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"KIR" 2003 Obituary


KIRCHHOFF  KIRK  KIRKLAND  KIRKPATRICK  KIRKUP  KIRKWOOD 

KIRCHHOFF o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-01-08 published
Chance Justin Wynne NOLAN
By H.J. KIRCHHOFF Wednesday, January 8, 2003, Page A16
Builder and adventurer in training, class clown. Born November 13, 1995, in Thunder Bay, Ontario Died December 31, 2002, in Toronto, in a tragic household accident, aged 7.
If Chance had been allowed by fate to grow up, he would have been a ladies' man. He liked women, and the more full-figured the better. He was charming and roguish and had a twinkle in his eye, and he loved to hug, even though he thought kissing was yucky.
He would have been a builder of some sort -- an engineer, a construction worker or an architect. He was always putting together factories and robots and spaceships out of the bottles and cans in the recycling box, using yards of tape to hold it all together, often following detailed plans he had drawn up beforehand. His room was the scene of many monumental and complex forts, constructed out of blankets and chairs and tables and shelves.
He would have been a joker and a trickster. He laughed easily and often, and loved wordplay. Even his "mistake words" were imaginative and colourful: Our family vocabulary includes such rich inventions as "hoptercopter" for helicopter, "colourpillar" for caterpillar, and "platemat" for placemat. I have always liked "grunch" instead of brunch. He also loved fart and bum jokes, which never failed to crack him up. He was only 7, after all.
He would have been an artist. He had a good eye and handled pencils, pens and crayons confidently. Once, when I told him I couldn't draw, he took most of a Sunday afternoon patiently instructing me: "Look at that tree over there. Just draw what you see. . executed -- did I mention he was only 7? -- but they were always full of nicely observed detail and funny touches.
He would have been an actor. He had a mobile, expressive face, and a gift for mimickry. When he saw Titanic on video (and he didn't just see it once, he watched it five times in one weekend), he spent the next four weeks playing Jack Dawson: wearing overalls, hair slicked back, being courtly. He carefully posed my wife on the couch, adjusting her head just so, to paint her portrait à la Jack and his lady love.
He would have been a good parent. He was considerate of younger children, including them in games and reading them stories. He treated his favourite stuffed bear very well. He called that bear Corduroy Blue, because his overalls were blue instead of the green of the other Corduroy, star of television and children's books. Corduroy Blue travelled with him and slept with him, and once went to school with him; Corduroy Blue was given sums to do, and got them all right.
He would have been a gymnast. He loved tumbling and climbing and jumping. He was always up in the trees, and more than once got into trouble for swinging on the pipes in the basement. He was looking forward to starting circus school later this month, even though his first attempts at flying on the trapeze hadn't gone so well; he froze on the ladder and the platform, but was eager to try it again.
He would have been a proud and active member of the native community. He knew he was Ojibway, had a good idea of what that meant, and wanted to speak the language. He attended summer camp at the Native Canadian Centre in Toronto, where he would dash up the steps and through the door, screech to a stop at the desk to wash himself with smudge, and then streak off to camp. He loved the dancing and the drumming, especially the drumming, at pow wows.
It's sad to think of the things Chance will never get to be. But it's good to think of all that he was. And as his father said to me, "Sometime, we're all going to go where Chance is. When we do, he'll be there to guide us. And he'll be dancing."
H. J. KIRCHHOFF is Chance Nolan's grandfather of the heart.

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KIRK o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-07-09 published
Former Canadian Football League receiver dies at 49
Canadian Press Wednesday, July 9, 2003 - Page S9
Ottawa -- Kelvin KIRK, who played 78 games in the Canadian Football League with Ottawa, Toronto and Calgary, died suddenly this past Wednesday while playing pickup basketball. He was 49. KIRK caught 103 passes for 2,942 yards and 16 touchdowns, and was also outstanding at returning kickoffs and punts.

