All Categories: A B C D E F G H I J K L M Mc N O P Q R S T U V W Y Z Welcome Home
Local Folders.. A B C D E F G H I J K L M Mc N O P Q R S T U V W Y Z
-1 +1

"MAL" 2003 Obituary


MALCOLM  MALETTE  MALLET  MALLORY  MALLOY  MALONE  MALONEY 

MALCOLM o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-08 published
MALCOLM, Percy Lewis
Peacefully, at the Grenadier Retirement Home on Friday, March 7th, 2003 in his one hundredth year. Beloved husband of the late Vera. Loving uncle, great-uncle, great-great-uncle and great-great-great-uncle and friend to many. A much loved and respected member of Runnymede United Church and much loved and admired former teacher of Runnymede Elementary School. A Service to celebrate Mr. MALCOLM's life will be held at a later date. Arrangements under the direction of the Turner and Porter Yorke Chapel, 416-767-3153.

  M... Names     MA... Names     MAL... Names     Welcome Home

MALCOLM o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-06-16 published
SNELGROVE, Martha Jean, R.N.
On Saturday evening June 14, 2003. Jean died in peace with her loving nephew and niece-in-law Brian and Anneliese O'MALLEY at her side. A Registered Nurse, Jean was born in Colborne, Ontario. She served her country with distinction as a Nursing Sister in the Canadian Army during World War 2 in South Africa, England, and on board hospital ships. After the War she completed her studies as a Hospital Records Librarian and enjoyed a long and productive career establishing medical record libraries in hospitals throughout Ontario. Daughter of the late Donald and Teresa SNELGROVE and predeceased by her sisters Marion and Kathleen, she is survived by her sister Flora GREGOIRE of Innisfil, Ontario and brother and sister-in-law Emmett MALCOLM and Keitha SNELGROVE of Rochester, New York. She will be remembered by her many nieces and nephews, grand nieces and grand nephews. The celebration of Jean's life will be held in the Church of St. Leonard, 25 Wanless Avenue (east of Yonge), on Tuesday, June 17, 2003 at 2: 30 p.m. A reception for Friends and family will follow in Church Hall. In lieu of flowers, Friends may wish to consider a memorial gift to the Church of St. Leonard or Sunnybrook Hospital.

  M... Names     MA... Names     MAL... Names     Welcome Home

MALCOLM - All Categories in OGSPI

MALETTE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-10-07 published
Jonathan SWALLOW
By Chris MALETTE Tuesday, October 7, 2003 - Page A24
Teacher, educational software consultant, ski and soccer coach, and dad. Born in Glenn Ridge, N.J., on April 20, 1958. Died April 27 in Stirling, Ontario, of sudden heart failure, aged 45.
Kids who love a cold day on a fast ski hill, somewhat sedentary soccer moms and dads who liked to break an occasional sweat and, strangely, frogs everywhere will miss Jonathan SWALLOW. Jonathan was 45 when, in the prime of an athletic and active life, his heart -- harbouring a hidden, undiagnosed ailment that affected the rhythm of the organ -- betrayed an otherwise vibrant man in his prime.
Born in suburban New Jersey and educated at Syracuse University, Jonathan came to Canada in the 1980s to undertake graduate studies at McMaster University where he met the woman who would become his wife, Mary Ellen THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON. He went on to achieve his PhD at the University of Toronto.
In his professional career, Jonathan was lauded by scholars for his cutting-edge work in interactive learning software. At Waterloo, he collaborated with professor Norm SCOTT and the Centre for Learning and Teaching Through Technology -- or LT3 -- to create a program that allows biology students to dissect frogs in a virtual environment, on computer, without harming a single amphibian.
After moving to Stirling, north of Belleville, Ontario, and beginning a family there, Jonathan made fast and strong Friends in the local amateur theatre community. He helped get couch-potato parents off the sofa for an adult soccer league and coached in the Stirling and District Minor Soccer League. But Jonathan truly came to the fore on the ski slopes of Ontario.
Batawa Ski Club holds many memories of Jonathan. During the winter he was either on the road, at a ski race, over by the fireplace talking earnestly with a parent, sitting at a table with his family and Friends or on the hill having a great time with his racers.
At a moving and funny, yet surreal, memorial service for Jonathan at the tatty but active ski club in May, one of Jonathan's closest Friends and fellow Batawa racing coach, Jeff DURISH, remembered Jonathan's dual sense of duty and of fun: "The Rookie program, for children not old enough to travel with a league team, had fallen on hard times and nobody had run it for a number of years. Jonathan phoned me and talked me into helping him revive the program. Helping Jonathan was one of the best decisions that I have ever made. I always meant to thank him for it, now I wish I had."
Jonathan would always show up to practice with a backpack full of beanbags, ropes and bungee cords, his arms full of bamboo poles and his head full of crazy ideas. All the other coaches would scratch their heads and marvel at the weird and wonderful drills he came up with -- four kids hanging onto a bamboo pole doing 360s down the hill, racers hanging onto long ropes as they carved big turns around beanbags. Those crazy beanbags were always strewn across the hill.
Of course there were always the weird songs and dances to go along with the drills. It was effective, it was amazing, it was silly, it was fun, it was wonderful and full of joy -- it was Jonathan.
"Jonathan was an exceptional coach because he was a great teacher, an inventor and a child at heart," said brother-in-law Rob TERRY.
Jonathan leaves wife Mary Ellen, daughter Jenny Lee and son Joseph, as well as scores of grateful soccer kids, skiers and leopard frogs everywhere who croak their thanks for a life well lived.
Chris MALETTE is a ski dad who shared a mug or two of hot chocolate with Jonathan SWALLOW.

