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"MAD" 2003 Obituary


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MADAHBEE o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-11-05 published
Barbara KING (née MADAHBEE)
In loving memory of Barbara KING (née MADAHBEE) who passed away Thursday morning, October 30, 2003 at her residence at the age of 73 years.
Beloved wife of Raymond George KING, predeceased. Will be sadly missed by her children, Susan KING and Will PATHY, Jane KING and Ken PASTO, Debbie KING and Bill HOMER, Patrick KING (wife Jean) and predeceased by son Kevin KING. Special grandmother of Desmond and Grant KING. Dear sister of Anne BREYER, Jean ANDREWS, Ivan MADAHBEE, Lillian BUCKNELL, Archie MADAHBEE, Cecilia BAYERS, Linda THIBODEAU, Patsy CORBIERE, Tootsie PANAMICK, Patrick MADAHBEE and predeceased by Veronica McGRAW, Lawrence MADAHBEE, Elizabeth KING, Eli MADAHBEE, Morris MADAHBEE and Doris BREWER. Rested at the Sucker Creek Community Hall on Sunday, November 1, 2003. Funeral Mass was held at St. Bernard's Church, Little Current on Monday, November 3, 2003. Cremation. Lougheed Funeral Home Sudbury.

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MADDEN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-05-28 published
Rev. John Francis MADDEN
By Joan Fidler BURROW and Reverend Bob MADDEN Wednesday, May 28, 2003 - Page A20
Son, brother, uncle, Basilian priest, teacher. Born October 30, 1921, in Detroit. Died January 5, in Toronto, of cancer, aged Picture a long stretch of red dirt road in the tropical forest of central Ghana, West Africa, in 1957. A minivan stops and disgorges five young Canadian university students, their Ghanaian guide, and their leader: a slight, youthful-looking priest from Toronto. He discreetly hands out the toilet paper as his companions disappear into the lush growth.
Father Jack MADDEN, C.S.B., was well-suited to be accompanying the students attending a seminar at the University of Accra in Ghana.
Born of Irish heritage, he was the eldest of three children of the late Patrick Henry MADDEN and Mary Agnes McKNIGHT. After graduating from high school, Jack came to Toronto to enter the novitiate of the Basilian Fathers. He was ordained a priest in 1948, pursued graduate studies at Harvard, and spent the rest of his life ministering and teaching in a variety of situations.
Father Jack was a much-beloved English professor at St. Michael's College, University of Toronto, in the 1950s and 1960s. He loved words and helped his students love them. He would recite by memory the etymology, the cognates in sister languages and the story of their development. Students learning Anglo-Saxon today still use his "Frequency Word List of Anglo-Saxon Poetry." He was approachable and never pedantic.
He used the storyteller method, and his enthusiasm for English literature inspired many of his students. Former students often refer to his vibrant presentation of the works of Chaucer; one such student still cherishes the image of "Father MADDEN sitting cross-legged on his desk, chuckling as he read aloud from The Canterbury Tales!" Many have said that he was one of the best teachers they ever had; all benefited from his zeal, intelligence, knowledge and compassion.
In 1969, he was assigned to Houston, Texas, where he combined ministry with teaching at the University of Saint Thomas. He also served successfully and effectively as chaplain to the parish grade-school. At that time, one colleague noted, "Saint Anne's must have the only grade-school in the world whose chaplain has a PhD from Harvard!"
In 1980, he went to St. Joseph's College, University of Alberta in Edmonton, where he was involved in campus ministry and taught theology. Other parish assignments were in Owen Sound, Ontario, and in Calgary.
Wherever he taught or worked in campus ministry, Father Jack combined the sacramental and education roles of his priestly calling as a Basilian. Along with his teaching and parochial duties, he gave retreats to priests, religious and laity in the United States and Canada. In almost every diocese and Basilian Institution in which he served, he was consulted by bishops, confrères, diocesan priests and religious on matters educational, spiritual, theological and liturgical.
