING o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-08-09 published
Mary Catharine JONES (née STALEY) Died 3 August 2003
Peacefully, in Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, at home surrounded by her loving family.
She gave unending, unconditional love and encouragement to her children and their spouses: Sharon GLOVER (Douglas WILKINS) of Salt Spring Island, British Columbia; Christopher JONES (Susan) of Dartmouth; and also to her deeply beloved grandchildren: Jason (Alessandra) of L'Aquila, Italy; Nicholas (Erin); and Jennifer of Dartmouth.
Mum was predeceased by her loving and beloved husband Owen in She is survived by her dearest sister Barbara MANNING of Ottawa.
She leaves us a rich legacy: love, courage, common sense, acceptance and a zest for life that was never-ending. She is deeply cherished by all of us who loved her, and she will be held in our hearts and minds forever.

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MANNING o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-11-29 published
Manager editor of Guelph Mercury
Guelph Mercury Saturday, November 29, 2003 - Page F11
Guelph, Ontario -- Bonnie EWEN, managing editor of the Guelph Mercury, died Monday night after suffering a brain aneurysm last weekend. She was 44.
Ms. EWEN was taken to Guelph General Hospital Saturday afternoon after suffering severe head pain and then transferred to Mississauga's Trillium Health Centre, where she soon lapsed into a coma.
She had been maintained on life-support systems until arrangements could be made for her organs to be donated, in keeping with her wishes, said her sister, Brenda EWEN.
Bonnie EWEN began working at the Mercury 24 years ago as a clerical assistant, but it was clear from the start she had her sights set on loftier positions. "It took some time, but I managed to force editors to throw me a story or two," she said in a 1999 interview after being appointed managing editor.
"I'd wanted to be a journalist ever since I was a child, and I was like a kid in a candy store when the paper finally hired me as a reporter. I spent a great 10 years on assignment before taking a desk here as a junior editor."
Bob RUTTER, a former regional editor at the Mercury, was given the task of teaching Ms. EWEN, who had no formal training in journalism, the basics of the job. "This came about after months of pestering, and an almost daily inquisition about why she could not be given a reporting assignment," Mr. RUTTER said.
Gary MANNING, a former Mercury managing editor who hired Ms. EWEN in 1980, said he gave her the job "because she showed a lot of self-confidence and interest in the news business."
But becoming a reporter was just a step toward where Ms. EWEN really wanted to be -- the managing editor's office.

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MANNIS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-02-18 published
His voice resonated on airwaves
Veteran read news, hosted shows on Canadian Broadcasting Corporation Radio and television for four decades
By Allison LAWLOR Tuesday, February 18, 2003 - Page R7
Harry MANNIS, a popular Canadian Broadcasting Corporation announcer and host whose warm, deep voice graced the country's airwaves for four decades, died last month in Toronto. He was 82.
Mr. MANNIS started his career with the Canadian Broadcasting Corp. in Halifax at the end of the Second World War. He was known across the country, not only for reading the radio news, but hosting a number of programs including Canadian Broadcasting Corporation radio's Themes and Variations and Anthology. His voice was also often heard on the Project, Stage and Fourth Estate.
"He had that great resonance that I envied, " said his long-time friend and former radio personality Max FERGUSON. "As an announcer I have always considered him the best."
Mr. MANNIS preferred radio but also ventured into television, reading the Toronto metro news and hosting What's New?, a news magazine geared toward youth, which was launched in 1972.
In radio, he said, you had the option of sitting at the microphone in an old T-shirt (although Mr. MANNIS himself was most often smartly dressed in a turtleneck sweater and dress coat). He also found it less stressful than television. "It's easier on the nerves. Only one thing can be a problem -- reading, " he said in an interview in 1975.
A modest, unassuming man, who stood at just over six-feet tall, Mr. MANNIS admitted to still having a bout of nerves after almost three decades in the business.
"Even after 29 years I haven't been able to conquer this feeling, " he said in 1975.
"When I was doing the Toronto metro television news, I had a recurring nightmare that when I'd go on the air, all the pages of the news would be mixed up. It's never happened, but you never know, " he said.
It was that same fear that prompted him to meticulously check his work before sitting down in front of the microphone. If he didn't know a word, or its proper pronunciation, instead of guessing and taking the risk of being wrong on-air he would head right to the public broadcaster's man in charge of language and make sure he got it right.