  M... Names     MA... Names     MAL... Names     Welcome Home

MALETTE - All Categories in OGSPI

MALLET o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-10-11 published
Creator of Savage God
Theatre director was a Canadian nationalist, a fan of the avant garde and a champion of playwright George Ryga. He was also seen as a kook, a dilettante and a street fighter
By Tom HAWTHORN Special to The Globe and Mail Saturday, October 11, 2003 - Page F9
John JULIANI was a provocateur in life as on stage. A man passionate about the possibilities of theatre, he roused reverence in some, antipathy in others.
His most infamous act was to challenge the Stratford Festival's newly hired artistic director to a duel. Robin PHILLIPS's offence was that he is British when Mr. JULIANI and others were certain a land as grand as Canada was capable of producing a director for its Shakespearean theatre.
What he called a "romantic gesture with tongue in cheek" earned cheers from Canadian theatre directors and sneers from much of the theatre establishment.
Mr. JULIANI, who has died at the age of 63, was an unabashed Canadian nationalist, a dedicated fan of the avant garde, an ardent defender of the right of actors to a decent living, a champion of playwright George Ryga and a tireless figure so commanding as to develop an intense loyalty among acolytes.
At the same time, he was seen as a kook, a dilettante and a street fighter. One critic called him "the Tiger Williams of Canadian theatre," his pugnacious approach earning him comparison to a notorious hockey goon. In his defence, Mr. JULIANI explained that he was merely a "true believer" with opinions on controversial subjects.
Mr. JULIANI's credits were long and varied, including spontaneous Sixties street happenings such as the staging of his own wedding as a theatrical performance and brief appearances on such 1990s television dramas as The X-Files.
From 1982 until 1997, Mr. JULIANI was executive producer of radio drama for Canadian Broadcasting Corporation Radio in Vancouver. He helped to bring to air many celebrated productions, including the brilliant and provocative Dim Sum Diaries by playwright Mark LEIREN- YOUNG.
Mr. JULIANI also possessed a head-turning beauty, with a profile as striking as a Roman bust. Radio host Bill RICHARDSON commented on his handsomeness at a raucous memorial after his death, calling him a "hunka hunka burnin' love." Some said he had the looks and bearing of a Shakespearean king.
John Charles JULIANI was born in Montreal on March 24, 1940. Raised in a working-class neighbourhood, he attended Loyola College and was an early graduate from the fledgling National Theatre School.
He spent two seasons as an actor at Stratford before being hired as a theatre teacher at Simon Fraser University in 1966. The new university atop Burnaby Mountain east of Vancouver was a hotbed of radicalism in politics and the arts. Mr. JULIANI bristled at an imposed curriculum and so infuriated the administration that he was banned from the campus in 1969.
Mr. JULIANI was heavily influenced by the writing of Antonin Artaud, a Surrealist who championed a theatre based on the imagination. He long sought to erase the barrier between scripted text and sensory impression, between performer and audience, to mixed success.
After moving to the West Coast, Mr. JULIANI launched a series of experiments in theatre. He credited these productions to Savage God, which was less a troupe in the traditional sense than a title granted to any performance involving Mr. JULIANI. The name came from William Butler Yeats's awestruck reaction to Alfred Jarry's Ubu Roi: "After us, the Savage God?"
Savage God defied explanation, though many tried and even Mr. JULIANI offered suggestions. Savage God was "an anthology of question marks," he once said. (It was, after all, the 1960s.) "Savage God is simply the Imagination," he told the Vancouver Sun, "insatiable, unrelenting, fiercely energetic, wary of categorization, fond of contradiction and inveterately iconoclastic."
In January, 1970, Mr. JULIANI married dancer Donna WONG, a ceremony conducted as a Savage God performance at the Vancouver Art Gallery. He repeated the process at the christening of his son. Ms. WONG- JULIANI would be his domestic and drama partner for more than three decades.
In 1971, the streets of Vancouver were the scene of several spontaneous and sometimes incomprehensible -- performances under the aegis of PACET ("pilot alternative complement to existing theatre.") The $18,000 project, funded by the federal government, incorporated Gestalt therapy sessions in street performances.
Theatrical events took place willy-nilly across the city, including malls, the airport, the library and Stanley Park. Admission was not charged, nor did all spectators appreciate their role as audience to avant-garde performance. A scene in which bicyclists wearing gas masks pedalled along city streets left many scratching their heads in puzzlement.
In 1974, Mr. JULIANI moved to Toronto to set up a graduate theatre-studies program at York University.
He called the program PEAK (" Performance, Example, Animation, Katharsis") and perhaps should have found an acronym for PEEK, as the instructor and his class stripped naked to protest against a lack of classroom space.
The challenge to the new Stratford artistic director in 1974 was written on a piece of parchment and delivered in London by Don RUBIN, a York colleague. Alas, Mr. RUBIN could not find a proper gauntlet and wound up ceremoniously striking Mr. PHILLIPS with a red rubber glove, an absurd note to a theatrical protest.
