All Categories: A B C D E F G H I J K L M Mc N O P Q R S T U V W Y Z Welcome Home
Local Folders.. A B C D E F G H I J K L M Mc N O P Q R S T U V W Y Z
-1 +1

"MAG" 2003 Obituary


MAGEE  MAGIDSOHN  MAGILL  MAGISDSOHN  MAGNUSON  MAGUIRE  MAGWOOD 

MAGEE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-05-31 published
Henry Roger JOWETT
Born Melbourne, Australia, on July 2, 1926. Died 10: 15 a.m., May 25, 2003. It is with great sadness that his family announces his passing. Educated at Shaftesbury Grammar School in London, England, Roger served as an officer with the British Army from 1945 to 1947, until being transferred to British Intelligence. After living in Egypt, Sweden, Hong Kong and Singapore, he moved to Canada and joined the Canadian Army where he was stationed at Camp Borden from 1954 to 1957, and was promoted Captain Staff Quarter Master. In 1969, Roger became a professor of Photography and later the Chair of Visual Arts at Sheridan College, Oakville, until retiring in 1991. A proud and devoted father, brilliant photographer, and wonderfully eccentric man. Roger was an avid sailor and sportsman who was still winning on the tennis court at the age of 73. He will be missed by many of his close Friends and colleagues, and forever by his beloved children Nicola, Alexander and Andrew and his sisters Diana and Cynthia. Roger was predeceased by his brother Anthony. With the help of family and Friends he was able to spend his last days at home in comfort. Nicola, Alexander and Andrew would like to express sincere thanks to Dr. Karen PAPE, Brian MAGEE Sr., Steve JOHNSON, Bill COSTIGANE, Sandy and John DUNN, Dr. Matthew DISTEFANO, Gillian, Sylvie and Kate HAND and to his caregiver Eric NOFTLE. In keeping with Roger's spirit a 'Pimm's Party' will be held to celebrate his life at The Oakville Club, 56 Water Street, on July 2nd from 6 p.m. until 9 p.m. In lieu of flowers, gifts may be made to a memorial charitable trust established in his memory to assist palliative care patients in their wishes to die at home in dignity. Donations can be sent to 'The Roger Jowett Charitable Trust', 45-1534 Lancaster Drive, Oakville, On L6H 2Z3. The trust is currently applying for registered status with the Canada Customs and Revenue Agency.