"Harry never mispronounced a word, Mr. FERGUSON said.
But like any new radio broadcaster, Mr. MANNIS, who didn't lack a wry humour, had a couple of small announcing mishaps in the early years. One day in Halifax, the city experienced a power failure. The show still having to go on, Mr. MANNIS was forced to read the news from the master control room with someone holding a flashlight over his shoulder.
Another time, when his microphone was switched on for a station call he happened to be looking at a drama producer whose last name was Appleby. Before he knew it, the words coming out of his mouth were: "This is CBH, Applefax."
"Relax for a minute and it's fatal, Mr. MANNIS said in the 1975 interview. "The minute a mike is turned on, I visualize a million pairs of ears glued to their radios or television sets, all eagerly awaiting to pounce on my slightest mispronunciation. Is it any wonder the tongue cleaves to the palate, the eyes become glazed, the hand holding the script trembles like a leaf in a gale?"
Harry MANNIS was born in Toronto on April 11, 1920. He was the youngest of three children born to Jessie and Benjamin MANNIS, who owned a furrier shop. Harry attended Oakwood Collegiate Institute and met his wife Elizabeth when she moved in two doors down. The couple married in 1942 and later had a daughter.
"He was like any nice young man, Elizabeth MANNIS said. "He was private. He wasn't flamboyant."
After high school, Mr. MANNIS briefly attended the University of Toronto before leaving to join the Royal Canadian Air Force. Stationed in England during the war, he returned home to Canada in 1946. Uncertain about what to do next, he decided to enroll in a radio-announcing course at Toronto's Ryerson Institute of Technology (now Ryerson University).
"We all liked the way he read things at home, " said Elizabeth MANNIS, who was one of the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation's first female announcers.
Impressed with his voice quality and enunciation (which was untrained), they told him not to bother with school and sent him to Canadian Broadcasting Corporation for an audition. He was hired the next day for an announcing job in Halifax. Within two weeks of his audition, he was reading the radio news on the East Coast.
"I just happened to be in the right place at the right time, Mr. MANNIS said of his quick entry into the radio world.
He had had a brush with the airwaves before the war. After learning to play the piano, violin and clarinet by ear as a child, he decided to try his hand at singing, fancying himself a pop star one day.
When he was 17, he appeared on an amateur radio hour show singing a pop song. He thought he had found the key to his success until, as he put it, "the pianist refused to play slowly, and I refused to sing fast, and the result was pandemonium."
"Music came naturally to him, " Elizabeth said. "The same with announcing, he didn't have to struggle with it."
Mr. MANNIS remained with the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation until his retirement in the mid-1980s. He was widely liked and respected by his colleagues, who called him a "class act." Judy MADDREN, host of Canadian Broadcasting Corporation Radio's World Report, wrote in a condolence note to his family that Mr. MANNIS was a "true gentleman" who always treated her with respect and without condescension.
An animal lover, Mr. MANNIS and his wife took in stray animals and supported a local organization called the Toronto Wildlife Centre, which helps rehabilitate injured wildlife.
Mr. MANNIS died of cancer on January 2 in a Toronto hospital. Besides his wife, he leaves daughter Kate and two grandchildren.
Harry MANNIS, born in Toronto on April 11, 1920; died in Toronto on January 2, 2003.

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MANSEAU o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-09-13 published
Singer was hit on Hit Parade
Canadian-born performer played violin with Jack Benny and posed as wife of Sid Caesar
By James McCREADY Special to The Globe and Mail Saturday, September 13, 2003 - Page F11
She was called "Canada's First Lady of Song." In the late 1940s, singer Gisele MacKENZIE was so popular on Canadian Broadcasting Corporation radio that she was known just by her first name.
When she was 23, she headed off to Hollywood, where she became one of the main singers on Your Hit Parade, a popular American network television show in the 1950s. By the time television started in Canada in 1952, she was already a star in the United States, appearing on programs with Jack Benny and later with Sid Caesar, the hottest comedian of his day.
Gisele MacKENZIE, who has died at the age of 76, was not always known by that name. On the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, she was known simply as Gisele, though a 1950 Canadian Broadcasting Corporation press release did call her by her proper name -- Gisele LAFLECHE. As soon as she moved to CBS in 1951, she adopted the stage name Gisele MacKENZIE. The reason, she told a New York reporter in 1955, was that the name Gisele LAFLECHE "sounded too much like a striptease artist's." The real explanation was an American audience would have trouble with so French a name. It was the television network that ordered the name change.