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KIRK o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-07-21 published
Canadian Football League wide receiver 'was always there' and rarely missed a pass
All-round athlete was also a prolific artist who amused teammates and Friends with his skillful caricatures
By Randy RAY Special to The Globe and Mail Monday, July 21, 2003 - Page R5
Ottawa -- Kelvin KIRK was an artist on and off the football field.
On the gridiron, the former Canadian Football League wide receiver was known as an all-round athlete with tremendous breakaway speed who rarely missed a pass within his grasp; in the locker room, at home and in his second career in the advertising department at an Ottawa newspaper, he was skilled with pen, pencil and paintbrush.
His humorous caricatures often left his teammates and fellow employees grabbing at their sides with laughter.
Mr. KIRK, who was born on December 13, 1953, died on July 2 of an apparent heart attack while playing pickup basketball in Ottawa.
The 49-year-old native of Mt. Pleasant, Florida, began his football career at Dunbar High School in Ohio where he caught 13 touchdown passes in two years for the Dunbar Wolverines.
In 1973, the 5-foot-11 (1.79 metre), 175-pound (65-kilogram) receiver joined the Dayton Flyers at the University of Dayton in Ohio, where he was the Flyers' top pass receiver for three straight years and was voted the team's most valuable player in 1975.
When he left after three seasons, he held the school's record for receiving yardage, with 1,676 yards. In the Flyers' record book, he continues to hold fourth place in career receiving yardage, says Doug HAUSCHILD, director of media relations and sports information at the University of Dayton.
After being selected by the Pittsburgh Steelers in the 17th round of the 1976 National Football League draft, Mr. KIRK walked out of training camp when he sensed he wasn't getting a legitimate opportunity to make the club.
He was named "Mr. Irrelevant" because as the 487th selection, he proved to be the last player taken in the draft, says Shawn LACKIE, a public-relations spokesman for the Canadian Football League.
He signed with the Canadian Football League's Toronto Argonauts in 1977 and led the team in pass receptions.
He also played for the Calgary Stampeders, Saskatchewan Roughriders and the Ottawa Rough Riders. He was Ottawa's most valuable player in 1981 when the Rough Riders made it to the Grey Cup that year but lost 26 - 23 to the Edmonton Eskimos.
His quarterback that year was J.C. WATTS, who would later become an Oklahoma congressman.
During his Canadian Football League career he caught 153 passes for 2,942 yards and 16 touchdowns. He returned 163 punts for 1,678 yards and 82 kickoffs for another 1,922 yards. His runbacks produced seven touchdowns.
"When the ball was thrown to him, he was always there. He had great breakaway speed," says Rick SOWIETA, a teammate of Mr. KIRK's when both broke into the Canadian Football League with the Argonauts.
"He had good speed, great hands -- he was our deep threat," says Jeff AVERY, one of Mr. KIRK's former Ottawa Rough Riders teammates, and now a radio commentator for the Ottawa Renegades of the Canadian Football League. "I remember one game when he caught three touchdown passes to help us whip the Montreal Concorde." Most of his former Rough Riders' teammates remember Mr. KIRK's biggest missed pass, though the failed reception wasn't his fault.
"It was the 1981 Grey Cup game in the third or fourth quarter and Kelvin was streaking down the sidelines in the clear. J.C. [WATTS] overthrew him by about six inches. Had he made the catch, it was a touch-down and we would have won the cup," says Mr. SOWIETA, now a restaurant owner in Ottawa.
A professional artist and trained art teacher, Mr. KIRK joined the advertising department at The Ottawa Citizen in 1989 in an order entry position and eventually worked on layouts and processing copy for advertisements, before moving into desktop publishing, which involved the creation of ads.
"There was nothing you could put on his desk that he couldn't handle," says Rejéan SAUMURE, manager of advertising services at the Citizen.
"Kelvin never complained. He took it all on with a smile that was worth a million bucks.
"He was the kind of guy who, as soon as he walked into the office, everyone liked. He had a magnetism about him. He warmed a room." Besides staying in tip-top shape, Mr. KIRK kept involved in football by helping coach the Ottawa Sooners of the Ontario Football Conference. He was also a prolific artist, one of his specialties being caricatures that amused his former teammates and Citizen colleagues.
During his years as a player, he would often sneak into the locker room prior to practice and draw cartoons on a chalk board, usually poking fun at teammates, coaches and various on-field happenings, says Mr. AVERY. He continued his antics as a coach with the Sooners as a way of keeping the mood light, adds Mr. SOWIETA.
"Before practice, players always checked the board to see who was being picked on that day by this mystery drawer. His work could be hilarious," says Mr. AVERY.
At the Citizen, where one of his dreams was to become a newsroom artist, Mr. KIRK often drew caricatures of co-workers and members of his own family.
His drawings often appeared on the birthday cards that circulated around the office.
"People would be quite amused," says Mr. SAUMURE. " His work was not always flattering but it always captured those he was drawing." Mr. KIRK leaves his 20-year-old son, Jonathan, and his wife Joann LARVENTZ, from whom he was separated.

