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"LOC" 2003 Obituary


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LOCHEAD o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-09-10 published
Marguerite Esther LOCHEAD
In loving memory of Marguerite Esther LOCHEAD, July 11, 1919 - September 2, 2003.
Marguerite Esther LOCHEAD, a resident of Mindemoya, passed away at the Mindemoya Hospital, Mindemoya on Tuesday, September 2, 2003 at the age of 84 years. She was born in Dalhousie Township daughter of the late Hugh and Marion (PARK) LOCHEAD. Marguerite was a teacher for 35 years, teaching in such places as Copper Cliff, Gatchell and Little Current before retiring to Mindemoya. She became very active in the Mindemoya United Church. She had many hobbies, including gardening, knitting and art especially painting with oils. Well-known and respected in her community, she will be sadly missed by all who knew her. A loving sister, aunt, great aunt and friend, many fond memories will be cherished. Marguerite is survived by her sister Marion "Betty" SLOSS of Spring Bay and brother Alex LOCHEAD and wife Mary of London. Predeceased by a brother Alex LOCHEAD and wife Mary of London. Predeceased by a brother Charles and brother-in-law Elwood SLOSS. Dear and loving aunt of Jim SLOSS, Susan GRENON, Mary Lynn McQUARRIE, Bill LOCHEAD, Charles LOCHEAD, Marian LOCHEAD, James LOCHEAD and Phyllis SPARKS. Also survived by 11 great nieces and nephews. Friends called at the Mindemoya United Church, Mindemoya on Friday, September 5, 2003 from 2 - 4 pm and 7 - 9 pm. The funeral service was conducted at the Church on Saturday September 6, 2003 at 11 am with Reverend Mary Jo ECKERT TRACY officiating. Interment in Mindemoya Cemetery.
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LOCKHARD o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-07-18 published
D-Day vet one of the 'Two Jacks'
Story of two soldiers'daring escape from a German PoW camp inspired a book of 'amazing adventures'
By Allison LAWLOR Friday, July 18, 2003 - Page R13
Jack VENESS, a D-Day veteran whose dramatic account of capture and escape during the Second World War was chronicled in the book The Two Jacks, has died at his home in Fredericton. He was Maritime writer Will R. BIRD recounted Mr. VENESS's wartime heroism in his 1954 book The Two Jacks: The Amazing Adventures of Major Jack M. VENESS and Major Jack L. FAIRWEATHER.
When Canadians landed on the Normandy coast of France on D-Day, Mr. VENESS and Dr. FAIRWEATHER were there with the North Nova Scotia Highlanders. By June 7, the North Novas (as they were known) battled their way inland -- about 13 kilometres -- and had occupied the villages of Buron and Authie when they were met by German tanks and gunfire, led by the 12th SS Panzer Division.
A raging battle ensued that left dozens of North Novas dead and injured and led to the capture of both Mr. VENESS and Dr. FAIRWEATHER. They were among close to 100 who were taken prisoner by the Germans at the time.
"We thought it was bad luck that we were captured but on the other hand there were a lot of people who didn't survive," said Dr. FAIRWEATHER, a retired doctor living in Lewisburg, Pa.
After being forced to walk for close to a week with little food or rest, the two officers, along with the other prisoners, reached the gates of "Front Stalag." The German prison was a collection of worn-out army huts surrounded by three barbed wire fences.
Included in the book The Two Jacks is a card Mr. VENESS wrote dated June 16, 1944. "Dear Mother, I am in a German PoW camp. I am in good health and will write more later. Love, Jack."
The two Jacks would then spend the next six weeks in the prison camp before being loaded onto a railway boxcar. After spending at least five days jammed into the crowded car, with bombs dropping all around them, the two men decided if they were going to escape, now was the time.
"It was made pretty clear in training... an officer's first duty when captured is to escape," Dr. FAIRWEATHER said. "We had that in the back of our minds."
In the dark of the night, just outside the French city of Tours, the two terrified men escaped their imprisonment by jumping from a moving train through a hole in the boxcar.