Marie Marguerite Louise Gisele LAFLECHE was born on January 10, 1927, in Winnipeg. The name MacKENZIE was from her paternal grandmother. Her father, Georges, was a doctor, who played the violin, and her mother, Marietta MANSEAU, was a concert pianist and singer as a young woman. Ms. MacKENZIE started playing the violin seriously when she was 7. She made her first public performance at the Royal Alexandra Hotel in Winnipeg at the age of 12.
When she was 14, her family sent her to the Royal Conservatory of Music in Toronto. She studied the violin and the piano, and planned on being a concert violinist. Later in life, a story circulated that she never took voice lessons, but Jim GUTHRO, who was at the conservatory at the same time, remembered a voice teacher who took an interest in her. He also remembered that she attended at the same time as Robert GOULET and they would sing together.
When she first came to Toronto, she stayed at Rosary Hall, a residence for Catholic girls on Bloor Street at the top of Jarvis Street. Tess MALLOY, who was there at the same time, remembered her. "She lived right across the hall from me. She and her girlfriend used to drive us nuts practising the violin."
Ms. MALLOY didn't remember her singing at the residence, but somewhere along the way someone discovered Ms. MacKENZIE could sing. It was close to the end of the war and she started to perform for groups of servicemen. It was then that she was discovered by musician Bob SHUTTLEWORTH, a lieutenant who led a band for the Royal Canadian Navy.
Right after the war, she started singing with Mr. SHUTTLEWORTH's band at the Glenmount Hotel on the Lake of Bays, north of Toronto. Mr. SHUTTLEWORTH, who later became her manager and her husband, took her to the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, which then broadcast live popular music over the radio.
"Bob SHUTTLEWORTH called me at the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation and said, 'Get a studio, a piano and a vocal mike. I have someone I want you to hear,' recalled Jackie RAE, then a music producer at the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, later leader of his own band (and, incidentally, the uncle of former Ontario premier Bob RAE.) "I remember her wonderful voice and how fresh she was. We hired her straight away to do three programs a week."
The program was Meet Gisele, and it ran for 15 minutes on Monday, Wednesday and Friday. The program started on October 8, 1946, and lasted for four years. She was so popular the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation used her in other programs with names such as The Girl Next Door or The Song Pluggers.
In 1951, Ms. MacKENZIE was spotted by Bing CROSBY's son, and went to work in the United States for Bob CROSBY's Club 15, bumping the Andrews Sisters from their regular slot. The pay was $20,000 (U.S.) a year, worth $150,000 in today's money. She was 23.
The money was something Canada could never match. Mr. GUTHRO, later head of Variety at the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, guesses she was making $200 a week for her radio programs.
"Gisele Leaves for Hollywood. Canada's Loss," read a headline in one Toronto paper. The article guessed at the pay package, and it was right.
Ms. MacKENZIE was about to have her best decade ever in show business. After a short stint on Club 15, she worked on the Mario Lanza Show, before landing her full-time job at Your Hit Parade. The idea behind the NBC program was to take the top seven songs on the hit parade that week and have them done by the regular singers in the Your Hit Parade troupe. The half-hour program was a huge success in the United States and in late 1953 the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation picked it up for a while.
Ms. MacKENZIE was the only regular singer on the program to have her own hit record, Hard to Get, in 1955.
Though none of her family shared her success, all were musical. There were her parents, both of whom were serious amateur musicians two of her sisters sang and played, and a brother played the cello. Along with Gisele, two of them had what is called perfect pitch.
"It's rare and she had it," Mr. RAE said. "You would play four notes on the piano and she could match them. Perfect pitch isn't always a great thing, but in her case it was."
Ms. MacKENZIE's training as a classical violinist came in handy on the Jack Benny program, on which she first appeared in 1955. The droll comedian always made a thing of how he couldn't play the violin. One vaudeville-type act they would do on his show involved her patiently showing him what to do with a violin after he made some awful screeching noise with his bow.
She was Jack Benny's protégé, and he helped land her own television program in 1958. Called the Gisele MacKENZIE Show, it lasted only six months.
