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"KIN" 2003 Obituary


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KING o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-01-22 published
John OBIMWAIWAI-- CURRIE BAREFOOT
March 8, 1919 to January 14, 2003. He passed away peacefully on Tuesday at 10: 30 am at the Espanola General Hospital. Beloved husband of the late Elizabeth KING also predeceased by parents Bill BAREFOOT and Maggie KAY as well as all his brothers and sisters. Beloved father of Leon (friend Jennifer) of Whitefish Falls, Leslie (wife Marge) of Birch Island, Emily, Ashlie, Marilyn, all of Toronto, Margo (step daughter) of Orillia. Ex-wife Violet of Toronto. He will be sadly missed by grandchildren, nephews, nieces and many close Friends. He enjoyed his hobbies like fishing, hunting, and many other sports. Visitation was held on Wednesday until the funeral service on Friday, January 17, 2003 all at Birch Island Community Complex. Burial in Birch Island Cemetery, Arrangements in care of Island Funeral Home.

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KING o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-02-19 published
Karen Louise SHAW (née KING)
Passed away peacefully at Gore Bay, Ontario on February 16, 2003, age 59.
Loving wife of Robert D. SHAW for 33 years and mother of Dara (husband Richard BRACHMAN), Debbie (husband Kyle BRENTNELL), and Diana (fiancé Scott INGHAM).
Predeceased by parents Kenneth and Dorothy KING and brother Harold (wife Bonnie KING). Sister to Alan KING (Barbara), Betty Ann HOUDE (Garry) and Candace INNES (Eric.) Sister-in-law to Norman SHAW and Barbara BILLMAN (Arlo.) Aunt, friend, and role model to many. Karen possessed a passion for education working with Okanagan University College in Kelowna, BC (1996-98), Cambrian College (1982-1996), and Sudbury High School as a teacher (1967-72). She earned a Doctor of Philosophy in Higher, Adult and Lifelong Education from Michigan State University in 1997. Karen served the Sudbury community in many roles as: Councillor, Regional Municipality and City of Sudbury (1991-97), Governor, Laurentian University (1985-96), President, Sudbury Chamber of Commerce (1993-94), President, Sudbury Business and Professional Women's Club (1986-88), and Trustee, Sudbury Board of Education (1976-85).
Her family greatly appreciates the loving care provided by the staff at Manitoulin Lodge.
A memorial service was held on Thursday, February 20 in Sudbury. Karen's life will be celebrated with a memorial service at St. Francis of Assisi in Mindemoya later in the summer.

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KING o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-11-05 published
Barbara KING (née MADAHBEE)
In loving memory of Barbara KING (née MADAHBEE) who passed away Thursday morning, October 30, 2003 at her residence at the age of 73 years.
Beloved wife of Raymond George KING, predeceased. Will be sadly missed by her children, Susan KING and Will PATHY, Jane KING and Ken PASTO, Debbie KING and Bill HOMER, Patrick KING (wife Jean) and predeceased by son Kevin KING. Special grandmother of Desmond and Grant KING. Dear sister of Anne BREYER, Jean ANDREWS, Ivan MADAHBEE, Lillian BUCKNELL, Archie MADAHBEE, Cecilia BAYERS, Linda THIBODEAU, Patsy CORBIERE, Tootsie PANAMICK, Patrick MADAHBEE and predeceased by Veronica McGRAW, Lawrence MADAHBEE, Elizabeth KING, Eli MADAHBEE, Morris MADAHBEE and Doris BREWER. Rested at the Sucker Creek Community Hall on Sunday, November 1, 2003. Funeral Mass was held at St. Bernard's Church, Little Current on Monday, November 3, 2003. Cremation. Lougheed Funeral Home Sudbury.

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KING o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-05 published
Marion Isabel Patricia MacLEA (née ROBERTSON)
Peacefully on February 24, 2003 at Belmont House in her 91st year. Born in Toronto on July 1, 1912. Predeceased by her devoted husband, Wid, in December 1975. Much loved mother of Pat KING (Doug,) Linda THEODOROU (Nick) and Bob MacLEA. Survived by her beloved sister Ruby COWLING. Wonderful grandmother to Andrew, Edward, Peter, Tania, Malcolm (deceased), Michael and Jenna. She led an active and full life. There were annual trips to Greece and several to the Far East, England and New York to be with her family. She grew up in Riverdale and moved to the Beach as a young adult where she met Wid. A long time member of Kew Beach United Church Women's Group, lawn bowler at Balmy Beach and active social and community member. After a stroke in 1995 she was slowed down. She was alert and contented until a week before her death. Many thanks to the wonderful staff, volunteers and Friends at Belmont House. Friends will be received at Kew Beach United Church (Wineva and Queen Street) on Thursday, March 6, 2003 from 1: 00 p.m. until service time at 2: 00 p.m. A reception will be held in the church parlour following the service. In lieu of flowers, please send a donation to Belmont House, 55 Belmont Street, Toronto, Ontario M5R 1R1, or a charity of choice. Arrangements in the care of Sherrin Funeral Home (416-698-2861).

