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"LIN" 2003 Obituary


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LIN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-28 published
BERRY, Virginia Gingerick M.A., PhD., D.Litt., Member of the Order of Canada
Died in Victoria, British Columbia on Saturday, March 22. Born in 1915 in North Manchester, Indiana to Fred and Julia GINGERICK, Virginia did her B.A. at Mount Holyoke College, Massachusetts., and took her M.A. (1938) and PhD (1941) in Medieval Studies at the University of Chicago. After teaching at Stephens College, Columbia, Missouri, Virginia moved to Winnipeg in 1943 on her marriage to Edmund BERRY of the Classics Department of the University of Manitoba. She taught at Saint John's College (1943-44), from which she received an Honorary Fellowship in 1986. While raising her two daughters, Virginia began a lifelong involvement in the Winnipeg Art Gallery. She was an early member and later President of the Women's Committee, a member of the Building Committee for the new Gallery, and a Board member for many years, including a term as Vice- President. In 1986 she was made a Member of the Order of Canada for her work in the arts community. She was awarded an honorary Doctor of Letters from the University of Winnipeg in 1987. As Guest Curator at the Winnipeg Art Gallery she wrote two book-length exhibition catalogues, A Boundless Horizon and Vistas of Promise, on the history of Manitoba art. This year she completed a manuscript on the role of women in Manitoba art, 1880 to 1920. In the fifties, Virginia sat on the Boards of Balmoral Hall School and the Middlechurch Home. She was a member of the Altar Guild of All Saints Anglican Church for more than 50 years. Virginia loved historical research, antiques, art and travel. She and Edmund travelled often to England, spent part of each winter with Friends in Spain, and more recently wintered in Victoria. She was slow to criticize and quick to encourage. Her quiet strength and warm support endeared her to many. She will be remembered for her grace and dignity, and her kindness. She is survived by her husband of 59 years, Edmund, daughters Julia MELNYK (George) of Calgary, Margaret LIN (Philip) of Victoria, and grand_sons Adam MELNYK and Brian and Michael LIN. A memorial service at All Saints Church in Winnipeg is planned for 4: 00 p.m. April 26, 2003. Donations in Virginia's memory may be made to the Winnipeg Art Gallery, 300 Memorial Blvd. R3C 1W2 or All Saints Church, 175 Colony Street, Winnipeg, R3C 1W2.

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LIN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-07-26 published
'She wore a smile all the time'
A nursing 'hero' cared for severe acute respiratory syndrome victims, became one herself and died not knowing the fate of her husband
By Allison LAWLOR Saturday, July 26, 2003 - Page F10
'I don't think she worried about it," Michael TANG says of his mother. "She was very invincible."
But Tecla LIN knew the risks far better than most people. She was among the first to volunteer when West Park Healthcare Centre, where she was a part-time nurse, set up a special unit to treat Toronto health-care workers stricken in the city's initial outbreak of sudden acute respiratory syndrome.
It was dangerous duty, but she knew what to watch for -- especially the high fever so closely associated with the mysterious disease. So, whenever she went to sleep, a thermometer could be found with the face creams and makeup on her bedside table.
Then, on April 4, she realized she had sudden acute respiratory syndrome symptoms and immediately checked herself into Sunnybrook and Women's College Health Sciences Centre.
"We didn't think much of it the first week or so," recalls Mr. TANG, 32. "We remained optimistic."
But Ms. LIN's health started to deteriorate and soon she required an oxygen mask. For three months she remained in hospital, and "it got harder and harder for her to breathe," her son says.
Last month she was transferred to the William Osler Health Centre in Etobicoke, where she died last Saturday morning at the age of 58.
She probably knew the end was near. What she didn't know was that Chi Sui LIN, the husband she had infected, had passed away just three weeks after she went into Sunnybrook.
Mr. TANG says he and his brother Wilson decided to keep their stepfather's death from their mother, feeling she needed all her strength to fight her own illness.
Born on December 18, 1944, in Hong Kong, Tecla Lai Yin WONG was the eldest of four children. Her father died while she was still young, and she became largely responsible for supporting the family.
"There was a great deal of obligation to help the family and to help others," Mr. TANG says.
After graduating from the Government School of Nursing, she began her career in Kowloon, Hong Kong, in 1968, spending five years as an operating-room nurse at the Queen Elizabeth Hospital.