  M... Names     MA... Names     MAG... Names     Welcome Home

MAGEE - All Categories in OGSPI

MAGIDSOHN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-07-02 published
Susan WESTMORELAND
By Anria LOUBSER, Wednesday, July 2, 2002 - page A18
Wife, mother, friend, reporter.
Born August 5, 1965, in Hamilton, Ontario Died April 28 in Hamilton, of breast cancer, aged 59.
Bright, wacky, fun-loving and fiery of temperament, Susan Westmoreland brought abundant energy to everything she did and could put a positive, often humorous, spin on just about anything. Even cancer. "Pick up some lottery tickets, sweetie - we lost the cancer lottery and someone owes us big time!" (Don't think she was flippant. She was plucky and very determined to have a good time.)
Sue was 5-foot-8 but, through a combination of heels and personality, seemed six feet tall.
Her intelligence, sociability, sharp wit and palpable integrity could make her seem intimidating at first. She was competitive in the best sense of the word and didn't readily cut slack for herself or others. Still, those close to her got to hear and see the doubts, fears and vulnerabilities that made her adorable.
Friends and family (both human and furry) were at the heart of Sue's world.
She loved the ritual of getting together and had a way of making moments memorable by doing something special, creating a tradition or saving a memento. Sue was a devoted, attentive friend; she gave the best of her enthusiasm to others.
Sue brought all her gifts for Friendship to bear in her marriage to Jon MAGIDSOHN.
Whether you knew them as "SueandJon" or "JonandSue," you knew they shared many interests and had a deep love for and loyalty to one another, but always with an awareness of and deference to each other's autonomy.
Sue had a very deliberate way of envisioning, planning and making everything and anything happen, from decorating her home to a radical career change.
Vision and ambition drove Sue to find work that she loved. After a degree in political science, a year in France, four years working on Parliament Hill and four as an actor, Sue undertook the broadcast journalism program at Ryerson University, graduating with honours in 1998.
Susan was a born video-journalist. Every aspect of the job drew on her strengths and challenged her to use them in new ways. In 1999, she and Jon moved to Windsor, Ontario, where she had landed a television-news reporter job at CHWI. She was exhilarated by the demands of her job and became involved in the community.
Devoted to family and Friends in the Toronto area and missing the big city life, Sue and Jon moved back to Toronto in January, 2002, when Sue was hired as an arts reporter for Canadian Broadcasting Corporation Radio.
Sue was almost defiant in the face of the diagnosis she was given a year ago. She was four months pregnant. After agonizing deliberation, she and Jon chose to have a course of chemotherapy that was. as far as research could attest, safe for pregnant women. It was very, very difficult for her to go for those treatments, but she went and Jon read her Dr. Seuss and The Stinky Cheese Man while the intravenous dripped. Sue took a leave from work, kept up her social calendar and enjoyed the nesting phase of expectant parenthood. She had a vision of her and Jon's life as parents and kept her eyes resolutely "on the prize."
Sue gave birth to Myles Day on Oct.16, 2002, and declared (with gusto) that she was taking a little holiday from cancer. Then, later, her voice cracked as she talked about just wanting to be a healthy mom. The commonplace feelings of self-doubt and anxiety experienced by new parents were painfully magnified for her.
Sue was admitted to hospital April 24; as the pain ebbed away, her tenacity finally did, too. Her sparkly aura and mega-watt smile are indelibly in our hearts.
Anna is a friend of Sue. Jon MAGISDSOHN, Sue's husband, contributed to this essay.

  M... Names     MA... Names     MAG... Names     Welcome Home

MAGIDSOHN - All Categories in OGSPI

MAGILL o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-11-20 published
CADOGAN, Elda Magill (née MAGILL)
of Mount Saint Joseph Nursing Home, Miramichi, New Brunswick, a journalist, poet, playwright and short story writer, died Tuesday, November 18, 2003, at 7: 47 a.m. at the age of 86. As a playwright, she was best known for her one-act-play, Rise and Shine, which has the distinction of being one of the most frequently-performed Canadian plays ever written. It has been performed in every province in Canada, in 47 states in the U.S., and in England, Ireland, Australia and South Africa. A German translation was Canada's representation in a worldwide cultural exchange in Bonn, Germay.
In 1992, the University of Guelph added the Elda Magill Cadogan Collection to its extensive theatre archives. The collection included correspondence, manuscripts, printed editions, advertisements, review and programs related to the play. In 1993, the university obtained her voluminous collection of memorabilia on the Stratford Festival She attended the theatre's premier performance in 1953 and took a special interest in the organization after moving to Strfatford in 1985. Born December 17, 1916 at Mount Forest, Ontario, she was the only daughter of Robert, a lay minister at Conn, and Katherine Herron MAGILL. She grew up in Woodstock, where her writing was first published - a story and poem in the Woodstock Sentinel Review - when she was 8. She graduated from Woodstock Collegiate Institute, where she was valedictorian for her class and, after completing a business course, was employed at the Woodstock Sentinel Review. In 1939, she married George CADOGAN, of Woodstock.
The couple later purchased newpapers in Durham, Ontario, Pictou, Nova Scotia and Oromocto and Newcastle, New Brunswick. George CADOGAN died in February, 1996. Mrs CADOGAN won several awards for her newspaper articles and she and her husband were the first husband and wife team to be named honourary life members of both the Atlantic and the Canadian Community Newspaper Associations. While in Stratford, Mrs. CADOGAN was an honourary member of the Writers Club of Stratford and a member of the Canadian Authors Association, the Noon Book Club and the Good Book Club. She was a member of Saint John's United Church, Stratford. She was also a contributor to The Beacon Herald for several years. In September, 1999, she moved to a retirement residence in Frederiction, New Brunswick, where she could be closer to some of her family members, and recently moved again, to Mount Saint Joseph Nursing Home in Miramichi.
An animal lover, Mrs. CADOGAN usually had at least one cat in her life, and once a dog as well.
She is survived by two sons, David (Michelle), of Miramichi, New Brunswick, and Michael, of Scarborough; daughter Katherine HILDER (Stephen,) of Prince George, British Columbia, and Elizabeth Jean MORGAN (Dan,) of Fredericton, New Brunswick. Also surviving are six grandchildren, Joanne (Allen IRVING) and Colin CADOGAN, Craig CADOGAN and Sheryl UDEH (Obi) and Kristin and Leslie HILDER, and one great grandchild, Benjamin UDEH. In addition to her husband, she was predeceased by four brothers, Max, Rex, Weston and Robert, and a daughter-in-law, Susan (YOUNG) CADOGAN. Friends will be received and the Stratford, Ontario W.G. Young Funeral Home for visitation Friday evening November 21st from 7: 00-9:00 p.m. and for the funeral service Saturday morning, November 22nd at 11: 00 a.m. Reverend Greg WHITE/WHYTE of Saint John's United Church will officiate.

