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"LYN" 2003 Obituary


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LYNCH o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-04 published
NICHOLS, Onetta Irene (Ret'd Executive Secretary - Parliment Buildings, Toronto)
peacefully at the Grove Park Nursing Home, Barrie on Monday, March 3rd, 2003; in her 93rd year. Onetta NICHOLS, of Orillia, beloved daughter of the late Mrs. Nellie NICHOLS. Predeceased by her brother Orval. Lovingly remembered by Kathleen NICHOLS Roy NICHOLS (Barb); Helen LYNCH (Ross); Lynne WEIR (Don - her 'Favorite';) Susan YOUNG (Mark) and by her many great and great great nieces and nephews. The late Miss Onetta NICHOLS will rest at the Mundell Funeral Home, 79 West Street, N., Orillia on Wednesday evening from 7 - 9 p.m. Funeral and Committal Service in the chapel on Thursday morning, March 6th at 11 o'clock. Spring Interment: - St. Andrew's - St. James' Cemetery, Orillia. If desired, Memorial Donations to your choice of any Children's Charity would be gratefully appreciated. Messages of condolence are welcome at
www.mundellfuneralhome.com

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LYNCH o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-04-10 published
The Globe was his church'
The editor-in-chief was mentor to journalists, defender of social policies, respected by those criticized in print, and described as a man with a 'warm human touch'
By Michael VALPY Thursday, April 10, 2003 - Page R11
In his two decades as editor-in-chief of The Globe and Mail, former senator Richard (Dic) James DOYLE wielded a journalistic influence in Canadian public life matched only by that of George BROWN, the newspaper's founder.
He died yesterday in Toronto, one month past his 80th birthday. His wife of 50 years, Florence, passed away on March 20.
Senator DOYLE -- editor from 1963 to 1983 -- gave the newspaper a boldly independent voice, loosening up its then lock-step support for the Progressive Conservative Party.
Under his direction, the newspaper would praise a government one day and lambaste it the next. He was a passionate defender of civil liberties, intensely engaged in the development of Canada's social policies throughout the 1960s and 1970s and as much concerned with the powerless in Canadian society as the powerful.
"In the time I've been editor," he once said, "we've not supported any party in office. I think we make whomever we support uncomfortable. We're the kind of friend you could do without."
He once said he felt more intellectually comfortable with Pierre TRUDEAU than all the prime ministers he knew, and one of his favourite editorial cartoons was one he suggested after overhearing his daughter Judith talking to a friend in her bedroom. It showed two teenage girls sitting on a bed under a poster of Mr. TRUDEAU. One girl says to the other: "He's not 50 like your father's 50."
His views, although stamped on the editorial page, were never imposed on his reporters. He was concerned with a story's news value -- not the fallout -- and he expected his staff to act with the same concern.
He wanted The Globe to be a writer's newspaper and gave his writers autonomy, even when their views went against his own philosophies. He had a special place in his heart for columnists who expressed contradictory opinions.
The young writers invited to attend the buffet lunches he gave regularly for prime ministers, premiers and cabinet ministers, bank presidents and giants of the arts were treated to superb tutorials in the life of their nation that left an indelible mark on their minds.
Warm, funny, theatrical and gregarious, he was a mentor and model for many of Canada's best-known journalists -- among them, the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation's Michael ENRIGHT and Don NEWMAN, former Globe and Maclean's managing editor Geoffrey STEVENS, his successor as Globe editor Norman WEBSTER, and former foreign correspondent, dance critic and now master of the University of Toronto's Massey College, John FRASER.
"He was absolutely fearless," Mr. STEVENS said yesterday. "He did tough stuff. He did important stuff. And he refused to bow to pressure from business, from politicians and for that matter from journalists. I didn't always agree with him, but I always, always respected what he said."
Mr. FRASER said: "He was an editor who made young journalists' dreams come true. Like many who came under his spell at The Globe and Mail, I will go to my grave grateful for the horizons he opened up to me."