Father Jack began to experience physical health difficulties early in 1980. In 1990, he fell victim to neuropathy, which increasingly affected his walking. At his request, he was appointed to Anglin House, the Basilian infirmary facility in Toronto on the St. Michael's College campus, taking up residence there in 1998. In 2002 he was diagnosed with cancer, which eventually confined him to bed until his death.
He finished his life's journey on a road paved with loving concern for others, a dynamic personality, a sense of humour, and a deep and joyous faith in God. He leaves his brother, Reverend Bob MADDEN, C.S.B.; his sister Patricia SYRING of Toledo, Ohio; six nieces and nephews and seven grand-nieces and nephews.
Joan Fidler BURROWS is a former student of John MADDEN; Father Bob, his brother.

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MADDEN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-10-25 published
MADDEN, Devon Lee (née HASSARD)
Died suddenly in Annapolis, Maryland on October 17, 2003. Forever cherished by husband Robert, daughters Brooke and Page, mother Enid HASSARD, sister Shelley, and niece Ashley. Predecased by father Russell HASSARD. Cremation, family service. For those who wish, donations to charity of choice would be appreciated.

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MADDREN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-02-18 published
His voice resonated on airwaves
Veteran read news, hosted shows on Canadian Broadcasting Corporation Radio and television for four decades
By Allison LAWLOR Tuesday, February 18, 2003 - Page R7
Harry MANNIS, a popular Canadian Broadcasting Corporation announcer and host whose warm, deep voice graced the country's airwaves for four decades, died last month in Toronto. He was 82.
Mr. MANNIS started his career with the Canadian Broadcasting Corp. in Halifax at the end of the Second World War. He was known across the country, not only for reading the radio news, but hosting a number of programs including Canadian Broadcasting Corporation radio's Themes and Variations and Anthology. His voice was also often heard on the Project, Stage and Fourth Estate.
"He had that great resonance that I envied, " said his long-time friend and former radio personality Max FERGUSON. "As an announcer I have always considered him the best."
Mr. MANNIS preferred radio but also ventured into television, reading the Toronto metro news and hosting What's New?, a news magazine geared toward youth, which was launched in 1972.
In radio, he said, you had the option of sitting at the microphone in an old T-shirt (although Mr. MANNIS himself was most often smartly dressed in a turtleneck sweater and dress coat). He also found it less stressful than television. "It's easier on the nerves. Only one thing can be a problem -- reading, " he said in an interview in 1975.
A modest, unassuming man, who stood at just over six-feet tall, Mr. MANNIS admitted to still having a bout of nerves after almost three decades in the business.
"Even after 29 years I haven't been able to conquer this feeling, " he said in 1975.
"When I was doing the Toronto metro television news, I had a recurring nightmare that when I'd go on the air, all the pages of the news would be mixed up. It's never happened, but you never know, " he said.
It was that same fear that prompted him to meticulously check his work before sitting down in front of the microphone. If he didn't know a word, or its proper pronunciation, instead of guessing and taking the risk of being wrong on-air he would head right to the public broadcaster's man in charge of language and make sure he got it right.
"Harry never mispronounced a word, Mr. FERGUSON said.
But like any new radio broadcaster, Mr. MANNIS, who didn't lack a wry humour, had a couple of small announcing mishaps in the early years. One day in Halifax, the city experienced a power failure. The show still having to go on, Mr. MANNIS was forced to read the news from the master control room with someone holding a flashlight over his shoulder.
Another time, when his microphone was switched on for a station call he happened to be looking at a drama producer whose last name was Appleby. Before he knew it, the words coming out of his mouth were: "This is CBH, Applefax."
"Relax for a minute and it's fatal, Mr. MANNIS said in the 1975 interview. "The minute a mike is turned on, I visualize a million pairs of ears glued to their radios or television sets, all eagerly awaiting to pounce on my slightest mispronunciation. Is it any wonder the tongue cleaves to the palate, the eyes become glazed, the hand holding the script trembles like a leaf in a gale?"
Harry MANNIS was born in Toronto on April 11, 1920. He was the youngest of three children born to Jessie and Benjamin MANNIS, who owned a furrier shop. Harry attended Oakwood Collegiate Institute and met his wife Elizabeth when she moved in two doors down. The couple married in 1942 and later had a daughter.