"Jack said, 'This is our chance, we have to take it,' Dr. FAIRWEATHER recalled. "He said, 'Come on, we can do this.' " The two officers were hidden by a French priest in the belfry of a church (which Mr. VENESS would later visit in the 1970s with his son and first wife), and were soon after linked up with the French underground.
"I'm sure we wouldn't have survived without the underground," Dr. FAIRWEATHER said. "They hid us and protected us."
The two officers served with the French underground in the German-occupied Loire district of France for less than two months before they were able to make a safe return to their regiment in England.
After declining an offer to be re-posted to Canada, both Jacks rejoined their North Nova units in Europe. This next period would mark some of the most intense fighting Mr. VENESS took part in during the war.
"He was a very courageous and a very brave man," said his friend and fellow veteran, retired judge David DICKSON/DIXON of the New Brunswick Court of Queen's Bench. "He never lacked valour."
John (Jack) Mersereau VENESS was born on November 11, 1922, in Ottawa to John and Annie VENESS. After moving with his family to Fredericton in 1933, he attended Fredericton High School. He went on to complete one year at the University of New Brunswick before joining the Canadian Infantry Corps (North Nova Scotia Highlanders) in May, 1942, at the age of 19. A year later, he went overseas and not long after met Dr. FAIRWEATHER while in England with the North Novas.
Dr. FAIRWEATHER said he immediately liked his fellow Maritimer's directness. "He called a spade a spade."
Over the course of his storied military career, Mr. VENESS would go on to serve in England, Belgium, the Netherlands, Germany and France. After returning to his unit after his capture and escape, Mr. VENESS was engaged in fighting in the flooded Scheldt Estuary in Holland and Belgium, during which time he captured a German major-general at gunpoint.
In March, 1945, while leading his company in Germany, Mr. VENESS was seriously wounded by shrapnel from an exploding shell. After more than a month in hospital he recovered.
Mr. VENESS retired from the army in 1946 as a major with many medals, including the War Medal, being mentioned in dispatches, Croix de Guerre 1940 with Palm, Chevalier of the Order of Leopold II with Palm (Belgium), The Defence Medal and the 1939-45 Star.
"He had a high respect for the veterans all his life," Mr. Dickson said. "I really [think] he felt he owed a debt to his fellow soldiers."
After returning home to New Brunswick after the war, Mr. VENESS returned to the University of New Brunswick and graduated in 1950 with a degree in civil engineering. He spent four years working in Cape Breton, Nova Scotia, and Banff, Alberta., then returned to New Brunswick to work for the Department of Highways. He retired in 1983 as director of traffic engineering.
In 1948, Mr. VENESS married Jere WOOD from Saint Martin's, New Brunswick They had one son. In 1976, after almost 30 years of marriage, Mr. VENESS lost both his wife and mother in a tragic car accident, while the two women were driving home to Fredericton from St. Andrews, New Brunswick Two years later, Mr. VENESS married Freda LOCKHARD. The couple enjoyed travelling and visited Europe to pay homage to fallen soldiers at military cemeteries and to attend commemorative services.
In addition to travelling, Mr. VENESS was also an active member of the community. He volunteered with a number of organizations, including the Young Men's Christian Association, where he served on the board of directors; the Masons; the Canadian Legion; and the Fredericton Garrison Club, where he was president.
Mr. VENESS's strict, early military training stuck with him throughout his life. Mr. DICKSON/DIXON remembers that a telephone call to his friend meant a brisk talk to convey a message and no idle chitchat.
"He was a little gruff at times," Mr. DICKSON/DIXON said.
Mr. VENESS died of a heart attack on June 30 while playing snooker at his home in Fredericton.
He leaves his wife Freda, son Randy, daughter-in-law Angela and two grandchildren.