George BAIN, for years The Globe's Ottawa columnist, recalled the only time Senator DOYLE actually complained about something Mr. BAIN had written was when he filed an end-piece to a royal tour and suggested that the institution wasn't appropriate to the Canadian circumstances.
"Dic, as a devoted monarchist, was moved to say, 'Did you have to?' The fact is I felt I did -- and he, despite strong feelings, didn't say, 'You can't.' "
When Prime Minister Brian MULRONEY appointed him to the Senate in 1985, he decided to sit as a Conservative out of courtesy.
Mr. MULRONEY described him yesterday as "a marvellous man, rigorous, thoughtful, with a disciplined approach to life and a very warm human touch to everything he did.
"When he cut people up, including me, there was no malice to it, no ad hominem attack, he was never bitter or partisan in any way.'The full impact of Senator DOYLE's presence as editor was probably first felt by The Globe's readers on March 20, 1964, when a front-page editorial appeared under the heading, Bill of Wrongs.
It was prompted by legislation proposed by Ontario's Conservative attorney-general, Frederick CASS, which empowered the Ontario Police Commission to summon any person for questioning in secret deprive him of legal advice; and keep him in prison indefinitely if he refused to answer.
"For the public good," the editorial stated, the Ontario Government "proposes to trample upon the Magna Carta, Habeas Corpus, the Canadian Bill of Rights and the Rule of Law.
"Are we in... the Canada of 1964 -- or in the Germany of 1934?
"This legislation is supposed to be directed against organized crime. In fact, it is directed against every man and woman in the province."
Soon after, Mr. CASS resigned.
Senator DOYLE's skills as a writer were particularly evident on an election night when the paper would present an editorial on the results between editions. Alastair LAWRIE, now retired as an editorial writer, recalled that once the results were known, Senator DOYLE would stand in silent thought for maybe a minute and a half and then start to dictate. In a matter of a few minutes, he would complete a reasoned editorial that scarcely required the addition of a comma.
Senator DOYLE preferred to work in anonymity, only accepting honorary degrees and later the seat in the Senate near the end of his newspaper career.
He sat on no boards, belonged to no important clubs, almost never appeared on television or radio, didn't sign petitions and seldom gave speeches. When he met a politician, there were usually witnesses.
He didn't hold a driver's licence and for years arrived at the old Globe office on King Street by streetcar. When The Globe moved to its present office on Front Street, Senator DOYLE took a taxi.
Retired Ottawa Citizen publisher Clark DAVEY, a former managing editor of The Globe and a close friend of Senator DOYLE, suspected "he didn't trust his Irish temper [to drive] and that was probably to the common good."
Mr. DAVEY said Senator DOYLE's low public profile "was part of his own protection against conflicts on his own part. The Globe was his church. Journalism was his religion.
"I think that Dic, in the context of his time, probably had a greater influence on Canadian journalism than any other single individual," Mr. DAVEY said.
"It was Dic's execution that made the Report on Business what it became and is. He was the moving force from within The Globe often unseen -- in the whole question of conflicts of interest as they affected journalists.
"He was really the wellspring of that kind of thinking and, of course, what The Globe did affected very directly what a lot of other organizations did."
Born in Toronto on March 10, 1923, Dic DOYLE seemed destined to get ink on his hands. He said in 1985 that he had decided on a newspaper career at age 7 and joined the Chatham Daily News as a sports reporter after he graduated from Chatham Collegiate Institute. He was promoted to sports editor, city editor and then news editor.
During the Second World War, he enlisted in the Royal Canadian Air Force and served with the 115 (Bomber) Squadron (Royal Air Force) at Ely, near Cambridge in England. He was discharged at the end of the war with the rank of flying officer.
He was 23 and felt that life was passing him by, so rather than attending university, as other returning air-force officers were doing, he returned to the Chatham paper. It was a decision he said he later regretted.
He came to The Globe in 1951, initially as a copy editor, the only job available. His first byline appeared in The Globe in December of 1952 over a story about milk bottles.