In June, 1968, she married Augustine TANG, the father of Wilson and Michael. Five years later, the couple (who divorced in the mid-1980s) brought their family to Canada, settling in Toronto and opening a Chinese restaurant.
Ms. LIN worked in the struggling restaurant with her husband but in 1977 landed a job at the Doctors Hospital, where she worked there for more than 20 years. In that time, she became a specialist in dealing with high-maintenance patients. She also went back to school, to earn her nursing degree from Ryerson University and to complete a certificate in critical-care nursing.
She started to work part-time at West Park Healthcare Centre in October, 1999, mainly in the rehabilitation centre's respiratory-services unit. She also worked part-time at the Toronto Rehabilitation Institute, often on the night shift.
By working at night, she could spend the day doing the other things that she enjoyed. She regularly went to the Chinese Community Centre of Ontario in downtown Toronto with Mr. LIN, whom she had married after her divorce from Mr. TANG in the mid-1980s.
"They were very devoted to each other," says Donald CHEN, president of the community centre, where Ms. LIN became an executive director.
"The two of them would come in together and enjoy the company of others."
Almost 20 years his wife's senior, Mr. LIN had lived in Taiwan before coming to Canada. He served in the air force, Mr. CHEN said, and went on to become a teacher and then the head of an elementary school.
"We called him 'Principal,' " he said.
Mr. LIN was in his mid-70s when he died, and had long been retired. His own children live in Taiwan, according to Mr. TANG, who says he was not close to his stepfather.
At the centre, Ms. LIN organized such activities for the women as tai chi, gardening and dancing. But she also had a passion for mahjong, the popular Chinese tile game, often taking on some of the seniors at the centre.
"She could play all night," Mr. TANG said.
Friendly and outgoing, "she wore a smile all the time," Mr. CHEN says. "She was very sweet and very friendly," enjoyed the company of others, and treated people at the centre as "sisters and mothers."
Mr. TANG agrees, saying: "She liked to chat."
She also liked to help. In March, she traded her part-time duties in West Park's respiratory services for a full-time job in the new sudden acute respiratory syndrome unit. Fourteen staff members from Scarborough Hospital (Grace Division), the initial sudden acute respiratory syndrome epicentre, had been infected and transferred to the ward for treatment.
The caregivers managed to fight off the infection until last month, when June, Nelia LAROZA, 51, of North York General Hospital, became the first nurse to die. Ms. LIN was the second. Her death brought the sudden acute respiratory syndrome fatalities in Canada to 41, all in Ontario.
Colleagues at West Park Healthcare Centre are in mourning. Last weekend, the hospital lowered its flag to half-mast, and later issued a statement saying that Ms. LIN, "like everyone else who had worked to contain sudden acute respiratory syndrome and care for patients under stressful and extreme circumstances, was considered a hero."
Barbara WAHL, president of the Ontario Nurses' Association, says that "I certainly heard outstanding things about her nursing care. She was totally dedicated."
Her death, Ms. WAHL adds, "is a terrible blow to her colleagues," and to her profession.
Those co-workers remember her compassion and generosity.
"Tecla provided a unique mix of skilled nursing and unwavering compassion for her patients and fellow staff members," the statement says. "Popular, hard working and beloved by many, she would even sometimes bring lunch for her colleagues."
She was also, her son says, "known for her resilience and strength."
Even while confined to her hospital bed, she was trying to plan a wedding -- Wilson, 34, is to be married in September. "She was really looking forward to it," brother Michael says.
A private funeral service for family, Friends and invited guests will be held at 10 a.m. on Tuesday at the Hong Kong Funeral Home, located at 8088 Yonge Street, in Thornhill, Ontario
The public will be received at the funeral home tomorrow from 2 to 6 p.m. and Monday from 5 to 9 p.m.
Tomorrow afternoon at 3, the Chinese Community Centre, located at 84 Augusta Ave., will conduct a special memorial service for Mr. and Ms. LIN, who leaves her mother, a sister and two brothers in Hong Kong, as well as her sons.
Ms. LIN was an animal lover with two cats. Her family asks that memorial donations be sent to the Toronto Humane Society.

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LINDELL o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-07 published
Willard Adrian JACKSON
By Andrew LINDELL, Donna MORRISON Friday, March 7, 2003 - Page A18
Engineer, adventurer, grandfather. Born July 19, 1912, in Sudbury, Ontario Died February 8, in Toronto, of congestive heart failure, aged 90.