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KING o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-24 published
Sailor mom had Northern Magic
An early experience with skin cancer led her to contemplate her life and make the decision to set off from Ottawa on a four-year family voyage around the world
By Allison LAWLOR Monday, March 24, 2003 - Page R7
Diane STUEMER dared to dream big and in doing so she captured the country's imagination.
The Ottawa woman, who sailed around the world with her husband and three sons and captivated Canadians back home with her weekly newspaper reports from faraway places, has died of cancer. She was 43.
"She touched people, said her younger sister Linda MASLECHKO. "When you read her stories, you felt that you were part of her family. She was unabashedly human."
The family odyssey began on September 11, 1997, when Ms. STUEMER, her husband Herbert, and their three sons Michael, Jonathan and Christopher, all under the age of 12, left Ottawa in their 42-foot steel sailboat named Northern Magic and headed down the St. Lawrence River.
When they left, the sum of their sailing experience consisted of a handful of summer afternoons on the Ottawa River.
"Finally, we all wanted to leave, just to get it over with. So when every contingency had been thought of, prepared for and fretted over, when we were as ready as we ever would be, we set off. All we could do now was pray."
Over the next four years, they would visit 34 countries and travel 35,000 nautical miles. When they returned home, in the summer of 2001, 3,000 people were there to welcome them.
Throughout the trip, Ms. STUEMER wrote 218 weekly dispatches for The Ottawa Citizen, chronicling every aspect of their journey from their lost cat to seasickness to travelling through pirate waters along the coast of Somalia.
"It's been a long time since the cold grip of fear has clenched me in my gut, and I was not the only one on board to shiver beneath the touch of its icy fingers, Ms. STUEMER wrote, before heading into waters where there had been at least seven attacks on private yachts in the past 12 months, two of which involved gunfire.
Ms. STUEMER subsequently published a book about their adventures called The Voyage of the Northern Magic.
Before setting sail on their epic journey, Ms. STUEMER and her husband fantasized about travelling the world, but like a lot of people they considered putting it off until their retirement.
"In the hustle and bustle of living our lives, with the business and the home and the kids and everything else, the travel part of our ambitions just got forgotten, " she once said in a television interview.
But a brush with skin cancer in 1994 persuaded her to re-evaluate her life. She and her husband decided it was time to start following their dreams. Soon after, they sold their advertising business, rented out their Ottawa-area home, bought and renovated Northern Magic, a modest 37-year-old sailboat.
"She taught people that you have to find a way to make your own dream come true, said Diane KING, a close friend.
The STUEMERs began their journey by sailing down the eastern seaboard of North America, through the Panama Canal and across the Pacific Ocean, eventually reaching Australia. From there, they travelled to Indonesia, Thailand, Sri Lanka and across the Indian Ocean to Zanzibar. They sailed the Red Sea and up through the Mediterranean to Gibraltar, from where they set out across the North Atlantic homeward bound.
At times they travelled for weeks without seeing land. The music of Canadian folksinger Michael MITCHELL frequently echoed through Northern Magic, calming frayed nerves during stormy weather or reminding them of home as they sailed into a new port.
Back home in Canada, Mr. MITCHELL read about their trip. "I almost felt I was on the journey with them, " he said.
The family encountered many close calls on their voyage. At one point, the family boat was docked in Yemen only a few hundred metres away from where suicide bombers blew a gaping hole in the U.S.S. Cole.
The trip was not just one of adventure. Along the way they met remarkable people, many of whom were living in poverty. Touched by these people, the family set out to make a difference. Ms. STUEMER's work, along with her popular columns, has managed to raise more than $50,000 so far for humanitarian causes in Africa and Southeast Asia.
The money was raised to help pay for student tuitions and school supplies in Kenya and to help protect orangutans in the jungles of Borneo.
Diane STUEMER was born on June 23, 1959, in Sarnia, Ontario Not long after, her family moved to Edmonton. From there they moved to Calgary, where she spent her formative years. As a teenager, Ms. STUEMER was working at the Calgary Stampede when she met a young German man who would later become her husband. Born in Berlin, Herbert STUEMER came to Canada with the intention of travelling and working throughout North America. But after meeting Diane, he decided to stay put in Calgary. The couple married there in 1981.
From Calgary the couple went to Ottawa, where Ms. STUEMER studied journalism at Carleton University. After earning her degree, she went to work for the federal government in various positions, including briefing the Environment Minister for Question Period.
In 1988, she quit her government job and bought a faltering advertising company. She turned it around to become a successful business. She also wrote a biography of her grandfather, William HAWRELAK, a former mayor of Edmonton, and helped her father, Frank KING, write up his memories of his experience organizing the 1988 Calgary Winter Olympics.
"Whenever she put her mind to something, she did it intensely, Ms. MASLECHKO said.
During her life, Ms. STUEMER followed 11 basic rules. "Live your life with passion. Dare to dream big dreams, " was rule No. 1.
"Begin immediately, even if you are not ready, " rule No. 4 states.
Last Boxing Day, Ms. STUEMER became ill, and suffered from persistent headaches. But it was not until February 6 that the malignant melanoma that took her life was discovered. In the last month of her life, she was surrounded in the hospital by family and Friends, whom she kept laughing with her wonderful sense of humour, said her sister.
"She said: 'I got a wake-up call and thank goodness I listened. I changed my life. I fulfilled who I was meant to be', " her sister Ms. MASLECHKO recalled. "She made the most of it and that's a lesson to all of us."
Ms. STUEMER was recently presented with the Queen's Golden Jubilee Medal. The Medal is given to Canadians "who have made a significant contribution to their fellow citizens, their community or to Canada."
The City of Ottawa also has plans to name a park and beach area on the north shore of Petrie Island Stuemer Park, in honour of Ms. STUEMER. The Ottawa River island, close to where the STUEMERs live, is the place from which they departed on their journey and returned to four years later.
News of her death attracted a flood of messages to the family Web site (http: //www.northernmagic.com). Some admirers had followed Ms. STUEMER's exploits for years. Long-time reader Carol LAVIOLETTE wrote: "I followed your adventure from the very start; I laughed and cried through all of the stories in the Citizen. I prayed for your safe return and cried tears of joy when the five of you returned to Canada.
"I am a mother of three myself and could not imagine going on that kind of adventure, I don't have the strength of character to undertake something of such magnitude. But I lived it through your tales. Thank you and God bless you."
Ms. STUEMER died in an Ottawa hospital on March 15. She leaves her husband Herbert and their three sons Michael, 16, Jonathan, 14, and Christopher, 11, her mother and father, sister and two brothers.
"Diane was like a little girl who, in all her innocence, really truly believed she could change the world, Ms. KING wrote in a eulogy. "Who would dare tell her that she couldn't?"

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KING o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-05-23 published
Died This Day -- William Richard MOTHERWELL, 1943
Friday, May 23, 2003 - Page R9
Agrarian, politician born at Perth, Canada West, on January 6, 1860; early homesteader in Saskatchewan; in 1901, co-founded Territorial Grain Growers' Association to legislate against monopolistic practices of elevator companies and Canadian Pacific Railway in 1905, appointed Saskatchewan's first minister of agriculture tireless advocate of modern farming techniques and agrarian education in 1918, resigned in opposition to provincial support of conscription from 1921 to 1930, served twice as federal minister of agriculture under Mackenzie KING; died in Regina.

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KING o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-05-26 published
WEDLOCK, Walter Bertram
We announce the sudden passing of Walter Bertram WEDLOCK of Scarborough at the age of 72 years. Born at London, Ontario, Walter moved to Toronto in 1949. He was the son of Walter WEDLOCK (died 1980) and Helen WEDLOCK (died 1986.) Walter will be sadly missed and fondly remembered by his life-long Friends: Marion FLEMING/FLEMMING of Manotick and Elizabeth FLEMING/FLEMMING of Mississauga and her children Nancy CRAWFORD of Acton and Derek FLEMING/FLEMMING of Mississauga. A funeral service in commemoration of Walter's life will be held in St. George's Anglican Church, 3765 St. Clair Ave. E., on Wednesday, May 28, 2003 at 1 p.m. with the Reverend Gord KING officiating. Walter was interred with his parents in Resthaven Memorial Gardens. Arrangements entrusted to McDougall and Brown Funeral Home.