  M... Names     MA... Names     MAG... Names     Welcome Home

MAGILL - All Categories in OGSPI

MAGISDSOHN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-07-02 published
Susan WESTMORELAND
By Anria LOUBSER, Wednesday, July 2, 2002 - page A18
Wife, mother, friend, reporter.
Born August 5, 1965, in Hamilton, Ontario Died April 28 in Hamilton, of breast cancer, aged 59.
Bright, wacky, fun-loving and fiery of temperament, Susan Westmoreland brought abundant energy to everything she did and could put a positive, often humorous, spin on just about anything. Even cancer. "Pick up some lottery tickets, sweetie - we lost the cancer lottery and someone owes us big time!" (Don't think she was flippant. She was plucky and very determined to have a good time.)
Sue was 5-foot-8 but, through a combination of heels and personality, seemed six feet tall.
Her intelligence, sociability, sharp wit and palpable integrity could make her seem intimidating at first. She was competitive in the best sense of the word and didn't readily cut slack for herself or others. Still, those close to her got to hear and see the doubts, fears and vulnerabilities that made her adorable.
Friends and family (both human and furry) were at the heart of Sue's world.
She loved the ritual of getting together and had a way of making moments memorable by doing something special, creating a tradition or saving a memento. Sue was a devoted, attentive friend; she gave the best of her enthusiasm to others.
Sue brought all her gifts for Friendship to bear in her marriage to Jon MAGIDSOHN.
Whether you knew them as "SueandJon" or "JonandSue," you knew they shared many interests and had a deep love for and loyalty to one another, but always with an awareness of and deference to each other's autonomy.
Sue had a very deliberate way of envisioning, planning and making everything and anything happen, from decorating her home to a radical career change.
Vision and ambition drove Sue to find work that she loved. After a degree in political science, a year in France, four years working on Parliament Hill and four as an actor, Sue undertook the broadcast journalism program at Ryerson University, graduating with honours in 1998.
Susan was a born video-journalist. Every aspect of the job drew on her strengths and challenged her to use them in new ways. In 1999, she and Jon moved to Windsor, Ontario, where she had landed a television-news reporter job at CHWI. She was exhilarated by the demands of her job and became involved in the community.
Devoted to family and Friends in the Toronto area and missing the big city life, Sue and Jon moved back to Toronto in January, 2002, when Sue was hired as an arts reporter for Canadian Broadcasting Corporation Radio.
Sue was almost defiant in the face of the diagnosis she was given a year ago. She was four months pregnant. After agonizing deliberation, she and Jon chose to have a course of chemotherapy that was. as far as research could attest, safe for pregnant women. It was very, very difficult for her to go for those treatments, but she went and Jon read her Dr. Seuss and The Stinky Cheese Man while the intravenous dripped. Sue took a leave from work, kept up her social calendar and enjoyed the nesting phase of expectant parenthood. She had a vision of her and Jon's life as parents and kept her eyes resolutely "on the prize."
Sue gave birth to Myles Day on Oct.16, 2002, and declared (with gusto) that she was taking a little holiday from cancer. Then, later, her voice cracked as she talked about just wanting to be a healthy mom. The commonplace feelings of self-doubt and anxiety experienced by new parents were painfully magnified for her.
Sue was admitted to hospital April 24; as the pain ebbed away, her tenacity finally did, too. Her sparkly aura and mega-watt smile are indelibly in our hearts.
Anna is a friend of Sue. Jon MAGISDSOHN, Sue's husband, contributed to this essay.

