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"LEC" 2003 Obituary


LECKEY  LECKIE 

LECKEY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-09-12 published
NESBITT, Robert Samuel
Born 26 April 1913, died peacefully 11 September 2003, of complications following a broken hip, in his ninety-first year. Beloved husband of Jean (née BOOTH) and loving father of Catherine (Bob LECKEY,) Shelagh (Doug WHITFIELD) and Robbie (deceased.) Proud grandfather of Bill (Shelly,) Rob and Aaron (Lynne DESPRES) WHITFIELD and of Amelia BAILEY (Mark) and Robert LECKEY (Josý NAVAS) and great-grandfather of Amy and Ashley WHITFIELD and of Corbin BAILEY. Predeceased by sisters Joyce (Clarence LOCKWOOD,) Patricia (Ben THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON) and, in childhood, Eleanor and brother George. Bob's life was marked by his dedication to his family, Friends, neigbours, church and community. The family will receive Friends at the Walas Funeral Home, 130 Main Street, Brighton on Sunday from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Service will be held from St. Paul's Anglican Church, Brighton on Monday, September 15th at 1 o'clock. Interment Mount Hope Cemetery Cemetery, Brighton. As an expression of sympathy, donations to St. Paul's Anglican Church, Belleville Hospital or The Red Cross, care of Box 96, Brighton, Ontario K0K 1H0, would be appreciated by the family.

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LECKIE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-02-24 published
Constance Patricia YOUNG (née BOND) Lieut. Nova Scotia, R.C.A.M.C.
Beloved wife of the late Roy YOUNG. Born in Worthing, England August 9, 1911 died in Toronto February 22, 2003.
In between she lived her life with joy, humour, love, and faith. Connie graduated from St. Michael's Hospital in 1932 as a registered nurse. She practiced as a Public Health nurse (St. Elizabeth) after graduation. From 1941-1945 Connie served her country as a Nursing Sister in the Royal Canadian Army Medical Corp., No. 2 C.C.S. Unit. After the war Connie worked as a Corporate nurse until her marriage to Roy YOUNG in 1954 when she began her second career as a wife and mother. Connie passed away peacefully after a lengthy battle with cancer. Connie is survived by her son Carl and Elizabeth YOUNG, Claremont, Ontario, and her daughter Mary and Keith LECKIE of Toronto and her much loved grandchildren Toban, Katelyn and Sean LECKIE. She was predeceased by siblings Courtney, Alban, Dorothy and Douglas all of whom together with Connie survived the Halifax Explosion of 1917. Friends may call at the Turner and Porter Yorke Chapel, 2357 Bloor Street West, at Windermere, east of the Jane subway, from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. On Tuesday, February 25. Funeral Mass will be celebrated at St. Gabriel's Church, 650 Sheppard Avenue East, Willowdale at 10 a.m. Wednesday, February 26. Interment will take place at St. Luke's Cemetery, Downeyville, Ontario. The family wish to thank their friend Mely and the staff at West Park Long Care Hospital.