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KING o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-06-06 published
Died This Day -- Lord Byng of Vimy, 1935
Friday, June 6, 2003 - Page R11
British Army officer and aristocrat born Julian Hedworth GEORGE on September 11, 1862, at Wrotham Park, England; May, 1916, appointed to command Canadian Corps; April, 1917, directed attack on Vimy Ridge; promoted to command British 3rd Army; April, 1921, named Governor-General of Canada; in June, 1926, refused request for dissolution of Parliament sought by Prime Minister Mackenzie KING; led to King-Byng Affair; departed from Canada under a shadow, even though constitutionally correct; 1928-31, named chief commissioner of London Metropolitan Police.

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KING o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-08-18 published
SHEPBERD, Maryan (née KING)
Born Halifax, Nova Scotia 1935 died Mullumbimby, New South Wales, Australia 2003. Predeceased by parents Marjorie and Martin KING of Halifax and by brothers Stanley (Captain R.C.N.) of Ottawa and Andrew (Major (Retired) R.C.R.). Maryan graduated from Compton School, Quebec and Acadia University. She spent time in England and emigrated to Australia with her husband John in 1969. Funeral to be held at Saint Martin's Anglican Church, Mullumbimby, 21st August, 2003.

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KING o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-11-12 published
James Alexander GIBSON
By David FARR, Wednesday, November 12, 2003 - Page A30
Secretary to a prime minister, teacher, university builder, scholar. Born January 29, 1912, in Ottawa. Died October 23 in Ottawa, of natural causes, aged 91.
The sudden death of James Alexander GIBSON has taken from the scene a man who served a great prime minister during the crowning moments of his career. James GIBSON was the last survivor of the small group of men and women who toiled at the side of Mackenzie KING throughout the Second World War.
GIBSON joined KING's personal staff in 1938, seconded from the Department of External Affairs to Laurier House, KING's home and office. Prime Minister KING was also Secretary of State for External Affairs and GIBSON's job was to liaise with the department. The lonely prime minister, totally dedicated as he was to his office and to the place he was forging in Canadian history, revealed himself to be a severe taskmaster. GIBSON had been married only a few months after he started work at Laurier House but KING paid little attention to the family circumstances of his staff. His absorption in his work was almost total, even including nights, weekends and holidays.
GIBSON met these demands with an even temper and a willingness to subordinate his time to that of his master. It cannot have been an easy role but GIBSON rarely showed impatience. Shortly after he joined Laurier House, GIBSON was plunged into the mass of arrangements connected with the Canadian visit of King George Virgin Islands and Queen Elizabeth in 1939. Later, during the Second World War and after, he travelled with KING to conferences in Quebec City, San Francisco, London and Paris.
GIBSON was aided immensely, through an extraordinarily crowded life, by a phenomenal memory. He could tell you something about each of more than 50 trips, by sea and air, that he had made across the Atlantic. He could recall when he had read a book or met a person; when someone had held office, diplomatic or political or when someone had died. One of his most striking feats of memory, expressed casually, was to point out to the Parks Canada staff at Laurier House, when he revisited his old quarters after 30 years' absence, that they had moved many of KING's pictures! When he taught at Carleton University after leaving External Affairs in 1947, his fund of knowledge on Canada's constitution and politics amazed his students. His prodigious memory remained with him, clear and accurate, to the last.
Unfortunately James GIBSON never wrote the "big book" that was in him on his life with Mackenzie KING. He completed a number of short articles on war-time incidents in KING's time in office which revealed the prime minister's manner of dealing with matters of state. His recollections are also to be found in taped interviews. Sadly his conversations are no more for, in a city of notable raconteurs, he was superb.
His historical interests were mostly directed toward the office of governor-general, especially to those governors-general around the time of Confederation. His Oxford thesis was a study of Sir Edmund Head, whose wife painted the water colours that persuaded Queen Victoria to settle Canada's capital in a remote lumber village. His knowledge of the careers of our governors-general won him the Jules and Gabrielle Leger Fellowship in 1980, a fully merited honour.
Behind GIBSON's formidable knowledge and long experience dwelt a gentle soul, a kindly and considerate man who remembered families and occasions without fail. He was always a delight to be with, a companion who gave more than you were ever able to return. Vigorous to the end, his death leaves a sad emptiness in many lives.
David FARR is a friend of James GIBSON.