"He was like any nice young man, Elizabeth MANNIS said. "He was private. He wasn't flamboyant."
After high school, Mr. MANNIS briefly attended the University of Toronto before leaving to join the Royal Canadian Air Force. Stationed in England during the war, he returned home to Canada in 1946. Uncertain about what to do next, he decided to enroll in a radio-announcing course at Toronto's Ryerson Institute of Technology (now Ryerson University).
"We all liked the way he read things at home, " said Elizabeth MANNIS, who was one of the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation's first female announcers.
Impressed with his voice quality and enunciation (which was untrained), they told him not to bother with school and sent him to Canadian Broadcasting Corporation for an audition. He was hired the next day for an announcing job in Halifax. Within two weeks of his audition, he was reading the radio news on the East Coast.
"I just happened to be in the right place at the right time, Mr. MANNIS said of his quick entry into the radio world.
He had had a brush with the airwaves before the war. After learning to play the piano, violin and clarinet by ear as a child, he decided to try his hand at singing, fancying himself a pop star one day.
When he was 17, he appeared on an amateur radio hour show singing a pop song. He thought he had found the key to his success until, as he put it, "the pianist refused to play slowly, and I refused to sing fast, and the result was pandemonium."
"Music came naturally to him, " Elizabeth said. "The same with announcing, he didn't have to struggle with it."
Mr. MANNIS remained with the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation until his retirement in the mid-1980s. He was widely liked and respected by his colleagues, who called him a "class act." Judy MADDREN, host of Canadian Broadcasting Corporation Radio's World Report, wrote in a condolence note to his family that Mr. MANNIS was a "true gentleman" who always treated her with respect and without condescension.
An animal lover, Mr. MANNIS and his wife took in stray animals and supported a local organization called the Toronto Wildlife Centre, which helps rehabilitate injured wildlife.
Mr. MANNIS died of cancer on January 2 in a Toronto hospital. Besides his wife, he leaves daughter Kate and two grandchildren.
Harry MANNIS, born in Toronto on April 11, 1920; died in Toronto on January 2, 2003.

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MADILL o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-08-23 published
Artist focused on geometric shapes
Sculptor helped to design precast concrete panels that sheathe the University of Toronto Medical Sciences Building
By Carol COOPER Special to The Globe and Mail Saturday, August 23, 2003 - Page F8
Robert DOWNING thought that he needed lessons in order to become an artist. Entering a storefront studio in his hometown of Hamilton, he paid the $1 fee and was asked what he wanted to make. When he replied that he didn't know, the studio owner told him to come back when he did and gave him back his buck.
Turning to the door, Mr. DOWNING realized that whatever he did was in his own hands. Deciding upon this as the subject of a sculpture, he paid again and, in clay, fashioned a hand with a spike through it. Upon seeing the sculpture, the studio owner returned Mr. DOWNING's dollar, saying, "You don't need me. You know what you want to do."
A creator of sculptures, paintings, prints, photographs and digital art, Mr. DOWNING has died at the age of 67.
His work appeared in the Ontario Centennial Art Exhibit, the National Art Gallery of Canada Sculpture '67 Exhibit and at Habitat during Expo 67. In partnership with sculptor Ted BIELER, Mr. DOWNING designed the precast concrete panels that sheathe the University of Toronto Medical Sciences Building and, on his own, designed two of its interior concrete-sculpted walls.
In 1969, he was the first Canadian to have a solo exhibition at the Whitechapel Art Gallery in London.
His work is also found in the National Art Gallery of Canada, the Art Gallery of Ontario, the University of Saskatchewan's gallery and the Singapore National Museum among many others and were included in 77 exhibitions in seven countries. As well, he completed 16 commissions in three countries.
Largely self-taught, Mr. DOWNING, a one-time police officer, burst onto the scene during the late '60s with his Cube Series in aluminum and Plexiglass. A highly intellectual artist, who often explored sophisticated mathematical concepts in his work, he created 108 cube-related sculptures for the series. Seventy-four appeared in the Whitechapel show and the British Arts Council purchased one, The Cube Turned Inside Out Revealing the Relationship of the Sphere.
