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"LAM" 2003 Obituary


LAMARSH  LAMB  LAMBERT  LAMONT 

LAMARSH o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-08-30 published
A man of uncommon passion and drive
Despite hints of scandal, the scrappy former Liberal member of parliament, who spent a lifetime fighting for social safety nets, earned a reputation as a tireless crusader for the working people
By Ron CSILLAG Special to the Globe and Mail; With a report from staff Saturday, August 30, 2003 - Page F8
He died with his boots on.
John MUNRO, a Trudeau era Liberal warhorse once described as a rumpled fighter who had gone too many rounds, had just put the finishing touches to a barn-burning speech, to be delivered to a Rotary Club, on the evils of concentration of media ownership when he suffered at heart attack at his desk in his Hamilton home on August 19. He was 72.
It was almost just as well that he went suddenly, his daughter, Anne, said in a eulogy, for her father could not stand suffering. Rather, he would not abide it. Suffering had no place in Canada, he reasoned, which is why his name is so closely associated with such social safety nets as medicare, the Canada Pension Plan and improvements to Old Age Security.
More than 500 well-wishers, including old political pals, steel-workers, artists, business people and labourers, packed the James Street Baptist Church last Saturday to laud Hamilton's favourite son, a scrappy lawyer who earned a reputation as a tireless crusader for working people, despite the recurring taint of scandal.
As the Member of Parliament for Hamilton East from 1962 to 1984 and through five cabinet posts, he was proudly on the left of the Liberal Party, alongside people such as Allan MacEACHEN, Judy LAMARSH, Lloyd AXWORTHY, Eugene WHELAN -- and probably Pierre TRUDEAU himself -- fighting for medicare, against capital punishment and in favour of a guaranteed annual income. As minister of national health and welfare, he didn't win the battle for a guaranteed annual income, but he did get the Guaranteed Income Supplement that has made life easier for many seniors. He was also known and often ridiculed -- for being a chain-smoking health minister.
Prime Minister Jean CHRÉTIEN, who entered Parliament a year after Mr. MUNRO, mourned the death of his former cabinet colleague. "We were very good Friends, and I'm terribly sorry that he passed away. He was a very good member of Parliament, and he was a very good minister and a guy who worked very, very hard in all the files that were given to him."
The political bug bit early. At 18, Mr. MUNRO ran for president of the Tribune Society at Westdale Secondary School in Hamilton. Mark NEMIGAN, a lifelong friend, remembers his resourcefulness: "He went to a local bus stop and festooned all the park benches with banners reading, 'Vote for John.' It worked too. He had uncommon drive and passion, even then."
Born in Hamilton on March 26, 1931, to lawyer John Anderson MUNRO and Katherine CARR, a housewife, John Carr MUNRO became a municipal alderman at the age of 23 while attending law school at Osgoode Hall in Toronto.
"I have no idea how he did that," Mr. NEMIGAN says. "The guy didn't sleep."
Mr. MUNRO took his first run at federal politics in the seat of Hamilton West in 1957, but was beaten by Ellen FAIRCLOUGH, who went on to become Canada's first female cabinet minister. In 1962, he switched ridings, and won the seat he would hold for the next 22 years.
With the election of Mr. TRUDEAU in 1968, a string of cabinet positions followed for Mr. MUNRO: minister without portfolio, amateur sport, health and welfare, labour and Indian affairs and northern development, the last earning him the hard-won respect of aboriginal groups.
In the 1968 general election, an aggressive young poll captain named Sheila COPPS worked on Mr. MUNRO's re-election bid. She would go on to replace him in the seat in 1984.
Tom AXWORTHY, who was Mr. TRUDEAU's principal secretary, recalled that the prime minister often turned to Mr. MUNRO for support on progressive positions at the cabinet table: "When we had those kind of debates, he would kind of look over to MUNRO when he wanted to hear the liberal perspective on the issue."
Mr. MUNRO's support for the decriminalization of marijuana led to a perk in December, 1969: A 90-minute chat about drugs with John LENNON and Yoko ONO, fresh from the duo's "bed-in" at Montreal's Queen Elizabeth Hotel. Documents unearthed this spring by a researcher for an Ottawa Beatles Web site revealed that Mr. LENNON joked that while Mr. TRUDEAU and Mr. MUNRO, then health minister, were members of the "establishment," they were both "hip."
