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"LEW" 2003 Obituary


LEWINGTON  LEWIS  LEWISTON 

LEWINGTON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-10 published
Japan Camera co-founder dies in car accident
John Asa was a passenger in his wife's car when he fell out and hit head, reports say
By Colin FREEZE With a report from Jennifer LEWINGTON Monday, March 10, 2003 - Page A10
John ASA, a boyhood survivor of the Hiroshima bombing who grew up to co-found the Japan Camera retail chain, died after falling from a car said to have been driven by his wife.
"All of us are just waiting to find out what happened, really, said Mr. ASA's nephew, Bryan, in an interview last night.
He said the entire family is grieving for his uncle, whom he described as an inspiring and visionary Canadian entrepreneur who never tired of building his business or of taking snapshots.
According to CFTO News, Mr. ASA had just left his home in the hamlet of Leaskdale, northeast of Toronto, about 8: 30 a.m. on Thursday when he saw his wife of two years driving the other way.
According to the report, they pulled over to the side of the road and he got into her car. But after about 15 metres, he fell out of the passenger side and hit his head.
An witness who came on the scene told the Uxbridge Times Journal that "when I saw the amount of blood I was surprised he was still alive."
Mr. ASA died of the head wounds in hospital.
Police in Durham Region are investigating the case. Constable Robert HAWKES, the lead officer, said he expects to get a reconstruction of the incident tomorrow. The Durham homicide squad is not involved in the probe.
Bryan ASA, who is a Japan Camera vice-president, described his uncle as the youngest and most charismatic of three brothers who overcame hardships early in life.
John ASA was born in Canada but was brought to Japan as a child shortly before the Second World War started.
When he was about 7, he and his older brothers heard the U.S. bomber Enola Gay fly over their small village about 10 kilometres from Hiroshima on August 6, 1945, then saw the tremendous mushroom cloud engulf the city. The explosion killed his mother, who was travelling, but the radiation-filled smoke blew away from his village.
With his two older brothers, Kenji and Roy, Mr. ASA made his way to Canada in 1954. They settled in Toronto, where their first jobs were picking mushrooms.
As a teenager, John ASA went on to become his high-school class president. He and his brothers opened the first Japan Camera store near Yonge Street in 1959.
Twenty years later, the enterprise had grown into a leading chain with outlets across Canada.
Japan Camera was the first company in North America that allowed customers to have their photos developed within an hour.
For the last 20 years, Mr. ASA had lived in Leaskdale, a tiny village in the community known as Uxbridge. His first wife died five years ago, and he had remarried.
Bryan ASA said his uncle never stopped urging people to take pictures.

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LEWINGTON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-08-18 published
Werner SEEGELKEN
By Jennifer LEWINGTON, Jean LEWINGTON and Antji GILES Monday, August 18, 2003 - Page A14
Farmer, opera lover, wine maker, improviser of machinery. Born June 24, 1932, in Gibeon, South West Africa (now Namibia). Died June 16, in London, Ontario, of cancer, aged 70.
The place called "Werner's Paradise" is special, hidden from roadside view on a farm north of London, Ontario The Nairn River, lined with weeping willows, cuts through the rolling property as a fast-flowing stream. On humid summer nights, Sabrina the turtle may poke her head out of a spring-fed pond at the sound of her name. In winter, deer and fox meander through a nearby woodlot of maple, pine and cedar.
This 14-acre sanctuary for people and wildlife is one of the legacies of Werner SEEGELKEN. A farmer "through and through," so aptly described by daughter Antji, Werner had a knack for creating something from nothing.
For example, Werner saw the potential of a rough piece of land on an otherwise productive farm of corn and white beans. He bulldozed aside a few of the thorn trees and tapped into natural springs to create two ponds that attracted birds and wildlife. Year by year, Werner and his family planted native trees, creating a place of beauty and tranquility.
Born in South West Africa, Werner was raised in Germany from the age of 5 and as a young man emigrated to Canada after the Second World War. He came with little money but sharp memories of war-related privation. He decided to be a farmer so he would never be hungry again.
In 1957, temporarily leaving behind his fiancée Marga in Germany, he arrived in Canada and worked on a dairy farm in Ottawa. A year later, Marga joined him and they were married in the fall of 1958. At first, they lived in London, Ontario, where Werner worked in several industrial jobs to save money for a farm.
Werner and Marga bought their first farm in 1963, after the birth of their two children, Antji and Werner, Jr. During the next 30 years, the SEEGELKENs acquired five farms in the London area, including the Pond Farm of "Werner's Paradise."
Like many farmers, Werner was a frugal and practical man. He had a talent for adapting farm machinery to extend its life. In the wintertime, Werner was busy in the large metal-working shop at the family homestead, tinkering and improvising to get more from a cantankerous combine for the next crop season.
He knew what it meant to respect the natural environment. On one occasion, he found a young heron with a broken wing. Ignoring the bird's angry pecks, Werner nursed it back to health and released it back into the wild.
Spring planting and fall harvest are the most exhausting times for farmers. In addition to farming their own land, Werner and Werner, Jr., worked the land of several neighbours, including my mother Jean's farm some 30 kilometres away. In spring and fall, the SEEGELKENs would arrive with their imposing equipment and work all night, if needed, to beat any forecast of rain. Since there was no time to stop for a meal, my mother would prepare a picnic supper for them to eat on the run.
When Werner pulled up in his big tractor to meet her, he would be singing along with the German operatic music that boomed from his glass-enclosed cab. He always was ready with a joke or a funny story -- or a blunt assessment of the planting conditions or the likely crop yield.
Werner saw any visit to his family's farm as an excuse for little party. Out would come the stubby glasses filled with his homemade beer and wine. He made you feel welcome, even if you had interrupted a sprawling Sunday dinner of the immediate family (six young grandchildren), assorted relatives visiting from Germany and Friends. Werner's big heart embraced family, Friends and the land.
Jennifer and Jean are Friends of Werner and Antji is his daughter.

