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"LEV" 2003 Obituary


LEVAN  LEVERETTE  LEVERTON  LEVESQUE  LEVIN  LEVINE  LEVINNE  LEVOIR 

LEVAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-06-10 published
Stove maker got company cooking
Innovator steered Western Foundry Co. into supplying auto exhaust manifolds
By Allison LAWLOR Tuesday, June 10, 2003 - Page R5
An innovative Canadian businessman who transformed a small family company that produced iron stoves into the world's supplier of exhaust manifolds for cars and light trucks, has died. Dick LEVAN passed away in Brantford, Ontario, in late April. He was 68.
In 1961, Mr. LEVAN joined the Western Foundry Co. Ltd., now called Wescast Industries Inc., as a young engineer with little knowledge about the foundry business. At the time, the company, which now has more than 2,000 employees, had 32 employees who worked with primitive equipment in run-down buildings in the small, southwestern Ontario town of Wingham.
Fifty-eight years earlier, Mr. LEVAN's maternal grandfather Richard VANSTONE had been one of the first businessmen in Wingham to buy five shares, valued at $100 each, in the new foundry. Today, the LEVAN family is the company's major shareholder.
"It was his passion that has driven the growth of the company for the past 42 years," said Mr. LEVAN's son-in-law Edward FRACKOWIAK.
"He made things happen. He didn't wait around for things to happen to him."
Mr. FRACKOWIAK succeeded Mr. LEVAN, who stepped down as the company's chairman of the board in March. He was diagnosed with liver cancer.
In his early years with the company, Mr. LEVAN faced several challenges. In 1964, the same year he was elected president by the board of directors, replacing his father William LEVAN, the company got a contract to manufacture radiators for the Toronto Separate School Board. After a summer spent making the cast-iron hot-water radiators, they were installed, but when they were turned on, they leaked.
The company not only lost $64,000 replacing the radiators but their credibility in the cast-iron heating business. But Mr. LEVAN was determined to turn the company around. He steered the company toward the auto industry and in the late 1960s it started manufacturing auto parts. "He was a leader," said Clyde McBAIN, chairman of Winnipeg-based Ancast Industries Ltd. "He was a hard driver. He was tough."
Mr. LEVAN found himself faced with another tough challenge in 1978 that could have forced the foundry into bankruptcy. Ford Motor Co. recalled 65,000 Bronco transmission extensions that year, according to Wescast. The foundry took partial responsibility and worked with Ford to address the problem. As a result of the recall, Mr. LEVAN became determined to build quality control into the foundry's production system.
"He capitalized on this low point," Mr. FRACKOWIAK said, adding that today the company has an enviable safety record. "I think that was one of the remarkable things about Dick. When faced with a critical issue he could do something about it."
By the early 1990s, the company was a major supplier of manifolds for the Big Three auto makers. Under Mr. LEVAN's guiding hand, the company continued to grow over the next decade. Based in Brantford, Wescast now operates seven production facilities in North America. It also has a joint-venture interest in Weslin Autoipari Rt., a Hungarian-based supplier of exhaust manifolds and turbocharger housings for the European auto market.
Last year, Wescast announced that it had acquired Georgia Ductile Foundries L.L.C., a privately held auto-parts maker also in the cast-iron business, which manufactures suspension and brake components.
Richard LEVAN was born in New Rochelle, New York on May 30, 1934, but grew up in the town of Arnprior, west of Ottawa. He attended Trinity College School, a private school in Port Hope, Ontario, and went onto study engineering physics at the University of Toronto. He graduated in 1956 and two years later married Jane RYERSON. They had four children.
As a young engineer fresh out of school, Mr. LEVAN went to work for a refrigeration company in Brantford, Ontario, before moving to Wingham to join Western Foundry at his father's urging. Known as a demanding employer, Mr. LEVAN was respected for his hard work, directness and leadership abilities. He was someone who had an ability to "cut to the chase," Mr. FRACKOWIAK said.
An astute businessman, one of Mr. LEVAN's favourite expressions was, "Don't let your short-term greed get in the way of your long-term greed."
Over the years, his good sense of humour and ability to laugh at himself served him well. Just before an important meeting in Flint, Michigan., with executives from General Motors Corp., Mr. LEVAN discovered he had forgotten his suit. A colleague came to the rescue, offering to lend him an extra suit.
Mr. LEVAN arrived at the meeting the next day wearing the borrowed suit, the pant legs just short of his ankles. When the General Motors executives arrived, Mr. LEVAN decided to make light of the situation. "We had a lot of rain in Wingham last night," he told them.
Described as "fanatical about improvement," Mr. LEVAN was always looking for new ways to improve the company's products, which meant talking to employees and visiting them on the foundry floor, especially in the early years. On one such visit, an employee approached Mr. LEVAN complaining that he didn't have the right tools for the job. Mr. LEVAN went directly to the employee's supervisor and suggested that the problem be corrected. The supervisor, trying to play down the employee's complaints, told him the tools were fine. After listening to the supervisor, Mr. LEVAN looked at him and said: "You have to give people good tools if you want the job done properly."
Later, despite the company's success and his own personal wealth, Mr. LEVAN remained unpretentious and at his core a small-town family man.
"He liked to have the family around," said Mr. FRACKOWIAK. The family not only worked together but often spent vacations together.
Several family members continue to work at Wescast, including Mr. LEVAN's son William LEVAN, who is the company's vice-president of technology.
Outside work, Mr. LEVAN golfed, fished and was an accomplished pilot. He flew a Cessna 206 for years.
"Dick was never quiet," Mr. McBAIN said. "He liked to have fun."
Mr. LEVAN served on several boards, including Trinity College School, to which he donated generously. He also served as past-president of the Canadian Foundry Association and as past director of the American Foundrymen's Society. In Brantford and Wingham, his philanthropy was well known at local hospitals, churches and golf courses.
Mr. LEVAN, who died at his home in Brantford on April 29, leaves his wife Jane, their four children Sally, Bill, Bruce and Ginny, and nine grandchildren.
"He was more than a guy who knew business," Mr. FRACKOWIAK said.