In the same year, he also wrote a book called The Royal Story, a labour of love that proved to be a standard treatment of the monarchy, and which he was the first to acknowledge, replowed already well-tilled soil.
(The Royal family had a special status at The Globe under Senator DOYLE. One former senior editor, the legendary Martin LYNCH, told of being taken off the front-page layout after he replaced a picture of Princess Margaret, which appeared in early editions, with a photograph of a prize-winning pig.
When The Globe decided to publish a weekly supplement in 1957, Senator DOYLE became its first editor, with a staff that had no experience in the weekly field. The paper was laid out on the carpet of the managing editor's office after he had gone home.
It shrunk over the years because, Mr. DOYLE said, it was ahead of its time. It died in 1971.
From there, in 1959, he became managing editor of the newspaper and then editor in 1963. He stepped aside in 1983 to take on the role of editor emeritus and to write a column -- an experience, he said two years later, that left him chastened. "The guy [columnist] out there has his problems."
Former Globe publisher A. Roy MEGARRY, said, "In my opinion, no one -- including the seven publishers that Dic has served with during his time at the paper -- had made a more positive and lasting impression on The Globe than he has."
Likely among the greatest tributes paid to him as an editor came from the Kent Commission established by the federal government in 1980 to investigate the ownership of Canada's daily newspapers after the Ottawa Journal and the Winnipeg Tribune folded in virtually simultaneous moves by the Thomson and Southam chains.
In its report, the commission credited Senator DOYLE with "adhering to an ideal of press freedom that often tends to get lost in the management of newspapers....
"To a great extent, the editor-in-chief of The Globe belongs to a breed which unfortunately is on its way to extinction.
"The Globe and Mail testifies to the influence that continues to be exerted by a newspaper with a clearly defined idea of its role and substantial editorial resources. It is read by almost three-quarters of the country's most important decision-makers in all parts of Canada and at all levels of government. More than 90 per cent of media executives read it regularly and it tends to set the pace for other news organizations."
The Globe and Mail was bought by Thomson Newspapers in 1980. Senator DOYLE made no secret of the fact that he would have preferred having the newspaper bought by R. Howard Webster, who owned it before it became part of the Financial Post chain. However, in 1985 he said that Thomson was the best alternative among the others in the field.
When Prime Minister MULRONEY named him to the Senate, he became the first active Globe journalist to receive such an appointment since George BROWN in 1873. As an editor and a columnist, Senator DOYLE had often preached Senate reform and had opposed patronage appointments.
His acceptance prompted a flow of letters to the editor that favoured and disapproved of the appointment in about equal measure.Senator DOYLE is survived by his children Judith and Sean and his granddaughter Kaelan MYERSCOUGH. Funeral arrangements have not been announced.

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LYNCH o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-07-21 published
Died This Day -- Charles LYNCH, 1994
Monday, July 21, 2003 - Page R5
Journalist, born on Dec 3, 1919, in Cambridge, Massachusetts. moved to Canada with family at age of two weeks; grew up in Saint John; 1936, joined Saint John Citizen at 17; 1943, hired as war correspondent by Reuters; 1944, posted to London; covered D-Day landings and Nuremberg War Trials; became head of Southam News wrote daily column on national affairs for 20 years; died in Ottawa.

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LYNCH o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-09-30 published
ORR, Rosemary Margaret (STINSON) 75 of Fonthill, Ontario died September 27, 2003 at West Lincoln Memorial Hospital, after a long battle with cancer. She is survived by her husband James Campbell ORR and by her children; Catherine E. ORR of Beamsville, James C. ORR and his wife Diane of Toronto, Susan Orr LYNCH of Salem, Massachusetts, Nancy J. THOMAS and her husband Philip of Fonthill. She was pre-deceased by her daughter Jane Orr CRONIN. She also leaves grandchildren; Carlton CRONIN, Katlyn PECK, Lesley ORR, Michael ORR, Elizabeth THOMAS, and Cameron LYNCH; and a sister Jane WHITE/WHYTE of Peterborough. Cremation has taken place. A burial service will be held at St. Andrews Anglican Churchyard in Grimsby at 11: 00 a.m. on Wednesday, October 1, 2003.