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LEWINGTON - All Categories in OGSPI

LEWIS o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-01-08 published
Nelda May MONTGOMERY
In loving memory of Nelda May MONTGOMERY, September 13, 1913 - January 5, 2003.
Nelda MONTGOMERY, a resident of Spring Bay, passed away peacefully at her residence on Sunday, January 5, 2003, at the age of 89 years. She was born at Grimesthorpe, daughter of the late Neil and Pearl (LEWIS) McALLISTER. Nelda had operated Dawson's Resort from 1935 until 1982. Her hobbies included quilting, driving, picking raspberries, and most of all, going to yard sales.
Nelda was predeceased by her first husband Robert DAWSON in June of 1957. She later married Colin MONTGOMERY who predeceased November 1982. Dearly loved mother of James and daughter-in-law Myrtle DAWSON of Spring Bay. Proud grandmother of Marilyn, Sylvia (Doug ORFORD,) Paul, Murray (Dawn) all of Spring Bay and David of London and great grandchildren Bruce, Rodney and Sarah ORFORD and Rebecca and Alexander DAWSON. Dear sister of Dorothy DOBRANSKI of Little Current, Calvin (Winnifred) McALLISTER of Azilda and Marie (Richard) LAVOIE of Sudbury. Also survived by many nieces and nephews. Predeceased by brothers Gordon and Elgin and brother-in-law Michael DOBRANSKI.
Friends called at the Culgin Funeral Home on Tuesday, January 7, 2003. The funeral service will be conducted in the Wm. G. Turner Chapel on Wednesday, January 8, 2003 with Reverend Frank HANER officiating. Spring interment in Grimesthorpe Cemetery. Arrangements in care of Culgin Funeral Home.

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LEWIS o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-01-22 published
Margaret Clara LEWIS (Nee WHIDDON)
In loving memory of Margaret Clara LEWIS who died peacefully, January 19, 2003 at the Manitoulin Lodge, age 91 years.
Beloved wife of William LEWIS (predeceased in 1996.) Loving mother of Jack (Myrna,) Carol (Carl HALL,) Lyle (Paulette.) Very special grandmother to Wendy, Michael, David, Stacey and Sherry. Cherished great grandmother to Justin, Adrien, Parker, Ally and Hunter. Dear sister of Bill (Lena) and Nora (Nick predeceased), predeceased by John and Dorothy. Dear sister-in-law of Doreen GRANGER (George,) Madeline HOLOWACK, Mary KERHANOVICH (Earl), Catherine GIFFEN (Garth). Predeceased by Ina and George BREATHAT and Margaret and Arden LEWIS. Sadly missed by many nieces and nephews.
Margaret was born in Fort Frances, Ontario and graduated as a registered nurse in 1932. She moved to Manitoulin Island where she married her husband in 1941. A hard working woman, Margaret raised her children, worked on the family farm, and nursed until her retirement. She lived her later years in Little Current, and most recently at the Manitoulin Lodge in Gore Bay. Visitation from 10: 00 until Funeral Service 11:00 a.m. Wednesday, January 22, 2003 at Island Funeral Home. Cremation with burial of ashes in Elmview Cemetery.

