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"LAV" 2003 Obituary


LAVALLEE  LAVENDER  LAVERY  LAVIGNE  LAVIOLETTE  LAVIS  LAVOIE 

LAVALLEE o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-07-23 published
Moses LAVALLEE
In loving memory of Moses LAVALLEE, 77 years, who died peacefully at his daughter Karen's home in Wikwemikong, Thursday, July 10, 2003.
Moses LAVALLEE began his journey through life on March 10, 1926. At the young age of 16 he worked for the Canada Steam Ship Lines. At the age of 22 he journeyed to Toronto and worked on the construction of the Toronto Subway Line. He subsequently obtained a job with the City of Toronto and retired as a heavy equipment operator after 30 years of service in 1983. Moses had many interests including repairing old lamps, bed frames and chairs, to name a few. He worked with deer hides and made many beautiful pairs of men's and ladies' gloves. He also enjoyed traveling to pow-wows to watch his children and grandchildren dance.
Beloved husband of Rosemary (MISHIBINIJIMA) LAVALLEE of Sudbury. Loving father of Karen J. PHEASANT of Wikwemikong, Sharon LAVALLEE (Harvey BONDY) of Manitowaning and Tim LAVALLEE of Toronto. Survived by son-in-law Isadore PHEASANT Jr. of Wikwemikong, and his son Lloyd COOPER of Wikwemikong. Dear grandfather of Sophie PHEASANT (friend Peter JONES), Matthew PHEASANT (friend Jodi FOX), Jesse OSAWAMICK, Lisa LAVALLEE and Jenmee BONDY and great grand_son Ezra JONE. Dear son of the late Michael and Sophie LAVALLEE (both predeceased.) Dear brother of the late Liza PELTIER and the late Eva EWIIWE. Funeral mass was held in Holy Cross Mission in Wikwemikong on Monday July 14, 2003. Interment in the Buzwah Cemetery.

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LAVENDER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-04-22 published
Walter TORRANCE
By Emerson LAVENDER Tuesday, April 22, 2003 - Page A18
Walter TORRANCE
Husband, father, teacher, market gardener, football coach, author. Born December 13, 1899, in Amaranth Township, Dufferin County, Ontario Died February 16 in Burlington, Ontario, of natural causes, aged 103.
Walter TORRANCE's grandfather, Thomas TORRANCE, a Scottish immigrant and devout Presbyterian, bought a farm in Amaranth Township, Dufferin County, in Ontario in 1869. As a boy and teenager, Walter helped with the work on the farm and, more importantly, he became a keen observer of all that went on around him. His whole life was a testimony to the best traditions of the Scottish Presbyterian: self-reliant, energetic, honest-to-the-core, respectful of family. For Walter and his family, the Presbyterian Church provided comfort, but it also set the moral compass by which they related to each other and to their neighbours.
As a farm boy, Walter had no opportunity to play football at Shelburne High School. He had no knowledge of football. But when he became a teacher, his principal at Burlington High School asked Walter to coach the junior football team; he agreed without reservation. A few years ago, I asked him how he did it. "Simple," he said. "The boys I coached had never played the game before and knew nothing about how to play it. I read a book on coaching and got to know a little bit more than the boys. No fancy plays, no complicated tactics. Just two or three plays, practised over and over again, with lots of physical conditioning. Gradually, our junior team gained the respect of others and we went on to win several championships." Simple: do what you are asked; if you don't know, find out, get organized and do it.
The salary of a high-school teacher was hardly enough to support Walter and his family, so for several years he operated a market garden and sold his produce at the market in Kitchener, Ontario, and sometimes at the Guelph market. That meant involving all the family in spring planting, summer cultivation and weeding, and attendance at weekend markets. Rising on Saturday morning at 3 or 4 o'clock, he loaded the little truck with produce and then drove to the market to arrive by 6 o'clock. The income from this work made life a little more comfortable for the family. Early shoppers at the market sought out his special "Jet Star" tomatoes.
Walter taught commercial subjects at the school. The graduates from his special commercial course were much sought after in the business offices of Burlington and Hamilton because Walter had not only taught them the technical skills required but, learning through his own example, his students showed respect and commitment to the job at hand.
In 1997, at the age of 94, he published A Land Called Amaranth, a season-by-season account of the life on the farm in Amaranth Township between 1901 and 1917. Walter may have had the hands of a farm boy, but he had the eye of an artist and the sensitivity of a poet. Not only was he a keen observer of all that went on around him but his ability to recall what he saw and heard was amazing. Some of his passages, such as one describing the return of the birds in spring, are almost lyrical. Others, such as the one describing the Sabbath evening with the family gathered around the kitchen table and Father leading in prayer, moved me to tears.
Sometimes of a Sunday evening, Friends and neighbours would gather for conversation and the singing of favourite hymns and, to quote Walter:
"It was our habit, a custom that came from Grandfather's time, to end the singing with that grand old hymn of parting:
God be with you till we meet again, / By His counsels guide, uphold you, / With His sheep securely fold you: / God be with you till we meet again."
Emerson was a friend of Walter TORRANCE.