In 1978, Mr. JULIANI took the stage in a Toronto production of Children of Night, portraying Janusz Korczak, a doctor and teacher who ran an orphanage in the Warsaw ghetto. The critics were appalled.
Gina MALLET of the Toronto Star said Mr. JULIANI's performance sullied Dr. Korczak's memory. Jay SCOTT of The Globe and Mail, noting "the dreadfulness" of Mr. JULIANI's acting, said the production robbed the dead of their dignity.
From the stage, Mr. JULIANI challenged the Star's critic to a public debate on the aesthetics of theatre. He also wrote a letter to the editor, noting that Holocaust survivors in the audience had wholeheartedly embraced the production.
Mr. JULIANI wound up in Edmonton, where he continued to condemn the "exorbitance, elitism and museum theatre" of the establishment.
In 1982, he directed and co-wrote Latitude 55°, a feature film with just two characters -- a slick woman from the city and a Polish potato farmer -- set in a snowbound cabin. "It is filled with a passionate conviction that evaporates in pretentious pronouncements," The Globe's Carole CORBEIL wrote, "filled with truthful moments that evaporate in the desire to use every narcissistic trick in the book."
In a 1983 book examining the alternative theatre movement in Canada, author Renate USMIANI devoted most of a chapter to Mr. JULIANI, a decision that got her a scathing rebuke from a reviewer who considered him worthy of little more than a footnote.
"His works are curiosities; at best, they are worthy experiments in Artaudian theory," Boyd NEIL wrote in a Globe review. "But they are neither popular... nor influential."
Mr. JULIANI's years at Canadian Broadcasting Corporation Radio in Vancouver were both productive and successful. Among the many projects he directed was a three-part adaptation of Margaret Laurence's The Diviners; King Lear, starring John COLICOS; a 13-part series titled, Disaster! Acts of God or Acts of Man?" and, famously, Ryga's The Ecstasy of Rita Joe, with Leonard GEORGE portraying a role once assumed on stage by his late father, Chief Dan GEORGE. The surprise selection of Mr. GEORGE was typical of Mr. JULIANI's often brilliant casting.
Mr. JULIANI directed a 1989 production of The Glass Menagerie at the Vancouver Playhouse with Jennifer Phipps and Morris Panych. Globe reviewer Liam LACEY praised a production that "opens up the play like an old treasure chest, and lets in some fresh air without rearranging or disturbing the work's original grandeurs and caprices."
Four years later, Mr. JULIANI was directing a production of the mystery thriller Sleepwalker when actor Peter HAWORTH took sick shortly before opening night. The director suddenly found himself as the male lead. "Not even the most colossal egotist would want to do this," he said.
Dim Sum Diaries, a series of monologues written by Mr. LEIREN- YOUNG, received protests when aired by Canadian Broadcasting Corporation Radio in 1991. One episode, entitled The Sequoia, in which the white vendor of a luxury home launches a tirade against the Hong Kong immigrant who cuts down two rare and spectacular trees on the property, was accused of being racist. The playwright's well-intentioned exploration of stereotyping was charged with fostering those very prejudices.
After directing Dim Sum Diaries, Mr. JULIANI urged the playwright to tackle an issue that was dividing his church. Mr. LEIREN- YOUNG remembers replying: "You're talking same-sex marriage in the Anglican church and you want a straight Jewish guy to write this?"
The resulting play, titled Articles of Faith: The Battle of St. Alban's, was staged at Christ Church Cathedral in downtown Vancouver to great acclaim.
The collaborations between young playwright and veteran director succeeded in achieving Mr. JULIANI's goal of inspiring dialogue through theatre.
Mr. JULIANI had a reputation as a demanding taskmaster for novice and veteran actors alike. Rehearsals were jokingly called "Savage God Boot Camp."
He maintained a breakneck pace, both in the theatre and in the boardroom. He was artistic co-director of Opera Breve, a small company dedicated to nurturing young singers; president of the Union of British Columbia Performers (Alliance of Canadian Cinema, Television and Radio Artists); and, a former national president of the Directors Guild of Canada, among many boards on which he served.
Feeling fatigued in early August, Mr. JULIANI was diagnosed with liver cancer. The end came swiftly. He died on August 21 at Lions Gate Hospital in North Vancouver.
He leaves his wife of 33 years, Donna WONG- JULIANI, and a son, Alessandro JULIANI, an actor. He also leaves brothers Richard and Norman.
(Wit was long a part of the JULIANI mystique. The family pet, a canine named Beau Beau, was referred to in the family's paid obituary notice as a Savage Dog.)
For one who roused such passions, Mr. JULIANI felt that he led a conservative life. "I have always been a square," he once said.
A theatrical farewell to Mr. JULIANI attracted hundreds to St. Andrew's Wesley Church in Vancouver on Labour Day, a Monday and traditionally a quiet date on the theatre calendar. Those in attendance were encouraged to write remembrances on Post-It notes, which were then stuck to the church's pillars.
The City of Vancouver has declared next March 24, which would have been Mr. JULIANI's 64th birthday, to be Savage God Day.