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KING o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-11-26 published
A scholar and a gentle man
'Fine example of a great Canadian' who founded Ontario's Brock University was once private secretary to prime minister Mackenzie KING
By Ron CSILLAG, Special to The Globe and Mail Wednesday, November 26, 2003 - Page R9
In an almost Zen-like fashion, James GIBSON knew the value of not acting. In the late 1960s, when a group of student radicals seized part of Brock University, hoping to be dragged away kicking and screaming, Dr. GIBSON, who had helped found the institution a few years earlier, reacted in a way no other university president did when faced with the same problem: He did nothing. The protesters, he reasoned, may have had legitimate grievances, but their unseemly actions offended his firm sense of propriety. In time, the students simply went away.
It was an effective, though uncharacteristic, action for a man who embodied Brock's Latin motto: "Surgite," freely translated as "push on." That he did, through some 65 rich years of advancing higher education and in public service, most notably as a private secretary to former prime minister Mackenzie KING, whose penchant for soothsaying and assorted eccentricities Dr. GIBSON kept mainly to himself until later in life.
Just five days before his death in Ottawa on October 23 at the age of 91, Dr. GIBSON was doing what he loved: Watching a new group of graduates receive their diplomas at the fall convocation of Brock University in St. Catharines, Ontario, the school he had launched as founding president in 1963.
At a recent memorial service at Brock, David ATKINSON, the university's president and vice-chancellor, recalled a man whose attributes a strong moral fibre, clarity of thought and a general uprightness, all tempered by a warm and gentle touch -- harkened to a quaint, bygone era. "It's unlikely we will meet anyone like him again," Dr. ATKINSON said.
In the House of Commons on October 27, Dr. GIBSON was praised by St. Catharines Liberal member of parliament Walt LASTEWKA as "a fine example of a great Canadian."
Dr. GIBSON, whose knowledge of Canadian history and government were legend, was in the news this past summer as the oldest of over 1,000 Rhodes Scholars who flew to England for a five-day bash honouring the centenary of the trust. With his brother William, also a Rhodes Scholar, Dr. GIBSON dedicated a re-leaded stained-glass window at the chapel of Oxford's New College.
A normally discreet man, he had sharp words for former prime minister Brian MULRONEY, not an Oxford graduate, who surprised guests at the alumni dinner -- and raised a few eyebrows -- when he took a seat on the podium alongside Oxonians Bill CLINTON and Tony BLAIR, and guest Nelson MANDELA. Many alumni, Dr. GIBSON included, felt that Mr. MULRONEY, who had been invited by The Independent newspaper chain, had no business being there. Though upset, Dr. GIBSON retained his dignity, saying simply, "I was offended."
James Alexander GIBSON was born in Ottawa, in 1912, to Canadian-born parents of Irish-Scottish stock with strong Methodist and Quaker leanings. Raised in Victoria, he graduated with a B.A. in history from the University of British Columbia at age 18. Less than a year later, he was one of the youngest boys at Oxford.
"That was the real dividing line in my life," he told The Globe and Mail last July. "The economic depression was beginning to take over and some of the graduates in my year at University of British Columbia ended up digging ditches, but I had a guaranteed income for three years."
The annual stipend was only £400 but it enabled Dr. GIBSON to live comfortably and travel to the rest of Europe when he wasn't studying modern history, debating in the Oxford Union Society and keeping wicket for the New College cricket squad, the Nomads.
Back in Ottawa and armed with a doctorate in history, he joined the Department of External Affairs. On his second day on the job, he was whisked to the prime minister's office for a six-month secondment that lasted nine years. Mr. KING, who was also External Affairs minister, blocked Dr. GIBSON's promotions to postings abroad three times because "he told me I stopped him getting into trouble."
The prime minister was a notorious taskmaster, calling on his assistant to work most evenings and weekends to draft letters and speeches. Throughout, "Dad never complained about anything," said his daughter Julia MATTHEWS. " But as he got older, he loosened up a little."
According to his daughter, he came to describe the famously erratic leader as "a very grumpy man and a very lonely man, insensitive, and quite damaging to work for."
Ultimately, it occurred to the clan that perhaps the unmarried prime minister was simply jealous of Dr. GIBSON's status as a beloved family man and father of three children. "Whenever we went on a family holiday, Dad always got called back," remembered Ms. MATTHEWS.
But a high point came in the spring of 1945, when Dr. GIBSON accompanied Mr. KING and 380 other delegates to San Francisco and the founding of the United Nations. During the historic two-month conference, Dr. GIBSON got personal glimpses of such leaders as the Soviet Union's Andrei GROMYKO and Britain's Anthony EDEN, but the task at hand, he later recalled, was to keep the Canadian prime minister "on the rails."
Fearing he would never advance in the public service, Dr. GIBSON resigned in 1947 and took a teaching post at Ottawa's Carleton University, where he later served as the first dean of arts and science and deputy to the president. By the early 1960s, he was courted by a group of community leaders in the Niagara peninsula to establish Brock University. When he began as founding president, the school had seven faculty (known as "the magnificent seven"), 29 students and a "library" consisting of a shelf of books. Today, it boasts more than 15,000 students and 47,000 alumni.
His first order of business at Brock was the creation of a library.
Now housed in the campus's Schmon Tower, it has become something of a landmark on the Niagara Escarpment. Dr. GIBSON, fondly known by faculty as "James A.," remained as Brock's president until 1974. He was named to the Order of Canada in 1992, and the library was named after him in 1996.
He was also a leading figure in the Unitarian faith, serving for a time as chaplain of the Unitarian Congregation of Niagara.
Asked what dinner-table conversation was like at home, Ms. MATTHEWS sighed good-naturedly. "Oh, God. There was a lot of current events. He had all the answers. He was always lecturing, but he could be really charming." Even after his vision started to fail, he travelled, read and wrote. "He never felt old."
After moving from his beloved St. Catharines to an Ottawa retirement home, Dr. GIBSON lectured residents on "governors-general I have known."
Dr. GIBSON was predeceased by his wife of 57 years, Caroline (née STEIN,) and leaves three children, seven grandchildren, two great-grandchildren, his brother, and a sister, Isobel SEARLS.
His final days were summed up poetically by Josephine MEEKER, a former professor at Brock. After attending the university's convocation last month, Dr. GIBSON "went for a long walk, returned to his residence, went into the lounge area, took off his coat and folded it up, put it on the back of his chair, sat down, folded his hands in his lap, closed his eyes, and died."

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KING o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-02 published
Died This Day -- Sir Joseph POPE, 1926
Tuesday, December 2, 2003 - Page R5
Federal civil servant born at Charlottetown on August 16, 1854 1878, arrived in Ottawa as private secretary to uncle, Prince Edward Island premier James Colledge POPE; later served Sir John A. MacDONALD; 1896, became under-secretary of state for foreign affairs; persuaded LAURIER government to set up permanent department 1909, named first permanent head of External Affairs; helped resolve such significant issues as Alaska boundary dispute; adviser to Mackenzie KING.