Mr. DOWNING's work remained centred on geometric shapes throughout his career. "I am one of those people who views geometry as a divine expression of integration between the physical and the spiritual," he wrote in a brochure. He attributed his interest in organic geometry to the works of sculptors Eli Bornstein and Tony Smith, and the Art and Technology Movement.
Despite his intellectual bent, spirituality figured large in Mr. DOWNING's art and provided his inspiration to pursue it. When he was a Hamilton policeman, he was relaxing after a shift. "I suddenly became conscious of the warm glow of a transparent rose-coloured light completely surrounding me," he wrote in his memoirs, Feeling My Way.
"I was still aware of my body, but I felt myself to be extended into and penetrated by this light, which simultaneously caused me to feel radiant pulsations of pure love. It was as though I, somehow, had transcended the physical plane and, for a brief moment of time, experienced a cosmic level of infinite bliss."
Thereafter, Mr. DOWNING felt a new sensitivity to life and found himself in an almost trance-like state when observing the world around him. He left the police force -- and his family -- to become an artist. He maintained, "I've been given to make art in celebration of life as a humble song of praise to the Divine Creator of All."
Mr. DOWNING was born on August 1, 1935, in Hamilton, one of two children of a Canadian Westinghouse labourer and a housekeeper. When he was young, the family lived in a tent while waiting for housing.
In early adolescence, bedridden with a bout of rheumatic fever, Mr. DOWNING discovered that he enjoyed working with his hands by threading macaroni and constructing lilac-shell pictures.
Leaving school at 15 with a Grade 8 education, Mr. DOWNING delivered telegrams before joining the Canadian navy for five years. There he worked in food stores and as a photographer. After the service, Mr. DOWNING joined the Hamilton Police Force.
Early in his art career, Mr. DOWNING became discouraged by his attempts to sell his work in Toronto. He hit the road, travelling to Montreal and then to Vancouver, where he sold his first sculpture in 1962.
Still seeking a direction, he moved with his second wife to California, where they ran an antique shop. Mr. DOWNING experimented with d-Lysergic Acid Diethylamide and yoga, and participated in a couple of shows.
Returning to Toronto, Mr. DOWNING approached Mr. BIELER, who taught at the University of Toronto, for instruction. With Mr. BIELER's encouragement, he began his exploration of the cube. "He used whatever was available to dig into this and then came up with some quite interesting stuff," said Mr. BIELER, now a professor at York University in Toronto.
Selling his house to pay for shipping his sculpture to Whitechapel Art Gallery, Mr. DOWNING ended up after the show emotionally and financially exhausted. To recover, he spent a year studying the sitar.
After the bubble of government funding for art during Canada's centennial period burst, Mr. DOWNING and other Canadian artists found themselves short of work and money.
"By the end of 1972, my commissions and sales of art had completely evaporated," he wrote in a preamble to his Fibonacci Series. The only job he could find was teaching at an Ontario private school.
Throughout his career, Mr. DOWNING taught at several institutions, including U of T, the Ontario College of Art and the Banff School of Fine Art, all the while living a hand-to-mouth existence. Still, despite a lack of money and critical attention, he created prolifically, in series that often overlapped, carefully recording his creative process and organizing his works.
During the '70s, influenced by Mr. Bornstein's work, Asian philosophy, crystals and numerology, he explored the hexagon, producing a trial printing set for children and his I'Ching Series, a notebook in which he placed a diary-like record beside a tangram (a Chinese puzzle consisting of five triangles, a square and a rhomboid) based on a computer printout.
While in hospital in 1974 with a heart attack, Mr. DOWNING worked with construction paper and scissors and formed a three-dimensional shape that led to the Fibonacci Series, also called the Nothing Series. The 24 solid-steel castings and eight metal powder and fibreglass life-sized sculptures reflect a system Mr. DOWNING said he discovered, of combining squares, equilateral triangles and pentagons. Some of the works' proportions contained the Fibonacci ratio. (In the Fibonacci sequence -- 1, 1, 2, 3, 5, 8 etc. -- each successive number is equal to the sum of the preceding two numbers.)