  M... Names     MA... Names     MAL... Names     Welcome Home

MALLET - All Categories in OGSPI

MALLORY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-04-09 published
MALLORY, Frances Keller
Died peacefully, at home in her sleep on Sunday, April 6, 2003. Born in 1919 in Rosemont, Pennsylvania. Survived by her husband of 63 years James MALLORY, and her two sons James of London, England, and Charles of Ottawa. Educated at Shipley School and Bryn Mawr College. Further education (varied by the exigencies of marriage) at the universities of Edinburgh, Dalhousie and Saskatchewan (B.A. 1943) and McGill, where she also taught English. A committed activist in all the communities in which she lived-university, her children's school and the politics of the left. She is a much-loved and irreparable loss to her family, extended family and Friends. Memorial Service at McEvoy-Shields Funeral Home, 235 Kent Street, Ottawa, on Friday, April 11, at 11 a.m. In lieu of flowers, please donate to your local food bank in her memory.

  M... Names     MA... Names     MAL... Names     Welcome Home

MALLORY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-06-27 published
MALLORY, James Russell
Died peacefully at home on Tuesday, June 24, 2003. Born in 1916 in St. Andrews New Brunswick. Educated at New Brunswick (B.A. Hons), Dalhousie (M.A.), and Edinburgh (LL.B). There he met and married Frances KELLER in 1940, who shared his highs and lows for 63 years until her death in April 2003, a loss which left him bereft of the love and companionship which so long and happy a union brings. Foremost among his rewards was that he touched many through his teaching and written works about the constitution and workings of Canadian government. His career took him to Saskatchewan, Toronto, Brandon and McGill (for 45 years), where he was named professor emeritus and was for 10 years chairman of the economics & political science department. He will be much missed by his sons, James of London, and his wife Linda and children Pauline and Katie, and Charles of Ottawa, and his wife Dorothy, on whom he imparted, they hope, some of his wisdom, patience and integrity. Memorial Service McEvoy-Shields Funeral Home, 235 Kent Street, Ottawa on Saturday, June 28, at 11 a.m. In lieu of flowers, please donate to a charitable organization in his honour.

  M... Names     MA... Names     MAL... Names     Welcome Home

MALLORY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-07-22 published
MATHER, Naomi
Peacefully, at her home in Waterloo, surrounded by the love of her family, Naomi died early Monday morning, July 21, 2003. She was 20. Naomi struggled with Ewing's Sarcoma since January of 2002. Her indomitable spirit sustained all who knew her. Precious daughter of Susan (COOKE) and Fred MATHER and dearest sister of John. Naomi will be lovingly remembered by her Paternal grandmother, Ivey MATHER of Perth; her special friend Marjorie MALLORY, Aunts and Uncles, Marilyn CURRY of Headingly, Minnesota, Catherine and Richard FREEMAN of Vancouver, Lorna and Jim PEDEN and Sheila PRESCOTT (Dave McGRATH) of Perth; cousins, Tyler, Jennifer and Andrew CURRY, Harry and Gabby FREEMAN, Corinne, Trent and Colin PEDEN and Patricia PRESCOTT. Naomi's life included a wide circle of Friends, especially Cara DURST. Her Scottish Terrier Ghillie and Tabby cat Tamara had a special place in her heart. She was predeceased by Maternal grandparents, Roy and Edith COOKE and her Paternal grandfather, John MATHER. In Naomi's short life, she involved herself in many activities. She was a graduate of Waterloo Collegiate Institute and was enrolled in Science studies at Queen's University when she became ill. Some of her involvements and interests included Strathyre Highland Dancers, Children's International Summer Villages, working as a lifeguard and swimming instructor and playing the piano. Friend's and relatives are invited to share their memories of Naomi with her family at the Edward R. Good Funeral Home, 171 King Street South, Waterloo from 7 to 9 pm this evening (Tuesday) and 2 to 4 and 7 to 9 pm Wednesday. A service to celebrate Naomi's life will be held on Thursday, July 24, 2003, 11 am, at Westminster United Church (The Cedars,) 543 Beechwood Drive, Waterloo, with Reverend John ANDERSON officiating. A committal service will follow in Parkview Cemetery Crematorium Chapel, Waterloo. Following the committal at the Cemetery, Friends and relatives are invited to return to Westminster United Church for refreshments and a time to visit with the family.In Naomi's memory, in lieu of flowers, donations to the Sarcoma Fund at Mount Sinai Hospital in Toronto or the Grand River Regional Cancer Centre would be appreciated as expressions of sympathy and can be arranged through the funeral home, phone (519) 745-8445 or www.edwardrgood.com

  M... Names     MA... Names     MAL... Names     Welcome Home