Willard Adrian JACKSON was cremated in a pine box, with no funeral, arrangements you might think were for a man without family or Friends. Yet, Willard was one of most loved men I've ever known, deeply loved by his wife of 68 years, three daughters, eight grandchildren and 17 great grandchildren.
Born the son of a funeral director, he did not believe in excess or unnecessary extravagances and rituals, including funerals. He called cars "necessary evils" and did not pretend to understand the generation controlled by computers. His strong attitudes were often offensively opinionated and even politically incorrect. Still, what most warmed to in him was his belief in the simple joys of life: family, love, and good old-fashioned hard work.
Willard lived a good life and a long one -- one longer than you might expect after a life of work-related injuries and mishaps. A plane crash in 1954 during Hurricane Hazel left him with a torn ear, crushed left forearm and broken neck (he broke it twice in his lifetime; his back once, in another incident), that put him in a plaster cast from head to waist for six months. The doctors told him he would likely be paralyzed. Helped by his wife Jane by playing Scrabble for hours, forced to pick up the tiny letter pieces with his mangled hand, he fully recovered.
A graduate of Queen's University science class of 1939, as a civil engineer, Willard began his career working in the underground mines, first with Inco and then at Falconbridge, both in Sudbury. In 1940, he tried to join the war effort overseas, but wasn't accepted because, as an engineer, he was needed in his own country to help build airstrips in Goose Bay, Labrador. After the war, he worked at Canadian Pacific Railway in Sudbury for five years. He joined Clarke Steamship Co. of Montreal in the construction department and was later lured to join Caswell Construction where he helped build Highway 401. He left to set up his own business in Toronto, Consul Consultants, where, as crane specialist, he travelled all over North America investigating large construction and mining accidents for insurance companies.
Willard was a master storyteller, and loved to tell tales of his adventures hunting, building or travelling. He once had to eat raw porcupine after his food and dry-match supply ran out on a moose-hunting trip. He had a special place in his heart for Canada's Arctic, where in 1978 he befriended many of the local residents at his (now late) grand_son's wedding to (now) federal Member of Parliament for Nunavut, Nancy KARETAK- LINDELL. A week before Willard died, he was paid a visit by his longtime friend from Iqaluit, Abraham. It was one of the final highlights of his life.
My grandfather was an extraordinary male role model for seven boys growing up in divorced marriages. He taught us to work hard at everything we do. When we were teenagers, he had us blasting rocks and felling trees to build roads at his farm in Lafontaine, Ontario He was always our biggest fan, praising our accomplishments and encouraging us to take risks into fields that filled our hearts, not necessarily our wallets.
When he turned 90 last July, it became obvious that Willard himself thought he was done. Living became a necessary evil. He became crippled with arthritis and his breathing became very laboured. In November, he called the entire family together for Christmas day, knowing -- he told us -- it would be his last. With my video camera rolling, I asked him what advice he could pass on. "Be true to your values, " he said.
Andrew is Willard's grand_son. Andrew and his fiancée Donna collaborated on this essay.

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LINDOKKEN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-02 published
Jeanette Katherine Emily (Ma) LINDOKKEN
By John RICHTHAMMER, Tuesday, December 2, 2003 - Page A24
Nurse, grandmother, leader, merchant. Born August 9, 1910, in McTavish, Manitoba Died April 2, 2003, in Winnipeg, after a stroke, aged 92.
After more than 71 consecutive years in Northwestern Ontario, Jeanette "Ma" LINDOKKEN returned to her childhood home of Winnipeg to be near her family. Within a week of her arrival, Jeanette's hip shattered. Undaunted, she started therapy for recovery -- which was ultimately not to be.
Jeanette's prairie roots were deep. She was born in a southern Manitoba hamlet to a family who began homesteading there in 1876. Although she idolized her father James for his gentleness, the home was ruled by her distant, undemonstrative mother, Sarah Annie WESTGATE. Even in old age, Jeanette fondly spoke of her younger sister, Ethel, who had died from juvenile diabetes in Jeanette finished high school in Petersfield, Manitoba, where the family had moved to farm, and at the outset of the Depression, enrolled in a three-year nursing program. Then she took nursing jobs in Winnipeg, and in a tuberculosis sanatorium in Saskatchewan.
In 1932, at 21, Jeanette travelled by canoe to return an infant to a remote Anishinaape community in Northwestern Ontario. En route, she washed diapers in the lakes and cooked over open fires. The experience forever changed Jeanette's life and began seven decades of Friendship and work with First Nations people.