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LYNCH o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-11-07 published
MALONEY, Reverend Francis (Frank) Joseph, C.Ss.R.
At the Houses of Providence on November 5, 2003, age 84 years, Father Frank was born in Peterborough, Ontario, son of the late George MALONEY and Cecilia LYNCH, survived by his brother, Raymond MALONEY (Jeanette), Royal Oak, Michigan, sisters-in-law, Rita MALONEY and Helen MALONEY (Peterborough, Ontario) also leaves to mourn several nieces, nephews and cousins, his Redemptorist confreres and many Friends. Predeceased by his brothers Harold, George, John and Vincent (both of whom died as infants) and his sister, Sister Cecilia MALONEY, C.S.J. Father Frank worked for General Electric (Peterborough) for eight years. Profession of vows as a Redemptorists was made in Woodstock, Ontario August 2, 1949. Ordained to the priesthood at Woodstock, Ontario, June 17, 1954 by London Bishop John C. CODY. For the first twelve years of his priesthood, he worked in Redemptorist parishes in London, Ontario, Saint John's, Newfoundland., Quebec City, and Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island, where he planned and supervised the building of their new parish church. From 1968 until his health began to decline in 1995, Fr. Frank served the Redemptorists in Eastern Canada as Consultor, Treasurer (18 years) and Provincial Superior (9 years) 1975-1984. In declining health since 1995, Father Frank lived at Providence Centre. Friends may call at St. Patrick's Shrine Church, 141 McCaul Street (at Dundas) all day Sunday, November 9, with wake prayers at 7: 00 p.m.
Mass of Christian burial will be celebrated on Monday, November 10, at 10: 00 a.m. at St. Patrick's Church, Toronto. Burial will take place at St. Peter's Cemetery, Peterborough on Monday, November 10 at 3: 00 p.m. Funeral arrangements entrusted to Paul O'Connor Funeral Home Ltd.

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LYNES o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-05-27 published
POWLESS, Alex Ross September 29, 1926 - May 26, 2003.
Peacefully, surrounded by his loving family, at the Willett Hospital, in Paris, Ontario, at 5: 00 a.m., on Monday, May 26, 2003, Alex Ross POWLESS, in his 77th year, went to meet his creator after several months of illness. Ross was born in Ohsweken on the Six Nations Reserve on September 29, 1926. Ross was a devoted husband and loving father and was married to Margaret Wilma POWLESS (nee BOMBERRY) for 55 years. Together they raised 14 children, 27 grandchildren and 7 great grandchildren. Ross was predeceased by his sons: Victor in 1955, Gaylord in 2001 and Gregory in 2002, his parents: Chauncey and Jessie, and his siblings: Mary Ella and Alice Maracle, Amy and Maude Martin, and Raymond and Jean Powless.
Ross is survived by his loving wife Margaret Wilma POWLESS (nee BOMBERRY) and sister Vernice Maizie JONATHAN, and his children, including daughter in law Patti, Gail (Mark AYRES,) Gary, Audrey (Jim BOMBERRY), Harry, Arlene (Dan MARTIN), Richard (Effie PANOUSOS), Darryl (Naansii JAMIESON,) Karen (Jerry MARTIN,) Tony (Cheryle GIBSON,) Jeffery, and Jacqui baby (Ron LYNES.) Ross is a cherished uncle to many nieces and nephews.
Ross had a passion for hunting and also loved fishing, pool and playing cards. He demonstrated his love for his grandchildren in many ways. He's fondly remembered for making up nicknames for them. Ross' sense of humour and storytelling was renowned and he was often asked to speak at public functions because of it.
Ross POWLESS distinguished himself in lacrosse both as a player and a coach. He was a member of the Ontario and Canadian Lacrosse Hall of Fame and won four Mann Cups (Canadian Lacrosse Championships) with the Peterborough Timbermen from 1951 to 1954, including an Most Valuable Player award in 1953. Ross coached the Brantford Warriors to the Canadian Senior B Championship in 1968 and the Rochester Chiefs to a Can-Am Lacrosse League Championship in 1969. In 1974, Ross coached six of his sons on the Ontario First Nations Team, which captured the All Indian Nations Championship Cup.