MALLORY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-08-15 published
Professor played a role in defeat of SSAINTURENT government
By M.J. STONE Special to The Globe and Mail Friday, August 15, 2003 - Page R5
Nearly four decades after Louis SSAINTURENT had been Prime Minister of Canada, McGill professor James MALLORY was surprised to discover how influential he had been in the defeat of Mr. SSAINTURENT's Liberals in 1957. The revelation occurred in 1992 when the cabinet papers of the SSAINTURENT government, which had been sealed for 35 years, were made available to the public.
Unknown to Professor MALLORY, a radio interview he gave in the wake of the 1957 election had caught the Prime Minister's ear. The Liberals had been reduced to 105 seats in the House, seven fewer than the Conservatives. But the Grits were still in a position to form a minority government with the aid of the 25 elected members of the Co-operative Commonwealth Federation, later to become the New Democratic Party.
Mr. SSAINTURENT found himself at a crossroads. While his party was clearly in decline, the Conservatives were on the rise and many questioned whether the Liberals still had a legal mandate to govern. When Mr. SSAINTURENT arrived in cabinet that morning, Prof. MALLORY's radio interview was still ringing in his ears.
Prof. MALLORY, who died in Montreal on June 24, said in the interview that if the Liberals continued to govern it would result in a constitutional crisis. He believed it was the responsibility of John DIEFENBAKER and the Conservatives to form a government. The cabinet papers clearly reflect Prof. MALLORY's influence over the Prime Minister that morning. Mr. SSAINTURENT demanded a copy of the MALLORY interview and after carefully studying the radio transcripts, he handed the rule of government over to the Tories.
Highly regarded as the foremost expert in Canadian legal and federal structures, Prof. MALLORY was often called on to advise governments about constitutional procedures. McGill professor Charles TAILOR/TAYLOR said another good example occurred in 1979.
"Joe CLARK's Conservatives had just lost a parliamentary vote," Prof. TAILOR/TAYLOR recalled. "The governor-general, Ed SCHREYER, telephoned McGill's political science department, looking for Jim. It caused something of a stir when he couldn't be found immediately. SCHREYER was frantic for MALLORY's advice. The governor-general was unsure how to proceed.
"Jim was eventually found and consulted. His advice was that the Conservatives should call an election -- exactly what Joe CLARK did."
The son of a county sheriff, James Russell MALLORY was born on February 5, 1916. He graduated with a Bachelor of Arts from the University of New Brunswick in 1937 and later studied law at Edinburgh and Dalhousie universities.
He met his American-born wife, Frances KELLER, in Scotland, and the couple married in 1940. They had two sons: James and Charles. Prof. MALLORY joined the faculty of the University of Saskatchewan in 1941. Later, he taught at the University of Toronto and Brandon College before moving to McGill in 1946.
A respected scholar and lawyer, Prof. MALLORY was an "old-school" professor who taught at McGill for 45 years. His reputation as a constitutional expert was solidified in 1954 when he published Social Credit and the Federal Power in Canada. The quintessential text mapped out the constitutional parameters of federal/provincial relations.
"James MALLORY was a discreet and modest man," McGill professor Sam NOUMOFF recalled. "He had a profound understanding of morality and he was incapable of self-promotion. He worked on university committee after committee while holding many teaching responsibilities.
"Jim wasn't the sort of man who sought public approval, he just did things because they were the right thing to do."
His son James, who lives in Britain, summed up his father's idealism: "He had a bloody-minded stubbornness. It would manifest sometimes in allowing discussions to go on and on. Then he would do exactly what he intended to do in the first place. Somehow it never impaired his reputation as a genuine democrat."
Prof. MALLORY was the founder of both the Canadian Studies program at McGill and the Canadian Association of University Professors. After retiring in 1982 he was appointed professor emeritus and continued to teach for another 10 years. In 1964, he was elected to the Royal Society of Canada and was later awarded the Queen's Silver Jubilee Medal in 1977.
In 1995, McGill founded the James R. Mallory lecture series, a one-day event that features a special guest who lectures about Canadian issues. Past guests have included Bob RAE, Peter WHITE/WHYTE and Phyllis LAMBERT. The organizers of the event say that this year's lecture will focus on Prof. MALLORY's legacy.
Prof. MALLORY died 11 weeks after the death of his wife on what would have been their 63rd anniversary.