In the Northern Ontario community of Deer Lake, Jeanette met a Norwegian-born trapper and prospector Oskar LINDOKKEN. The Beaver magazine described him as "a figure who might have stepped out of... the stirring days of beaver hats, freight canoes and singing voyageurs." He became her rugged partner-in-life for the next 47 years.
They married in 1933 in Winnipeg, and then returned to Deer Lake to build a log home. Their meals were fish, moose, rabbit, and bannock. Jeanette fished, trapped, hunted, and made campfires, as well as cooked, sewed and made clothing, often from hide she skinned and stretched. Despite her small, lithe frame, she often carried heavy loads.
Jeanette used her nursing skills in every aspect of health care, from tuberculosis treatment to midwifery to palliative care. She nursed several generations of families, saved lives, and also treated injured animals, which she fed with baby bottles.
Assuming charge of a situation, Jeanette often tread on toes. But if she had a reputation for bossiness and brutal honesty, everyone knew it stemmed from her caring intensely about others' welfare. She was known as "Ma." Her defence of the underdog was the stuff of local legend. In honour of her 50 years of nursing there, the Deer Lake community nursing station was named after Jeanette, and the Ontario government presented her with a medal of service.
The LINDOKKENs also operated a general trading post, tourist camp, and commercial fishing and flying enterprises. Oskar was the garrulous, savvy front man, while Jeanette, a natural manager, did everything else. Their store was a community gathering place.
Deeply religious, Jeanette laughingly described herself as "probably the only Scottish Presbyterian Mennonite in the world." Her unshakeable faith guided her through tragedies such as the death of her only child, Jimmy, in an aircraft crash nearly 40 years ago, the death of her beloved Oskar, and her own oncoming blindness. Despite these hardships, the tiny-framed woman who withstood every rigour of the remote North remained indomitable and engaged to the end.
John RICHTHAMMER was considered an adopted grand_son by Jeanette.

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LINDSAY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-05-09 published
He was a daredevil footballer in the days of leather helmets
By Tom HAWTHORN Special to The Globe and Mail Friday, May 9, 2003 - Page R11
Norris LINDSAY, a teammate of Ormond BEACH and Bummer STIRLING on the storied Sarnia Imperials football team, has died in Petrolia, Ontario He was 94.
At 6-foot-3, 220-pounds, he was a big man in the era of leather helmets and earned a reputation for his flying tackles, a daredevil play that has long since fallen out of favour. In lieu of salary as a two-way player, Mr. LINDSAY and his teammates were guaranteed jobs with Canadian Oil Companies Ltd.
Mr. LINDSAY helped the Imperials win the Ontario Rugby Football Union champioship in 1933 and 1934 over Balmy Beach, St. Michael's College and the Hamilton Tigers.
In 1933, the Imperials played host to the 1933 Grey Cup championship against the Toronto Argonauts. Despite his regular-season contributions, coach Pat OUELLETTE did not have Mr. LINDSAY suit up for the big game, which was won 4-3 by Toronto in the lowest-scoring Grey Cup ever played.
Mr. LINDSAY was frustrated again the following year, when coach Art MASSUCCI did not place him on the Imperials' roster for the Grey Cup final. Sarnia defeated the Regina Roughriders 20-12 at Toronto. Among Mr. LINDSAY's teammates wearing the three-starred sweater of the Imperials were Mr. BEACH, a sensational halfback kicker Hugh (Bummer) STIRLING of Saint Thomas, Ontario; rugged snapper Boob MOLLOY; and, the speedy Norm PERRY, known as The Galloping Ghost.
Mr. LINDSAY, who was born in Tupperville, Ontario, near Chatham in southwestern Ontario, was also a gifted golfer who entered the 1940 Canadian Open. "He told me his first shot went out of bounds, said Pat SUTHERLAND, a friend. "By the time he was done, he had shot an 11 on the first hole."
Mr. LINDSAY, an amateur, shot an embarrassing 93 on the par-71 course, following with a 90. The tournament was won in a playoff by the legendary American golfer Sam SNEAD. Shortly after, Mr. LINDSAY joined the merchant marine and was a radio operator during the Second World War. In peacetime, he took over the Blue Bay Lodge near Huntsville, Ontario, which he operated until 1963.