"Mr. MUNRO's speech [on the decriminalization of marijuana] was the only political speech I ever heard about that had anything to do with reality that came through to me," Mr. LENNON is quoted as saying in the 12,000-word document.
Contacted by a reporter in May, Mr. MUNRO recalled that the incident, and his stand on cannabis, didn't go over well. "Yeah, I was in a little hot water at the time," he laughed. "Everybody thought I wanted to give the country to the junkies."
Mr. LENNON and Ms. ONO made a distinct impression, he said. "The more I think about it, the more I remember he and his wife were very polite and committed people."
In 1974, the water became considerably hotter when the Royal Canadian Mounted Police raided Mr. MUNRO's campaign headquarters during a probe into kickbacks and bid rigging on Hamilton Harbour dredging contracts.
Around the same time, Mr. MUNRO was criticized for accepting a $500 campaign donation from a union whose leaders were under investigation.
In 1978, he was forced to resign from the cabinet when it was revealed that he had talked to a judge by telephone to give a character reference for a constituent on the day of the person's sentencing for assault. But he bounced back with a tenacity that Mr. TRUDEAU was said to have admired and in 1980 won reappointment to the cabinet.
Mr. MUNRO's stamp on Hamilton was legendary, from the reclamation of land that gave the city Confederation Park, to the Canada Centre for Inland Waters, to the fundraising of more than $50-million for the local airport, renamed in his honour in 1998. "Without a doubt, he was the feistiest, most stubborn person I knew in public life," former mayor Bob MORROW remarked. "I don't think we will ever meet his equal of scaring up funds for Hamilton."
When Mr. TRUDEAU retired in 1984, Mr. MUNRO ran for the Liberal leadership and prime minister. He finished a poor fifth in a field of six. There began what his daughter called the "decade from hell," starting with a four-year Royal Canadian Mounted Police investigation so vigorous, the Mounties even considered using a helicopter to track Mr. MUNRO because the officers assigned to tail him couldn't keep up with his car.
That investigation killed a re-election bid in 1988 and scuttled his marriage to Lilly Oddie MUNRO, a minister in the former Ontario Liberal government. It eventually produced 37 flimsy charges of breach of trust, conspiracy, corruption, fraud and theft stemming from his years as Indian affairs minister. After a trial that dragged on for most of 1991, the judge threw out nearly all the charges without even calling for defence evidence. The Crown later withdrew the rest.
Mr. MUNRO welcomed the verdict as "complete exoneration" but was left with legal bills estimated at nearly $1-million and a reputation in ruins. Swimming in debt (he had to rely on Ontario Legal Aid), he filed a civil suit in 1992, claiming malicious prosecution and maintaining he had been targeted by the Royal Canadian Mounted Police to embarrass him. He attempted a political comeback in 1993, only to have Mr. CHRÉTIEN refuse to sign his nomination papers. Mr. MUNRO responded by filing an unsuccessful court challenge seeking to strip Mr. CHRÉTIEN of his power to appoint candidates.
Mr. MUNRO, who had returned to an immigration law practice in Hamilton, felt betrayed by the government's refusal to pay his legal bills, and it took an emotional toll.
"I'm not mad at the world," he said in 1996. "I realized this could totally destroy me if I didn't live a day at a time. You have to impose discipline, or you're finished. The motivation to carry on is voided. There's nothing to look forward to except endless grief."
He finally won nearly $1.4-million in compensation from Ottawa in 1999, but most of the money went to pay taxes, legal bills and other expenses. He could have avoided problems by declaring bankruptcy, but insisted on clearing his debts.
"He was no saint, but he was dedicated and hardworking," said his daughter Susan. "He was deeply hurt."
Mr. MUNRO had no interest in the personal trappings of wealth, she said, adding that he had a weakness only for Chevy Chevettes and homemade muffins. Good thing too, for a proposal for bankruptcy he filed in 1995 showed a monthly living balance of $476.
His last political gasp came in 2000 when he ran unsuccessfully for mayor of Hamilton. Asked in 1996 about writing his memoirs, he said: "I'm not ready. There's no last chapter yet."
Mr. MUNRO leaves his third wife, Barbara, and four children.

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LAMB o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-04-22 published
He founded Readers' Club of Canada
Nationalist visionary struggled financially to publish Canadian writers
By Carol COOPER Special to The Globe and Mail Tuesday, April 22, 2003 - Page R7
In the early 1960s, when writers asked Peter and Carol MARTIN where to publish their manuscripts on Canada, the couple realized how few choices there were. Inspired, the Martins, both voracious readers, staunch nationalists and founders of the Readers' Club of Canada, decided to start their own press. In 1965, Peter Martin Associates came into being. Last month, Peter MARTIN died of lung cancer in Ottawa.