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LEVERETTE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-11-29 published
DARE, Ruth Eleanor (née ROTTERS)
Ruth Eleanor DARE (née ROTTERS,) born Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan, 1918, died November 28th, 2003 at age 85, at Columbia Forest Long Term Care Centre, Waterloo. She suffered a hemorrhaging stroke in June 2002 after enjoying her 60th wedding anniversary with all her children and grandchildren in attendance. She was a member of St. Peters Lutheran Church, Kitchener, Westmount Curling Club, Probus Club, a long term member of the Kitchener-Waterloo Young Women's Christian Association, a founding member of the Kitchener-Waterloo-Gyrette Club, a long term volunteer member of the Kitchener-Waterloo Art Gallery and the Kitchener-Waterloo Symphony, and worked for the Canadian Blind Institute. She was also an ardent swimmer and canoeist during her Muskoka summers.
Ruth was the much loved mother of Carolyn WILFRED (Harmon) of Christchurch, New Zealand, Graham (Sandra) of Kitchener, and Bryan (Malkin) of Waterloo. In addition she is survived by her loving husband Carl and her grandchildren Tanya LEVERETTE, Carla WOOLNOUGH (Scott), Sydney, Jacob, Kaitlin, Alexa, Katherine and Laurence DARE.
A memorial service to celebrate her life will be held at St. Peter's Lutheran Church, 49 Queen Street North, Kitchener at 2 p.m. on Tuesday, December 2nd. Flowers are gratefully declined but a donation in Ruth's memory to the charity of your choice would be appreciated.
We know that like a candle
Her lovely light must shine
To brighten up another place
More perfect - more divine
And in the realm of Heaven
Where she shines so warm and bright
Our loved one lives forever
In God's Eternal Light.

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LEVERTON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-09-27 published
MOSCICKI, Joan (née TAILOR/TAYLOR)
Died peacefully at home on April 11, 2003 in Southport, England in her 81st year. Predeceased by her cherished husband Jan (1985) and her sister Muriel LEVERTON (1997.) Born in England, Joan emigrated to Canada after the Second World War. She settled in Toronto where she met and married Jan MOSCICKI, who came to Canada from Poland after World War 2. Joan enjoyed a long career with The Prudential Insurance Company of America. Following her retirement in 1986, she returned to England to live near her family. She is survived by her cousins, Pam TAILOR/TAYLOR and Rob TAILOR/TAYLOR. Joan will be sadly missed by her family, as well as Friends in both Canada and England. A funeral service was held on April 23, 2003 at Southport Crematorium. Interment at Mount Pleasant Cemetery in Toronto.