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KING o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-10 published
FULTON quietly kept the Canadian Football League in running order
By Stephen BRUNT, Wednesday, December 10, 2003 - Page S8
Less than a month back, during Grey Cup week, Greg FULTON picked up his phone to answer a few questions from a reporter.
Frail health had kept him from making the trip to Regina, but in conversation he was sharp as a tack and again proved himself to be a one-man encyclopedia of Canadian football history.
Paul MARTIN, the prime minister to be, was going to make a much publicized pregame appearance at Taylor Field, fresh from the Liberal leadership convention.
Aside from Pierre TRUDEAU, FULTON was asked, did he remember any other prime minister taking the time to attend the Grey Cup? "Well," he said, "I don't remember Mackenzie KING being there. Or Louis SSAINTURENT."
Of course, he knew because he was there. It seemed he was always there -- a player beginning in Winnipeg in 1939, a statistician and treasurer for the Calgary Stampeders from 1950 to 1966, a fixture in the Canadian Football League office from 1967 on, and, finally in his last job, the Canadian Football League's honorary secretary and official historian, a title surely unique in all of pro sports.
The National Football League still has a few owners with connections to the game's early days, and in hockey and baseball there are at least a handful of sportswriting elders who still remember when. But only the Canadian Football League actually employed someone who had an inside view extending back more than 60 years.
Considering how tumultuous some of those seasons have been and considering the game's highs and lows and the cast of strange and wonderful characters who came and went, what a tale FULTON could tell.
He was 84 when he died on Monday, and with him, sadly, is lost much of the anecdotal story of the league. (Commissioner Tom WRIGHT, who during his relatively short term on the job had come to appreciate FULTON's special role, planned to have FULTON's memories committed to tape and transcribed. Sadly, that didn't happen before FULTON fell ill.)
FULTON's tenure with the league office was perhaps the only significant legacy of Keith DAVEY's 54-day reign as commissioner in 1967. Davey lured FULTON to Toronto from Calgary to act as the league's treasurer. When Jake GAUDAUR took over from DAVEY, he decided to keep FULTON on.
"It would be the most important decision I would make," GAUDAUR says now, which, given the events of his 16 years in office, is quite a statement. Every subsequent commissioner -- and there have been a bunch -- endorsed and echoed that original decision.
Not that anyone on the outside would really understand. "All of those beneficial things he did for the league were all out of public view," GAUDAUR said. "He never received any sort of media credit, nor did he want any. Clearly, it was a labour of love for him. That's kind of corny to say that, but I really believe it was."
In those early days, the league was a two-man, two-secretary operation. FULTON, an accountant by profession, kept the books, kept an eye on club finances and kept the minutes during league meetings -- all during a period when the game grew into a multimillion-dollar sports business. He was also charged with producing the schedule every year, a trickier proposition than it might seem, given the uneven number of teams, the east-west split and the importance of certain dates in certain places.
At one point, GAUDAUR remembers, they turned the task over to a computer. And then, after the computer coughed out its work, they handed it to FULTON, who fixed it. "He had what I consider to be a computer mind," GAUDAUR said. "It was an incredible mind."
The Canadian Football League took a turn for the worse after GAUDAUR left the post. Commissioners came and went, the league at times teetered on the brink of insolvency, the disastrous U.S. expansion played itself out and the owners at times resembled a bag of mixed nuts.
But there was always FULTON, quietly keeping things in running order, breaking the tension with his wry, quiet sense of humour, loyal first and foremost to the game he loved.
"He was a remarkable person," GAUDAUR said. "It really was a pleasure to be around the guy."
Several generations of those who spent time in the Canadian Football League orbit share those sentiments and mourn the loss.

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KING o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-17 published
Life was good for MAGNUSON
By Eric DUHATSCHEK, With a report from Allan MAKI Wednesday, December 17, 2003 - Page S1
It was one of those "catching up with" features newspapers run every so often. Last January, the Chicago Sun-Times profiled Keith MAGNUSON, one of the most popular players ever to pull on a Chicago Blackhawks sweater.
To the thousands who used to pack the old Chicago Stadium, MAGNUSON's ever-lasting appeal came from a rough-and-tumble playing style that produced a cracked cheekbone, three knee injuries requiring surgery, a torn Achilles' tendon, two broken ankles, a dislocated elbow, three broken jaws, a broken vertebra, a broken wrist, a dislocated shoulder, three missing teeth and more than 400 stitches.
MAGNUSON, after reflecting on his career, his hobbies and all the aches and pains that resulted from a 10-year National Hockey League career, observed: "Otherwise, I feel great. Cindy [his wife] and I are real proud of our kids."
"Life is good," MAGNUSON concluded.
Life for MAGNUSON ended at the age of 56 in a fatal automobile accident on Monday afternoon as he was returning home from a funeral for National Hockey League alumni association chairman Keith McCREARY, who died last week of cancer. MAGNUSON was the passenger in a car driven by former National Hockey League player Rob RAMAGE, the vice-chairman of the alumni association.
MAGNUSON played 589 National Hockey League games for the Blackhawks, and on his retirement in October of 1979, he joined the team's coaching staff, as an assistant to Eddie JOHNSTON. JOHNSTON, now the Pittsburgh Penguins' assistant general manager, remembered MAGNUSON yesterday as "the ultimate competitor. I mean, when Keith MAGNUSON put on the skates on, you didn't just get 100 per cent, you got 110 per cent every night. He just played with so much passion, it was unreal."
The Blackhawks made it to the Stanley Cup final twice in MAGNUSON's career, in 1971 and 1973, losing both times to the Montreal Canadiens. It was the heyday of hockey in Chicago. The Blackhawks had Dennis and Bobby HULL, the legendary Stan MIKITA and Tony ESPOSITO, a future Hall Of Fame member, in goal. MAGNUSON's job was to protect ESPOSITO, and he did it with a passion that JOHNSTON said was contagious in the Blackhawks' dressing room.
"What he always did very, very well was set the tone early in the game. He let the opposition know that when you dropped the puck in the game, "This was what you were going to see, guys, for 60 minutes.' "
MAGNUSON, who most recently was the director of sales for Coca-Cola Enterprises, grew up in Saskatoon as an all-round athlete. He was a boyhood chum of former National Hockey League coach Dave KING. The two attended Churchill elementary school and used to play 1-on-1 hockey: KING as a forward and MAGNUSON as a defenceman.
Eventually, MAGNUSON and four other teenagers from Saskatoon earned scholarships at the University of Denver and helped the Pioneers win two National Collegiate Athletic Association championships. MAGNUSON and Tim GOULD played every sport together and were also teamed as defence partners.
"We never missed a shift," said GOULD, whose wife, a nurse in Calgary, woke him early yesterday to inform him of MAGNUSON's death. "He was the greatest guy and a good friend."
GOULD said he and MAGNUSON used to dream up ways to get MAGNUSON to hockey, football and baseball games on Sunday.
MAGNUSON's parents were Baptists and considered the Sabbath a day of rest. It became GOULD's job to sneak into the MAGNUSON home while they were at church and take Keith's equipment to the rink or the diamond.
"Of course, if we scored a goal or a run, our names would be mentioned in the newspaper the next day," GOULD said. "But we thought we were keeping it secret."
GOULD said MAGNUSON was best known among his Friends for having a poor memory. Once in Saskatoon, MAGNUSON drove his dad's car to the rink for a Blades game, only to drive home with a teammate, the two of them completely immersed in the game they had just played.
The next morning, MAGNUSON's father asked where the car was. "Keith had to run back to the rink to get it," said Dale ZEMAN, another of MAGNUSON's former junior and college teammates. "There was also the night Keith and I went bowling when we were freshmen at Denver. We came out and couldn't find the car. It had rolled backwards three blocks because Keith forgot to put it in park."
GOULD said: "He was awful forgetful. We're having a reunion in June [for Denver University hockey] and we had a card printed up, and Keith's quote on it was: 'I'm going to be there -- and Cliff [KOROLL] is going to remind me.' The memories, that's what get you through this."
MAGNUSON is survived by his wife, his daughter, Molly, and his son, Kevin, a former University of Michigan defenceman who had a tryout with the Blackhawks. Recently, after a short playing career in the East Coast Hockey League, Kevin had gone back to school for his law degree, JOHNSTON said.
"To have something like this happen, this close to the holidays, the timing couldn't be worse. It's never good, but geez, here he is, going up there for a funeral for Keith McCREARY and then to have something like this happen.
"God, it's awful," he said. "We'll miss him. He was such a big part of the community in Chicago, an icon. Everybody knew Keith MAGNUSON. It's an awful tragedy."
San Jose Sharks general manager Doug WILSON, another of MAGNUSON's close Friends, was badly shaken by his former teammate's death. WILSON said he thought of MAGNUSON as something of a father figure. "Keith has had a profound influence on my life." Really, all I can say is, all my thoughts and prayers are with Cindy and the kids right now."
Jim DEMARIA, the Blackhawks executive director of communications, worked closely with MAGNUSON in his role as the founder and president of the Chicago alumni association.
"Any time you needed something, you could call Maggy," DEMARIA said. "He was the first guy in line to help any kind of charity you had. I mean, he was just that kind of person. And when the team wasn't doing real well, he was down in the room, talking to the coaches, telling the players, 'keep your chin up, keep working, things will turn around.' He was a real positive guy."