In an industry overshadowed by American companies, Peter MARTIN Associates was among the first in a wave of independent publishing houses to open during a time of rising Canadian nationalism.
Launched in a downtown Toronto basement on a shoestring budget, skeleton staff, idealism and enthusiasm, the company flew by the seat of its pants. Its employees were often young and new to the business. But many, including Peter CARVER, Michael SOLOMON and Valerie WYATT, went on to become Canadian mainstays.
"It really was a time of Canadian nationalism and those of us who believed in that cause could see what Peter and Carol were doing," said Ms. WYATT, a children's editor who spent four years with the company in the seventies.
During the 16 years before its sale in 1981, Peter Martin Associates published approximately 170 works, mainly non-fiction. Its presses put out I, Nuligak, the autobiography of an Inuit man; The Boyd Gang by Marjorie LAMB and Barry PEARSON; Trapping is My Life by John TETSO; and the Handbook of Canadian Film by Eleanor BEATTIE. Others who came through their doors included Hugh HOOD, Robert FULFORD, John Robert COLOMBO, Douglas FETHERLING and Mary Alice DOWNIE -- all to have their works published.
Started with small amounts of seed money from private investors and no government funding, Peter Martin Associates constantly struggled financially. At one point, for a bit of extra cash, the office became the designated nuclear-fallout shelter for the street. Pat DACEY, once the firm's book designer, lugged suitcases of books up the street to sell at Britnell's bookstore with summer employee Bronwyn DRAINIE.
Working at Peter Martin Associates was always fun, Ms. WYATT said. "You went in to work happy and you stayed happy all day."
Still, in a time when Canadian works received little recognition, she remembers finding it difficult to get media interviews for the author of Martin-published book.
Yet another title caused trouble with its subject. The company was putting out a collection of previously published sayings of former prime minister John DIEFENBAKER, called I Never Say Anything Provocative, edited by Margaret WENTE. Mr. DIEFENBAKER heard about the project, called Mr. MARTIN and threatened to sue. Mr. MARTIN stood firm.
"He handled it with such élan," said writer Tim WYNNE- JONES, then in the art department. "He was suitably dutiful, but not in awe. Mr. DIEFENBAKER was just over the top, as was his wont."
The book went to press and Mr. DIEFENBAKER did not go to court.
Once listed along with Peter GZOWSKI in a Maclean's magazine article on "Young Men to Watch," Mr. MARTIN was born on April 26, 1934 in Ottawa to a dentist father and a mother who drove an ambulance in the First World War. The younger of two sons, he attended Trinity College School in Port Hope, Ontario and the University of Toronto, where he earned a degree in philosophy.
During a year in Ottawa as the president of the National Federation of University Students, Mr. MARTIN met his first wife Carol. They married in 1956 and moved to Toronto. Three years later, they founded the Readers' Club in Featuring one Canadian book a month, it distributed works by Mordecai RICHLER, Irving LAYTON, Morley CALLAGHAN and Brian MOORE among others, and supplied its members with coupons. While continuing to run the Readers' Club (sold in 1978 to Saturday Night Magazine and closed in 1981), the MARTINs started Peter Martin Associates.
Throughout his career, Mr. MARTIN spoke out for Canadian publishing. Alarmed by the sale of Ryerson Press and Gage Educational Press in 1970 to American firms, he called a meeting of publishers to discuss problems in the industry. Named the Independent Publishers Association, the group started in 1971 with 16 members and with Mr. MARTIN as its first president. In 1976, it was renamed the Association of Canadian Publishers and continues today with 140 members. As a result of the group's efforts, Canadian publishing began to receive federal and provincial funding.
In the late 1970s, the MARTINs went their separate ways. Afterward, Mr. MARTIN published a small newspaper, The Downtowner, and owned a cookbook store with his second wife, Maggie NIEMI. In 1983, they moved near Sudbury, Ontario, where Mr. MARTIN did freelance book and theatre reviews, then moved to Ottawa in 1985 to work as president for Balmuir Books, publisher of the magazine International Perspectives and consulting editor for the University of Ottawa Press.
After a spinal-cord injury in 1997, Mr. MARTIN was left a quadriplegic, except for limited use of his left arm. Even so, he remained active, maintained a heavy e-mail correspondence and spent time in the park reading while seated in a bright-yellow wheelchair.