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LAVERY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-03 published
SMYTH, Mary Emily (née LAVERY)
Died in Las Vegas, Nevada on February 28, 2003 from natural causes. She is survived by husband John, sister Grace and several nieces and nephews. Her mother was Emily McARTHER of Collingwood. Her cremated remains will be intered at Mount Pleasant Cemetery at a later date.

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LAVERY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-08-02 published
LAVERY, Margaret
In loving memory of Margaret who died August 2, 1995. She will always be remembered in our thoughts and in our hearts.
There is a link death cannot sever.
Love and remembrance lasts forever.
Lovingly remembered by her husband Bill, family and Friends.

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LAVIGNE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-06-15 published
Radio pioneer built network
He founded Ontario's first French-language radio station in 1951 when his local station denied francophones airtime.
By Randy RAY Special to The Globe and Mail Monday, June 16, 2003 - Page R7
He started in business as a butcher, and later was a soldier and a hotelier, but Conrad LAVIGNE's first love was show business. Whether he was operating the television stations in Northern Ontario that became the largest privately owned television broadcast system in the world, appearing at the staid proceedings of the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission, or at conventions, Mr. LAVIGNE often delighted those within earshot with jokes, stories, witty comments -- even singing.
Like the time he sang grace during the annual meeting of the Association for French Language Broadcasters in the 1970s.
"Members of the head table, including myself and Premier Bill DAVIS, walked into the room and stood behind our chairs," recalls Pierre JUNEAU, chairman of the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission from 1968 to 1975.
"Mr. LAVIGNE, who was chairman of the French-language broadcasters group, began singing grace in French, and with his very strong voice. People felt sort of strange with this."
When he was done, Mr. LAVIGNE looked at Premier DAVIS and quipped: "Well, Mr. Premier, this is to show you that when you are chairman, you can do whatever you like."
J. Lyman POTTS, former vice-president of Standard Broadcasting, remembers the time in the early 1960s when Mr. LAVIGNE appeared before the Board of Broadcast Governors -- predecessor of the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission -- in support of a radio or television station licensing application.
At the beginning of his presentation, Mr. LAVIGNE expressed his regrets that Board of Broadcast Governors member Bernard GOULET had died at few days earlier. Then, without skipping a beat, he looked toward the ceiling and said: "If Bernie were here today, I think he would vote for my application."
"It broke up the room," says Mr. POTTS. "If ever a meeting got dull he'd liven things up. It was a joy to find him at meetings. He was a unique personality."
Mr. LAVIGNE, who was born in the small town of Chénéville, Quebec, on November 2, 1916, and raised in Cochrane, Ontario, died in Timmins, Ontario on April 16 following a lengthy battle with emphysema. He was 86.
Friends, family and business associates say Mr. LAVIGNE had show business in his blood in his late teens. On many evenings, the young man who moved to Timmins from Cochrane at age 18 to open a small grocery store and butcher shop with his uncle would act in plays in the hall of a local church. But he didn't get into the entertainment business in a big way until after he helped Canada's war effort, got married and started his life as an entrepreneur in the hotel business.
In 1942, he sold his butcher shop and enlisted in the Canadian infantry. He became a commando training officer while stationed at Vernon, British Columbia, and in 1944 headed overseas. While on a furlough from Vernon he returned to Timmins and married Jeanne CANIE. The couple raised seven children.
Mr. LAVIGNE returned to Canada in 1946 and bought the Prince George Hotel in Kirkland Lake, Ontario, which at the time was a booming gold-mining town. He sold the business in 1950.
He entered the world of media and entertainment by founding CFCL, the first French-language radio station in Ontario in 1951, in what, essentially, was his way of ensuring the area's large French-speaking population had a voice in the North.