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LEWIS o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-04-23 published
Maurice Russell CAMPBELL
In loving memory of Maurice Russell CAMPBELL, November 3, 1930 to April 5, 2003.
Maurice CAMPBELL, a resident of Gore Bay and formerly of Ice Lake, died at the Mindemoya Hospital on Saturday, April 5, 2003 at the age of 72 years He was born in Carnarvon Township, son of the late Russell and Mildred (LEWIS) CAMPBELL. Maurice had worked as a mechanic for over 40 years, for McDougall Construction, McQuarrie Motors and Manitoulin Transport. When he was able, Maurice enjoyed hunting and fishing. Dearly loved husband of Jean CAMPBELL of Gore Bay. Loved father of Marilyn of Mindemoya, Rick and his wife Laurie of Spring Bay, Ron and his wife Bonnie of Ice Lake, Stephen of Sudbury and Tracy and husband Steve VYSE of Mindemoya. Loving grandfather of Ryan, Leslie, Colin, Krystal and TecaBoo and Chevy. Dear brother of Ivan CAMPBELL of Sudbury, Blaine CAMPBELL of Spring Bay, Myrna PATTERSON of Gore Bay, Edith LOGAN of Lively and Keith CAMPBELL of Milton. Predeceased by one sister Berniece. Also survived by several nieces and nephews. Cremation will take place and a memorial service will be held at a later date. Culgin Funeral Home

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LEWIS o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-04-30 published
Shirley Eleanor COOPER
In loving memory of Shirley Eleanor COOPER who passed away peacefully at her home in Espanola on Sunday, April 27, 2003 at the age of 71 years.
Born July 15, 1931. Cherished wife of Burt. Loved mother of Sandra and husband Bill OLFERT of Espanola, Marilyn and husband Paul FORD of Naughton, Randy and wife Terri of Mount Albert. Special grandmother of Stacey and Sherry LEWIS, Carrie PATTY, Chris and Paula FORD, Thomas and Justin COOPER. Dear great grandmother of Brandon, Brady, Kyle, Kamryn. Missed by brother Bud and wife Pat Wilkin. Will be remembered by in-laws Nellie Thomas (husband Gordon predeceased) of Tehkummah, Jean and husband Bernie Harfield, both predeceased, Leonard and wife Betty Cooper of Mindemoya, Alvern Nighswander (husband Stuart predeceased) of Little Current, Max Cooper (predeceased) and wife Ellen of Little Current, Don and wife Karlene Cooper of Espanola. Aunt to many nieces and nephews.
Visitation was held on Tuesday, April 29, 2003. Funeral Service at 2: 00 p.m. Wednesday, April 30, 2003 both at Mindemoya Missionary Church. Burial in Mindemoya Cemetery.

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LEWIS o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-08-13 published
Howard Reginald McCORRISTON
Died peacefully at Grand River Hospital, Kitchener-Waterloo Health Centre on Monday, August 4, 2003 at the age of 77 years.
Beloved husband of 51 years to Lenna (née LEWIS.) Loving father of Terry and Marg of Kitchener, Ross and Cheryl of Saint Agatha, Mark and Willi of Kindersley, Sask., and Brian and Sue of Oak Ridges, ON.
Grandpa will be missed by his 12 grandchildren, Jason and Rachel, Colin, Blair, Adam, Matthew, Ashley, Holly, Lorah, Kaitlinn, Melissa, and Brittany. He will be remembered by his brothers and sisters, Roy of South Porcupine, ON., Harvey of Saskatoon, Sask., Ann and Charles HANCOCK of Humboldt, Sask., and Jim and Gretta of Saskatoon, Sask. Brother-in-law Viola McCORRISTON of Tisdale, Sask., and Dianne McCORRISTON of Kitchener. Missed by Lenna's family, Ilene McMILLAN, Marvin and Nancy LEWIS, Eldon and Mona LEWIS, June LEWIS, Liz LEWIS, and Carl and Lorene LEWIS. Predeceased by his parents, Reginald (1932) and Mildred (1998) McCORRISTON, his brothers, John and Dave, and brothers-in-law to Earl LEWIS Jr., Harold McMILLAN, Jim LEWIS, and Rene LEWIS. Survived by his aunts, Hazel and Irma and Uncle Dave and many nieces and nephews.
The McCORRISTON family will receive Friends at the United Missionary Church, Spring Bay, on Saturday, August 23, 2003 for Howards' memorial from 1-3pm. The Funeral Services were held in Kitchener on August 8, 2003. Visit www.obit411.com/1066 for Howards' memorial.