When discharged from the hospital, Mr. DOWNING was unable to pay his mortgage. He sold the house and moved with his third wife and family to California, where he lived from 1974 to 1978. He taught at California State College in Long Beach and continued with the Fibonacci Series.
Entering the '80s, Mr. DOWNING turned to conceptual/performance art. In conceptual art, the works themselves are not considered important, but are intended to examine the language and system of art. Performance art presents actual events as art to a live audience, as opposed to the illusions of events presented by theatre.
For the series Art Isn't? Mr. DOWNING used a Canada Council grant to solicit work from the presidents of Canada's top 500 companies. Asked by the council to reimburse the money because he had not used it to create art, Mr. DOWNING agreed to send a monthly cheque for 10 per cent of his income. The amount came to $2.
The Canada Council responded with a request for a bigger cheque and Mr. DOWNING complied. Using a photocopier, he enlarged a $2 cheque and sent it off.
"He was desperately honest and he would not put up with bullshit at all," sculptor and artist Gord SMITH said. "He stayed on top of the Canada Council.... He believed passionately in the culture and knew it was going down."
Also during the '80s, Mr. DOWNING produced many Documeditation works, which included Transentials in Space, the work he said in 1992 was the most significant of his life. Describing it as a visual literacy program, he spent two years developing the three-volume work.
Always an outspoken advocate for his calling, Mr. DOWNING helped to found Canadian Artists Representatives in 1967. Driven, brilliant, often difficult and prickly, he was frustrated by his inability to qualify for grants from the Ontario government. He lacked the formal training the government required and went to the offices of the Minister of Culture and Citizenship to state his case. Screaming, " This isn't art?" Mr. DOWNING hurled his portfolio to the ground. The minister's office called the police.
Mr. DOWNING described his Closet Art, from 1984 to 1987, as "an installation piece which outgrew the confines of two large storage closets and raised the question of how practical it was for a senior artist to continue playing the role of an unpaid custodian of earlier work that had long proven itself to qualify as legitimate cultural property."
He donated the works to the Art Gallery of Hamilton, counting the 250-page record of his negotiations with the gallery as a Documeditation. "Coming back to these [donated] works again and again one is reminded of the expansive scope of Mr. DOWNING's thinking, of the evolving nature of his practice," said the gallery's chief curator, Shirley MADILL.
Mr. DOWNING left Canada once again to make a living in the late '80s, working and teaching in Botswana and Singapore. Returning because of ill health, he spent his last years largely confined to his apartment. He found a creative outlet, producing computer-generated images, once again exploring geometric forms. In 1998, as artist-in-residence at the U of T, he developed a Web site containing a retrospective of his work.
Always outspoken, a quality that alienated many, in the spring of 2002, he published an Internet manifesto announcing his resignation as a practising Canadian artist. In it, he chastized business, government, galleries and academia for not supporting artists in general and him in particular.
At his death on July 22, Mr. DOWNING had not sold his work in Canada for the past 15 years. Still he continued to promote it, even receiving a posthumous rejection.
"Robert's first love was his art, and his life was his art, and that's the beginning and end of it," said his fourth wife, Mickey DOWNING.
Mr. DOWNING leaves his wife, Mickey, two ex-wives, children Michael DOWNING and Sara ROBINSON, and three grandchildren.

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MADORE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-04-15 published
ANSLEY, John A.
Of Peterborough, Ontario, died peacefully, on Saturday, April 12, 2003, at the age of 61 years. He leaves his beloved wife of 34 years Gail (née MADORE) and their son James. son of Mrs. Grace PETERSON (née McINTOSH) of Ottawa and the late Dr. Harold ANSLEY of Ottawa and Barrie, and his late stepfather Ted PETERSON. Also surviving are his sister Ms. Sherrill ANSLEY (Jim,) William ANSLEY of Ottawa, cousins Susan and Kenneth BURNETT of W. Vancouver, Sandy and Peter QUINN of Roberts Creek, British Columbia, and John and Cordelia McINTOSH of Victoria, British Columbia, and their families. John graduated from Ashbury College in Ottawa and attended Carleton University before becoming advertising, sales and marketing manager in the window and door industry. For many years he was active in community volunteer work with a special interest in boating. His family wishes to thank Dr. Stephan RAGAZ of Peterborough, Dr. Bryce TAILOR/TAYLOR of Toronto General Hospital and the loving nurses at the Palliative Care Unit in Peterborough.