Mr. LINDSAY golfed until late in life. When his local club opened a new clubhouse, he rented the old one and made it his home. He died on March 11 at the Lambton Meadowview Villa in Petrolia, 10 days after marking his 94th birthday. He was predeceased by his wife, Bette, who died in 1965.

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LINDSAY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-10-27 published
SAULT, John Henry (1918 - 2003)
Died peacefully in Toronto on Friday, October 24, 2003 surrounded by his wife and family. Loving husband of Beth (HARRISON) for over 60 years. Great Dad to Mary (Max McKELVEY,) the late Peggy (Bruce TRUSCOTT), Cathie (Wayne HUGHES), John (Linda), Barb (Liz THOMAS,) Patty (Michael BONTJE.) Wonderful Grampa who will be missed particularly at Boshkung Lake by his grandchildren Keith, Andrew and Heather McKELVEY; Sarah, Rebecca (Josh KESTER), and Martha TRUSCOTT; Alison, Calum and Jeremy HUGHES; Harrison and Alex BONTJE. Predeceased by sister Helen (SAULT) LINDSAY whose children looked to him as a mentor and guide. Special Uncle to his many nieces and nephews. Jock, affectionately known as ''Saltie'' was a long-time salesman for the Canadian Salt Company. Along with a busy career and active family life, Jock coached hockey, golfed and drove the water-ski-boat. He was a dedicated Big Brother, Boy Scout Leader and Elder at Forest Hill United Church. Later in life he volunteered with North Toronto Meals on Wheels. He served a term as Mayor of Donarvon Park, Boshkung Lake and spent a cherished year as President of the Boshkung Lake Cottagers Association ending the summer by holding the First Annual Presidents Ball. A large man who loved life, he will be missed by his family, many relatives, Friends and co-workers. Jock was well known for his favourite saying, ''It's great to be alive''.The family extends sincere gratitude to the staff at Kingsway Retirement Home and the Trillium Health Centre (Mississauga) for their devoted and professional care. Friends may call at the Turner and Porter Yorke Chapel, 2357 Bloor St. West at Windermere, east of the Jane subway from 2-4 pm and 7-9 pm, Monday; Memorial Service in the Chapel on Tuesday October 28, 2003 at 3: 00 pm. If desired a donation may be made to National Ovarian Cancer Association, 27 Park Road, Toronto, Ontario Canada, M4W 2N2.

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LINKE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-11 published
Kenneth Wilfred CONIBEAR
By Marilyn CONIBEAR Tuesday, March 11, 2003 - Page A16
Canadian pioneer, scholar, writer, teacher, builder. Born August 29, 1907, in Orville, Ontario Died October 4, 2002, in Vancouver, of natural causes, aged 95.
During Ken's "retirement" years, he built, stone by stone, the "Great Wall" of Vancouver on the waterfront behind his home near Jericho Beach. This wall, an unofficial Vancouver landmark, intrigued visitors from around the world who brought or sent stones to be embedded in individual concrete plaques within the wall. From that wall, he invited thousands of visitors to come into his home to share stories and rest a while.
Ken was a man distinguished by intellectual discipline, a love of the language, a respect for all people and the outdoors, as well as personal qualities of patience, kindness, and gentle humour.
His formative years were spent near Fort Resolution on the shores of Great Slave Lake and at Fort Smith, Northwest Territories. He later intrigued his family with tales from as early as 1912, when he remembered vividly taking the train with his mother and four older siblings from Parry Sound, Ontario, to Edmonton, and then taking the last stagecoach from Edmonton to Athabasca Landing. From there they travelled by freight barge along the river and lake systems until they reached their new home, a log cabin at Nagel Snye on Great Slave Lake.
After spending a few years in Fort Resolution, they moved to Fort Smith where his father continued his work as a marine engineer for the Catholic mission on Great Slave Lake and his mother became a respected and successful storekeeper and fur trader.
Ken had little formal education until he went to Edmonton for Grades 11 and 12. He then entered the University of Alberta, and in 1931 won the Alberta Rhodes Scholarship. After completing his English studies at Oxford, he became a writer of Canadian fiction, and had his first of five novels published in 1936 (Northland Footprints)and the last in 2000.
In 1937, Ken was hired by his publisher, Lovat DICKSON/DIXON, to manage Grey OWL's last lecture tour in England. Following the tour, Grey OWL was the best man at Ken's wedding. On the way to the wedding, Lovat DICKSON/DIXON drove the car while Grey OWL and Ken sat in the back seat. Grey OWL threw his arm around Ken's shoulder and said, "Just treat the little lady right, Ken, just treat the little lady right!"