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LEWIS o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-09-10 published
LEWIS
-In loving memory of a wonderful father and grandfather James LEWIS who passed away September 10, 2000
Three years have passed by since you left us.
We will always remember a kind, caring dad and grandpa.
-Forever loved and sadly missed, Your daughter Jody, grandchildren Sarah and Nicolas

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LEWIS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-08 published
PETROWSKI, Mary Anne (KENT)
At London Health Sciences Centre, Westminster Campus on Thursday, March 6, 2003 in her 73rd year. Only daughter of the late Marion (FAUNT) and Gordon KENT. She leaves behind her dearest friend and loving husband Victor. She is survived by her two cherished daughters Suzanne LEWIS of West Vancouver and Lauren TEEVAN of Toronto, their husbands Richard and Nicholas, and two darling granddaughters Jordan and Kendall LEWIS. Mary Anne was predeceased by her son G.W. Kent PETROWSKI and now goes happily to meet him with open arms. She was born and lived her entire life in London and was a third generation of the West-Kent family, business people in London from 1888-1980. She will be fondly remembered by many beloved relatives and Friends made throughout her life. She was very interested in the work of the Imperial Order of the Daughters of the Empire and May Court clubs and was a life member of Metropolitan United Church. Mary Anne had a deep love of music for pleasure, and hopefully will leave a song in the hearts of all who knew her and whom she loved.
Friends may call on Sunday from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. at the James A. Harris Funeral Home, Richmond St. at St. James, London, Ontario. A memorial service will be conducted on Monday, March 10 at 12: 00 Noon in Metropolitan United Church, Dufferin Ave. at Wellington Street, London, Ontario, by Reverend Farquhar MacKINNON. A private cremation service will be held followed by burial in Woodland Cemetery. Memorial contributions to the Children's Hospital Foundation (for Medical Genetics Research) or the London Regional Cancer Centre would be gratefully acknowledged.

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LEWIS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-05-06 published
Ken POWERS
By Leslie POWERS Thursday, May 8, 2003 - Page A22
Artist, banker, bird watcher, traveller, amateur archaeologist. Born February 4, 1925 in Ottawa. Died June 17, 2002, in Oakville, Ontario, of cancer, aged 77.
Two things usually struck people when they first met Ken: He had a way of finding something remarkable about you and passed along his observation with sincerity and a grand sense of humour, and he was a constant source of information. Ken could tell you in great detail all about the unusual bird nestled in the tree or the areas of Nova Scotia where the Mi'kmaq people settled. He was inspirational, yet humble enough to be inspired.
Ken was born in Ottawa to a single mother but was raised by his strict Irish grandparents. Barely 17 years old when the Second World War broke out, Ken, determined to serve his country, enlisted. He became a member of the Royal Air Force's 12th squadron, stationed in Lincoln, England. Remarkably, Ken made it back from every one of his 32 missions.
Prior to the war, Ken had no ambitions for higher education or a career. Upon returning to Ottawa, he had a new sense of purpose and direction and immediately enrolled in Carleton College. He later entered the college's undergraduate commerce program before completing his degree (with Honours) at Queen's University.
Shortly after graduating, Ken was hired by the Industrial Development Bank (now the Business Development Bank of Canada) and began a career that took him, his wife and two children to Winnipeg, Montreal, Halifax and Oakville. During his tenure at the bank, Ken also spent time in Ghana, Africa, teaching commerce.
Ken's wife Joan was his soulmate and constant companion. The couple met in 1954 after a performance of Swan Lake by the Royal Winnipeg Ballet. Joan was a ballerina with the Royal Winnipeg and Ken was introduced to her following a performance one spring evening. Married after nine months of courtship, Ken would often remark on how lucky he was to have met his "darling Joani."
While living in Halifax, Ken started taking art classes. Ken had always drawn, but the art classes uncovered a unique talent. Art became a focal point in Ken's life. Friends would often receive a painting to commemorate a special event. Incredibly well-versed in art and artists, Ken became an aficionado and collector of Canadian art. When living in Winnipeg, he made a special point of contacting the primitive painter, Jan WYERS. Ken befriended Mr. WYERS and corresponded with him for years. While living in Halifax, Ken contacted Nova Scotian painter Maud LEWIS, and made several trips to her tiny house in the country where everyone would gather round the wood-burning stove, discussing her art over a cup of tea.
Ken's other interests included bird watching -- a passion born out of a chance childhood meeting with Canadian ornithologist P.A. TAVERNER. Ken also liked archeology: his archeological digs took him across Canada and to the Badlands in the United States. When Ken invited Friends and their children on his archaeological digs he would often strategically place arrowheads around the site so the children would find them.
In 1980, Ken retired from the bank to pursue his many avocations. For the next 20 years, Ken and his wife travelled extensively. The places he visited became inspiration for his artwork and his paintings often portrayed images from distant lands or those closer to home, such as snow-laden pine trees in Algonquin Park or decaying totem poles on the Queen Charlotte Islands.
Shortly before his death, a close friend remarked that Ken operated the way people are supposed to be living their lives: with passion and with joy.
Leslie POWERS is Ken's daughter.