The family will honour his life with a visitation at Styres Funeral Home, Ohsweken after 7 p.m. Tuesday, May 27. Evening prayers 7 p.m. Wednesday, May 28 where Funeral Service will be held in the chapel on Thursday, May 29, 2003 at 2 p.m. Interment: St. Paul's Anglican Cemetery, Sour Springs Road. Memorial donations to the Canadian Diabetes Association, the Iroquois Lodge or the Canadian Cancer Society can be made in lieu of flowers.

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LYNES o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-05-31 published
Robert Marven SYER
Born February 19, 1912 at Thamesville, Ontario, died May 15, 2003 at Oakville, Ontario, late of Oakville (Bronte) and lastly of Burlington Ontario; predeceased by parents Frank Morgan SYER (1923) and Maud Lillian SYER (née) (1969,) and by brother Ralph Evans SYER (1932;) survived by his wife of 63 years, Frances Teresa SYER (née,) and seven children: Robert Marven (Marg HEEMSKERK) of Toronto, David Dirk (Mimi CHAMPAGNE) of Shelburne Nova Scotia, Susan Frances (Brian RIKLEY) of Hudson Québec, Michael Stanley of Oakville, Timothy William (Marilyn MacGREGOR) of Milton Ontario, Deborah Anne (Barry BALL) of Brampton Ontario and Dani Elizabeth (Brian FINNEY) of Orlando Florida; and by fifteen grandchildren: Sheri Lynne SYER (Michael PINNOCK) of San Jose California, Wendy Frances SYER (Kevin OUGH) of Peterborough Ontario and Julia Helen SYER (Pat PELLEGRINI) of Ajax Ontario; David Dirk SYER (Doris HOO) of Whitby Ontario and Judith Gail SUSLA (Joe SUSLA) of Oakville Brian Joseph Rikley (Eva GJERSTAD) and Toni Lauren RIKLEY (Dave KRINDLE) of Hudson; Cassidy Anne SYER (Danny PIETRONIRO) of Montréal, Michael Timothy SYER of Victoria, British Columbia and Robert Christopher SYER of London Ontario; Thomas William SYER and Douglas Donald SYER of Milton; and Hayley Elizabeth FINNEY, Brian James FINNEY and Kyle James FINNEY of Orlando; and by nine great-grandchildren: Skylar Syer OUGH of Peterborough and Julian Robert Domenico PELLEGRINI of Ajax; Robert Marven SYER, James Michael SYER and David Dirk SYER of Whitby and Erin Nicole SUSLA of Oakville; and Austin Tyler RIKLEY- KRINDLE, David Shane RIKLEY- KRINDLE and Joseph Cody RIKLEY- KRINDLE of Hudson; also, by nephew Richard Frank SYER of Lake Placid Florida, grand-nephew Michael Charles SYER of Ann Arbor Michigan and by brother-in-law Dr. Patrick Gaynor LYNES of Brampton and his family. An Anglican graveside service was held at St. Jude's Cemetery in Oakville on May 22, 2003. Expressions of respect may be sent to the family at 2455 Milltower Court Mississauga, Ontario L5N 5Z6 or by eMail to RMS@The RMSGroup.net gifts may be made to a charity of choice. A child is sleeping: An old man gone. ­ James Joyce

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LYNN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-14 published
Thomas MacDONALD
By Joan ROBINSON Friday, March 14, 2003 - Page A24
Father, husband, caterer. Born November 12, 1915, in Liverpool, England. Died January 25, in Ottawa, of a stroke, aged 87.