But she remained famous. At one stage, she was the subject of This is Your Life, which involved linking up with old Friends and relatives. She was a regular on game shows that featured minor celebrities, such as Hollywood Squares.
In 1963, she was cast as Sid Caesar's television wife and made regular trips to New York City, where the program was done. Like other television programs of that era, it was live, since videotape was only just being introduced.
Ms. MacKENZIE also acted and sang in live musicals in the United States, things such as Annie Get Your Gun and South Pacific. Over the years, she also worked in Las Vegas, performing in night clubs there. She returned to Canada for the occasional concert and television special, including one on the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation in late 1960. It was about "her story book career" and included the yarn, always told by her publicists, of how she decided to take up singing after she lost her $3,000 violin.
By the end of the 1960s, the big work started to dry up and Canadian newspapers were running the occasional "Where Are They Now" articles. She was in a sprawling ranch house in suburban Encino, Calif. She also owned property in Palmdale and Marin County, Calif., as well as a house on Lake Manitoba back home.
All that detail came up in a nasty divorce from Mr. SHUTTLEWORTH in 1968. Because he was also her manager, he kept 10 per cent of her gross income for the next three years. She later married a banker, Robert KLEIN, but that also ended in divorce.
During the rest of her career, Ms. MacKENZIE kept working in regional theatre and made guest appearances on television series, including MacGyver and Murder, She Wrote, as well as singing stints on programs such as the Dean Martin Show. She also did television commercials in the United States and Canada.
Ms. MacKENZIE had some odd hobbies. She collected and mixed exotic perfumes and in the 1950s she took up target shooting, becoming an expert shot. She and her first husband had a large collection of pistols, rifles and shotguns. In her later years, like many Hollywood stars, she was involved with Scientology.
Ms. MacKENZIE, who died in Burbank, Calif., on September 5, had two children with Mr. SHUTTLEWORTH, a son Mac and a daughter Gigi (short for Gisele) DOWNS.

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MANUEL o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-03 published
SANTOS, Felicidade
Peacefully at home on Saturday, March 1, 2003 in her 80th year. Beloved wife of the late Joao. Loving mother of Joao LUIS, Jose MANUEL, Fernando, Maria FELICIDADE, Maria GORETE and Tony. Dear grandmother of sixteen and great-grandmother of one. Friends may call at the Turner and Porter 'Peel' Chapel, 2180 Hurontario Street, Mississauga, (Hwy. 10 north of Q.E.W.), from 2-4 and 6-9 p.m. on Tuesday. Parish Prayers at 7: 30 p.m. Tuesday. Funeral Mass at S. Salvador do Mundo Church, 1225 Melton Dr., Mississauga on Wednesday March 5 at 10 a.m. Interment Saint Mary's Cemetery. If desired, donations may be made to the Trillium Health Centre-Mississauga (Oncology).

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MANULA o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-15 published
MANULA, William (Bill)
Died unexpectedly, yet peacefully March 10, 2003. Bill will be sadly missed by his dearest Friends; Ron WILKIE, Rosemary JEFFREY, Niece Lynda (Peter and family), Nephews; Gordie (Cindy and family) and Robbie (Lori and family). Bill is predeceased by loving mother Alma and sister Helen. Memorial Service Tuesday, March 18, 2003 @ 1: 30 p.m., Glebe Road United Church, 20 Glebe Road, Toronto. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to The Kidney Foundation or Toronto General Hospital.
Genuine kindness is never forgotten

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MANUS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-05-03 published
Leafs trusted their doctor
Talented M.D. specialized in hand surgery. 'He had a unique technical approach. That's what made him different from other surgeons.'
By Carol COOPER Special to The Globe and Mail Saturday, May 3, 2003 - Page F10
Nothing about Jim MURRAY's hands indicated that he was a surgeon. Large and gnarled with undulating fingernails, those hands played bagpipes, patched up Toronto Maple Leafs and Team Canada players and restored form and function to other hands.
Dr. MURRAY, a plastic surgeon who was the first Canadian doctor to devote his practice to hand surgery, died last month at the age of 82.
"His hands looked more like those of a prize fighter than a surgeon. His fingers were bent, "said Robert McFARLANE, a retired plastic surgeon with a special interest in hands and a close friend of Dr. MURRAY. "It didn't seem to make a difference. He had tremendous skill."