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KIRK o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-09-30 published
SAVAGE, Roy John
Born London, England February 2, 1939, died September 26, 2003 in Toronto after a long and courageous battle with cancer. Roy is survived by his wife Lesley KIRK, daughter Katherine (and her mother Annette,) sister Patricia KAELBLE and nephew David PATEL (and Lara,) and stepdaughters Amanda CLYNE and Sarah CLYNE- SANCHEZ (and Jose Luis SANCHEZ,) and granddaughter Avila.
Roy spent his entire career in the telecommunication industry, first in England and then in Canada with C.N. Telecommunications and its successor companies, retiring from A.T.&T. Canada in December 1999. Roy will be remembered as a strong leader, a complex problem-solver and a generous friend and mentor.
Throughout his life, Roy applied his signature zeal in taking on new challenges. He was a life-long learner who proved he could excel at anything he put his mind to: from flying planes, playing drums or target shooting to fly fishing, rebuilding car engines or computer programming. His humour and energetic spirit will be greatly missed.
The family would like to give special thanks to the staff of the Palliative Care Ward at Toronto Grace Hospital for their professionalism, their compassion and their support for both Roy and the family during Roy's last weeks. Friends wishing to honor Roy's memory are asked to make a donation to the Palliative Care Ward of the Toronto Grace Hospital (416-925-2251).