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LEWIS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-05-31 published
LONGSTAFFE, J. Ron, C.M.
Died peacefully in Vancouver on May 28, 2003, after a stoic battle with bone cancer. Survived by his devoted wife, Jacqueline, daughter, Brandy (Rob AUBIN,) also by his son, Ted, and daughter, Zoe LEWIS, and brother, Douglas in Toronto. Ron was born in Toronto on April 6, 1934. He attended Upper Canada College (Class of 1952). Graduated from University of British Columbia with degrees in Arts and Law in 1958. Spent 28 productive years in British Columbia and Alberta forest industry, primarily with Canadian Forest Products Ltd., including 10 years of Executive Vice-President. Served 3½ years as Chairman of the Port of Vancouver (1994-97). During his career, Ron was engaged in many community activities, including President, Vancouver Art Gallery; President, Canadian Club; Chair, Project Building Committee at St. Paul's Hospital for 18 years Chair, St. Paul's Hospital Board for 5 years; Chair, Celebration of Life for Pope John Paul 2nd at British Columbia Place Stadium (1984;) Co-Chair, World Affairs Dinner with Lee IACOCCA (1986.) More recently, Ron participated as a member of the Canadian Cultural Property Review Board; Director of the National Youth Orchestra and Vancouver Recital Society. Enthusiastic collector of Canadian art and international graphics for over 50 years; major donor of art works to the Vancouver Art Gallery since 1978. Appointed a Member of the Order of Canada in 2001. Many thanks to all the medical and nursing staff who provided compassionate care for Ron during the last 8 months at St. Paul's Hospital, Holy Family Hospital, Cancer Control Agency and Vancouver General Hospital. No flowers by request. Arrangements for a celebration of Ron's life will be announced shortly. Personal Alternative Funeral Services 1-604-857-5779.

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LEWIS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-07-04 published
Patricia BLYTH
By Sam BLYTH Friday, July 4, 2003 - Page A18
Wife, mother, teacher, headmistress, priest. Born January 10, 1916, in Reigate, Surrey. Died May 20 in Ottawa, of cancer, aged In the middle of the night, in the middle of February 1953, in a blinding snowstorm, mother disembarked from the Canadian in Brandon, Manitoba, with her five young daughters in hand. Dressed in a full-length mink coat and direct from London via Halifax, she watched as the porter hurled her trunks onto the platform and told her: "If this is where you are going to live -- God help you." Fifty years later she dryly observed that He certainly did.
Mother was born Patricia WILLIAMS to a gentler life in England. Educated at Cheltenham Ladies College and Lady Margaret Hall, Oxford, she read English and was tutored by C.S. LEWIS and J.R.R. TOLKIEN. Oxford life between the wars was both elegant and edgy, with the likes of John PROFUMO and Harold WILSON in her year. While mom inherited a strong Christian work ethic from her great-grandfather, Sir George WILLIAMS, she was not above enjoying some of the better things in life.
The war brought both drama and excitement and then devastating loss as her only sibling Graham was killed in action.
She met my father on a golf course in Kent during the darkest days of the war. He was a clean-cut Canadian from Regina who went on to command a flight squadron. Their romance played out in London during the blitz and on their wedding night the fires burned so brightly that they could read at night without turning the lights on. Undeterred, they produced three children before the end of the war and went on to have three more, including a son born in Camp Shilo, Manitoba, where mom was bound that February in 1953.
After the family relocated to Ottawa, Mom's career as a mother and a military wife soon gave way to a second career of teaching at Elmwood School. Success in the classroom led to her appointment as headmistress. Mrs. BLYTH was an imposing figure and not to be trifled with. But she was also caring of her students and they returned her devotion.
It must have been with a heavy heart that she gave it all up to accompany dad to diplomatic posts in England, West Germany and Greece. In Bonn, she decided to learn to drive and, after buying an orange Volkswagen, took to the roads and autobahns with a determination that impressed even the locals. Her third career as a diplomatic spouse was unfulfilling.
Mom's fourth career was perhaps her calling in life. Following dad's death in 1985, she started as a lay reader in a small Anglican parish in the West Country of England. Soon she ran up against the Church of England's refusal to ordain woman so she relocated one last time to Ottawa, where she was ordained shortly before her 70th birthday. Every summer thereafter she returned to Devon, installed herself at the local inn and met her former parishioners.
For the last 17 years in Ottawa, she spent her life ministering to the elderly and dying in a large public health facility. In this grim setting she was superb and much loved by both the patients and the caregivers. In her last months, she cared for people who were likely both younger and healthier than Mom as she dealt with terminal lung cancer. Typically, she refused to see a doctor, knowing that the diagnosis would be bad and perhaps curtail her day-to-day life. When she finally agreed to see a doctor she would have less than a week to live.
Several weeks prior to that she summoned the priest in charge of her church to discuss her funeral arrangements. She told him that he should do what he thought was best and then proceeded to tell him exactly what to do. At the funeral, he told an enormous congregation that Pat had insisted that there be no eulogies and then proceeded to deliver one. It was a fitting tribute.
Sam BLYTH is Patricia BLYTH's son.