  M... Names     MA... Names     MAG... Names     Welcome Home

MAGISDSOHN - All Categories in OGSPI

MAGNUSON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-16 published
Former National Hockey Leaguer MAGNUSON killed, RAMAGE injured in car crash
By Erin CONWAY- SMITH, Tuesday, December 16, 2003 - Page S1
Former National Hockey League defenceman Keith MAGNUSON was killed in a three-car collision yesterday when he was a passenger in a car driven by former Toronto Maple Leaf captain Rob RAMAGE.
RAMAGE was injured in the car crash north of Toronto.
MAGNUSON played 11 years with the Chicago Black Hawks.
York Regional Police said RAMAGE was driving a blue Intrepid that was involved in the accident, caused when one of the vehicles apparently went out of control.
RAMAGE was in an Etobicoke, Ontario, hospital last night, being treated for a broken femur, police said.
The accident, which occurred in Vaughan, happened about 5 p.m., but rescue workers were unable to remove the body until after 10 p.m. Police didn't believe weather was a factor in the accident.
Sergeant Igor CHOMIAK said late last night that an investigation is under way.
A third person, a woman, was being treated for non-life threatening injuries last night.
It was reported that RAMAGE was travelling back to Toronto from Bolton, northwest of the city, after attending the funeral of former National Hockey League player Keith McCREARY, who died last week after a battle with cancer. McCREARY was the chair of the National Hockey League Alumni Association and RAMAGE is the vice-chair.
RAMAGE is a frequent guest commentator on FanSports KFNS, a St. Louis radio station. Last night, the station had posted a notice on an internal bulletin board informing staff about RAMAGE's accident.
RAMAGE, 44, played 1,044 games in the National Hockey League from 1979 to 1994. He served as Maple Leaf captain from 1989 to 1991.
MAGNUSON was born on April 27, 1947, in Wadena, Saskatchewan. He played college hockey at Denver University, where he helped the Pioneers to the N.C.A.A. championship in 1968 and 1969. He was a mainstay on defence for the Blackhawks from 1969 to 1979.