At that point Ken had no idea that Grey OWL was not only not an Indian, but that Grey OWL had five wives and therefore was not exactly qualified to give Ken advice on how to treat his new wife.
Ken returned to the north he loved so much to continue writing about the north and its people and animals, and try to establish a freight business on Great Slave Lake.
He spent several years in the Canadian Navy during the Second World War, had a brief career as executive secretary of the British Columbia Hospitals Association. He was then hired, in 1965, by the newly created Simon Fraser University, at an age, he said, when most people want to retire but when he got the job that he dearly loved.
When he retired from Simon Fraser University (twice) at the ages of 65 and 70, he persuaded the university not to give him a silver tray as a retirement gift, but instead a hand-powered cement mixer. Ken continued his relationship with Simon Fraser University by helping to establish the Simon Fraser University seniors' program and the seniors' Opsimath club until he reached the age of 90 years.
Ken was predeceased by his wife of 50 years, Barbara (née LINKE,) and his son, Peter. He is survived by his wife, Marilyn (ERNEST,) his son John, grandchildren Donald, Tina and Kathy, and six great-grandchildren.
Marilyn CONIBEAR is Kenneth's wife.

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LINKE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-06-16 published
WRIGHT, Barbara Hermine Montizambert
Died June 13, 2003 at age 72. She is sadly missed by her husband Dr. Thomas WRIGHT; her family Doctors Janet and the Reverend Paul FRIESEN and their daughter Anya of Halifax; Ian and Kaethe (née NEUFELD) WRIGHT and their children Jonathan and Caitlin of West Vancouver Margot and Rob LINKE and their children Cameron and Chloe of Saint John, New Brunswick; her sister Dorothy REID; and by many dear Friends and relatives. After graduating from nursing programs at the Royal Victoria Hospital and U of T, she worked as a public health nurse until her children were born. She then gave her time to family and Christian ministry. Her life was marked by her relationship with Jesus Christ and her knowledge of Scripture. She lived by the words: ''If you abide in me, and my words abide in you, ask whatever you wish, and it will be done for you. My father is glorified by this, that you bear much fruit and become my Disciples.'' (John 15: 7,8). Barbara leaves behind two generations of family who love the Lord; rich Friendships and a loving marriage of 47 years. A Funeral Service will be held from St. George's Anglican Church, Lowville, at 7051 Guelph Line, on Tuesday, June 17th at 2 p.m. Visitation will take place one hour prior at the church. Donations to Middle East Christian Outreach, P.O. Box 307, Station A, Mississauga, Ontario L5A 3A1; S.I.M., 10 Huntingdale Boulevard, Toronto, Ontario M1W 2S5; or St. George's Anglican Church, 7051 Guelph Line, R.R. #1, Campbellville, Ontario L0P 1B0. Arrangements through the J. Scott Early Funeral Home, 21 James Street, Milton, Ontario L9T 2P3, (905) 878-2669.

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LINLEY o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-09-03 published
Ina ADDISON
In loving memory of Ina ADDISON, August 27, 1914 to August 22, 2003.
Ina ADDISON, a resident of Gordon Township, passed away at Manitoulin Lodge on Friday, August 22, 2003 at the age of 88 years. She was born in Gordon Township, daughter of William and Ida (WOOD) LINLEY. Ina was predeceased by brothers William and Herbert and sisters Edith (CAMPBELL, WILSON) and May (MORDEN.) Ina enjoyed quilting, flowers and gardening. Her greatest love other than the cattle was her family and all the gatherings they enjoyed over the years. Ina married Joe WILSON on August 9, 1933 and they lived their married life on the farm in Gordon, where Ken and Beth GIBBS now reside. Joe died on April 27, 1981 and on May 4, 1985 Ina married Clarence ADDISON. Clarence died on March 18, 1995. Ina's daughter, and only child, Eldean GIBBS (Mrs. Jack,) died on March 29, 1995. Ina's faith in God got her through this sad time but she spent many lonely days. Clarence and Ina lived in Evansville where his daughter Sheila and her husband Frank HARLEY now spend their holidays. They then moved to Mill Site Apartments and in October 2002, Ina moved to Manitoulin Lodge. Ina leaves to mourn her son-in-law, Jack GIBBS (friend June,) grand_son Ken GIBBS (wife Beth) and her beloved great-grandchildren, Loren, John, and Krysten GIBBS, and her stepchildren, Chester ADDISON (wife Pat deceased,) Stan and Joan ADDISON, Sheila and Frank HARLEY and step-grandchildren and great-grandchildren. She will also be remembered by many nieces and nephews to whom she was a very special aunt. Friend called the Culgin Funeral Home on Sunday, August 24, 2003. The Funeral Service was held on Monday, August 25, 2003 with Pastor Erwin Thompson officiating. Interment in Gordon Cemetery. Culgin Funeral Home 282-2270

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LINTON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-07-23 published
Susan Elizabeth CRERAR
By Lauren LINTON and Kelly KIRKLAND, Wednesday, July 23, 2003 - Page A18
Daughter, sister, wife, mother, aunt, grandmother. Born March 30, 1939, in Port Arthur, Ontario Died March 11, 2003, in Delray Beach, Florida, of ovarian cancer, aged 63.