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LOCKHART o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-31 published
Died This Day -- Gene LOCKHART, 1957
Monday, March 31, 2003 - Page R7
Actor born on July 18, 1891, in London, Ontario; born to a musical, Scottish family; in 1923, starred on Broadway in long-running Sun Up; moved to Hollywood to appear in more than 100 movies, including Abe Lincoln in Illinois (1940), The Devil and Daniel Webster (1941), The Desert Song (1944), Miracle on 34th Street (1947), Joan of Arc (1948), Madame Bovary (1949), The Man in the Gray Flannel Suit (1956), Carousel (1956); nominated for Academy Award for Algiers (1938); married to actress Kathleen LOCKHART; daughter June LOCKHART a television regular on Lassie and Lost in Space; died in Santa Monica, Calif.

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LOCKHART o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-08-15 published
Godfather of Canadian paratroops
'Superb combat leader' led a courageous allied rush to the Baltic in the closing days of Second World War
By John WARD, Ottawa
Fraser EADIE, a legendary soldier who commanded the 1st Canadian Parachute Battalion in the waning days of the Second World War and went on to be the godfather to generations of post-war paratroopers, has died at age 86.
During the war, Mr. EADIE fought through northern Europe and led his battalion to Wismar, on Germany's Baltic coast, as the fighting ended.
His men remembered him as a disciplinarian who would nod at unorthodox tactics that worked. In the postwar period, he was patron of Canada's paratroop association. He served as honorary colonel of the Canadian Airborne Regiment from 1989 until it was disbanded in disgrace in 1994 after the Somalia affair.
In 1993, at the age of 76, he marked the Airborne's 25th anniversary by making a parachute jump with the outfit.
"He was a natural leader, a superb combat leader," said Bob LOCKHART, a retired paratroop officer who knew Mr. EADIE well after the war.
Mr. EADIE began his military career as a militia soldier in the 1930s, serving as a private in both the Calgary Highlanders and the Royal Winnipeg Rifles.
After the war broke out, he left his job with the Ford Motor Co. for the army and went overseas as a lieutenant with the Rifles.
He was promoted to captain and then major, and took a parachute course before joining the fledgling parachute battalion. As a hockey player before the war, he was in top physical shape. He breezed through gruelling training which left many gasping by the wayside.
In March, 1944, the battalion took part in Operation Varsity, leapfrogging the Rhine River into Germany.
The jump zone was heavily defended and the battalion commander, Lieutenant-Colonel Jeff NICKLIN, was killed. One story says he died when he landed in a clump of trees directly above a German machine-gun nest, but Jan DEVRIES, who was a private at the time, doubts that.
"NICKLIN was actually probably dead before he came into the trees because he sailed right over a German machine-gun," Mr. DEVRIES said.
With the commander dead and the landing under heavy fire, the Canadians were in a crisis.
"Fraser immediately assumed command," said Mr. DEVRIES.
He rallied the men and despite heavy casualties -- 25 killed, about 50 wounded and 20 missing out of 475 -- he led them to seize their objectives.
The battalion jumped into Normandy on D-Day, June 6, 1944, as part of a larger British unit. The Canadians fought in Normandy for weeks and helped break the German army in France.
Mr. DEVRIES said Mr. EADIE showed a sense of humour even in combat. He recalled an incident in Normandy when Mr. EADIE spotted a German tank and called for artillery support, telling the gunners he faced a Tiger tank, a formidable piece of armour. When a corporal pointed out that the tank was, in fact, a smaller though still potent Mark IV, Mr. EADIE smiled at him: "Don't spoil a good story."
Mr. EADIE was awarded the Distinguished Service Order, promoted to lieutenant-colonel and confirmed as battalion commander.
In the final weeks of the war, the battalion was paired with a British armoured unit, driving into northern Germany. The Canadians commandeered cars, trucks and other vehicles and outran the British, Mr. Lockhart said.
"They were moving so fast with their captured cars and such that the armoured battalion ran out of gas."
At one point, a British general arrived to inspect the regiment and was shocked to find some soldiers decked out in German parachute smocks, others sporting looted bowler hats.