  M... Names     MA... Names     MAG... Names     Welcome Home

MAGNUSON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-17 published
Life was good for MAGNUSON
By Eric DUHATSCHEK, With a report from Allan MAKI Wednesday, December 17, 2003 - Page S1
It was one of those "catching up with" features newspapers run every so often. Last January, the Chicago Sun-Times profiled Keith MAGNUSON, one of the most popular players ever to pull on a Chicago Blackhawks sweater.
To the thousands who used to pack the old Chicago Stadium, MAGNUSON's ever-lasting appeal came from a rough-and-tumble playing style that produced a cracked cheekbone, three knee injuries requiring surgery, a torn Achilles' tendon, two broken ankles, a dislocated elbow, three broken jaws, a broken vertebra, a broken wrist, a dislocated shoulder, three missing teeth and more than 400 stitches.
MAGNUSON, after reflecting on his career, his hobbies and all the aches and pains that resulted from a 10-year National Hockey League career, observed: "Otherwise, I feel great. Cindy [his wife] and I are real proud of our kids."
"Life is good," MAGNUSON concluded.
Life for MAGNUSON ended at the age of 56 in a fatal automobile accident on Monday afternoon as he was returning home from a funeral for National Hockey League alumni association chairman Keith McCREARY, who died last week of cancer. MAGNUSON was the passenger in a car driven by former National Hockey League player Rob RAMAGE, the vice-chairman of the alumni association.
MAGNUSON played 589 National Hockey League games for the Blackhawks, and on his retirement in October of 1979, he joined the team's coaching staff, as an assistant to Eddie JOHNSTON. JOHNSTON, now the Pittsburgh Penguins' assistant general manager, remembered MAGNUSON yesterday as "the ultimate competitor. I mean, when Keith MAGNUSON put on the skates on, you didn't just get 100 per cent, you got 110 per cent every night. He just played with so much passion, it was unreal."
The Blackhawks made it to the Stanley Cup final twice in MAGNUSON's career, in 1971 and 1973, losing both times to the Montreal Canadiens. It was the heyday of hockey in Chicago. The Blackhawks had Dennis and Bobby HULL, the legendary Stan MIKITA and Tony ESPOSITO, a future Hall Of Fame member, in goal. MAGNUSON's job was to protect ESPOSITO, and he did it with a passion that JOHNSTON said was contagious in the Blackhawks' dressing room.
"What he always did very, very well was set the tone early in the game. He let the opposition know that when you dropped the puck in the game, "This was what you were going to see, guys, for 60 minutes.' "
MAGNUSON, who most recently was the director of sales for Coca-Cola Enterprises, grew up in Saskatoon as an all-round athlete. He was a boyhood chum of former National Hockey League coach Dave KING. The two attended Churchill elementary school and used to play 1-on-1 hockey: KING as a forward and MAGNUSON as a defenceman.
Eventually, MAGNUSON and four other teenagers from Saskatoon earned scholarships at the University of Denver and helped the Pioneers win two National Collegiate Athletic Association championships. MAGNUSON and Tim GOULD played every sport together and were also teamed as defence partners.
"We never missed a shift," said GOULD, whose wife, a nurse in Calgary, woke him early yesterday to inform him of MAGNUSON's death. "He was the greatest guy and a good friend."
GOULD said he and MAGNUSON used to dream up ways to get MAGNUSON to hockey, football and baseball games on Sunday.
MAGNUSON's parents were Baptists and considered the Sabbath a day of rest. It became GOULD's job to sneak into the MAGNUSON home while they were at church and take Keith's equipment to the rink or the diamond.
"Of course, if we scored a goal or a run, our names would be mentioned in the newspaper the next day," GOULD said. "But we thought we were keeping it secret."
GOULD said MAGNUSON was best known among his Friends for having a poor memory. Once in Saskatoon, MAGNUSON drove his dad's car to the rink for a Blades game, only to drive home with a teammate, the two of them completely immersed in the game they had just played.
The next morning, MAGNUSON's father asked where the car was. "Keith had to run back to the rink to get it," said Dale ZEMAN, another of MAGNUSON's former junior and college teammates. "There was also the night Keith and I went bowling when we were freshmen at Denver. We came out and couldn't find the car. It had rolled backwards three blocks because Keith forgot to put it in park."
GOULD said: "He was awful forgetful. We're having a reunion in June [for Denver University hockey] and we had a card printed up, and Keith's quote on it was: 'I'm going to be there -- and Cliff [KOROLL] is going to remind me.' The memories, that's what get you through this."
MAGNUSON is survived by his wife, his daughter, Molly, and his son, Kevin, a former University of Michigan defenceman who had a tryout with the Blackhawks. Recently, after a short playing career in the East Coast Hockey League, Kevin had gone back to school for his law degree, JOHNSTON said.
"To have something like this happen, this close to the holidays, the timing couldn't be worse. It's never good, but geez, here he is, going up there for a funeral for Keith McCREARY and then to have something like this happen.
"God, it's awful," he said. "We'll miss him. He was such a big part of the community in Chicago, an icon. Everybody knew Keith MAGNUSON. It's an awful tragedy."
San Jose Sharks general manager Doug WILSON, another of MAGNUSON's close Friends, was badly shaken by his former teammate's death. WILSON said he thought of MAGNUSON as something of a father figure. "Keith has had a profound influence on my life." Really, all I can say is, all my thoughts and prayers are with Cindy and the kids right now."
Jim DEMARIA, the Blackhawks executive director of communications, worked closely with MAGNUSON in his role as the founder and president of the Chicago alumni association.
"Any time you needed something, you could call Maggy," DEMARIA said. "He was the first guy in line to help any kind of charity you had. I mean, he was just that kind of person. And when the team wasn't doing real well, he was down in the room, talking to the coaches, telling the players, 'keep your chin up, keep working, things will turn around.' He was a real positive guy."