Michelle DE COURVILLE NICOL of Ottawa said her father launched the station after a group of francophones that he was part of in Kirkland Lake was told by the manager of an English-language radio station that they would no longer be given regular air time to discuss issues of interest to French people.
"He was very proud of being a francophone," says Ms. DE COURVILLE NICOL. " When he was told that his compatriots would no longer be welcome on the local station he said, 'Oh, ya!' and got the idea of starting a French-language radio station. He moved to Timmins, applied for a licence and got it."
CFCL soon attracted a faithful audience, especially in Northwestern Quebec, where it could be heard more clearly than French stations in Montreal.
In a 1988 interview with Northern Ontario Business, Mr. LAVIGNE remembered the time he hired a relative unknown named Stompin' Tom CONNORS to perform live on CFCL. The radio station was located above a jewellery store and the pounding from Mr. CONNORS's size-11 boots caused china to fall off the shelves in the store below.
Radio was his first love until the mid-1950s when, on a business trip to southern Ontario, he saw his first television broadcast, on WHAM from Rochester, New York He fell for the concept of television and he and an engineer friend drove to Rochester and learned everything they could about the magic medium of television.
Back in Timmins, Mr. LAVIGNE bought a hill in the north end of the town, named it Mont Sacré-Coeur, built a road to the foot of his hill, and began blasting rock and working in earnest to put a television station on the air. By 1956, CFCL-television was a reality.
"There was always the fear of failure because of the sparse population," Mr. LAVIGNE said at the time. "But we had an engineer with us named Roch DEMERS, who later became president of Telemedia, and together we started putting up rebroadcasting stations between 1957 and 1962."
Kapuskasing's rebroadcasting station was the first such facility in Canada, and it added another portion of the sparsely populated northeastern Ontario market to the growing station's network. Eventually, Mr. LAVIGNE built rebroadcasting stations in Chapleau and Moosonee, Ontario and Malartic, Quebec, and by the time expansion was completed, CFCL-television served 1.5 million people. Eventually, he built the station into the world's largest privately owned system.
For many years he appeared on a very popular CFCL program known as the President's Corner, during which he would sit on camera in a comfortable chair and read and respond to letters from viewers.
Between 1962 and 1970, Mr. LAVIGNE's television network entered the world of high technology with its own microwave network. Mr. LAVIGNE had the northeastern Ontario television market virtually all to himself for about 20 years until the Canadian Television Network (CTV) arrived on the scene. He reacted by building new stations in North Bay and Sudbury with a rebroadcasting station in Elliot Lake to serve Manitoulin Island. Expansion continued in 1976 with the purchase of a bankrupt television station in Pembroke, in the Ottawa Valley. Eventually, Mr. LAVIGNE's private network stretched from Moosonee to Ottawa, and from Hearst to Mattagami, Quebec
"When we first started we had the market all to ourselves," he told Northern Ontario Business. "We had 20 hours a week of local programming, and it was beautiful. We gave the North a unified voice. One time, during a forest fire near Chapleau, our messages arranged for accommodations for 1,000 people in Timmins."
Mr. LAVIGNE divested himself of his broadcasting holdings in 1980, primarily because he was refused permission to operate a cable television service in the North. He remained a director of Mid-Canada Television, the network that grew from his little Timmins station in 1956, and was chairman of the board of Northern Telephone Ltd. For a number of years, he served on the board of the National Bank of Canada, and for 10 years served on the board of ICG Utilities (formerly Inter City Gas.)
His life after broadcasting also included 20 years as a property developer in the Timmins area.
"He was always a physically active person," says Ms. DE COURVILLE NICOL. "In the years he was setting up his television stations he would often go out with the engineers. He was not as happy sitting behind his desk."
Mr. LAVIGNE was elected to the Canadian Broadcasting Hall of Fame in 1990. His wife died in 1995. He leaves Ms. DE COURVILLE NICOL and six other children, Marc, Andrée, Nicole, Jean-Luc, Pierre and Marie-France.