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LEWIS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-08-19 published
LEWIS, Paul
Paul Lewis, age 90, died suddenly on Saturday, August 16, 2003 in Pembroke, Ontario. Beloved husband of Sarah Boone LEWIS (nee SMITH) and devoted father to Christine LEWIS (Gary CHANG;) Marion LEWIS (Billie BROCK;) Alan LEWIS (Kerry CALVERT.) Grandfather to Georgia BARKER, Robert CHANG and Ray LEWIS. Predeceased by sister Mary THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON. Brother-in-law to Davis (Catherine) SMITH of Sarnia Ontario; uncle to Ian THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON, the late Scott SMITH, and Grant, Sally Ross SMITH and Price SMITH. Paul was born in Toronto to Marion and Thomas LEWIS. He lived a full and varied life working as a chemical engineer on three continents. Raising his family in Deep River, Ontario, he retired from the Atomic Energy of Canada to Beachburg, Ontario where he continued his interest in gardening and his love of nature. A reception to celebrate his life for family and Friends will be held at Supples Landing Retirement Home in Pembroke on Friday August 22 at 2: 00. In lieu of flowers, a donation to your favourite charity would be appreciated.

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LEWIS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-10-28 published
Veteran of First World War dies at 104
By Tom HAWTHORN, Special to The Globe and Mail with wires Tuesday, October 28, 2003 - Page A10
Victoria -- Myer LEWIS, who served in two world wars and lived in three centuries, has died in California at the age of 104.
Mr. LEWIS, who was known as Jerry, was one of the last Canadian veterans of the First World War.
Last November, The Globe and Mail found 16 Canadian veterans of that war still alive. At least five of the group, which was profiled in The Globe for Remembrance Day, have since died.
Mr. LEWIS enlisted at 19 and was kept from the deadly trenches of the Western Front because he failed a medical test: He had flat feet. Instead, the army ordered him to drive trucks in England.
He had become a U.S. citizen by the time his adopted homeland became embroiled in the Second World War. At 43, he joined the U.S. Navy.
"My part in World War I and World War 2 was very small," Mr. LEWIS said three years ago, "but I was happy to do what I could for these two great countries."
Even though his contribution to the war efforts was admittedly minor, Mr. LEWIS was honoured for his service in recent years. He became a regular at veterans events and served as grand marshal for Memorial Day parades in his home of Cupertino, Calif.
In 2000, Mr. LEWIS was recognized by the Canadian government in a ceremony held at Good Samaritan United Methodist Church in Cupertino. Canadian consul Handol KIM presented him with a Queen's certificate and a John McCrae medallion.
The commemorative medallion, produced by the Royal Canadian Mint, was presented to veterans two years earlier on the 80th anniversary of the end of the war. Because no central record of Great War veterans is kept, Mr. LEWIS was not honoured until after his family and veterans groups contacted the government.
At the same ceremony, he also received awards from the U.S. Navy, and city, county and state governments.
"This is the greatest honour I have received in my 101 years," a nostalgic Mr. LEWIS said after the ceremony.
Myer Gerald LEWIS was born in London on May 24, 1899. His father was a career British army officer, and the boy moved with his family to postings in Malta and South Africa before emigrating to Ottawa in 1910.
He enlisted in 1918 and was posted to Honiton, in Devon, England, where he drove hand-cranked, two-ton trucks for the Royal Canadian Army Service Corps. The private was responsible for clerical and supply duties, a humdrum assignment but one safer than life in the trenches.
Decades later, he enthused about the delirious celebrations in London after the announcement of the armistice.
"The lights had been turned off during the war," he told The Globe's Erin ANDERSSEN last year. "And they turned all the lights on again. It was a big, big thrill."
He returned from the war to work as a clerk in Ottawa. He moved to the United States in 1924, became a citizen in 1932, and married a dietitian in 1933.
In 1942, he signed up with the navy and served with Fleet Air Wing 7, taking part in antisubmarine patrols in the Atlantic. His unit marked V-E Day, on May 8, 1945, by escorting a surrendered German submarine to port.
After the war, he sold stocks and bonds, as well as life insurance, for Metropolitan Life in the Chicago area. He retired in 1965, the same year in which he left the naval reserve, where his rank was Aviation Storekeeper 1st Class.
The couple moved to Florida, where his wife, Emily, died in 1984.
The childless widower then moved to California to be closer to family members. He died of causes associated with old age on October 15 at a retirement home in Los Gatos, Calif. He leaves two nephews and two nieces.
A memorial service was held Sunday.