  M... Names     MA... Names     MAG... Names     Welcome Home

MAGNUSON - All Categories in OGSPI

MAGUIRE o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-10-22 published
Alberta Ann (MAGUIRE) SLOSS
In loving memory of Alberta Ann (Maguire) Sloss, November 1, 1947 to October 9, 2003.
Alberta SLOSS, a resident of Espanola died at the Espanola General Hospital on Thursday, October 9, 2003, at the age of 55 years.
She was born in Mindemoya, daughter of the late Oswald and the late Elsie (QUACKENBUSH) MAGUIRE. Alberta was a teacher at the Webbwood Public School, S. Geiger School in Massey and A. B. Ellis School in Espanola. She was a member of the Spring Bay Pentecostal Church and the Queensway Pentecostal Church in Espanola. She enjoyed gardening but her greatest joys were serving the Lord Jesus and the time she dedicated to her loving husband, children and grandchildren. Alberta will be greatly missed by all who knew her or worked with her over the years.
Dearly loved and loving wife of Ken SLOSS of Espanola. Loving mother of Bryan and wife Susin SLOSS of Thornhill, Brent and wife Chani SLOSS of Alma, and Brad and wife Amber SLOSS of Cambridge. Dear grandmother of Shekinah, Blake, Shayna and Hannah Joy. Dear sister of Rosalie JAGGARD (husband David) of Mindemoya and Elsie SILESKY of Englehart (husband Clifford predeceased). Also survived by five nieces and nephews.
Friends called the Culgin Funeral Home, Gore Bay on Sunday, October 12. The funeral service was held from the Wm. G. Turner Chapel at the Culgin Funeral Home on Monday, October 13, 2003 with Pastor Frank HANER officiating. Interment followed in Long Bay Cemetery.

  M... Names     MA... Names     MAG... Names     Welcome Home

MAGUIRE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-05-31 published
NORMAN- SMITH, Keeva Minette
Born May 16, 2003 in Toronto to Martha NORMAN and P. Roch SMITH, Keeva died peacefully of a brain stem tumour at home on May 28, 2003 with the love of her parents and brother Ronan. Keeva joins her grandparents F. Charles SMITH (1983) and Rose Marie SMITH (2002) in eternal life. She leaves to mourn her grandparents: Sheelagh NORMAN and Gerry PARKES of Toronto; Conolly and Sharon NORMAN of Fairvale, New Brunswick; her uncles and their families: Randy SMITH and Jill BONNETEAU- SMITH and cousins Cole and Jake of Victoria, British Columbia; Christopher and Pamela SMITH and cousins Victoria and Jacqueline of Sugarloaf, New York; Nick NORMAN of Toronto; Renee MAGUIRE and cousin Devyn NORMAN of Huntington Beach, California. Martha, Roch and Ronan would like to extend a tremendous thank you to midwife Katrina KILROY; R.N. Katie WADEY; the nurses and doctors at the Hospital for Sick Children Mt. Sinai; Home Palliative Care Network; Community Care Access Centre and all those who helped in making Keeva's life a full one and ensuring that she had the opportunity to return home to die in dignity with her family. Thanks for coming to meet us Keeva, you are an incredible daughter. Ronan sends you dandelion wishes that you are safe. A visitation with Keeva and her family will take place on Wednesday June 4th from 7 - 9 p.m. at Morley Bedford Funeral Services, 159 Eglinton West (2 stoplights west of Yonge St.). A celebration of Keeva's life will be held on Thursday June 5th at 10: 30 am at the Church of the Messiah, Dupont and Avenue Road. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made in Keeva's memory to Trails Youth Initiatives, 378 Fairlawn Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M5M 1T8 (416) 787-2457 (www.trails.ca) or the Hospital for Sick Children Foundation, 555 University Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M5G 1X8.