  M... Names     MA... Names     MAL... Names     Welcome Home

MALLORY - All Categories in OGSPI

MALLOY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-09-13 published
Singer was hit on Hit Parade
Canadian-born performer played violin with Jack Benny and posed as wife of Sid Caesar
By James McCREADY Special to The Globe and Mail Saturday, September 13, 2003 - Page F11
She was called "Canada's First Lady of Song." In the late 1940s, singer Gisele MacKENZIE was so popular on Canadian Broadcasting Corporation radio that she was known just by her first name.
When she was 23, she headed off to Hollywood, where she became one of the main singers on Your Hit Parade, a popular American network television show in the 1950s. By the time television started in Canada in 1952, she was already a star in the United States, appearing on programs with Jack Benny and later with Sid Caesar, the hottest comedian of his day.
Gisele MacKENZIE, who has died at the age of 76, was not always known by that name. On the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, she was known simply as Gisele, though a 1950 Canadian Broadcasting Corporation press release did call her by her proper name -- Gisele LAFLECHE. As soon as she moved to CBS in 1951, she adopted the stage name Gisele MacKENZIE. The reason, she told a New York reporter in 1955, was that the name Gisele LAFLECHE "sounded too much like a striptease artist's." The real explanation was an American audience would have trouble with so French a name. It was the television network that ordered the name change.
Marie Marguerite Louise Gisele LAFLECHE was born on January 10, 1927, in Winnipeg. The name MacKENZIE was from her paternal grandmother. Her father, Georges, was a doctor, who played the violin, and her mother, Marietta MANSEAU, was a concert pianist and singer as a young woman. Ms. MacKENZIE started playing the violin seriously when she was 7. She made her first public performance at the Royal Alexandra Hotel in Winnipeg at the age of 12.
When she was 14, her family sent her to the Royal Conservatory of Music in Toronto. She studied the violin and the piano, and planned on being a concert violinist. Later in life, a story circulated that she never took voice lessons, but Jim GUTHRO, who was at the conservatory at the same time, remembered a voice teacher who took an interest in her. He also remembered that she attended at the same time as Robert GOULET and they would sing together.
When she first came to Toronto, she stayed at Rosary Hall, a residence for Catholic girls on Bloor Street at the top of Jarvis Street. Tess MALLOY, who was there at the same time, remembered her. "She lived right across the hall from me. She and her girlfriend used to drive us nuts practising the violin."
Ms. MALLOY didn't remember her singing at the residence, but somewhere along the way someone discovered Ms. MacKENZIE could sing. It was close to the end of the war and she started to perform for groups of servicemen. It was then that she was discovered by musician Bob SHUTTLEWORTH, a lieutenant who led a band for the Royal Canadian Navy.
Right after the war, she started singing with Mr. SHUTTLEWORTH's band at the Glenmount Hotel on the Lake of Bays, north of Toronto. Mr. SHUTTLEWORTH, who later became her manager and her husband, took her to the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, which then broadcast live popular music over the radio.
"Bob SHUTTLEWORTH called me at the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation and said, 'Get a studio, a piano and a vocal mike. I have someone I want you to hear,' recalled Jackie RAE, then a music producer at the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, later leader of his own band (and, incidentally, the uncle of former Ontario premier Bob RAE.) "I remember her wonderful voice and how fresh she was. We hired her straight away to do three programs a week."
The program was Meet Gisele, and it ran for 15 minutes on Monday, Wednesday and Friday. The program started on October 8, 1946, and lasted for four years. She was so popular the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation used her in other programs with names such as The Girl Next Door or The Song Pluggers.
In 1951, Ms. MacKENZIE was spotted by Bing CROSBY's son, and went to work in the United States for Bob CROSBY's Club 15, bumping the Andrews Sisters from their regular slot. The pay was $20,000 (U.S.) a year, worth $150,000 in today's money. She was 23.
The money was something Canada could never match. Mr. GUTHRO, later head of Variety at the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, guesses she was making $200 a week for her radio programs.
"Gisele Leaves for Hollywood. Canada's Loss," read a headline in one Toronto paper. The article guessed at the pay package, and it was right.
Ms. MacKENZIE was about to have her best decade ever in show business. After a short stint on Club 15, she worked on the Mario Lanza Show, before landing her full-time job at Your Hit Parade. The idea behind the NBC program was to take the top seven songs on the hit parade that week and have them done by the regular singers in the Your Hit Parade troupe. The half-hour program was a huge success in the United States and in late 1953 the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation picked it up for a while.
Ms. MacKENZIE was the only regular singer on the program to have her own hit record, Hard to Get, in 1955.
Though none of her family shared her success, all were musical. There were her parents, both of whom were serious amateur musicians two of her sisters sang and played, and a brother played the cello. Along with Gisele, two of them had what is called perfect pitch.
"It's rare and she had it," Mr. RAE said. "You would play four notes on the piano and she could match them. Perfect pitch isn't always a great thing, but in her case it was."
Ms. MacKENZIE's training as a classical violinist came in handy on the Jack Benny program, on which she first appeared in 1955. The droll comedian always made a thing of how he couldn't play the violin. One vaudeville-type act they would do on his show involved her patiently showing him what to do with a violin after he made some awful screeching noise with his bow.
She was Jack Benny's protégé, and he helped land her own television program in 1958. Called the Gisele MacKENZIE Show, it lasted only six months.
But she remained famous. At one stage, she was the subject of This is Your Life, which involved linking up with old Friends and relatives. She was a regular on game shows that featured minor celebrities, such as Hollywood Squares.
In 1963, she was cast as Sid Caesar's television wife and made regular trips to New York City, where the program was done. Like other television programs of that era, it was live, since videotape was only just being introduced.
Ms. MacKENZIE also acted and sang in live musicals in the United States, things such as Annie Get Your Gun and South Pacific. Over the years, she also worked in Las Vegas, performing in night clubs there. She returned to Canada for the occasional concert and television special, including one on the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation in late 1960. It was about "her story book career" and included the yarn, always told by her publicists, of how she decided to take up singing after she lost her $3,000 violin.
By the end of the 1960s, the big work started to dry up and Canadian newspapers were running the occasional "Where Are They Now" articles. She was in a sprawling ranch house in suburban Encino, Calif. She also owned property in Palmdale and Marin County, Calif., as well as a house on Lake Manitoba back home.
All that detail came up in a nasty divorce from Mr. SHUTTLEWORTH in 1968. Because he was also her manager, he kept 10 per cent of her gross income for the next three years. She later married a banker, Robert KLEIN, but that also ended in divorce.
During the rest of her career, Ms. MacKENZIE kept working in regional theatre and made guest appearances on television series, including MacGyver and Murder, She Wrote, as well as singing stints on programs such as the Dean Martin Show. She also did television commercials in the United States and Canada.
Ms. MacKENZIE had some odd hobbies. She collected and mixed exotic perfumes and in the 1950s she took up target shooting, becoming an expert shot. She and her first husband had a large collection of pistols, rifles and shotguns. In her later years, like many Hollywood stars, she was involved with Scientology.
Ms. MacKENZIE, who died in Burbank, Calif., on September 5, had two children with Mr. SHUTTLEWORTH, a son Mac and a daughter Gigi (short for Gisele) DOWNS.