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LEWIS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-11-05 published
O'NEILL, Madelène (née HERSEY)
Died suddenly and peacefully at the Griffith McConnell residence on Monday, November 3rd, 2003 in her eighty-third year. Dear wife of Dr. James H. O'NEILL and beloved mother of Sharon (Bob SMALLHORN), Sally (Bob LEWIS), Stephanie (Skip KERNER) of Montreal and Sheelah of Montreal. Lène will be lovingly remembered by her grandchildren David and Brian (Sandra) SMALLHORN, Chris and Tim (Jan) LEWIS, Matthew, Jamin, Emily and Sarah KERNER, and David and John ATTALA and new great-grandaughter. Sister of Peter (Mary) and the late John, also sister of Mason and Ronald. Visitation will be at Kane and Fetterly Funeral Home, 5301 Decarie Blvd. (Corner Isabella), on Wednesday, November 5, 2003, from 2 to 5 and from 7 to 9 p.m. Funeral Mass will be celebrated at St. Malachy's Church (corner Clanranald and Isabella) on Thursday, November 6, 2003, at 11 a.m. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the Montreal Alzheimer Society, 5165 Sherbrooke St. West, Office 410, Montréal, Québec, H4A 1T6 or to the Griffith McConnell Residence, 5760 Parkhaven, Cote St. Luc, Québec, H4W 1Y1. The family would like to thank the infirmary staff of the Griffith McConnell for their care and devotion. Condolences may be sent to www.kanefetterly.qc.ca

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LEWIS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-11-18 published
Black pride of Canadian track and field
First Canadian-born black athlete to win an Olympic medal was member of relay team at 1932 Los Angeles Games but could find work only as a railway porter
By James CHRISTIE, Tuesday, November 18, 2003 - Page R9
Ray LEWIS's event in Olympic track and field was officially the 400-metre sprint, a flat race. His enduring place in Canadian sport history, however, was earned for hurdling a barrier.
Mr. LEWIS, who died in his native Hamilton at age 94 on the weekend, was the first Canadian born black athlete to stand upon the Olympic medals podium. He won a bronze medal as a member of the Canadian 4 x 400-metre relay at the Los Angeles Games in 1932.
At a time where racial discrimination was the way of the world, Mr. LEWIS didn't get to live a hero's life. Viewed today as a pathfinder for talented black athletes, in the 1930s Mr. LEWIS had to all but quit his athletics training because of the demands of his job as a railway porter with the Canadian Pacific Railways. He spent 22 years on the trains making 250 trips from Toronto to Vancouver. To try and stay fit, Mr. LEWIS would train by running alongside the rails when the train stopped on the prairies.
"He deserved so much more than he ever received," said Donovan BAILEY, who won two gold medals at the 1996 Atlanta Olympics in the 100 metres and 4 x 100-metre relay. "I benefited from his going before.
"I had the honour and good fortune of having lunch with Ray LEWIS and talking with him. I couldn't imagine what it was like in his day. It was so different. Ultimately, he's one who inspired me."
Raymond Gray LEWIS was a Hamiltonian, cradle to grave. James WORRALL, honorary member of the International Olympic Committee and Canada's Olympic flag bearer in 1936, recalled the family roots in the area went back to the 1840s when his great grandparents escaped slavery in the United States and settled near Otterville, Ontario
The youngest child of Cornelius LEWIS and Emma GREEN, Ray LEWIS was born October 8, 1910, at 30 Clyde St. He began running races for fun at age 9 when he entered as contest at a local picnic. He began formal training in track and field at Central Collegiate where the autocratic John Richard (Cap) CORNELIUS was his coach. In 1929, he established a Canadian high-school track-and-field record of four championships in one day, taking the dashes at 100, 200, and 440 yards as they were measured then, and anchoring the one-mile relay. In 1928 and 1929, Mr. LEWIS was part of the Central relay team that won the United States national schoolboy title.
He briefly attended Marquette University in Milwaukee but returned to Canada during the Depression and joined the Canadian Pacific Railway.
Besides his Olympic medal performance with teammates Phil EDWARDS, Alex WILSON and Jimmy BALL, Mr. LEWIS was also a Canadian champion several times and competed in the inaugural British Empire Games in 1930 in Hamilton and the 1934 Empire Games in London. where he won a silver medal in the mile relay. Mr. EDWARDS was actually the first black athlete to win an Olympic medal for Canada in 1932, getting the 800-metre honour about a half-hour before the relay with Mr. LEWIS. Mr. EDWARDS, however, was native of British Guyana, while Ray LEWIS was a local.
Mr. LEWIS, who in 2001 was awarded the Order of Canada, had a life-long attachment to the Empire Games, later renamed the Commonwealth Games. He was an adviser to the bidders who recently sought the 2010 Games for Hamilton and vowed that if the Games were coming back, he'd be there to greet them at the official opening at age 100. The Hamilton bid lost out last week to one from New Delhi, India. He lit the torch during the opening ceremonies at the International Children's Games in Hamilton July 1, 2000.
Mr. LEWIS wrote an autobiography entitled Shadow Running in which he detailed his life "as porter and Olympian." He was featured in a 2002 TVOntario documentary series on racism, Journey to Justice. "It [racism] felt worse here, because it wasn't supposed to happen here," he recalled in the video.
Whereas white athletes had an opportunity for coaching jobs after their careers, Mr. LEWIS did not. His position as a porter was one of the few jobs open to men of his race.
"The first time I met him, the Canadian team was on its way to Fort William, Ontario, for the Canadian championships in 1933. They travelled by Pullman and Ray was the porter. He couldn't get the time off to compete. But he did make the 1934 Empire Games team and was presented to the Prince of Wales, something that was a point of honour for him. He felt it was something to rub into all those people who had kept him off teams and out of places because he was black," Mr. WORRALL said.
Mr. LEWIS married Vivienne JONES in 1941, and they adopted two children, sons Larry and Tony.