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KINGSMILL o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-04-04 published
DEVLIN, Major Edward Gordon
Died suddenly on April 2, 2003. A former student of the Royal Conservatory of Music, distinguished World War 2 veteran, avid concert goer and antique collector. Beloved brother of Betty JARVIS, the late Dorothy BAGSHAW and the late John DEVLIN. Dear Uncle of Bill BAGSHAW, Bettyann WARD, Carolyn MacLEOD, John KINGSMILL, Julie, Jane and Lesley DEVLIN and predeceased by his niece Gillian KINGSMILL. Devoted Great Uncle of Joshua, CONNOR and Caitlin KINGSMILL, Laura THORNBERRY, John WARD and Susan ENGLAND, Cameron and Kaylie MacLEOD and Ellie, Kate and Alex POMERANT. The family would like to thank the caring staff at The Briton House. Friends may visit on Saturday, April 5th from 11: 00 a.m. to 12:45 p.m. at Morley Bedford Funeral Home at 159 Eglinton Avenue West (2 stoplights west of Yonge St.), Toronto, following which a private family service will be held. In lieu of flowers, donations to the Toronto Humane Society or a charity of your choice would be appreciated.

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KINGSTON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-05 published
ORR, Edith Hilda
On Sunday, March 2, 2003, at St. Catharines General Hospital, Edith ORR, in her 80th year. Beloved wife of Dr. William J. ORR for 58 years. Daughter of the late Archbishop and Mrs. George Frederick KINGSTON, former Primate of the Anglican Church of Canada. Loving mother of James (Sally), William (Manon), Donald and Robert (Judith), loving grandmother of James, Sarah, Kate, Heather, Graham, David and Anne. Born in Nova Scotia, graduate of Bishop Strachan School and Trinity College, University of Toronto. Will be remembered for her active contribution to the Niagara community. Cremation has taken place. Family will receive Friends at George Darte Funeral Chapel, 585 Carlton Street, St. Catharines, on Wednesday from 7-9 p.m. Memorial Service to celebrate her life will be held at St. George's Anglican Church, 83 Church Street, St. Catharines, Ontario, L2R 3C7, on Thursday at 2 p.m. If desired, family would appreciate donations to Dr. William J. Orr Fund of the Niagara Peninsula Children's Centre, 567 Glenridge Avenue, St. Catharines, Ontario, L2T 4C2 or St. George's Anglican Church.

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KINGSTONE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-02-12 published
KEARNS, Thomas Joseph
Tom died peacefully at North York General Hospital on February 9, 2003, following a brief illness, in his 96th year. Beloved husband of Edith KEARNS, and the late Anne KEARNS (1979.) Tom will be greatly missed by his son Dr. Terrence KEARNS (Linda) and his daughter Colleen DODDS, and Edith's children Bob McFARLAND (Pat,) and Jayne CHALLONER (Jim.) He leaves behind six grandchildren Glen KEARNS (Shelly), Chris KEARNS (Nancy), Tim KEARNS (Kim), Darlene KINGSTONE (Brian), Denise DODDS (Wayne), Catherine DODDS (Lee), and seven great-grandchildren. The family extends thanks to Dr. RUMBLE, Dr. SOMMERFIELD, and the excellent nursing staff at North York General Hospital. Friends may call at the Trull 'North Toronto' Funeral Home and Cremation Centre, 2704 Yonge Street (5 blocks south of Lawrence), on Wednesday from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. A Mass of Christian Burial will be celebrated at Blessed Sacrament Church (Yonge Street south of Lawrence), on Thursday morning February 13, 2003 at 10 o'clock. Interment Holy Cross Cemetery. Donations to the charity of your choice would be appreciated.

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KINNA o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-08-20 published
MacDONALD, Catherine Mildred (née JOHNSON)
Died peacefully at home, on August 19, 2003, in her 87th year, surrounded by those she loved. Daughter of the late Michael and Catherine JOHNSON. Cherished wife and constant companion of Martin for over 61 years. Devoted mother of Stephen, David and Jody, Bob and Moira, Tom and Lise Anne, Andrew and Ellen, and Paul. Loving grandma of Kaeli, Liane, Michael, Mark, Colin, Kristen, Brendan, Katie, Andrew, Joana and Matthew. Much loved sister of Geraldine, Sister Gertrude, Congregation of Notre Dame, Father Joseph, S.J., and Theresa, the late Ellen, Bernard, George, Gerald, John and Howard. Special sister-in-law of Margaret KINNA. Family and Friends may call on Thursday, August 21, 2003 from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. at the R.S. Kane Funeral Home (6150 Yonge Street, at Goulding, south of Steeles). A Mass of Christian Burial will be held at 11 a.m. on Friday, August 22, 2003 at St. Gabriel's Roman Catholic Church, 650 Sheppard Avenue East, Toronto, followed by burial at Holy Cross Cemetery, Thornhill. Special thanks to Dr. Anne PYPER, Virginia CLARK- WEIR, R.N., and friend Andrea WARNICK, R.N., for their extraordinary care and kindness. In lieu of flowers, donations to North York General Hospital Foundation, Attn. Freeman Centre for Palliative Care (4001 Leslie Street, Toronto, Ontario M2K 1E1) would be most appreciated. Millie/mom/ grandma was an extraordinary woman who touched all who knew her. She will be deeply missed.
''Deo gratis''

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KINNEAR o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-27 published
KERNOHAN, Kathryn Margaret (née KINNEAR)
Born December 29, 1911 died December 24, 2003 in Toronto, her birthplace. Beloved wife of the late Gordon E. KERNOHAN. Predeceased by her parents Thomas H. and Margaret G. KINNEAR (née NASMITH) and her brother T. Clark KINNEAR. Much loved and most loving mother of Susan SCACE (Arthur,) Kathy and Patrick KINNEAR (Ginny.) Adored ''Gammi'' of Jennifer and Patrick, Gordon and Cayleigh, and Sarah and Maggie. Special Grammi to Matthew, Jonathan and Adam. Cherished Auntie Kay to Bill KERNOHAN, the late Dodie PHILLIPS Tom, Bob and Bill KINNEAR and Margo HYDE. A heartfelt thank you to all the caregivers at Belmont House over the last ten years. A memorial service will be held on Monday, January 12, 2004 at 11 o'clock at Timothy Eaton Memorial Church. A reception will follow. If desired, donations may be made to Timothy Eaton Memorial Church, 230 St. Clair Avenue West, Toronto M4V 1R5, or to a charity of your choice.