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KIRKLAND o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-07-23 published
Susan Elizabeth CRERAR
By Lauren LINTON and Kelly KIRKLAND, Wednesday, July 23, 2003 - Page A18
Daughter, sister, wife, mother, aunt, grandmother. Born March 30, 1939, in Port Arthur, Ontario Died March 11, 2003, in Delray Beach, Florida, of ovarian cancer, aged 63.
The youngest of two girls, Sue was born to Robert and Laura PRETTIE, a high-profile couple who had moved to Port Arthur, Ontario, to start Northern Wood Preservers Ltd. Sue's strong will and innate sense of fairness were rewarded with her many Friends. Sue would cause trouble if she thought the system was not fair for all. She carried this attitude to boarding school in Toronto where she let it be known that she disagreed with the many rules imposed by the strict girls' school.
After graduating from Havergal College, Sue headed to Vancouver to attend the University of British Columbia. On her second day on campus, Sue met Bill CRERAR at a "registration mixer." Bill said he was quick to "latch onto her and take her off the dating circuit." There they began the love affair that would last more than 44 years.
The children came soon after with Kelly, Lauren, and Steve all born within four years. Sue's philosophy was that if you were home with one child you might as well be home with a few (this seemed reasonable until we had our own kids). The family moved to Berkeley, Calif., where Bill completed his M.B.A. and Sue stayed home with the three young children and became involved in various local charities. After graduation, the family moved to White Plains, New York A fourth child, Andrew, was born in One of Sue's many gifts was her ability to create a home in any environment. We have memories of living in dust and plastic during the many home-renovation projects and eating unidentifiable meals prepared in the microwave aboard a travelling motor home. Mom made it all seem like a great adventure.
Another move brought the family to Toronto in 1967 where Sue could be closer to her sister, Audrey. She volunteered with various non-profit organizations and also served on a number of boards, including the Shaw Festival. In 1975, Sue persuaded a good friend, Diane, that they should open an art gallery, and Hollander York Gallery was founded. She showed us the importance of balancing work and family.
Sue had a great appreciation for the written word. She relished her moments of solitude with a book or newspaper and also had a great talent for expressing herself on paper. When fax machines were invented, Sue saw this new technology as an opportunity soon all family members (including grandparents) were given fax machines and the Family Fax Network was born. And when Sue taught herself how to operate a Macintosh computer, all her faxes arrived neatly typed. When e-mail was the new rage, Sue took it up with passion and couldn't understand why everyone (including her husband!) did not have an e-mail address.
It was as a mother that Sue had the most profound impact. Communication with her two daughters and two sons was daily by phone, fax or e-mail. She was always happy to hear from us and was so wise about so many things, from relationship woes to disciplinary issues with children.
One can never forget Sue's loud, infectious laugh. She laughed at herself when she would tell the story of how her printer broke down and she purchased a new printer only to discover that she had forgotten to plug in the original computer. Human foibles, especially her own, delighted her and she was so quick to see the humour in any situation.
In July, 2001, Sue was diagnosed with ovarian cancer. Sue never hesitated to say to curious Friends "I am more than just a cancer patient." She knew the end was near at Christmas 2002 and kept this awareness private between herself and her best friend, Bill.
Lauren and Kelly are Sue's daughters.

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KIRKLAND o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-09-03 published
GOEL, Dr. Asha, (1940 - 2003)
Asha GOEL was a vibrant member of the many communities to which she belonged. She was a respected and accomplished obstetrician/gynecologist in Regina, Saskatchewan (1971-1987), Brampton, Ontario (2001- 2003), and Orangeville, Ontario (1987-2003) where she was chief of the Obstetrics Department. She was a passionate advocate for women's health issues, a devoted member of the Brampton Hindu Sabha temple, a caring and compassionate physician, and a steadfast friend. In addition to bringing some 10,000 infants into the world, she and her husband, Dr. Sadan Kumar GOEL, raised three children of their own -- Sanjay, Rashmi and Seema. More recent additions to her family are her sons-in-law Michael ALPER and Steve KIRKLAND, and her beloved grand_son, Aaron Rohan ALPER. She died tragically while abroad on August 23, 2003. The family invites Friends and loved ones to attend a memorial service to celebrate her life at the Garden Banquet and Convention Centre in Brampton, on Sunday, September 7th, 2003, at 3 p.m. The Garden Banquet and Convention Centre is located at 8 Clipper Court, on the southwest corner of Hwy. 410 and Steeles Avenue in Brampton. Detailed directions may be obtained by contacting the Centre at (905) 450-8000.

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KIRKPATRICK o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-06 published
MacLEAN, Anne R. (née PARKER)
Peacefully, on Wednesday, March 5, 2003, at The Houses of Providence, Toronto, in her 83rd year. Beloved wife of the late Michael Daniel MacLEAN. Beloved mother of Robert and Janet MacLEAN, and grandmother of David LEMIEUX. Dear sister of Betty KIRKPATRICK and sister-in-law of Eleanor MacLEAN and Isabel MacLEAN. Anne lived life fully and touched all of us deeply. A special thank you to all of her wonderful caregivers at The Houses of Providence. Friends may call on Thursday from 6-9 p.m. at the G.H. Hogle Funeral Home, 63 Mimico Avenue, Etobicoke. Funeral Mass at St. Leo's Catholic Church, 2777 Royal York Road, Etobicoke, on Friday at 10 a.m. Interment Mount Peace Cemetery.