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LEWIS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-11-18 published
Oldest Canadian Olympian first black to win medal
Canadian Press, Tuesday, November 18, 2003 - Page S3
Canada's oldest Olympian, Raymond Gray LEWIS, died last Friday, the Canadian Olympic Committee said yesterday. He was 94. LEWIS won a bronze medal in the 1,600-metre relay at the Los Angeles Games in 1932. He was the first Canadian-born black to win a medal.

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LEWIS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-09 published
GILL, Martha Elizabeth (née BARBER)
Formerly of Montreal and King City, Ontario, died peacefully at The Maple Health Centre, on December 7, 2003. Beloved wife of the late Frederick P. (Perc). She will be missed by her many Friends, especially Cathy Goodier POTE and Sally O'Neill LEWIS. Cremation has taken place. Interment in Mount Royal Cemetery, Montreal, Quebec. If desired, memorial donations to the Ontario Humane Society would be appreciated. A celebration of Martha's life will be held at a later date.

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LEWISTON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-05-17 published
CAMERON, Docia Lorraine Bennett.
Born April 14, 1917, Russell Springs, Logan County, Kansas; died, Edmonton, April 16, 2003. Predeceased by her husband Norman S. CAMERON, sisters Stella and Irene, and brothers Emory, Bill, Guy, and Ivan. Mourned by daughter Jane CAMERON, Toronto, son Duncan (Yolande GRISÉ) Chelsea, Quebec, her brother Don (Georgie) LEWISTON, Idaho, and special Friends Michelle, Kevin and Olivia TOM, Penticton, British Columbia. Like her parents Charles and Mary she was an Alberta pioneer, arriving as a young child in the farm country in the Forestburg area. Her youth was spent in the world depression which so affected the prairies; at 22 she witnessed the outbreak of World War 2. Bride of a Naval lieutenant she lived in Esquimalt, Prince Rupert, Halifax, and Toronto during the war years. With her husband overseas, she established the family home in Edmonton until a family move to Vancouver in 1966. Shortly after Norman died in 1992 she returned to Edmonton. She was a passionate Canadian, an admirer of her contemporary Pierre Elliot Trudeau, a lover of good books, gardens, antiques, and the opera on Canadian Broadcasting Corporation. A wonderful story teller, her sense of humour endeared her to many. She thrived on lively conversation, good drink, and fine cuisine. Independent minded, a fierce defender of all those she loved, and a steadfast opponent of mean spirited governments, she lived her life fully. In her memory donations may be made to the Parkland Institute, University of Alberta.

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