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KINNEAR o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-30 published
KERNOHAN, Kathryn Margaret (née KINNEAR)
Born December 29, 1911 died December 24, 2003 in Toronto, her birthplace. Beloved wife of the late Gordon E. KERNOHAN. Predeceased by her parents Thomas H. and Margaret G. KINNEAR (née NASMITH) and her brother T. Clark KINNEAR. Much loved and most loving mother of Susan SCACE (Arthur), Kathy and Patrick (Ginny). Adored ''Gammie'' of Jennifer and Patrick, Gordon and Cayleigh, and Sarah and Maggie. Special Gammie to Matthew, Jonathan and Adam. Cherished Auntie Kay to Bill KERNOHAN, the late Dodie PHILLIPS Tom, Bob and Bill KINNEAR and Margo HYDE. A heartfelt thank you to all the caregivers at Belmont House over the last ten years. A memorial service will be held on Monday, January 12, 2004 at 11 o'clock at Timothy Eaton Memorial Church. A reception will follow.

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KINOSHAMEG o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-08-13 published
Phillip Howard DEBASSIGE
In loving memory of Phillip Howard DEBASSIGE, February 5, 1947 to August 9, 2003. "Lover of Horses" Phillip DEBASSIGE, a resident of M'Chigeeng First Nation, began his spiritual journey through the western door, on Saturday, August 9, 2003 at the age of 56 years. He was born in Mindemoya, son of Vincent DEBASSIGE and the late Margaret (MIGWANS) DEBASSIGE.
Phillip worked in M'Chigeeng teaching computers at Kenjgewin Teg, a member of the Economic Development Committee and worked with the Union of Ontario Indians as well as Metis Nation of Ontario. He also enjoyed band politics especially the First Nation Governance Act. Phillip enjoyed playing the trumpet, playing lotteries especially Keno and horse racing. He was a great community worker as he helped many work in their garden, visited elders, enjoyed his time at the maple sugar camp and helped others with house construction and renovations. This familiar sight walking in the neighbourhood or on his way to Gus's store to play his numbers, will be greatly missed by all who knew him.
Loving father of Corena RYAN and husband Justin, Ladeanne DEBASSIGE and Nathan MIGWANS. Loved Mishomis of Justice and Reign RYAN. Survived by his former wife Giovanna. Dear brother of Ina PANAMICK, Alfred DEBASSIGE (wife Gladys), Marjorie WEBKAMIGAD, Greg DEBASSIGE (friend Bonnie,) Norma CORBIERE (friend Charlie,) Lyla KINOSHAMEG (husband Ray,) Nicolas DEBASSIGE (Alice,) Patrick DEBASSIGE, Joanne DEBASSIGE (Amadeo), Stanley DEBASSIGE (wife Donna) and Doris DEBASSIGE (friend Ronnie.) Also survived by many nieces and nephews. Friends called at the home of Alfred DEBASSIGE Monday and Tuesday. The funeral mass will be celebrated at Immaculate Conception Church, M'Chigeeng on Wednesday, August 13, 2003 at 11: 00 a.m. with Father Robert FOLIOT as celebrant. Interment in M'Chigeeng Cemetery. Culgin Funeral Home