Mr. MARTIN leaves his children Pamela, Christopher and Jeremy and his wife Maggie NIEMI. He died on March 15.

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LAMBERT o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-06 published
LAMBERT, Kenneth Frederick (Former President and General Manager of BASF Inmont Canada Ltd.)
Passed away peacefully at Etobicoke General Hospital, on March 2nd, 2003, with his family at his side. Ken, aged 79, is survived by his four children, Jim, Don, Rick and Margie and by his seven grandchildren. At Ken's request, a private family funeral service was held. A public celebration of his life will be held at the Courtyard Marriott, 231 Carlingview Drive, Etobicoke (905-675-0411), on Saturday, March 8th, 2003. All of Ken's many Friends are invited to attend anytime between 4 and 7 p.m. The family requests that in lieu of flowers, donations in his name be made to the charity of your choice.

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LAMBERT o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-06 published
The day the music didn't die
Beloved Toronto trumpeter credited with helping preserve a unique form of New Orleans jazz
By Sarah LAMBERT Thursday, March 6, 2003 - Page R9
Toronto -- The tightly knit world of New Orleans traditional jazz has lost one of its greats with the death, last month, of Cliff (Kid) BASTIEN, leader of Toronto's treasured Happy Pals.
The trumpeter is credited as having nothing less than single-handedly kept alive the unique, raw, New Orleans style of jazz, through his leadership and mentorship of hundreds of musicians.
Saddened fans and musicians filed into the city's Grossman's Tavern all week last month to pay tribute to Mr. BASTIEN at the long-time home of the Happy Pals, where the walls are lined with photos of his fans and musicians. It was a send-off worthy of New Orleans, birthplace of the kind of jazz Mr. BASTIEN played with his seven-piece bands, the Camelia Jazz Band and later the Happy Pals, during the 30 or so years he played at the Toronto landmark.
"He was never late. Never, never ever, said Christine LOUIE, whose family inherited Mr. BASTIEN's Saturday-afternoon gig when Al GROSSMAN sold the bar in 1975.
So it was with sinking hearts on February 8 that his loyal audience and band members watched the minute hand tick past 4 o'clock, waiting for him to arrive, brass trumpet in hand.
When he was found later that afternoon still sitting in his armchair, apparently looking up a new song in his hymn book, the Happy Pals played on and raised a glass in tribute to their leader who died as he lived, surrounded by music. He was 65 years old.
Noonie SHEARS, a long-time friend and leader of the traditional impromptu parade that would inevitably snake through Grossman's as Saturday afternoon wound down, said she thought Mr. BASTIEN was looking up I'll Fly Away, the old gospel song recently dusted off in the movie O Brother, Where Art Thou?
The band played it for the first time at Mr. BASTIEN's official memorial at Grossman's the Saturday following his death.
Born in 1937 in London's East End, Mr. BASTIEN emigrated to Canada in 1962 after a stint in New Orleans. It was there that he heard trumpeter (Kid) Thomas VALENTINE play and, experiencing a kind of epiphany, Mr. BASTIEN followed him from club to club and studied his style. It ultimately inspired a lifelong ambition to keep alive New Orleans-style traditional jazz.
A purist who drew a distinction between his chosen genre of music and the more popularized Dixieland Jazz, Mr. BASTIEN once said: "Had I never heard that music, I wouldn't have become a musician. I wouldn't play anything else."
I Like Bananas, Caledonia, All of Me and Louisiana Vie en Rose were just a few of his standards. But, as Happy Pals' trombonist Roberta TEVLIN explained, Mr. BASTIEN wasn't content to simply recycle the old chestnuts.
"Cliff kept adding songs. I've probably played 1,000 different tunes with him. He was particularly notorious for finding songs outside the standard jazz list, said Ms. TEVLIN, who joined the band 20 years ago, along with her saxophonist husband, Patrick.
Bob Dylan, Creedence Clearwater Revival, Western Swing numbers, Nigerian folk songs and Dean Martin could all tumble out during a set, said drummer Chuck CLARKE.
Mr. BASTIEN's Friends and peers point out that he was known for three primary qualities: His love of music, his scorn for fame or publicity and his mentoring of local musicians.