The youngest of two girls, Sue was born to Robert and Laura PRETTIE, a high-profile couple who had moved to Port Arthur, Ontario, to start Northern Wood Preservers Ltd. Sue's strong will and innate sense of fairness were rewarded with her many Friends. Sue would cause trouble if she thought the system was not fair for all. She carried this attitude to boarding school in Toronto where she let it be known that she disagreed with the many rules imposed by the strict girls' school.
After graduating from Havergal College, Sue headed to Vancouver to attend the University of British Columbia. On her second day on campus, Sue met Bill CRERAR at a "registration mixer." Bill said he was quick to "latch onto her and take her off the dating circuit." There they began the love affair that would last more than 44 years.
The children came soon after with Kelly, Lauren, and Steve all born within four years. Sue's philosophy was that if you were home with one child you might as well be home with a few (this seemed reasonable until we had our own kids). The family moved to Berkeley, Calif., where Bill completed his M.B.A. and Sue stayed home with the three young children and became involved in various local charities. After graduation, the family moved to White Plains, New York A fourth child, Andrew, was born in One of Sue's many gifts was her ability to create a home in any environment. We have memories of living in dust and plastic during the many home-renovation projects and eating unidentifiable meals prepared in the microwave aboard a travelling motor home. Mom made it all seem like a great adventure.
Another move brought the family to Toronto in 1967 where Sue could be closer to her sister, Audrey. She volunteered with various non-profit organizations and also served on a number of boards, including the Shaw Festival. In 1975, Sue persuaded a good friend, Diane, that they should open an art gallery, and Hollander York Gallery was founded. She showed us the importance of balancing work and family.
Sue had a great appreciation for the written word. She relished her moments of solitude with a book or newspaper and also had a great talent for expressing herself on paper. When fax machines were invented, Sue saw this new technology as an opportunity soon all family members (including grandparents) were given fax machines and the Family Fax Network was born. And when Sue taught herself how to operate a Macintosh computer, all her faxes arrived neatly typed. When e-mail was the new rage, Sue took it up with passion and couldn't understand why everyone (including her husband!) did not have an e-mail address.
It was as a mother that Sue had the most profound impact. Communication with her two daughters and two sons was daily by phone, fax or e-mail. She was always happy to hear from us and was so wise about so many things, from relationship woes to disciplinary issues with children.
One can never forget Sue's loud, infectious laugh. She laughed at herself when she would tell the story of how her printer broke down and she purchased a new printer only to discover that she had forgotten to plug in the original computer. Human foibles, especially her own, delighted her and she was so quick to see the humour in any situation.
In July, 2001, Sue was diagnosed with ovarian cancer. Sue never hesitated to say to curious Friends "I am more than just a cancer patient." She knew the end was near at Christmas 2002 and kept this awareness private between herself and her best friend, Bill.
Lauren and Kelly are Sue's daughters.

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LINXWEILER o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-09-10 published
Frederick CAPPEL LINXWEILER
Peacefully Tuesday, September 2, 2003 with his daughter at his side in the beautiful McGregor Bay.
Loved by wife Barbara, daughter Alice and husband Dick LOCKREM and son Fred LINXWEILER Jr. Forever in the hearts of six grandchildren and three great-grandchildren. Fred had a great interest in photography, ham radios and McGregor Bay, coming to the Bay since the age of eight. At his request direct cremation with a service at a later date in Dayton, Ohio. Arrangements in care of Island Funeral Home.

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