  M... Names     MA... Names     MAG... Names     Welcome Home

MAGUIRE - All Categories in OGSPI

MAGWOOD o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-09-30 published
Peter Gordon CROMPTON
Son, brother, friend, athlete, businessman. Born December 5, 1975, in Toronto. Died July 13 as a result of a boating accident, aged 27.
By Josh DOLAN, Bryce GIBSON, Blake HUTCHESON, Adam LAZIER, Rob MAGWOOD, Ian SULLIVAN
Tuesday, September 30, 2003 - Page A24
In the words of Pete's father Ken, "Pete did not live only 27 years. He lived 9,946 days and every one to the fullest!" Somehow this number is both more palatable and more appropriate when speaking of Pete's life.
Pete was born at Toronto General Hospital, weighing in at a larger-than-life 11 pounds, 10 ounces. From that day forward, "larger-than-life" was an apt description -- physically and otherwise. Pete grew up, along with brother Jeff, in a household that loved competition, outdoor activity, a good challenge, the odd healthy debate and, most of all, each other. The family went back and forth from Toronto to Collingwood, Ontario, to enjoy the best of both areas, depending on the season and the opportunity. His parents, Ken and Judy, loved watching their sons excel and gave them every opportunity to do so.
Pete was on skis at the age of 3 at Osler Bluff Ski Club, had a golf club in his hand by 5, and was windsurfing by 6. He took all three sports to incredible heights. He enjoyed and excelled at so much in life, yet did not seem to need or seek recognition. His low-key manner and his quiet confidence kept everyone at ease and drew people to him.
In skiing, Pete was a member of the Ontario Ski Team, competing nationally and internationally in the NorAm Race Series, the U.S.A. Junior Championships and the World University Games. He won several championships and had a natural gift on snow. He also became a scratch golfer and loved to take on Friends and family.
Perhaps his greatest passion, however, was windsurfing. He found every excuse he could to hit the surf on Georgian Bay, but his sense of adventure took him to beaches all over the world, including the southwest coast of Australia, Maui, the Colombian River Gorge in Oregon and Cape Hatteras in North Carolina. In the words of one of his lifelong Friends, "Pete loved life and life loved him right back!"
Pete was a generous, loyal and reliable friend who developed strong and lasting relationships at every phase of life: his youthful years of sports, competition and family; his fun and challenges at the National Ski Academy; his university years at Laurentian University and the University of Guelph (B.A. in Economics); his career launch at Nesbitt Burns; and his last several years at C.B. Richard Ellis where he was in commercial real-estate investment sales. At every turn he met with success with his long graceful stride and disarming smile.
It was going to be fun just to sit back and watch him perform in the decades ahead.
Looking through the family photo albums Pete had a mischievous smile and a sense of adventure in every picture. In virtually every snapshot either something spectacular had just happened, or it was about to happen. He was always surrounded by Friends and family as his easygoing style and sense of fun were infectious. His determination to improve and grow were never overt but always present. The results speak for themselves. As one good friend suggested: "Men wanted to be like Pete. Women wanted to be with him." More than 1,500 people attended his funeral.
Pete was quite simply a great human being who would have continued to win in his unpretentious manner and contribute on a kind-spirited and decent level to any situation. We are among his many Friends who have been brought together because of this fine person and who have had the good fortune of sharing a small piece of Pete's life -- all 9,946 days of it.
Josh, Bryce, Blake, Adam, Rob and Ian are Friends of Pete's.

  M... Names     MA... Names     MAG... Names     Welcome Home

MAGWOOD - All Categories in OGSPI