During the memorial at Grossman's, Downchild Blues Band headman Donny WALSH arrived from Florida to sit in with his harmonica, as he had done regularly with Mr. BASTIEN in the 1970s. Juno-nominated bluesman Michael PICKETT was there, as well as jazz singer Laura HUBERT, formerly of the Leslie Spit Treeo, pianist Peter HILL, The Nationals and many more.
From the worldwide New Orleans jazz community, among those who came to pay their respects were saxophonist Jean-Pierre ALESSI of France, trumpeter Roger (Kid Dutch) UITHOVEN of Orlando, Florida, clarinetist Kjeld BRANDT from Denmark and Toronto's Brian TOWERS, Jan SHAW and Joe VAN ROSSEM.
"I cannot imagine the Toronto traditional jazz scene without Cliff BASTIEN and his raw, emotional New Orleans-style jazz, Mr. TOWERS wrote in a notice posted on the Internet shortly after he learned of the death of his friend.
"He was probably the most popular and influential figure on the Toronto traditional jazz scene. He taught many others to play their instruments in the style and introduced thousands to the joys of New Orleans traditional jazz.
"We went to Grossman's after our own gig and Jan and I played some hymns with the Happy Pals. A sadder and more emotional scene I have rarely seen."
Toronto musician Joanne MacKELL, leader of the Paradise Rangers, wonders how things might have been if she had not met Mr. BASTIEN when she was just starting out.
"Though I was young and inexperienced, Kid would always invite me up to sing, Ms. MacKELL said, recalling how the band took her under its wing when she discovered them in the early 1970s.
"Kid didn't care about money or popular opinion. He filled Grossman's Tavern every Saturday for some 30 years because he played great music with honesty and integrity and he inspired me to try and do the same."
Until just last year, Mr. BASTIEN, who feared flying, avoided the lure of the road, taking only an annual sojourn to New Orleans for the French Quarter Festival. Finally, in the fall of 2002, he accepted an invitation to tour Scandinavia with the Danish/Swedish band New Orleans Delight, playing with George BERRY on tenor sax. A new Compact Disk is due to be released this spring.
His official recordings are few, numbering about a dozen, as Mr. BASTIEN preferred to play to an audience. Though, as Ms. TEVLIN pointed out: "There are bootleg tapes all over the place."
His legacy, the band says, is keeping the New Orleans style of jazz alive.
"Kid Thomas VALENTINE was one of the greats, and when he was gone, Kid BASTIEN carried on. Kid BASTIEN was one of the greats, and now Kid's gone. So who's going to carry the music on now? We will, said saxophonist Mr. TEVLIN on behalf of the Happy Pals, who intend to continue the Saturday-afternoon tradition at Grossman's.
In another side to his life, Mr. BASTIEN was an accomplished commercial artist whose hand-crafted signs, woodwork and acid-etched glass can be seen in many local pubs, including Toronto's Wheat Sheaf Tavern. His work can be found across Ontario, Quebec, British Columbia and California, as well as in Europe.
Mr. BASTIEN's wish was to be buried in New Orleans.

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LAMBERT o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-04-07 published
MURRAY, James Findlay, M.D., Fellow of the Royal College of Surgeons of Canada
A much respected, much loved and wonderful man has died. Peacefully but suddenly on April 4, 2003 in his 83rd year. Beloved husband of Shirley for 57 years, dearest father to John (Jenny), Bill (Stephanie), Claire and Hugh, adored grandfather to Amy and Katie (Milne), Robert and Olivia (Murray) and Scott and Cameron (Murray). Dear brother to Betty LAMBERT and the late Margaret PHOENIX, and cherished by his nieces, nephews and many relatives and Friends. He loved life with a passion, and deeply touched the hearts of countless people through the myriad organizations and endeavours he undertook. Born in Toronto, Jim attended Oakwood Collegiate, and University of Toronto where he graduated from medical school in 1943 as the permanent class president and Valedictorian, and recipient of the George Biggs Trophy. From 1944-46 he served as Captain in the Royal Canadian Army Medical Corps, and subsequently undertook his surgical training at the University of Toronto and at McGill University in Montreal. In 1953 he joined the Toronto East General and Orthopaedic Hospital, where he became head of Plastic Surgery and later Surgeon-in-Chief. He organized a specialized hand clinic, and was then appointed the consultant Hand Surgeon at the Ontario Workers' Compensation Board. Jim MURRAY is considered one of the pioneers of modern hand surgery in Canada. In 1983, he founded and became the first director of the Hand Service at Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, and in 1985 he was bestowed the honour of Professor Emeritus, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto. Over the years he held numerous professional positions including the Presidencies of the Canadian Society of Plastic Surgeons, The Canadian Society for Surgery of the Hand, and the American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Where he was known as ''Doc'', Jim served as team doctor for the Toronto Maple Leafs during the ''glory years'' from 1948-1964, and liked to claim he led them to 5 Stanley Cups. He was head doctor for Team Canada's 1972 Canada-Russia Hockey Series. This remarkable man who is sadly missed has brought warmth, love, humour, magic and a human touch to so many people, and above all to his Friends and dear family. The family will receive Friends and relatives at the Humphrey Funeral Home - A. W. Miles Chapel, 1403 Bayview Avenue (south of Eglinton Avenue East), from 7 to 9 p.m. Wednesday. There will be a memorial service to mark Jim's passing and celebrate his life on Thursday, April 10 at 11 o'clock at Lawrence Park Community Church, 2180 Bayview Avenue. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the Alzheimer Society of Ontario, 1200 Bay Street, Suite 202, Toronto M5R 2A5.