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LEVESQUE o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-10-08 published Glenna Viola LAROCQUE In loving memory of Glenna Viola LAROCQUE, who passed away peacefully at St. Joseph's Health Centre, Sudbury on Friday, October 3, 2003 in her 80th year.
Predeceased by husband Graydon WRIGHT (1969) and Gabriel LAROCQUE (1991.) Loved by children Dawn and Garry KERR of Manitowaning, Jacqueline and Arnold MacMILLAN of Val Caron, Patricia and Leon SAINT_MARSEILLE of Blezard Valley, Perry WRIGHT of London, Leon and Sylvie WRIGHT of Val Caron and John WRIGHT of London. Predeceased by daughter Vanessa GAYLE. Special grandmother of Shari (Ray) LEVESQUE, Kelli (Alton) HOBBS, Corrine (Claude) PELLATT, Allan (Holly) MacMILLAN, Catharine (Jeff) GIFFEN, Gregory (Nicole) MacMILLAN, Steven (Janice) SAINT_MARSEILLE,
Dean (Nicole) SAINT_MARSEILLE, Jodi WRIGHT, Kristy WRIGHT, Andy WRIGHT, Jennifer WRIGHT, Jason WRIGHT, David WRIGHT and Cyllna WRIGHT. Great grandmother of Jessica, Danielle, Nicholas, Allanah, Brytne, Kristofer, Tyler, Sarah, Bradley, Vanessa, Colin, Mackenzie, Kendra, Kyle and Sally. Remembered by brother Alvie (Ruth) ELLIOT/ELLIOTT of Sisson Ridge, NB. Memorial Service at 3: 00 pm Friday, October 10, 2003 at Knox United Church, Manitowaning. Darlene HARDY officiating. Burial of ashes in Hilly Grove Cemetery. Island Funeral Home.

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LEVIN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-11-15 published
GENSER, Bonnie
It is with great sadness that we announce the death of our mother, grandmother, and great-grandmother, Bonnie GENSER, who died on Sunday, November 29th, 2003. She died peacefully, without pain, with her family by her side. She was predeceased by her husband Harold GENSER who died in 1980, and her siblings Rebecca JAUVOISH, Lottie BECKMAN, Bessie MELEMADE, David LEVIN, Rosie LEVIN, Esther POLLOCK and Harry LEVIN. She leaves to grieve her death and celebrate her life, three daughters, Naomi COHEN (Jared SABLE,) Toronto, Barbara BUTLER, Winnipeg, Susan STARR (Don STARR), Toronto, London, six grandchildren, 6 great-grandchildren. In addition to her immediate family, she is remembered by her sisters-in-law Esther Genser KAPLAN, Myrna LEVIN, Beverley LEVIN and Marion Vaisley GENSER, and many nieces and nephews.
Bonnie served in a leadership capacity in various areas of the community; president of the Bride's group, National Council of Jewish Women, president of Lillian Frieman Chapter of Hadassah, founder of the Shaarey Zedek Girl Guides, and later as a commissioner of the Manitoba Girl Guides. During her many visits to Israel she served as a volunteer in areas of agriculture, education, archaelogy, and social services.
She lived life to the fullest, and will be remembered for her dynamic personality, wit, charm, generosity, and infectious smile which made everyone feel special.
We wish to thank Vangie, Claire, Amy, and Ruth for their loving care.
Pallbearers were her grand_sons Scott COHEN, Paul RAYBURN, Josh BUTLER, Sheldon POTTER, granddaughters Hally and Misha STARR, and nephews Michael and Daniel LEVIN. Honorary pallbearers were Don STARR, Jared SABLE, Perry RAYBURN, and Mayer LAWEE.
Rabbi Allan GREEN officiated and her granddaughter Leanne POTTER spoke on behalf of the family. Donations in Bonnie's memory may be made to The Bonnie Genser Fund in the Women's Endowment Fund of the Jewish Foundation of Manitoba, C-400-123 Doncaster Street, Winnipeg, Manitoba, R3N 2B2, (204) 477-7525 or www.jewishfoundation.org or the charity of your choice.