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LAVIOLETTE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-24 published
Sailor mom had Northern Magic
An early experience with skin cancer led her to contemplate her life and make the decision to set off from Ottawa on a four-year family voyage around the world
By Allison LAWLOR Monday, March 24, 2003 - Page R7
Diane STUEMER dared to dream big and in doing so she captured the country's imagination.
The Ottawa woman, who sailed around the world with her husband and three sons and captivated Canadians back home with her weekly newspaper reports from faraway places, has died of cancer. She was 43.
"She touched people, said her younger sister Linda MASLECHKO. "When you read her stories, you felt that you were part of her family. She was unabashedly human."
The family odyssey began on September 11, 1997, when Ms. STUEMER, her husband Herbert, and their three sons Michael, Jonathan and Christopher, all under the age of 12, left Ottawa in their 42-foot steel sailboat named Northern Magic and headed down the St. Lawrence River.
When they left, the sum of their sailing experience consisted of a handful of summer afternoons on the Ottawa River.
"Finally, we all wanted to leave, just to get it over with. So when every contingency had been thought of, prepared for and fretted over, when we were as ready as we ever would be, we set off. All we could do now was pray."
Over the next four years, they would visit 34 countries and travel 35,000 nautical miles. When they returned home, in the summer of 2001, 3,000 people were there to welcome them.
Throughout the trip, Ms. STUEMER wrote 218 weekly dispatches for The Ottawa Citizen, chronicling every aspect of their journey from their lost cat to seasickness to travelling through pirate waters along the coast of Somalia.
"It's been a long time since the cold grip of fear has clenched me in my gut, and I was not the only one on board to shiver beneath the touch of its icy fingers, Ms. STUEMER wrote, before heading into waters where there had been at least seven attacks on private yachts in the past 12 months, two of which involved gunfire.
Ms. STUEMER subsequently published a book about their adventures called The Voyage of the Northern Magic.
Before setting sail on their epic journey, Ms. STUEMER and her husband fantasized about travelling the world, but like a lot of people they considered putting it off until their retirement.
"In the hustle and bustle of living our lives, with the business and the home and the kids and everything else, the travel part of our ambitions just got forgotten, " she once said in a television interview.
But a brush with skin cancer in 1994 persuaded her to re-evaluate her life. She and her husband decided it was time to start following their dreams. Soon after, they sold their advertising business, rented out their Ottawa-area home, bought and renovated Northern Magic, a modest 37-year-old sailboat.
"She taught people that you have to find a way to make your own dream come true, said Diane KING, a close friend.
The STUEMERs began their journey by sailing down the eastern seaboard of North America, through the Panama Canal and across the Pacific Ocean, eventually reaching Australia. From there, they travelled to Indonesia, Thailand, Sri Lanka and across the Indian Ocean to Zanzibar. They sailed the Red Sea and up through the Mediterranean to Gibraltar, from where they set out across the North Atlantic homeward bound.
At times they travelled for weeks without seeing land. The music of Canadian folksinger Michael MITCHELL frequently echoed through Northern Magic, calming frayed nerves during stormy weather or reminding them of home as they sailed into a new port.
Back home in Canada, Mr. MITCHELL read about their trip. "I almost felt I was on the journey with them, " he said.
The family encountered many close calls on their voyage. At one point, the family boat was docked in Yemen only a few hundred metres away from where suicide bombers blew a gaping hole in the U.S.S. Cole.
