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"KEL" 2003 Obituary


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KELK o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-08 published
KELK, Margaret Emma (née POPE)
Peacefully on February 26, 2003, in her 86th year, at Dufferin Oaks Nursing Home in Shelburne, Ontario. Dear wife of the late Gordon Henry KELK. Beloved mother of Judith BRODIE of Grand Cayman and Jayne STANLEY of Shelburne. Loving sister of Mary Elaine UNWIN of Vancouver, British Columbia. Sadly missed by five grandchildren and six great-grandchildren. Thanks to the staff of Dufferin Oaks Nursing Home for their kind and patient care over the past eleven years. Cremation has taken care. A small family service was held in Shelburne. Donations to the Alzheimer Society would be appreciated by the family.

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KELK o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-06-24 published
KELK, Austin Rutherford
Died peacefully at the South Muskoka Memorial Hospital in Bracebridge, on Saturday, June 21, 2003 in his 76th year. Beloved husband of Maybelle of Baysville. Loving father of Cathy KELK of Toronto. Proud grandfather of Vicky KELK. Brother of Barbara Abel, the late Suzanne Hutchinson and Peter KELK. Friends will be received at the Reynolds Funeral Home ''Turner Chapel'', 1 Mary Street, Bracebridge, on Thursday, June 26, 2003 from 7-9 p.m. The funeral service will be held in the chapel on Friday at 11 a.m. followed by cremation. In lieu of flowers, donations to the Ontario Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals would be appreciated by the family.

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KELLER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-06-27 published
MALLORY, James Russell
Died peacefully at home on Tuesday, June 24, 2003. Born in 1916 in St. Andrews New Brunswick. Educated at New Brunswick (B.A. Hons), Dalhousie (M.A.), and Edinburgh (LL.B). There he met and married Frances KELLER in 1940, who shared his highs and lows for 63 years until her death in April 2003, a loss which left him bereft of the love and companionship which so long and happy a union brings. Foremost among his rewards was that he touched many through his teaching and written works about the constitution and workings of Canadian government. His career took him to Saskatchewan, Toronto, Brandon and McGill (for 45 years), where he was named professor emeritus and was for 10 years chairman of the economics & political science department. He will be much missed by his sons, James of London, and his wife Linda and children Pauline and Katie, and Charles of Ottawa, and his wife Dorothy, on whom he imparted, they hope, some of his wisdom, patience and integrity. Memorial Service McEvoy-Shields Funeral Home, 235 Kent Street, Ottawa on Saturday, June 28, at 11 a.m. In lieu of flowers, please donate to a charitable organization in his honour.

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KELLER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-08-15 published
Professor played a role in defeat of SSAINTURENT government
By M.J. STONE Special to The Globe and Mail Friday, August 15, 2003 - Page R5
Nearly four decades after Louis SSAINTURENT had been Prime Minister of Canada, McGill professor James MALLORY was surprised to discover how influential he had been in the defeat of Mr. SSAINTURENT's Liberals in 1957. The revelation occurred in 1992 when the cabinet papers of the SSAINTURENT government, which had been sealed for 35 years, were made available to the public.
Unknown to Professor MALLORY, a radio interview he gave in the wake of the 1957 election had caught the Prime Minister's ear. The Liberals had been reduced to 105 seats in the House, seven fewer than the Conservatives. But the Grits were still in a position to form a minority government with the aid of the 25 elected members of the Co-operative Commonwealth Federation, later to become the New Democratic Party.
Mr. SSAINTURENT found himself at a crossroads. While his party was clearly in decline, the Conservatives were on the rise and many questioned whether the Liberals still had a legal mandate to govern. When Mr. SSAINTURENT arrived in cabinet that morning, Prof. MALLORY's radio interview was still ringing in his ears.
Prof. MALLORY, who died in Montreal on June 24, said in the interview that if the Liberals continued to govern it would result in a constitutional crisis. He believed it was the responsibility of John DIEFENBAKER and the Conservatives to form a government. The cabinet papers clearly reflect Prof. MALLORY's influence over the Prime Minister that morning. Mr. SSAINTURENT demanded a copy of the MALLORY interview and after carefully studying the radio transcripts, he handed the rule of government over to the Tories.
Highly regarded as the foremost expert in Canadian legal and federal structures, Prof. MALLORY was often called on to advise governments about constitutional procedures. McGill professor Charles TAILOR/TAYLOR said another good example occurred in 1979.
"Joe CLARK's Conservatives had just lost a parliamentary vote," Prof. TAILOR/TAYLOR recalled. "The governor-general, Ed SCHREYER, telephoned McGill's political science department, looking for Jim. It caused something of a stir when he couldn't be found immediately. SCHREYER was frantic for MALLORY's advice. The governor-general was unsure how to proceed.
"Jim was eventually found and consulted. His advice was that the Conservatives should call an election -- exactly what Joe CLARK did."
The son of a county sheriff, James Russell MALLORY was born on February 5, 1916. He graduated with a Bachelor of Arts from the University of New Brunswick in 1937 and later studied law at Edinburgh and Dalhousie universities.
He met his American-born wife, Frances KELLER, in Scotland, and the couple married in 1940. They had two sons: James and Charles. Prof. MALLORY joined the faculty of the University of Saskatchewan in 1941. Later, he taught at the University of Toronto and Brandon College before moving to McGill in 1946.
A respected scholar and lawyer, Prof. MALLORY was an "old-school" professor who taught at McGill for 45 years. His reputation as a constitutional expert was solidified in 1954 when he published Social Credit and the Federal Power in Canada. The quintessential text mapped out the constitutional parameters of federal/provincial relations.
"James MALLORY was a discreet and modest man," McGill professor Sam NOUMOFF recalled. "He had a profound understanding of morality and he was incapable of self-promotion. He worked on university committee after committee while holding many teaching responsibilities.
"Jim wasn't the sort of man who sought public approval, he just did things because they were the right thing to do."
His son James, who lives in Britain, summed up his father's idealism: "He had a bloody-minded stubbornness. It would manifest sometimes in allowing discussions to go on and on. Then he would do exactly what he intended to do in the first place. Somehow it never impaired his reputation as a genuine democrat."
Prof. MALLORY was the founder of both the Canadian Studies program at McGill and the Canadian Association of University Professors. After retiring in 1982 he was appointed professor emeritus and continued to teach for another 10 years. In 1964, he was elected to the Royal Society of Canada and was later awarded the Queen's Silver Jubilee Medal in 1977.
In 1995, McGill founded the James R. Mallory lecture series, a one-day event that features a special guest who lectures about Canadian issues. Past guests have included Bob RAE, Peter WHITE/WHYTE and Phyllis LAMBERT. The organizers of the event say that this year's lecture will focus on Prof. MALLORY's legacy.
Prof. MALLORY died 11 weeks after the death of his wife on what would have been their 63rd anniversary.