Friends will be received on Wednesday, April 16th, 2003 from 2 to 4 and 7 to 9 p.m. at the Highland Park Visitation and Reception Centre on Bensfort Road at River Road South, Peterborough, 705-745-6984 or 1-800-672-9652. There will be a Funeral Service at the same location on Thursday, April 17th at 2 p.m. followed by a reception.
In lieu of flowers, donations to the Palliative Care Unit Peterborough Regional Health Centre would be appreciated. John will be missed by his family and Friends who respected him for his integrity, positive attitude and his humour.

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MADRAS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-07-23 published
WIESMAN, Brahm
Died peacefully and with dignity July 20, 2003. He leaves his wife Madge, brother-in-law Alan BERNSTEIN of Montreal, nephew Robert and his wife Judy of Ottawa, niece Janet MENDELSON and her husband Stephen and their family of Nepean, Ontario, nephew Mark MADRAS and his wife Eva of Toronto, niece Karen MADRAS- STOPA and her husband Ed and family of East Greenwich, Rhode Island, brother-in-law David McCULLOCH and his wife Janet of Glasgow, Scotland, brother-in-law George McCULLOCH and his wife Ina and family of Glasgow, niece Helen FARMER and her husband Stewart and family of Glasgow, and nephew Gordon McCULLOCK and his wife Linda and family of Glossop, England. Born on June 13, 1926, Brahm lived his rich life with the greatest consideration and care for others. He studied architecture and community planning at McGill University in preparation for what was to become a distinguished career in the field of city planning. After taking on senior management positions in the Cities of Edmonton, Victoria, and Vancouver, he was asked to join the faculty of University of British Columbia's School of Community and Regional Planning in 1967. He went on to serve as Director of the School for 12 years. In that position, he was much loved as a colleague and teacher, and provided internationally admired leadership to the planning profession. In retirement, Brahm continued to actively promote good planning by advising universities in Asia on planning curricula, consulting to cities in China, and speaking out forcefully as a citizen on Vancouver area issues. A service will be held, 11 a.m. on Wednesday, July 23, at Schara Tzedeck Cemetery in New Westminster, 2345 Marine Drive. In lieu of flowers, donations may be sent to ''Prostate Cancer Research at Vancouver General Hospital'', Vancouver General Hospital and University of British Columbia Hospitals Foundation, 855 West 12th Avenue, Vancouver, V5Z 1M9.

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MADRID o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-04-12 published
APPLEBY, Sarah
Love is not changed by death. Died peacefully at her home on April 10, 2003 in her 81st year after a valiant battle with cancer. Cherished wife for 54 years to the late Harry APPLEBY. Dear mother to Laurence and Lynda WENGER and mother-in-law to Marvin WENGER. Devoted and greatly loved grandmother to Meredith WENGER. Caring daughter to the late Isadore and Yetta GRYMEK. Survived by her brothers Lou and Sam GRYMEK and her sisters Ann COMASSAR and Shirley KREM. A wonderful mother has gone, leaving her children to remember her strong presence, graciousness and courage. For the love and happiness we shared we are truly thankful. The family acknowledges with thanks, the efforts of Dr. Joan MURPHY, the other doctors, nurses and support staff of the Princess Margaret Hospital. Also the caring attention of Dr. Russell GOLDMAN and Teresita MADRID. At Benjamin's Park Memorial Chapel, 2401 Steeles Avenue West (1 light west of Dufferin) for service on Sunday, April 13th at 3: 00 p.m. Interment Beth Tzedec Memorial Park. Shiva at 342 Spadina Road, Suite 303, Toronto, concluding Tuesday evening April 15. If desired, memorial donations may be made to the Princess Margaret Foundation, 610 University Avenue, Toronto M5G 2M9 (416) 946-6560.

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