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LEVINE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-01-10 published
Dorothy Juanita JOHNSON
By Ken JOHNSON Friday, January 10, 2003, Page A14
Wife, mother, scientist, independent woman. Born March 25, 1922, in Toronto. Died November 5, 2002, at home in Toronto of ovarian cancer, aged 80.
Dorrie (née McLEAN) JOHNSON was a truly independent woman. In an age that did not encourage higher education for women, she obtained a PhD in physiology at the University of Toronto in 1947, did post-doctoral work at Stanford and taught a year at Vassar in New York State. In 1949, Dorrie moved to Deep River, Ontario, where she met and married my physicist father, Art JOHNSON. In an age that also did not encourage natural childbirth, she had four births between 1953 and 1960, without the use of drugs or other interventions. And in an age that did encourage stay-at-home moms, my mother continued to do the work she loved, raising her family and teaching part-time in the biochemistry lab at the University of Toronto; later teaching world nutrition at York University and finally doing heart and stroke research at Hospital for Sick Children, well past retirement age.
She had a lifelong passion for nature, first-hand knowledge and simple living. As a kid, she longed for a pet snake, but reluctantly nixed the idea when her girlfriends objected. She loved being at the family farm near Orillia, Ontario, and could milk a cow and run a plow behind a patient horse.
In her 70s she was an Elderhostel regular, thrilled to slog (with a dozen others) along the coast of Scotland to study geology and ecology from a British professor. At 79, she went camping on Georgian Bay with her grandchildren. Dorrie had a love for paddling: at the age of 27, she bought her own 16-foot Peterborough cedar-strip; at age 80, this summer on Lake Joseph, she went for her last paddle.
My mother suffered her whole life from terminal modesty. Not until her death did I discover that her name appears in gold letters on the wall of Bishop Strachan School, in recognition of top marks in her senior high-school years. I also learned that she had been chosen to sail to England for the coronation of King George 6th in 1937, and that she had been the recipient of a Governor-General's medal.
Dorrie was practical and straightforward to a fault. When I arrived one day with a beard, she immediately stated: "Ken, you have a beard. I don't like it." As the cancer was overtaking her body, I commented that she seemed to be dealing with her illness and imminent death better than the rest of us. In a completely matter-of-fact way she simply replied that she had had more time to think about it than the rest of us.
Dorrie had a fine intellect and a forthright attitude to real-life problems. She perceived her life as 80 good years and one bad season. She did not want to suffer through a long demise -- she insisted on no heroics to prolong her life. She had explored euthanasia in the Netherlands but was disappointed to discover one had to be Dutch to qualify. We had the honour of caring for her at home and being there when she died, at home.
Garrison KEILLOR once said "They say such wonderful things at funerals, it makes me sad to think I'm going to miss my own by just a few days." I decided to tell mother what I was planning to say at her memorial. She was still conscious but too tired to respond, and it felt like she might only have a day or two left. At 2 a.m., with two of my sisters by her bed, I began to speak. I was two lines from finishing the final quotation, from Stephen LEVINE's book Who Dies,? when my mother took her last breath: "There seems to be much less suffering for those who live life in the wholeness that includes death. . . . I see few whose participation in life has prepared them for death."
I think my mother lived that life and found her peace.
Ken JOHNSON is Dorothy's son.