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LAMBERT o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-07-04 published
WELCH, Dr. Robert Hamilton
Died peacefully, at home in Toronto, on Tuesday, July 1, 2003, in his 90th year. Beloved husband of Jane (Penny) Simpson (née COYNE.) Devoted father of Thomas Gordon (Anne LAMBERT,) James Coyne (Hélène QUESNEL), Sarah Jane (Edward GELLER) and Margo Hamilton. Adored grandfather of Emily, Jackson, Brennen, Julia and Philippe. Predeceased by his brothers Albert Gordon and Thomas Alan.
Bob WELCH was born in Toronto, educated at University of Toronto Schools and U of T, and served his country as Surgeon-Lieutenant Royal Canadian Naval Volunteer Reserve in World War 2. He was in family practice and associated with St. Michael's Hospital for nearly 50 years. He was a great diagnostician who practiced the art of medicine with compassion for both patients and their families. A famous raconteur with a gentle sense of humour, he was also an avid reader who was engaged with life until the end. While he lived and worked in Toronto, he cherished his summers in Prince Edward Island from the 1950's on. Greatly loved and deeply missed.
The family will receive Friends at the Humphrey Funeral Home - A. W. Miles Chapel, 1403 Bayview Avenue (south of Eglinton Avenue East), from 7-9 p.m. on Thursday, July 3rd. Private service in Toronto and interment at Fortune, Prince Edward Island In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to St. Michael's Hospital, 30 Bond Street, Toronto M5B 1W8 or Bay Fortune United Church Cemetery Fund, c/o John Aitken, Souris, Prince Edward Island C1A 1B0.

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LAMBERT o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-08-15 published
Professor played a role in defeat of SSAINTURENT government
By M.J. STONE Special to The Globe and Mail Friday, August 15, 2003 - Page R5
Nearly four decades after Louis SSAINTURENT had been Prime Minister of Canada, McGill professor James MALLORY was surprised to discover how influential he had been in the defeat of Mr. SSAINTURENT's Liberals in 1957. The revelation occurred in 1992 when the cabinet papers of the SSAINTURENT government, which had been sealed for 35 years, were made available to the public.
Unknown to Professor MALLORY, a radio interview he gave in the wake of the 1957 election had caught the Prime Minister's ear. The Liberals had been reduced to 105 seats in the House, seven fewer than the Conservatives. But the Grits were still in a position to form a minority government with the aid of the 25 elected members of the Co-operative Commonwealth Federation, later to become the New Democratic Party.
Mr. SSAINTURENT found himself at a crossroads. While his party was clearly in decline, the Conservatives were on the rise and many questioned whether the Liberals still had a legal mandate to govern. When Mr. SSAINTURENT arrived in cabinet that morning, Prof. MALLORY's radio interview was still ringing in his ears.
Prof. MALLORY, who died in Montreal on June 24, said in the interview that if the Liberals continued to govern it would result in a constitutional crisis. He believed it was the responsibility of John DIEFENBAKER and the Conservatives to form a government. The cabinet papers clearly reflect Prof. MALLORY's influence over the Prime Minister that morning. Mr. SSAINTURENT demanded a copy of the MALLORY interview and after carefully studying the radio transcripts, he handed the rule of government over to the Tories.
Highly regarded as the foremost expert in Canadian legal and federal structures, Prof. MALLORY was often called on to advise governments about constitutional procedures. McGill professor Charles TAILOR/TAYLOR said another good example occurred in 1979.