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KIRKUP o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-05-12 published
KIRKUP, Professor Richard July 19, 1933 - May 9, 2003
Professor Richard KIRKUP died peacefully at home at the age of 69 with the ''Love of His Life'', Linda CAMERON now KIRKUP and his favorite baby sister, Wanda nursing him and by his side to the end. Many prayers sustained him plus special bedside prayers, caring and Christian love given with great gentleness and affection by international student, Donald, his tenant, and Catherine, his special nurse. His death was free of pain and filled with comfort and love and was indeed a gentle transition to a better place to be with God. Richard will be greatly missed by longtime friend, companion and wife, Linda Cameron KIRKUP, Richard's brother Donald KIRKUP, sister Wanda, cousin Diane, cousin Carolyn KIRKUP, his many relatives and Friends mourn his death. If you wish to donate in memory of his name, his favorite charities were the World Wild Life Foundation, Charities supporting animal welfare, the environment or those most vulnerable in our society. A memorial service will be held at a later date to be announced for Friends and family to share Richard's stories and to celebrate his life. In the care of the Gordon F. Tompkins Funeral Homes, Central Chapel (613)546-5454, gftompkins-central.ca

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KIRKWOOD o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-07-21 published
KUHN, Tillo E., Professor Emeritus of Economics, York University, B.Sc. L.S.E., PhD. McGill
Born November 1, 1919 in Munich, Bavaria, Germany, died July 18, 2003 in hospital in Gatineau, Quebec after a series of strokes. He leaves to mourn him his wife Naomi, sons Roland, Oliver and Christopher, daughter Nicola, daughters-in-law Susan and Tulimah, son-in-law Neil, and his grandchildren Alexander and Thomas KUHN, Sophia and William KUHN, and Holly and Josh JANNA. Tillo will be missed also by his niece Dagmar FORGET and nephew Hatto FISCHER, brothers-in-law David and John KIRKWOOD, and cousins in Germany and England, as well as many Friends, former colleagues and students. He was predeceased by his beloved sister Brigitte FISCHER and cousin ''like my brother'' Hatto KUHN. From 1949 to 1954 Tillo lived in England, where he was the first student from post-war Germany to enter the London School of Economics. In 1954 he emigrated to Canada to begin work in transportation economics in Montreal and then Ottawa. The summer of 1955 found him in a cottage ''up the Gatineau'' at Gleneagle, where he began a lifelong love affair with that area as well as with a cottage neighbour, Naomi, whom he married in 1956. After receiving Canadian citizenship in 1959, Tillo accepted an invitation to join the faculty of the University of California, Berkeley. Four years in Berkeley were the beginning of his twin careers of university teaching and international development assignments for the World Bank and other international agencies. In 1966 he became a member of the new Faculty of Administrative Studies at York University in Toronto, his employer until retirement in 1989. Tillo was proud to have worked in 13 different countries. Some of the longer and most exciting projects were in Honduras 1962, Dahomey (now Benin) 1967, Paraguay 1968, and Kenya 1970-72, where he was director of a Canadian International Development Agency team working with the Kenyan Ministry of Finance and Planning, coupled with a training program for Kenyans at York. His favourite country after Canada to live and work was Greece, where he spent 1964-65 in a research centre, 1980-82 working in the finance ministry under both a conservative and a Papandreou-led government, and 1985-87 teaching in the business school of the University of Athens. In 1989 Tillo retired to his house Tirconna at Gleneagle on the Gatineau River, the same site where Tillo and Naomi met in 1955. Cremation has taken place. Memorial service, burial of ashes and reception to celebrate Tillo's interesting life will follow in September in Wakefield, Quebec. Date to be announced later. Funeral arrangements c/o Hulse Playfair and McGarry, Wakefield.

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