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LECKIE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-05-21 published
Constance Patricia YOUNG
By Mary Patricia Young LECKIE
Mary Young LECKIE is Connie's daughter. Wednesday, May 21, 2003 - Page A20
Lieutenant, army medical corps; nurse, mother. Born August 9, 1911, in Worthing, England. Died February 22 in Toronto, of cancer, aged 91.
If a movie were to be made of Connie's life, it would be an epic. Born Constance Patricia BOND in a sleepy, seaside English town, her family moved to Halifax, Nova Scotia, in 1914. Her father Charles was a man of great ambition who traversed the Maritimes vending cash registers, while mother Blanche managed the staff. On December 6, 1917, their world came apart when the Mont Blanc collided with the Imo in Halifax Harbour, creating the largest explosion in pre-atomic history. Connie, in class at the Sacred Heart Convent, was blown onto the floor. Her brother Courtney made his way to Citadel Hill to fight the Germans he assumed had invaded the city. Charles, stranded in Saint John's, waited five excruciating days until word came that all of his "Victory Bonds" had survived.
For many Canadians, the end of the First World War war was the beginning of the most difficult time in that century. Charles moved the family to Toronto to begin anew. But the glory days of wartime prosperity gave way to a tumbling economy that crushed the ambitions, will and finally life out of Connie's beloved father. Connie dreamed of returning to Sacred Heart to take her vows as a nun but as she was by then a nurse, she was the only employed member of her family. Connie stayed to support her mother whose income would never again keep pace with her desires.
As her siblings found employment, Connie began to yearn for adventure. Once a shrinking violet, she longed to break free. The opportunity came: the Second World War was declared and Connie enlisted. In basic training at Camp Borden she met Lily CLEGG, an irreverent counterpoint who taught her the fine art of having fun. Combat field-training came next, then they were bound for England. Also aboard were the men of Essex Regiment, fellow recruits and Friends. It was Connie's great sorrow to receive those boys back in England when a pitiful handful of survivors returned from Dieppe.
General Hospital in Sussex was a safe refuge but Connie wanted more and in 1944 she got it when she and Lily embarked for France. In the early hours of D-Day-plus-four, they were among the first Canadian nurses to set foot on Juno Beach. They followed the action through France, Belgium and the Netherlands.
Connie celebrated Victory-in-Europe Day in Trafalgar Square. After decommissioning, she returned to Toronto to discover that the pay she had sent home had been squandered by her mother. So once again, she started over, studying Public Health at the University of Toronto; she practised as a public health nurse until 1954.
An unexpected whirlwind courtship was followed by marriage to Roy YOUNG, a widower with a son. Then, at the age of 45, Connie gave birth to a daughter.
Even in retirement in Omemee, Ontario, Connie continued to touch lives: administering meds, bandaging sprains and dispensing love and humour to all. She never lost her zest for life and in her 70s, Connie drove a fishing boat to town for supplies and in winter, a snowmobile to visit shut-ins. And she tended the ever-present live-in, Blanche, until her mother died in 1981.
Widowed at 89, Connie was soon after diagnosed with cancer. She moved to Toronto to be close to her children and was blessed with another two years. After a fall, Connie, wheelchair bound, almost gave up. Then the family discovered her old friend Lily was alive in a Toronto nursing home. The two were reunited and shared a month of memories. But on Christmas morning, Lily died and two months later, cancer took Connie.
Constance Patricia was a remarkable woman. For those she touched she will never die. Her spirit is irrepressible.

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LECKIE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-07-21 published
CAMPBELL, Freda Margaret (née LECKIE)
Died peacefully in her 93rd year on 19 July 2003 at the wonderful May Court Hospice in Ottawa. Her son, Edward, sister, Fay and daughter-in-law Elizabeth were with her until the very end.
Freda was born and raised on a small farm near Unity, Saskatchewan, and went to Regina for high school and business college and then to Saskatoon. She was a happy-go-lucky flapper and sometimes photographer's model in the Roaring Twenties and a hard working young bookkeeper in the Dirty Thirties when a large share of her salary had to go to help support parents and younger brothers and sisters left behind on a dust-bowl farm. In 1939, just as the war was about to begin, she married Frank CAMPBELL, also from Saskatoon, a lieutenant in the Navy; by early 1943 she was a widow with one young son. Despite offers from some fine men she remained a widow. From the late fifties until the mid seventies she looked after her widowed mother and went back to work - in the taxation department of the city of Richmond, British Columbia where she lived until the late 1990s. She moved to Ottawa in 1998 to be near her son. Her daughter-in-law Elizabeth saw to her every need for the past few years, helping her to enjoy life to the fullest, in her own home and on her own terms until just a few days before her death.
Freda CAMPBELL was a reserved woman of strong principles, firm character and high standards. She was generous to all, sharing whatever good fortune came her way but keeping the slings and arrows to herself.
She is survived by her son, Edward (Ted) of Ottawa, daughter-in-law Elizabeth, also of Ottawa, and grand_sons Frank (a lieutenant in the Navy in Victoria) and Michael Andrew, a graduate student at the University of Calgary, and brothers and sisters Gordon, Julia (Morris) (both of Penticton, British Columbia), Armand (Toronto), Clayton (Texas) and Fay (Carvahlo) (Hawaii). She was predeceased by brothers Robert and Albert.

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