"Joe CLARK's Conservatives had just lost a parliamentary vote," Prof. TAILOR/TAYLOR recalled. "The governor-general, Ed SCHREYER, telephoned McGill's political science department, looking for Jim. It caused something of a stir when he couldn't be found immediately. SCHREYER was frantic for MALLORY's advice. The governor-general was unsure how to proceed.
"Jim was eventually found and consulted. His advice was that the Conservatives should call an election -- exactly what Joe CLARK did."
The son of a county sheriff, James Russell MALLORY was born on February 5, 1916. He graduated with a Bachelor of Arts from the University of New Brunswick in 1937 and later studied law at Edinburgh and Dalhousie universities.
He met his American-born wife, Frances KELLER, in Scotland, and the couple married in 1940. They had two sons: James and Charles. Prof. MALLORY joined the faculty of the University of Saskatchewan in 1941. Later, he taught at the University of Toronto and Brandon College before moving to McGill in 1946.
A respected scholar and lawyer, Prof. MALLORY was an "old-school" professor who taught at McGill for 45 years. His reputation as a constitutional expert was solidified in 1954 when he published Social Credit and the Federal Power in Canada. The quintessential text mapped out the constitutional parameters of federal/provincial relations.
"James MALLORY was a discreet and modest man," McGill professor Sam NOUMOFF recalled. "He had a profound understanding of morality and he was incapable of self-promotion. He worked on university committee after committee while holding many teaching responsibilities.
"Jim wasn't the sort of man who sought public approval, he just did things because they were the right thing to do."
His son James, who lives in Britain, summed up his father's idealism: "He had a bloody-minded stubbornness. It would manifest sometimes in allowing discussions to go on and on. Then he would do exactly what he intended to do in the first place. Somehow it never impaired his reputation as a genuine democrat."
Prof. MALLORY was the founder of both the Canadian Studies program at McGill and the Canadian Association of University Professors. After retiring in 1982 he was appointed professor emeritus and continued to teach for another 10 years. In 1964, he was elected to the Royal Society of Canada and was later awarded the Queen's Silver Jubilee Medal in 1977.
In 1995, McGill founded the James R. Mallory lecture series, a one-day event that features a special guest who lectures about Canadian issues. Past guests have included Bob RAE, Peter WHITE/WHYTE and Phyllis LAMBERT. The organizers of the event say that this year's lecture will focus on Prof. MALLORY's legacy.
Prof. MALLORY died 11 weeks after the death of his wife on what would have been their 63rd anniversary.

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LAMONT o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-02-22 published
LAMONT, Katharine Johnston,
M.A. (Oxon.)
On Wednesday, February 19, 2003, in her 98th year. Beloved daughter of the Honorable John Henderson LAMONT, Supreme Court of Canada, and Margaret Murray JOHNSTON; predeceased by her brother Duncan Cameron. Miss LAMONT was head of the History Department at The Bishop Strachan School in Toronto (1930-1952), and Principal of The Study in Montreal (1952-1970). She will be remembered with pride, affection, respect and gratitude, by hundreds of former students, and by her surviving cousins, Jane MONTGOMERY of St. Catharines, Katherine STAPLES of Napanee, Elizabeth McLEOD of Toronto, and their families. Memorial donations may be made to Save the Children, Canada, 4141 Yonge Street, Toronto M2P 2A6, or the Katharine Lamont Bursary, The Bishop Strachan School, 298 Lonsdale Road, Toronto M4V 1X2. A memorial service will be held in the chapel of the Morley Bedford Funeral Home, 159 Eglinton Avenue West, Toronto, on March 3, at 1: 30 p.m.

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LAMONT o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-08-13 published
Katharine Johnston LAMONT
By Wallace McLEOD Wednesday, August 13, 2003 - Page A16
Historian, teacher, school principal, author. Born December 25, 1905, in Prince Albert, Saskatchewan. Died February 19, in Toronto, of natural causes, aged 97.
Throughout her life, Katharine Johnston LAMONT would recall her vivid memories of the cyclone that hit Regina in the afternoon of June 30, 1912, blowing away the third storey of the family home, while she hid under the dining-room table.