The trip was not just one of adventure. Along the way they met remarkable people, many of whom were living in poverty. Touched by these people, the family set out to make a difference. Ms. STUEMER's work, along with her popular columns, has managed to raise more than $50,000 so far for humanitarian causes in Africa and Southeast Asia.
The money was raised to help pay for student tuitions and school supplies in Kenya and to help protect orangutans in the jungles of Borneo.
Diane STUEMER was born on June 23, 1959, in Sarnia, Ontario Not long after, her family moved to Edmonton. From there they moved to Calgary, where she spent her formative years. As a teenager, Ms. STUEMER was working at the Calgary Stampede when she met a young German man who would later become her husband. Born in Berlin, Herbert STUEMER came to Canada with the intention of travelling and working throughout North America. But after meeting Diane, he decided to stay put in Calgary. The couple married there in 1981.
From Calgary the couple went to Ottawa, where Ms. STUEMER studied journalism at Carleton University. After earning her degree, she went to work for the federal government in various positions, including briefing the Environment Minister for Question Period.
In 1988, she quit her government job and bought a faltering advertising company. She turned it around to become a successful business. She also wrote a biography of her grandfather, William HAWRELAK, a former mayor of Edmonton, and helped her father, Frank KING, write up his memories of his experience organizing the 1988 Calgary Winter Olympics.
"Whenever she put her mind to something, she did it intensely, Ms. MASLECHKO said.
During her life, Ms. STUEMER followed 11 basic rules. "Live your life with passion. Dare to dream big dreams, " was rule No. 1.
"Begin immediately, even if you are not ready, " rule No. 4 states.
Last Boxing Day, Ms. STUEMER became ill, and suffered from persistent headaches. But it was not until February 6 that the malignant melanoma that took her life was discovered. In the last month of her life, she was surrounded in the hospital by family and Friends, whom she kept laughing with her wonderful sense of humour, said her sister.
"She said: 'I got a wake-up call and thank goodness I listened. I changed my life. I fulfilled who I was meant to be', " her sister Ms. MASLECHKO recalled. "She made the most of it and that's a lesson to all of us."
Ms. STUEMER was recently presented with the Queen's Golden Jubilee Medal. The Medal is given to Canadians "who have made a significant contribution to their fellow citizens, their community or to Canada."
The City of Ottawa also has plans to name a park and beach area on the north shore of Petrie Island Stuemer Park, in honour of Ms. STUEMER. The Ottawa River island, close to where the STUEMERs live, is the place from which they departed on their journey and returned to four years later.
News of her death attracted a flood of messages to the family Web site (http: //www.northernmagic.com). Some admirers had followed Ms. STUEMER's exploits for years. Long-time reader Carol LAVIOLETTE wrote: "I followed your adventure from the very start; I laughed and cried through all of the stories in the Citizen. I prayed for your safe return and cried tears of joy when the five of you returned to Canada.
"I am a mother of three myself and could not imagine going on that kind of adventure, I don't have the strength of character to undertake something of such magnitude. But I lived it through your tales. Thank you and God bless you."
Ms. STUEMER died in an Ottawa hospital on March 15. She leaves her husband Herbert and their three sons Michael, 16, Jonathan, 14, and Christopher, 11, her mother and father, sister and two brothers.
"Diane was like a little girl who, in all her innocence, really truly believed she could change the world, Ms. KING wrote in a eulogy. "Who would dare tell her that she couldn't?"