In 1983, Dr. MURRAY brought together plastic and orthopedic surgeons to form a hand unit at Toronto's Sunnybrook Health Science Centre, the city's first. "His concept was to pull together the expertise of different surgeons, "said Paul BINHAMMER, once a student of Dr. MURRAY and now a plastic surgeon at the hospital, now part of the Sunnybrook and Women's College Health Sciences Centre.
Dr. MURRAY assembled a highly skilled team. Among them were orthopedic surgeon Robert McMURTRY, who went on to become dean of medicine at the University of Western Ontario, and plastic surgeon and nerve expert Susan MacKINNON, who is now a professor in the United States.
But before rising to prominence in the field of hand surgery, Dr. MURRAY gained fame in hockey circles. Serving as one of the Toronto Maple Leafs team doctors from 1948 to 1964, he was greatly trusted by players. When cut during games on the road, they left their wounds unstitched until he could tend to them at home.
"He'd come at you with those fingers and they were just so big, you'd wonder how he was ever able to stitch as neat as he did," said former Leaf defenceman Bobby BAUN, who played professional hockey for 17 years.
Mr. BAUN estimates that Dr. MURRAY put in half of his 143 career stitches.
Under instructions from Leaf owner Conn SMYTHE, injured players were not to be rushed back into the lineup, according to Hugh SMYTHE, another Leaf doctor and Mr. SMYTHE's son. "This was a heavy and not always popular role, "he said.
During the 1964 Stanley Cup finals, it became especially challenging.
Entering Game 6, the Detroit Red Wings led the series against the Leafs 3-2. Playing in Detroit on April 23, with the scored tied at 3-3 in the third period, Mr. BAUN first was hit on his right leg by a slapshot from Gordie HOWE and then, after a faceoff, spun on the leg, which gave way.
X-rays delayed at Mr. BAUN's insistence showed a small broken bone, just above the ankle. He spent six weeks in a cast.
But that came after the series ended. During its sixth game, Mr. BAUN was tended to by Dr. MURRAY and other team doctors. After being carried off the ice, he asked Dr. MURRAY if he could hurt his leg any more. The doctor replied no. "Having someone like Jim tell me that, I could believe him, "Mr. BAUN said.
With his leg taped and frozen, Mr. BAUN continued playing. Within the first two minutes of the first overtime period, he scored the winning goal and kept the Leafs in the series.
Mr. BAUN didn't miss a shift during Game 7, and neither did teammate Red KELLY, who had torn knee ligaments during the previous game. The Leafs won the seventh game 4-0 and the Stanley Cup, their third in a row and their fifth during Dr. MURRAY's time with the team.
That year, Dr. MURRAY resigned and 20 years later joked to The Toronto Star that it was he who had led them to the five Stanley Cups.
If he took the connection between his presence and the Leafs' wins lightly, Punch IMLACH, then the team's coach, did not. Mr. IMLACH had become convinced that Dr. MURRAY brought the team good luck, the doctor told the Star in a 1972 story.
The newspaper was interviewing Dr. MURRAY about his appointment as a doctor to Team Canada for the Canada-Russia hockey series. In the article headlined "Good luck charm for Team Canada, " he recalled how during the 1967 Stanley Cup playoffs, Mr. IMLACH invited him to a Leaf game in Chicago, believing that he would bring the team good luck.
"If it had been anybody else but Punch, I'd have dismissed it as a joke. But he really needed to win and he honestly believed my presence would make a difference, "Dr. MURRAY was quoted as saying.
The Leafs won not only that game, but, with Dr. MURRAY in attendance for the remainder of the series, the Stanley Cup. The Leafs haven't won a Stanley Cup since.
And the Star's headline proved prophetic. Team Canada won the Canada-Russia series when Paul HENDERSON scored with 34 seconds left in the eighth game.
Born in Toronto on May 14, 1920, James Findlay MURRAY was the youngest of three children. His father ran a store at Yonge and Queen Streets in downtown Toronto and died before the birth of his third child.
Dr. MURRAY attributed his curvy fingernails to his mother's malnutrition when she was pregnant with him, said his youngest son Hugh. Within a few years, she had remarried, and his stepfather helped to raise him.