Katharine's father was John Henderson LAMONT (1865-1936;) he was successively a member of the federal Parliament (1904-1905), the first attorney-general of the new province of Saskatchewan (1905-1907), a judge of the Provincial Supreme Court (1907), and a justice of the Supreme Court of Canada (1927). The town of LAMONT, 56 kilometres northeast of Edmonton, was named for him. Katherine's mother was Margaret Murray JOHNSTON (1865-1950,) the daughter of William Soules JOHNSTON (1838-1869,) who edited and published the Iroquois Chief, the first newspaper in Dundas County, Ontario (1858), and the granddaughter of Reverend William Henry WILLIAMS (1795-1873,) who conducted the first Methodist camp-meeting in the eastern part of Upper Canada (near Point Iroquois, in 1823), and who later served as the junior minister of the Hay Bay Church, in Adolphustown (1838-1840).
She received her schooling in Saskatchewan, graduating from Regina College. She then attended Victoria College at the University of Toronto, where she earned a degree in English and history in 1927. Her entry in the Torontonensis yearbook gives as her characteristic motto, "Making a virtue of necessity." Then she went on to Oxford University, where she enrolled in Lady Margaret Hall, the oldest women's college there (founded in 1878), and graduated in 1930. She received the degree of Master of Arts from Oxford in 1934.
On her return to Canada, she obtained a position as a teacher at the Bishop Strachan School for girls in Toronto, where she served as head of the history department from 1930 to 1952. Then in 1952 she accepted a call to become the third headmistress (principal) of The Study, a school for girls in Montreal, which had been founded in 1915. She presided over its move to a new location in 1959/60, and continued in office there until her retirement in 1970. Soon after that, she returned to Toronto.
Over the years, she received a good measure of recognition from the alumnae of the Bishop Strachan School. A bursary was established in her name in 1992, and a celebratory dinner was held in her honour; her former students were invited to submit written testimonials. They included such assessments as "She made history come alive " "a truly remarkable woman; " "the most outstanding teacher I ever had; " "known throughout the Province as its finest history teacher; " "she had a way of making her pupils think things out."
And, as another testimony of appreciation, in 2001 one of the student subdivisions of the Bishop Strachan School was named "LAMONT House." A pupil she had taught 60 years earlier said at the time that she especially remembered "an enlightened and influential history teacher, Miss LAMONT, who taught her how to look at, question and analyze the world around her -- not with cynicism but with reason."
After her retirement from teaching, as a student of the past, Katharine wrote a history of her Montreal school, titled The Study: A Chronicle (published in Montreal in 1974). Then, to celebrate the bicentenary of the Loyalist settlement on the Bay of Quinte, she wrote Adolphustown 1784-1984 (Napanee, 1984).
Early in 1996, as her health deteriorated and it became impractical for her to live on her own, she took up residence in the Glebe Manor, in Toronto, where she received excellent care.
Wallace is a friend of Katharine LAMONT.

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LAMONT o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-10-16 published
LAMONT, Jean Annette (ROBINS)
Jean died peacefully, on Tuesday, October 14, 2003 in Toronto, with her children Doug and Anne at her side; in her 84th year. Predeceased by her loving husband and friend of 53 years, Bruce Maitland LAMONT, a former senior international executive with Royal Bank of Canada. Survived by son, James Douglas and his wife Kathy, stepchildren Melissa and August and step-great granddaughter, Elizabeth; and daughter Anne and husband Christopher JAMES and their daughter, Kathleen. Cherished sister of Joan BAILEY and her children, Robin (Marie,) Joanne (Ken HOLT,) John (Clare) and Janet (Heino CLAESSENS) and their families. Remembered by sisters-in-law Pauline FLYNN (Hank) and Meribeth LAMONT and their families and the extended LAMONT clan. Special thanks to cousin Joanne HOLT for all her support and help over the last few years. Thank you to the staff and Mom's new Friends at the Kingsway Retirement Residence, Etobicoke for their Friendship and support in making the Kingsway her home away from home. A graduate of MacDonald Hall, Guelph University (1940) and Toronto Western Hospital School of Nursing (1943) she was always proud of her accomplishment as one of Canada's first female nursing flight attendants with Trans Canada Airways. Mom was an avid bridge player and golfer, a social dynamo who cherished her wide circle of Friends. A celebration of her life will be held on Saturday, October 18, 2003 at 11: 00 a.m. at Knox Presbyterian Church, 89 Dunn Street (at Lakeshore Road), Oakville. If desired, in lieu of flowers, donations in Jean's memory to a charity of your choice would be appreciated.
Mom, a Grand Slam and a hole-in-one to you. Love always.

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