  M... Names     MA... Names     MAL... Names     Welcome Home

MALLOY - All Categories in OGSPI

MALONE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-04-21 published
The soul of Canadian basketball
The coach who led national teams to Olympics, world championships, was a well-loved motivator on and off the court
By James CHRISTIE Monday, April 21, 2003 - Page R5
Jack DONOHUE knew how to win. His underdog Canadian basketball teams won games against National Basketball Association-bound superstars -- and Mr. DONOHUE won every heart he touched.
The former national basketball coach and famed motivator was arguably the most beloved figure in Canadian amateur and Olympic sport. Mr. DONOHUE died Wednesday in Ottawa after a battle with cancer. He was 71.
With his trademark New York Irish accent and gift for telling inspirational and humorous stories, Mr. DONOHUE was the soul of basketball in Canada for almost two decades and led the national team to three Olympic Games and three world championship tournaments.
His great players included a high schooler in New York named Lew ALCINDOR (later Kareem ABDUL- JABBAR;) Canadian centres Bill WENNINGTON and Mike SMREK, who went on to get National Basketball Association championship rings with Chicago and Los Angeles respectively Leo RAUTINS, a first-round draft pick of Philadelphia 76ers in 1983; guards Eli PASQUALE and Jay TRIANO, who is now assistant coach with the Toronto Raptors.
"For all he's done for basketball in this country -- not just with the national team, but with clinics and all his public speaking he should get the Order of Canada," Mr. TRIANO said.
Under Mr. DONOHUE, Canadian teams stayed among the top six in the world for 18 years. Canada finished fourth at the 1976 Montreal and 1984 Los Angeles Olympics and claimed gold at the 1983 World University Games in Edmonton. In the process they beat a team of U.S. college talents that included future National Basketball Association stars Charles BARKLEY, Karl MALONE, Kevin WILLIS, Ed PINCKNEY and Johnny DAWKINS. The monumental win over the United States came in the semi-final. The gold medal match was just as much a stunner, as Canada beat a Yugoslavian team built with members of the world championship squad.
Globe and Mail columnist Trent FRAYNE recorded how the loquacious Mr. DONOHUE had steered the Canucks to the improbable triumph, making them believe in themselves:
"You've got to appreciate how much talent you have," Jack would say, hunkering down beside a centre or a guard or, every now and then, an unwary newshound (Jack is ready for anybody). "You are unique. Think about that: there's nobody else in the world like you. If you want to be happy, try to make other people happy. Hey, if you want to be loved, you must love others. The way to improve is to do something you have never done. Don't be afraid of your emotions. Let 'em all hang out. Emotions are your generator. The intellect is the governor...."
And now, in the seventh month of July, it has all come about just as Jack promised. On Saturday night in Edmonton, his players, Jack's Guys, hoisted him upon their shoulders, and, for once, Jack's jaw was still. Blue eyes blinking rapidly behind silver-rimmed spectacles, white hair tousled, Jack put the scissors to that final strand and held the net aloft.
Coaching was a passion, not so much for the trophies, but for the human victories, personal challenges and little triumphs.
"I remember my father coming home tired and dirty every night. That's not for me. I love what I'm doing, so it doesn't seem like work and never will," he said.
Since retiring as national coach in 1988, Mr. DONOHUE has been the darling of the motivational speakers' circuit. In that regard, Mr. DONOHUE never quit being The Coach. He urged captains of industry to get the most out of themselves and build teamwork among employees as he did his players.
Often, Mr. DONOHUE told them to find opportunity even in the midst of problems: "It's all a matter of attitude. A guy leaves the house wearing his new, expensive suit for the first time, trips and falls in a puddle. He can get up and curse; or he can get up and check his pockets to see if he caught any fish, " he said in an interview with The Globe and Mail before the Los Angeles Olympics.
Mr. DONOHUE, who was born June 4, 1931, received a bachelor's degree in economics at New York's Fordham University and a master of arts in health education before serving with the U.S. Army in the Korean War. He began teaching in American high schools in 1954 and eventually wound up at New York's Power Memorial Academy, where he coached Mr. ABDUL- JABBAR and amassed a 163-30 record.
He later moved up to Holy Cross College in Worcester, Massachusetts., before taking the reins of the Canadian program -- at first coaching both the men's and women's teams. Mr. DONOHUE was inducted into the Canadian Basketball Hall of Fame in 1992. He is also in the New York City Basketball Hall of Fame, and was awarded a Canada 125 medal by the Governor-General.
When the National Basketball Association expanded north into Canada in 1995, Mr. DONOHUE became director of international public relations and director of Canadian player development for the Vancouver Grizzlies.
One of Mr. DONOHUE's proudest times in basketball came when Mr. TRIANO followed in his path as a national coach. At the 2000 Olympics, Canada -- with Steve NASH and Todd MacCULLOCH -- finished with a 5-2 record, defeating mighty Yugoslavia once again, as it had in 1983.
"We talked about everything from how to guard guys on the perimeter to dying. I think he's at peace with it," Mr. TRIANO said of his mentor at a recent Raptor practice.
"He taught with humour," Mr. TRIANO said of Mr. DONOHUE's coaching style. "We learned a lot because we were laughing all the time."
A colourful broadcaster, naming names -- at least pronouncing them correctly -- wasn't one of Mr. DONOHUE's many strengths. He didn't earn the nickname "Jack Dontknowho" for no reason, Mr. TRIANO said. "It was always, 'that guy,' or 'you over there,'" he said. "I've seen him struggle to introduce his kids because he couldn't remember their names. He always told me he liked doing colour for the European teams, because no one knew if he wasn't saying their names right."
He travelled the world, but the dearest sight for Mr. DONOHUE was always his own front door, in Kanata, Ontario, where he spent his last days. Behind that door were wife Mary Jane, his six kids and his grandchildren.
"We're asking you to hug your families, extra special, and we're asking you to enjoy life, because we sure did and we still are," Mary Jane DONOHUE said this week.
Somewhere, the busy coach found time for all he needed to do. He used to keep a block on his desk reminding him that there are 86,400 seconds in a day, time enough if he organized himself. Family was a priority. At least five minutes of Mr. DONOHUE's day had to be reserved for hugging his kids. He was a believer in family and in human contact. In his coaching years, when he returned from a road journey, there would be a lineup awaiting him at home, the kids taking their turns to make up for the lost minutes of hugging during his absence.
"I met him at a dance he didn't go to," Mary Jane DONOHUE said in the pre-Los Angeles Games article. "My girlfriend and I went and he had several Friends who were very up on it. But Jack said he'd rather go to a movie and would meet them later. He came through the door as my girlfriend and I were walking out.
"He asked why we were leaving so soon, and said there were two gentlemen he wanted us to meet. He introduced my friend to one of his, then I asked who the other gentleman was supposed to be. Guess who?"
Mary Jane DONOHUE felt trust instantly. "I could have gone across the country with him that night and felt safe. If he's for you, he's for you all the way."