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LAVIOLETTE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-07-31 published
WHITEHOUSE, Gladys Yolande Laviolette
Died peacefully at Toronto Western Hospital on Tuesday, July 29, 2003, in her 100th year, one of eight daughters of the late Joseph B. LAVIOLETTE and May Emma SMITH, predeceased in 1961 by her husband, Robert Victor WHITEHOUSE, beloved sister of Dorothy BAIRD of Norwood, Ontario, and Gwyneth NEHER of Peace River, Alberta, and brother-in-law, George NEHER of Newmarket, Ontario, loving aunt of Debbie NEHER, Ginnie NEHER, Gwendy NEHER and Charles NEHER. Longtime member of the congregation and, with her late husband, a most generous benefactor of the Church of the Transfiguration (Anglican), 111 Manor Road East, Toronto. Funeral at the church on Friday, August 1, 2003 at eleven o'clock. Visitation at the church for one hour prior to the service. Cremation. Ashes to be interred beside her husband in the Laviolette family plot in Notre Dame du Neige Cemetery, Montreal. Arrangements entrusted to Murray E. Newbigging Funeral Home.

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LAVIS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-05-07 published
SCHEFFEL, Maxwell Lewis (Lew)
Of Niagara-on-the-Lake died peacefully after a short illness at the Greater Niagara General Hospital on May 1, 2003 aged 83. Cherished husband for 35 years of Marie Virginia (LAVIS.) Beloved brother of Clifford A. SCHEFFEL and his wife Helen (HENDERSON) of Cambridge. Lovingly remembered by his nieces and nephews Kenneth M. SCHEFFEL, Ronald P. SCHEFFEL, Susan E. BOUGHTON and Sandra L. WANKLIN and their families. Remembered affectionately also by Albert R. LAVIS and Georgette and Victoria E. and Edward E. STEWARD/STEWART/STUART. He is survived also by many cousins in Canada, Germany and U.S.A. B.A.Sc. Toronto 1945, he was a long-time employee of Stone and Webster, Toronto. Cremation has taken place. A memorial service will be held at St. Andrew's Presbyterian Church, Niagara-on-the-Lake on Thursday May 29, 2003 at 2: 00 p.m. In lieu of flowers, if desired donations may be made to St. Andrew's Presbyterian Church or the charity of your choice. Arrangements entrusted to the Morgan Funeral Home, Niagara-on- the-Lake.
On line guest register
www.morganfuneral.com

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LAVOIE o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-01-08 published
Nelda May MONTGOMERY
In loving memory of Nelda May MONTGOMERY, September 13, 1913 - January 5, 2003.
Nelda MONTGOMERY, a resident of Spring Bay, passed away peacefully at her residence on Sunday, January 5, 2003, at the age of 89 years. She was born at Grimesthorpe, daughter of the late Neil and Pearl (LEWIS) McALLISTER. Nelda had operated Dawson's Resort from 1935 until 1982. Her hobbies included quilting, driving, picking raspberries, and most of all, going to yard sales.
Nelda was predeceased by her first husband Robert DAWSON in June of 1957. She later married Colin MONTGOMERY who predeceased November 1982. Dearly loved mother of James and daughter-in-law Myrtle DAWSON of Spring Bay. Proud grandmother of Marilyn, Sylvia (Doug ORFORD,) Paul, Murray (Dawn) all of Spring Bay and David of London and great grandchildren Bruce, Rodney and Sarah ORFORD and Rebecca and Alexander DAWSON. Dear sister of Dorothy DOBRANSKI of Little Current, Calvin (Winnifred) McALLISTER of Azilda and Marie (Richard) LAVOIE of Sudbury. Also survived by many nieces and nephews. Predeceased by brothers Gordon and Elgin and brother-in-law Michael DOBRANSKI.
Friends called at the Culgin Funeral Home on Tuesday, January 7, 2003. The funeral service will be conducted in the Wm. G. Turner Chapel on Wednesday, January 8, 2003 with Reverend Frank HANER officiating. Spring interment in Grimesthorpe Cemetery. Arrangements in care of Culgin Funeral Home.

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