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KINSEY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-09-09 published
PRYCE, Maurice Henry Lecorney
Maurice Henry Lecorney PRYCE died at Vancouver, British Columbia, aged 90. He was a theoretical physicist with very broad interests. Following a spectacular early career at Cambridge, Oxford, and Bristol, he spent the second half of his life in the United States and Canada. Born in Croydon, England, on the 24th of January, 1913, he spent part of his childhood with his French mother in France where he learned to speak French 'like a Normandy peasant'. He was always encouraging to his two younger brothers, and fond of risky experiments such as using a magneto to fire a small cannon loaded with home-made gunpowder. Educated at the Royal Grammar School in Guildford he entered Trinity College, Cambridge, in 1930, graduating in 1933 and continuing to do research there initially with Sir Ralph Fowler and subsequently with the Nobel laureate Max Born. He spent two years as a Commonwealth Fund Fellow at Princeton University in 1935-7 before returning to Cambridge as a Fellow of Trinity College. During this period in Cambridge he made outstanding contributions to the so-called ''New Field Theory'' proposed by Born and Infeld. He also wrote an incisive paper demolishing the then fashionable idea that light quanta might consist of pairs of neutrinos. Paul Dirac, then one of the most influential theoretical physicists, was so impressed (which was a very rare occurrence) that he spontaneously offered to communicate the work to The Royal Society. Maurice PRYCE later remarked that this was the high-point of his scientific life. In 1939 he was appointed to a Readership in Theoretical Physics at Liverpool University, and married Margarete (GRITLI) BORN. At the advent of war he joined the team working on radar at the Admiralty Signal Establishment, and in 1944 transferred to the Joint Atomic Energy Project in Montreal. In 1945 he returned to his fellowship at Trinity College, Cambridge, and a university lectureship, but was soon invited to become Wykeham Professor of Physics at Oxford, a chair which had recently been earmarked for a theoretical physicist after the long tenure of Sir John Townsend. It was a bold appointment for someone aged only 32, who looked even younger than his years. At Oxford he rapidly acquired a large group of research students, many returning from war service, several of whom were to become very distinguished in their fields. His interests and knowledge spread across many branches of physics, and students were put to work on widely ranging topics stretching from field theory, the nuclear shell model, liquid helium, to solid state physics. Maurice PRYCE became most directly involved in interpreting the magnetic properties of atoms which were being studied in great detail through the paramagnetic resonance techniques by Brebis Bleaney and his colleagues in the Clarendon Laboratory. Almost half his published work relates to this area where he elucidated in detail the interaction between the magnetic electrons and the lattice (the crystal field), the effective lattice dynamics (the Jahn-Teller effect) and interaction with the nucleus (hyperfine structure). He also added considerably to the understanding of the magnetic properties of atoms in the actinide series, including the newly discovered transuranics. During his time in Oxford he took sabbatical leave to spend a year as Visiting Professor at Princeton. On his return he acted as the part-time head of the theoretical physics division at the nearby Atomic Energy Research Establishment at Harwell, where he replaced the previous head, Klaus Fuchs, who was arrested in 1950 and convicted on a charge of spying. In 1951 Maurice PRYCE was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society. In 1954, frustrated by the constraints of his position and in particular by the autocratic management of Lord Cherwell, he accepted an invitation to succeed Nevill Mott as Henry Overton Wills Professor of Physics at the University of Bristol. With greater administrative duties as head of the department he had less time to develop his research group but he continued with the subjects that he had begun at Oxford. His first marriage had broken down, and he married Freda KINSEY in 1961. He then accepted a tempting offer by the University of Southern California, and moved there in 1964, with the promise of resources to build up, essentially from scratch, a first class physics department. The reality turned out to be less attractive than he had hoped. In 1968 he moved again to a chair at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver where he was to remain until his death, on the 24th of July 2003. During these later years his main contributions were in the quite different field of astrophysics, although others, on molecular photoionisation and on the properties of the hydroxyl radical, continued to display his versatility and his wide understanding of physics. This knowledge was greatly valued by his colleagues who would rely on a critical appraisal of their work and its interpretation. But he did not suffer fools gladly and was a harsh critic; in a seminar, he could devastate the speaker and embarrass the audience with his acerbic comments. He also continued his interest in atomic energy derived from his wartime work and was latterly a member of the Technical Advisory Committee to the Atomic Energy of Canada Limited with a particular interest on nuclear fuel waste management. Some of his last work related to the questions of the safety of deposit of radioactive materials in geological structures. Maurice PRYCE was a keen walker and camper and, in younger days, a dinghy sailor. He was a competent pianist and liked to relax by playing classical music, mainly Bach and Mozart. He was a good cook, which stood him in good stead when entertaining Friends and family after his second wife died in 1990. He inherited from his father a love and knowledge of gardening, which he passed on to all four of his children. He always kept a boyish liking for silly games, from elaborate sandcastles on the beach to noisy card games on the living room floor. Until ill health stopped him, he was a skilful Scrabble player. He created a family tradition, perhaps characteristic of his personal philosophy, of Collaborative Scrabble -- the main aim is, within the rules, to maximize the overall score rather than to beat the other players. The mathematical gene has also passed on to his son John, well known in his field of mathematical software engineering; and to John's son Nathaniel, a professional software engineer. The last 14 years of his life he spent in the company of his great friend Eileen GOLDBERG, the widow of a South African lawyer who had been active in the fight against apartheid. They shared their love of music, literature, and walks in the woods. In December, 1997, he was incapacitated by an osteoporosis-induced bone fracture and subsequent infection, and spent his last five years at the University Hospital in Vancouver, visited daily by Eileen. During this period his mind was unaffected, and he bore immobility and frequent pain with patience, courage and a sense of humour, remaining in exemplary good spirits throughout. He is survived by his son, John, and three daughters, Sylvia, Lois and Suki, all from his first marriage.
Copyright: Roger Elliott and John Sanders/The Independent, London.

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KINSLEY o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-11-19 published
Margaret "May" KINSLEY
In loving memory of Margaret "Kay" KINSLEY who died at Sudbury Memorial Hospital on Sunday, November 16, 2003 at the age of 87 years.
Former resident of Tehkummah, Orangeville and Sudbury. Born to Alex and Martha McDONALD on September 7, 1916. Predeceased by both husbands Clarence KINSLEY and Archie McLENNAN. Loved by her children, Florence and husband Gilbert PYETTE of Mindemoya, John and wife Jean of Mindemoya, Russell and wife Fern McLENNAN of Bradford, David KINSLEY of Tehkummah. Will be missed by her grandchildren, Rodney, Anita, Frank, Doug, Don, Mark, Dennis, Janice, Patty (Patricia). Predeceased by granddaughter Barb. Great grandmother of ten. Remembered by siblings, "Russell" (William Alexander)(predeceased) and wife
Kathleen McDONALD, Mary and husband Harry LANKTREE (both predeceased,) Minerva HALL
of Orangeville and Annie and husband Arther (predeceased) McKINLEY of Sudbury.
Visitation from 2-4 and 7-9 on Wednesday, November 19, 2003 and Funeral at 11: 00a.m. Thursday, November 20, 2003 all at Tehkummah Pentecostal Church. Burial in Hilly Grove Cemetery. Island Funeral Home.

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KINSMAN o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-12-10 published
Nels PETERSEN
The family announces with sorrow his death in Arizona on Sunday, November 30, 2003 at the age of 73 years.
He was born in Wadena, Saskatchewan and married Iona (née COONEY) in Sudbury in 1950. After 25 years of service with the Region of Sudbury, Nels retired in 1989 and moved with Iona to Manitoulin Island. There they spent summers at Cedar Eden with their 5 children and 14 grandchildren and enjoyed winters at Cielo Grande Park, Mesa, Arizona with many Friends and relatives. He was always happiest tending to his flower and vegetable gardens and creating projects in his workshop. Nels was a hard worker, but took time to enjoy a round of golf, a game of pool, a good glass of wine and he always had a song in his heart. He will be remembered as a devoted family man and a good friend. Dear son of Peter and Elizabeth (both predeceased). Beloved husband of Iona (COONEY) PETERSEN of Sudbury. Loving father of Ken (partner Cathy KINSMAN) of Halifax, Kathy WOLYNSKY (husband George) of Sudbury, Kirk (wife Joyce) of Montreal, Mike (wife Debra predeceased) of Sudbury and Patty LAPLANTE (husband Paul) of Lively.
Proud grandfather of Ronnie, Laura, Nick, Graham, Kim, Elizabeth, Jessica, Amy, Jayson, Angela, Andre, Michelle, Amanda and Emily. Predeceased by sisters Herta and Elsie and brothers Andreas and Hans. Survived by his brother Peter (wife Millie) and Arne and sisters Margaret (husband Wilfred predeceased), Maren (husband Gordon predeceased) and Toody (husband Ron predeceased) all of Saskatchewan. He will be sadly missed as brother-in-law and uncle to his special Friends Martti and Gloria LUOMA of Coniston. Rested at the Jackson and Barnard Funeral Home, 233 Larch Street, Sudbury. Funeral Mass at Christ the King Church on Friday, December 5, 2003. Cremation at Parklawn Crematorium.

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