  M... Names     MA... Names     MAL... Names     Welcome Home

MALONE - All Categories in OGSPI

MALONEY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-06-05 published
Lawrence (Larry) C. UTECK
By Graham FRASER Thursday, June 5, 2003 - Page A24
Director of athletics at Saint Mary's University, politician, Canadian Football League all-star. Born October 9, 1952, in Toronto. Died December 25, 2002, in Halifax, of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, aged 50.
When Governor-General Adrienne CLARKSON pinned the Order of Canada on Larry UTECK's lapel in Halifax last October, there was a spontaneous standing ovation. The man in the wheelchair, silenced and paralyzed by disease, had won the city's heart.
Growing up in Thornhill and Willowdale, Ontario, Larry was part Tom Sawyer, part Huck Finn: mischievous, competitive, and profoundly resistant to being told what to do. He knew the joy and the pain of being adored and betrayed.
He was a talented athlete, but an injured Achilles tendon ended his hopes of playing hockey seriously. He went to the Jesuit school Brébeuf Collegiate, but his prickly resistance to authority resulted in the principal telling his mother every year to find another school for him. Every year, she prevailed and Larry stayed.
He had a continuing affection for waifs and strays, the marginal and the eccentric. He loved football, and played with reckless intensity, but hated being defined as just an athlete.
Larry went to the University of Colorado on scholarship, but insisted on taking East Asian Studies, and was furious when he was told he couldn't study Chinese because it conflicted with football practice.
He attended Wilfrid Laurier University in Waterloo, Ontario, for a year before being drafted by the Toronto Argonauts -- but after his first season, travelled through still-war-torn Vietnam and Cambodia, taking extraordinary risks, collecting amazing stories and lifelong Friends.
Larry's career in the Canadian Football League was defined by his physical courage. He was a punishing tackler -- it was unnerving to see him straighten out his helmet afterwards, as if his neck had been unhooked -- and a self-destructively determined punt returner.
He paid the price. After five years in Toronto, he was traded to Montreal (where his interception and touchdown took the Alouettes to the Grey Cup in 1978), and then, as his body deteriorated, to British Columbia and finally to Ottawa.
After his football career ended, it took him a while to acknowledge how much he loved the game. In 1982, he was hired as an assistant coach at Saint Mary's University and moved to Halifax, where he fell in love first with the city, then with Sue MALONEY (whom he married in 1989), and their two children Luke and Cain.
He became head coach in 1983, taking the team to the Vanier Cup three times. He saw a world beyond the football field; he was as proud of David Sykes winning a Rhodes Scholarship as he was of the players who went on to play professionally.
In 1994, he ran for Halifax City Council and was elected, and in 1998 became deputy mayor. He was as hardworking and candid as a politician as he was as a coach. In December 1997, Russell McLELLAN, then Liberal premier of Nova Scotia, tried hard to persuade him to be a candidate. Tempted, Larry said: "I just can't."
He was already feeling the first symptoms of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis; it was the beginning of a five-year decline and an extraordinary demonstration of grace, wit and courage. As he wrote his young daughter Cain, "I had a long, active, and productive life as a caterpillar. Now I am more quiet and restful, kind of like living in a cocoon. I don't know how or when or even why, but when this stage is over I will be a butterfly. Won't that be something, your Dad the butterfly."
At his instruction, the Bob Dylan song I Shall Be Released was played at his memorial service at the Basilica in Halifax, where 1,500 people came to say goodbye.
Graham is Larry UTECK's brother-in-law.

  M... Names     MA... Names     MAL... Names     Welcome Home

MALONEY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-09-27 published
MALONEY Marjorie (née HOBMAN)
Died peacefully in her daughters arms at her home as was her wish, the morning of September 21st, 2003 in her 62nd year. Marjorie brought warmth, peace, and a deeper joy to all those who knew and cared for her. Her intelligence, compassion, love, beauty, and deep billowing laughter were gifts she offered the whole world, but especially to the broken hearted, more fragile, and ethereal beings amoung us. Some knew Marjorie as a collector and 'reluctant' seller of antiques, but those who knew her better, saw her as what she truly was an: artist. She had an eye for the beautiful and unique, the deftly comic, and all the rare wonderful 'things' and people she came across in her life's searching. But for her great artistic and spiritual sensitivity she did endure some sufferings and sorrows. We may all celebrate the peace that she has now in her ultimate perfecting. She was the beloved mother, sister, and friend to thousands. She will be dearly missed. A wake to celebrate her life will be held at the family home on Sunday September 28, beginning at 3: 00 p.m. Friends and neighbours are invited to attend. Donations can be made to Trinity Home Hospice, 25 King Street West, Suite 1102, Toronto, Ontario., M5L 1G3.
When the baby is born, the baby cries, and the world rejoices. When a person dies, the world cries, and the soul rejoices. 'A Buddhist wisdom'

  M... Names     MA... Names     MAL... Names     Welcome Home

MALONEY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-11-07 published
MALONEY, Reverend Francis (Frank) Joseph, C.Ss.R.
At the Houses of Providence on November 5, 2003, age 84 years, Father Frank was born in Peterborough, Ontario, son of the late George MALONEY and Cecilia LYNCH, survived by his brother, Raymond MALONEY (Jeanette), Royal Oak, Michigan, sisters-in-law, Rita MALONEY and Helen MALONEY (Peterborough, Ontario) also leaves to mourn several nieces, nephews and cousins, his Redemptorist confreres and many Friends. Predeceased by his brothers Harold, George, John and Vincent (both of whom died as infants) and his sister, Sister Cecilia MALONEY, C.S.J. Father Frank worked for General Electric (Peterborough) for eight years. Profession of vows as a Redemptorists was made in Woodstock, Ontario August 2, 1949. Ordained to the priesthood at Woodstock, Ontario, June 17, 1954 by London Bishop John C. CODY. For the first twelve years of his priesthood, he worked in Redemptorist parishes in London, Ontario, Saint John's, Newfoundland., Quebec City, and Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island, where he planned and supervised the building of their new parish church. From 1968 until his health began to decline in 1995, Fr. Frank served the Redemptorists in Eastern Canada as Consultor, Treasurer (18 years) and Provincial Superior (9 years) 1975-1984. In declining health since 1995, Father Frank lived at Providence Centre. Friends may call at St. Patrick's Shrine Church, 141 McCaul Street (at Dundas) all day Sunday, November 9, with wake prayers at 7: 00 p.m.
Mass of Christian burial will be celebrated on Monday, November 10, at 10: 00 a.m. at St. Patrick's Church, Toronto. Burial will take place at St. Peter's Cemetery, Peterborough on Monday, November 10 at 3: 00 p.m. Funeral arrangements entrusted to Paul O'Connor Funeral Home Ltd.

  M... Names     MA... Names     MAL... Names     Welcome Home

MALONEY - All Categories in OGSPI