Mr. EADIE was driving a big German staff car at the time and was hardly in a position to complain. He remembered later that the general was taken aback by the scorn for dress regulations.
He told Mr. EADIE: "I saw one fellow wearing what looked like a rugby sweater embossed with the words, Flin Flon."
Mr. EADIE said the general never did figure out what that meant and no one enlightened him.
Mr. DEVRIES said the Canadians, in company with the Royal Scots Greys, an armoured outfit, eventually ran into the Russians on the Baltic.
"Their orders were to go to Denmark," Mr. DEVRIES said. Mr. EADIE would have none of that and confronted the Russians, telling his men "Get ready lads."
"He told the Russian officer, 'you better have 10 men for my one.'"
The Russians backed down.
The official history of the Canadian Army notes: "Wismar, taken by Lt.-Col. EADIE's men and the Royal Scots Greys was in fact the most easterly point reached by any Commonwealth troops in this campaign and the first point where any Commonwealth troops serving in it made contact with the Russian ally.
"It is satisfactory that a Canadian battalion was there."
The battalion went home in September, 1945, and was disbanded. Mr. EADIE went back to Ford, where he spent 46 years in all.
Canadian Press

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LOCKHEAD o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-09-10 published
Marguerite Esther LOCHEAD
In loving memory of Marguerite Esther LOCHEAD, July 11, 1919 - September 2, 2003.
Marguerite Esther LOCHEAD, a resident of Mindemoya, passed away at the Mindemoya Hospital, Mindemoya on Tuesday, September 2, 2003 at the age of 84 years. She was born in Dalhousie Township daughter of the late Hugh and Marion (PARK) LOCHEAD. Marguerite was a teacher for 35 years, teaching in such places as Copper Cliff, Gatchell and Little Current before retiring to Mindemoya. She became very active in the Mindemoya United Church. She had many hobbies, including gardening, knitting and art especially painting with oils. Well-known and respected in her community, she will be sadly missed by all who knew her. A loving sister, aunt, great aunt and friend, many fond memories will be cherished. Marguerite is survived by her sister Marion "Betty" SLOSS of Spring Bay and brother Alex LOCHEAD and wife Mary of London. Predeceased by a brother Alex LOCHEAD and wife Mary of London. Predeceased by a brother Charles and brother-in-law Elwood SLOSS. Dear and loving aunt of Jim SLOSS, Susan GRENON, Mary Lynn McQUARRIE, Bill LOCHEAD, Charles LOCHEAD, Marian LOCHEAD, James LOCHEAD and Phyllis SPARKS. Also survived by 11 great nieces and nephews. Friends called at the Mindemoya United Church, Mindemoya on Friday, September 5, 2003 from 2 - 4 pm and 7 - 9 pm. The funeral service was conducted at the Church on Saturday September 6, 2003 at 11 am with Reverend Mary Jo ECKERT TRACY officiating. Interment in Mindemoya Cemetery.
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LOCKREM o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-09-10 published
Frederick CAPPEL LINXWEILER
Peacefully Tuesday, September 2, 2003 with his daughter at his side in the beautiful McGregor Bay.
Loved by wife Barbara, daughter Alice and husband Dick LOCKREM and son Fred LINXWEILER Jr. Forever in the hearts of six grandchildren and three great-grandchildren. Fred had a great interest in photography, ham radios and McGregor Bay, coming to the Bay since the age of eight. At his request direct cremation with a service at a later date in Dayton, Ohio. Arrangements in care of Island Funeral Home.