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LEVINE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-05-02 published
Architect had a passion for museums
He won Governor-General's Award for a high-rise called 'a superior project' and helped to put the Royal Ontario Museum on the map
By Allison LAWLOR Friday, May 2, 2003 - Page R11
For Toronto architect Henry SEARS, working in museum-exhibit planning and design proved to be the perfect fit. What better place for a man interested in the world to delve into the fine details of everything from fossils to Meissen china?
"He had an inquiring mind, "said Doreen SEARS, his wife of 51 years. "[Museums] fed his natural curiosity in the most wonderful way."
Mr. SEARS, who died on March 19 at the age of 73, began his museum work in the mid-1970s at the Royal Ontario Museum when he was hired to be part of a task force to plan future expansion of the Toronto institution.
"Our job was to reimagine the Royal Ontario Museum, "said Louis LEVINE, director of collections and exhibitions at the Museum of Jewish Heritage in New York. At the time, Mr. LEVINE was a curator at the Royal Ontario Museum and part of the task force.
"He was the one who made us think. He wouldn't take fuzzy answers from us, "Mr. LEVINE said.
Mr. SEARS relished his job. Mr. LEVINE recalled how his good friend would show up at meetings unable to contain his enthusiasm. With the excitement of a young child, he would describe to the group, many of whom were academic archeologists, what he had learned on his travels through the museum.
"He was hungry for information. He wanted to know how things work, "said his son Joel SEARS.
The task force produced an influential publication called Communicating With the Museum Visitor in 1976, which became a textbook for museum work, said Dan RAHIMI, director of collections management at the Royal Ontario Museum. The publication put the museum on the world map as being a leader in museum theory, Mr. RAHIMI added.
In subsequent years, Mr. SEARS continued to work with the Royal Ontario Museum on various projects ranging from designing travelling exhibits to gallery space. "He was so sensitive to the content. He would always ask what is this gallery about? What stories do they tell?" Mr. RAHIMI said.
Aside from the Royal Ontario Museum, Mr. SEARS worked with several other museums across Canada, the United States and Europe. In recent years, he and his firm Sears and Russell were working with the National Museum of Ireland in Dublin in the planning for a new permanent gallery. Mr. SEARS also worked with the Nova Scotia Museum, the Peabody Museum at Yale University and the National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution, among others.
"I don't think he ever had the sense that he would ever retire," said Jeff WEATHERSTON, an architect at Sears and Russell. "He just loved the work here."
Henry SEARS was born in Toronto on October 30, 1929. After graduating from Harbord Collegiate Institute in downtown Toronto, he went on to study architecture at the University of Toronto, from which he graduated in 1954. While at university he met a young woman named Doreen on a blind date. The couple married on July 1, 1951, and later had two sons.
After graduating from university, the young couple headed to Europe where they spent six months travelling before heading home. Back in Toronto, Mr. SEARS went to work for a variety of architectural firms before heading out on his own. In the late 1950s he and a partner Jeff KLEIN started the firm Klein and Sears. They worked on several housing projects in the city, including the Alexandra Park Co-operative. Built in the 1960s, the large public-housing project was one of the city's earliest such schemes.
A fellow of the Royal Architectural Institute of Canada, Mr. SEARS received a Governor-General's Award for residential design in 1985. The award was for Cadillac Fairview Corp.'s Bay-Charles Towers, a mixed-use project designed by Mr. SEARS.
"A superior project, "the jury selecting the winners said at the time. According to the jury, the Toronto project shows that "the basic high-rise type provides opportunities for richness of expression hitherto rarely explored."
In 1984, Mr. SEARS created a new firm called Sears and Russell that was dedicated solely to museum work. Over the years, he acted as a mentor to several young architects who came to work for him and others who worked with him in the museum field.
Outside of work, Mr. SEARS loved to travel, and spent time at the family's country place near Meaford, north of Toronto, and on a sailboat on Lake Ontario. An avid sailor, Mr. SEARS continued to race even last year. "He was endlessly energetic and enthusiastic," Joel SEARS said.
Mr. SEARS, who died following a battle with cancer, leaves his wife, Doreen, and sons Alan and Joel.
"He was an optimist to the last minute, "Mr. LEVINE said. "He added beauty to the world."