Tom MacDONALD was the third of nine children born to William and Mary Ellen MacDONALD. The family emigrated from England to Canada in 1924 and settled in Kingston, Ontario With the outbreak of the Second World War, Tom and his four brothers joined the Armed Forces. Tom enlisted in the Canadian Army on January 25, 1940. He was assigned as batman/driver to Lieutenant-General H. D. R. CRERAR. In 1944, the Kingston Whig Standard featured a photo of "Cpl. T. McDONALD" sewing an extra pip on CRERAR's uniform, marking his promotion to full General; CRERAR was then Commander of the First Canadian Army. During those war years, Tom served with the general in Italy, Sicily, the Netherlands, Belgium, North Africa, France and Germany. One of his duties was to prepare the general's meals; he became proficient at obtaining and preparing reasonable meals with scant resources. It was during this time that he developed a keen interest in food preparation.
After the war, Tom remained in the army. Although he had no professional training, his natural flair for food preparation and presentation led to his employment in Ottawa by National Defence Headquarters as organizer and caterer of official banquets and what was known as "the cocktail party circuit." On a private basis, the United States Embassy also employed him in this capacity.
Among his effects are letters of appreciation from Ambassador Livingston MERCHANT of the U.S. Embassy and one from then-president Dwight EISENHOWER, thanking Tom for his efforts during the Second World War, as well as his contributions during two presidential trips to Ottawa. It concludes: "With best wishes to a former comrade-in-arms."
During this time he also accompanied General CRERAR on official business trips, wherein his role was to assist in the personal needs of the CRERAR family. Many of these trips were to major Canadian cities but in 1947, Tom accompanied General CRERAR on a trade development mission to Hawaii, Hong Kong, Tokyo and Manila. His last international trip took place in the 1960s when, in a similar role, he travelled to Cyprus with a delegation headed by Minister of Defence Paul HELLYER.
In 1965, he was honourably released from the army. He then assumed the position of steward at 24 Sussex Drive. He served with Prime Minister Lester PEARSON from 1965 to 1968 and with Prime Minister Pierre TRUDEAU from 1968 to 1975. He was again responsible for the organization of formal banquets and other entertainment. On one such occasion, a photo much prized by Tom's English mother shows him in formal dress, standing ready to serve the Queen Mother.
Although officially retired in 1975, he maintained his interest in cooking both in his private catering business and at home. He was a lively, fun-loving man and with his wife, Verena, hosted many memorable parties wherein his love of people and sense of humour had full rein.
Tom was proud of his country, his city and his war service. He could be moved to tears by memories of his war years and every year that he was physically able he marched in the Veteran's Day parade wearing his war medals.
In his declining years, he was comforted by the care and companionship of his family and Friends. At Uncle Tom's funeral they volunteered their special memories of him. There was much laughter and few tears as befitted the man. The music of his favourite song We'll Meet Again concluded the ceremony -- sung, of course, by Vera LYNN. He will be missed by many, including nieces, nephews, Friends and surviving comrades-in-arms.
Joan is Tom MacDONALD's niece.

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LYNN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-10-10 published
CLARK, Donald G. (1917-2003)
Died peacefully at home in Sarasota, Florida, surrounded by his family, on Monday, October 6th, 2003. Cherished and beloved husband of Thelma Jean CLARK (née LYNN.) Dear father of Donald Lynn and his wife Judy and Dean Goodwin and his partner Ken ROESKE. Loving grandfather of Donald Andrew and his partner Nadia ADAM/ADAMS, predeceased by grand_son Sean Patrick. 'Papa' to Christan BOSLEY. Survived by his brother Alfred Edward and his wife Elizabeth. Fondly remembered by his nieces and nephews.
After Glow
I'd like the memory of me
to be a happy one.
I'd like to leave an after glow of smiles
when life is done.
I'd like to leave an echo whispering softly
down the ways,
Of happy times and laughing times
and bright and sunny days.
I'd like the tears of those who grieve,
to dry before the sun
Of happy memories that I leave
when life is done.
Carol Mirkel
A private family service will be held at a later date. If desired, in lieu of flowers, the family would appreciate donations to the Hospice of Southwest Florida, 5955 Rand Blvd., Sarasota, Florida 34238. www.hospice-swf.org or charity of your choice.

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