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LOCKWOOD o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-05 published
McINTYRE, Marion (Monie) Elizabeth Daly Bean
Died on February 28, 2003 at Kipling Acres Nursing Home after a long and devastating battle with Alzheimers. Monie was born in Toronto June 18, 1923, the only child of Roland and Marion Daly. She attended Bishop Strachan School in Toronto and the University of Toronto where she earned her B.A. and M.A. in sociology. She leaves behind her children who adored her: Diane (Dennis LALOR), Martha, Sarah (Peter LOCKWOOD) and Andrew (Lisa PEDWELL) as well as eight grandchildren: Alison and Matthew SCHWARTZ, Carolyn, Michael, Douglas and Hilary LOCKWOOD and John and Leslie BEAN. She was predeceased by her second husband, Dr. Alex McINTYRE, the love of her life. We will always be grateful to him for caring so much about her. Monie was beautiful and bright, creative and colourful, tolerant and self-indulgent - and she made every day more interesting for all of us. She loved gardening, travelling, bridge, golf and fishing. She was always keen to learn and experience new things and enjoyed a rich and fulfilling life. We want to thank Sharmane SPENCE for her wonderful compassionate, gentle and considerate care of Mom in her final years, and Sandy McINTYRE for his many kindnesses over many years. Funeral arrangements will be private. For those of you who remember her and loved her we know you will understand, in truth, she left us many years ago and we have been mourning her loss ever since.

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LOCKWOOD o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-09-12 published
NESBITT, Robert Samuel
Born 26 April 1913, died peacefully 11 September 2003, of complications following a broken hip, in his ninety-first year. Beloved husband of Jean (née BOOTH) and loving father of Catherine (Bob LECKEY,) Shelagh (Doug WHITFIELD) and Robbie (deceased.) Proud grandfather of Bill (Shelly,) Rob and Aaron (Lynne DESPRES) WHITFIELD and of Amelia BAILEY (Mark) and Robert LECKEY (Josý NAVAS) and great-grandfather of Amy and Ashley WHITFIELD and of Corbin BAILEY. Predeceased by sisters Joyce (Clarence LOCKWOOD,) Patricia (Ben THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON) and, in childhood, Eleanor and brother George. Bob's life was marked by his dedication to his family, Friends, neigbours, church and community. The family will receive Friends at the Walas Funeral Home, 130 Main Street, Brighton on Sunday from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Service will be held from St. Paul's Anglican Church, Brighton on Monday, September 15th at 1 o'clock. Interment Mount Hope Cemetery Cemetery, Brighton. As an expression of sympathy, donations to St. Paul's Anglican Church, Belleville Hospital or The Red Cross, care of Box 96, Brighton, Ontario K0K 1H0, would be appreciated by the family.

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LOCKYER o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-04-16 published
Lillian Milinda VINEY
In loving memory of Lillian Milinda VINEY, who passed away peacefully at Manitoulin Health Centre on Friday, April 11, 2003 at the age of 82 years.
Beloved wife of Charles VINEY. Dear mother of Shirley VINEY of Little Current, George VINEY of Manitowaning, Sandra and husband Bruce POPE of Manitowaning, Lyla VINEY of Orillia. Loved grandmother of Stephanie and Mark MacDONALD (fiancée Holly,) Andrew and Katherine POPE, Kimberley, Laura and Marianne MENARD. Special great grandmother of Jonathan and Jessica ORR, Justin, Destanie (BAILEY) and Liliana MacDONALD. Remembered by brother and sisters Violet HUBBARD- McALLISTER (predeceased,) Harry JAGGARD (wife Gladys predeceased,) Bessie LOCKYER (husband James predeceased,) Florence LENSON (husband Walter predeceased,) Madeleine CHARLTON (husband John predeceased), predeceased by sisters Beulah and Iris and parents Guy and Evalena JAGGARD. Sister-in-law of Harry VINEY, Ruth McCULLIGH (predeceased,) Lauretta McGILLIS (predeceased,) Grace HUNTER (predeceased,) Joyce and husband Howard HOLMES, Glenn and wife Margaret VINEY, predeceased by Joe, Bob and Edith. Will be missed by numerous nephews and nieces. Visitation was held Sunday, April 13, 2003. Funeral service was held Monday, April 14, 2003. Both at Knox United Church, Manitowaning. Burial in Hilly Grove Cemetery at a later date. Arrangements in care of Island Funeral Home.

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