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LEVINNE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-05-07 published
Nathan Nauson LEVINNE
By Marsha COLLA and Wilma FREEDMAN Wednesday, May 7, 2003 - Page A20
Doctor, husband, father, grandfather, great-grandfather, friend. Born June 30, 1917, in Toronto. Died Feb 1, 2003, in Toronto, of cancer, aged 85.
Nathan LEVINNE was a gentle giant.
This 6-foot, 4-inch tall, handsome family doctor had retired from Toronto's Mount Sinai Hospital, following a 52-year career of being devoted to caring for patients and their families with incredible compassion, sensitivity and a unique sense of humour.
Nathan Nauson LEVINNE was born on Toronto's Niagara Street. After graduating from Oakwood Collegiate, he completed his medical degree at the University of Toronto. (He actually later became a professor emeritus at this same university.) Upon seeing a beautiful blonde woman at a fraternity party and mentioning to a friend, "That's the gal I intend to marry, Evelyn STEIN and Nate were wed in Toronto on December 28, 1941.
Immediately after getting married, they left for St. Louis, Missouri, where he completed his internship.
On returning to Canada, he enlisted in the army, served as a medical officer (attaining the rank of captain), and was decorated by both the Dutch and Canadian governments.
After his stint in the army, Dr. LEVINNE set up his first family-practice office on Lakeview Ave. in Toronto. He was a very skilled diagnostician and gave advice with great wisdom and compassion.
In 1966, the first Family Practice Unit was established at Mount Sinai Hospital with Dr. Nathan LEVINNE as its chief. He also was instrumental in organizing Ambulatory Care Services and was the director of Occupational Health and Safety.
He was chief of staff and chairman of the Medical Advisory Committee from 1979 to 1981. He made a tremendous contribution to health care.
It was on his 80th birthday that he retired from active practise, always maintaining that it was important to recognize when to stop. However, he continued to give back to the community.
He participated in a mentoring program for young students who were interested in pursuing medical careers, helped at the Canadian National Institute for the Blind by walking with a non-sighted gentleman once a week, and spent time at The Baycrest Home for the Aged talking to the lonely elderly who had no families with whom to visit.
And, being a very spiritual human being, he would enjoy studying the Bible in his quiet times.
Most importantly, Nathan LEVINNE was a real family man. A devoted, loyal and loving life partner to his wife of 61 years, he was happiest when surrounded by his five grandchildren, for whom he became a great source of life experience and support. For his new little great-grand_son, he was able to provide a big cuddly lap in which to snuggle.
And what an extraordinary father figure he was for me and my sister. He let us play hairdresser on his thick silvery locks, taught us how to swallow capsule pills by likening them to toboggans on the backs of our tongues, and he stayed home with us on Saturday nights if we didn't have dates -- and that added up to a lot of Saturday nights!
Nathan LEVINNE was a father, a friend and a hero. He went through many medical challenges in his life, never allowing anyone to see or feel his pain, protecting his family right until the end.
Dad always joked and encouraged us to ramble on for hours when there was a captive audience but we will stop now, so that he can rest in peace. His memory will beat on in our hearts forever.
Marsha COLLA and Wilma FREEDMAN are Nathan LEVINNE's daughters.

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LEVOIR o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-07-26 published
FOLLETT, Michael
Peacefully, at the Freeport Health Centre of Grand River Hospital, surrounded by the love of his family, Michael died on Thursday, July 24, 2003. He was 59 years of age.
Beloved husband of Sheila; loving father of Amanda and Andrea FOLLETT; step-father of Christa and Jodie HOY, Grant, Carolyn and Susie PARKS. Pappy to Roelien and Danielle PARKS. Brother of Peter (Lisa), and stepsister Lynne (Sandy).
He was predeceased by his wife Mary (LEVOIR,) August 12, 1996, his parents John and Margaret (TAILOR/TAYLOR) FOLLETT and stepmother Peggy FOLLETT.
Mike was well known in the business community. He was Past President of Kitchener-Waterloo and Area Chamber of Commerce, a member of The Conservative Business Association and the Kitchener-Conestoga Rotary Club and served on the board of the K-W Art Gallery. Mike is a member of St. George's of Forest Hill Anglican Church. He founded and operated Michael Follett Consulting Inc.
Friends are invited to share their memories of Mike with his family at the Edward R. Good Funeral Home, 171 King Street South, Waterloo from 2-4 and 7-9pm on Sunday. A service to celebrate Mike's life will be held at St. George's of Forest Hill Anglican Church, 321 Fischer Hallman Road East, Kitchener on Monday, July 28, 2003 at 1pm. with Reverend Mark GLADDING officiating. A private family interment will be held at a later date.
In Mike's memory, donations to the Grand River Regional Cancer Centre would be appreciated and can be arranged through the funeral home, phone (519)745-8445 or www.edwardrgood.com

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