An avid athlete, Dr. MURRAY played football during his high school and university days, so much so that once, when forbidden by his mother to play for his high-school team because he had had pneumonia, he practised and played in secret.
That lasted until his picture appeared in the Star running for a touchdown. He was immediately placed on the disabled list.
Awarded the George Biggs trophy for sportsmanship, leadership and scholarship, Dr. MURRAY graduated from medical school in 1943 and spent two years in the Royal Canadian Medical Corps, finishing as a captain.
After a year of general practice in Belleville, Ontario, he trained in plastic surgery at the Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto with A. W. FARMER, whom many consider to be the father of Canadian hand surgery.
A humble man, who drove less-than-fancy cars, Dr. MURRAY was known for his ability to relate to everyone. "He was a doctor and an esteemed member of society, but it didn't matter to him," Hugh MURRAY said. "He considered himself an everyday person. He was as comfortable, if not more comfortable, dealing with just working guys."
In 1953, Dr. MURRAY joined the Toronto East General and Orthopedic Hospital as head of plastic surgery and organized a specialized hand clinic, according to Bernd NEU, another former student of Dr. MURRAY and now a plastic surgeon at North York General Hospital.
"It's because the hand is such an important part of the body, not just physically, but aesthetically, "Dr. MURRAY, a specialist in soft tissue and the reconstruction of flexor tendons, said in 1984 to explain the dedication of hand surgeons.
In 1983, Dr. MURRAY left Toronto East General, where he had been surgeon-in-chief since 1976, to head the hand unit at Sunnybrook Medical Centre, taking a cut in pay to do so.
At the time, plastic surgeons could earn $2,000 for a face-lift and $106.50 for a carpal-tunnel release.
Dr. MURRAY derived great satisfaction from the help his hands gave others. Once in a clinic at Toronto East General, he and Dr. NEU came upon a patient with only a thumb and little finger on one hand.
"This is a wonderful hand, "he told Dr. NEU. " Look at how dirty and callused it is."
After several surgeries, Dr. MURRAY had restored the worker's hand to the point where the man could use it once again to earn a living.
"What to other people would look like a devastating loss, to Dr. MURRAY and the patient, this was a hand to be proud of, Dr. NEU said.
As a hand consultant beginning in 1974 at the Downsview Rehabilitation Centre of the Workers' Compensation Board, Dr. MURRAY treated those injured in industrial accidents, often surmounting language barriers to do so.
"He could speak to them [the patients] in basic English, so they could understand how seriously he took their problems, and how everything was being done that could be done for them, "Dr. NEU said.
In a 1996 letter to Dr. MURRAY, another of his former residents recalled how once on rounds, the doctor lifted the sheets to examine a paraplegic patient, only to find the man soiled. Instead of calling for hospital staff to clean the man, Dr. MURRAY performed the task himself.
"That little lesson reminded me that being a doctor is not just being a cutter, "the physician wrote.
Not only did he have a natural way with people, Dr. MURRAY was a gifted surgeon.
"He was a talented person with original ways of doing things," Dr. McFARLANE said. "He had a unique technical approach. That's what made him different from other surgeons."
Appointed a lecturer at the University of Toronto in 1953, Dr. MURRAY was first an assistant and associate professor, becoming a full professor in 1979. He developed the first hand surgery fellowship training program in Canada in 1981, Dr. NEU said.
As well as teaching at the university, Dr. MURRAY trained surgeons during two trips to Southeast Asia as a volunteer with Cooperative for American Relief Everywhere, Inc. Medico and led a group of hand surgeons to study techniques in micro-surgery in China during the late 1970s.
At the medical meetings Dr. MURRAY often attended, he impressed Dr. McFARLANE with his ability to discuss surgery. "He had a very common-sense approach to a surgical problem, and when everyone had something to say about a problem, he would get up and clarify it very nicely, "Dr. McFARLANE said.
A founder of MANUS Canada, a society of hand surgeons, once a president of the Canadian Society of Plastic Surgeons and the American Society for Surgery of the Hand, Dr. MURRAY was honoured by the U.S. society at "Murray Day" in 1990 with tributes from past presidents.
Stricken with Alzheimer's disease toward the end of his life, Dr. MURRAY died in Collingwood, Ontario, on April 4. He leaves his wife of 57 years, Shirley, and his children, John, Bill, Claire and Hugh.

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