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KELLS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-06-28 published
Lacrosse champ endured racism
Legendary player was subjected to slurs, but he didn't respond. 'It's because you were beating them they were saying it'
By Carol COOPER Special to The Globe and Mail Saturday, June 28, 2003 - Page F9
Before every Brantford Warriors lacrosse game in 1971, Ross POWLESS, the team's former player and coach, a member of the Canadian, and later, the Ontario lacrosse halls of fame, crossed the floor to speak with coach Morley KELLS.
As they chatted, Mr. POWLESS wagged his finger at Mr. KELLS, now an Ontario Member of Provincial Parliament. To the spectators above, it looked as if he were advising the coach on the upcoming game.
"I kind of laughed, because I knew what was taking place," Mr. KELLS said. "You could always see them up in the stands nodding, thinking, 'Ross has things straightened out.' I didn't mind a bit."
Known for his sense of humour as well as his playing and coaching, Mr. POWLESS died recently at the age of 76.
From 1945 to 1961, he played intermediate and senior level lacrosse in British Columbia, New York State and Southern Ontario, scoring 294 goals and 338 assists during his Senior A career. He contributed to three Mann Cup wins, lacrosse's national championship, for the Peterborough Timbermen from 1951 to 1953.
During the 1953 Cup finals, Mr. POWLESS won the Mike Kelly Award as the most valuable player of the series. Also, he was twice given the Tom Longboat Award as the top Indian athlete in Canada.
Born a Mohawk on the Six Nations Reserve of the Grand River Territory in Southwestern Ontario, Mr. POWLESS came from a family of talented players. One of his grandfathers, his father and several uncles played on Six Nations teams or with the travelling Mohawk Stars, according to lacrosse historian Stan SHILLINGTON.
And Mr. POWLESS was patriarch to another. Four of his sons played Senior A lacrosse. One of them, Gaylord, joined him in the Canadian Lacrosse Hall of Fame in 1990, making them the only father and son pair in the hall.
Ross POWLESS played what his people call "the game the Creator gave us" with skill and ease.
"He was a great, great player," said close friend and former teammate Roger SMITH, also a member of the Canadian and Ontario lacrosse halls of fame. "He could do it all. He could play defence, offence. He scored a lot of goals, he was a great team player, a great checker, a good corner player, a good loose-ball man. He was one of the best."
A large man, standing above six feet and weighing more than 200 pounds, Mr. POWLESS played an especially strong defensive game. "He wasn't fast, but he knew where to cut you off at the pass," said Mr. KELLS, who played against him.
"Ross's attitude was that sooner or later you had to show up heading for the net, so he would be there waiting for you. If anyone had a natural understanding of how the flow of the game should be and how to control it, it was him."
Mr. POWLESS played with handmade hickory sticks, disdaining the later mass-produced plastic sticks as "Tupperware."
A gifted coach who got the best out of his players, he led many teams to divisional and national championships. One of his prouder moments came when he coached six of his sons, including Gaylord, on the 1974 Ontario First Nations Team. The team won the All-Indian Nations Lacrosse Tournament in B.C.
Born on September 29, 1926, in the log cabin his carpenter father built in Ohsweken, Ontario, Alex Ross POWLESS was one of eight children. Although the family lived without running water or hydro, he later told his children that he never felt poor because there was always food on the table.
After his mother died in 1932, Mr. POWLESS attended residential school in nearby Brantford until Grade 8 and then high school for one year. In 1945, at the age of 18, he headed to Vancouver to play on Andy PAULL's Senior North Shore Indians team.
For the next five years, Mr. POWLESS played for intermediate teams in Buffalo, Brantford and Huntsville, Ontario, taking seasonal jobs to support himself. In 1951, he joined the Senior A Peterborough Timbermen.
By 1954, Mr. POWLESS and his wife Wilma, whom he married in 1948, had moved their growing family, which would eventually number 14, back to the family homestead in Ohsweken. There, they lived without electricity until 1957 and without running water until a new house was built in 1970.
Mr. POWLESS continued playing Senior A lacrosse for Hamilton and St. Catharines, and as a pickup player for the Timbermen in the 1956 Mann Cup finals, then moved to Senior B and intermediate teams until he retired from playing in 1961.
Lacrosse was important to a lot of people, but it was extra important to him, Mr. POWLESS told Canadian Broadcasting Corporation Radio in January.
Richard POWLESS, another son from the 1974 team, said: "It opened up the world to him. Back in those days, there weren't many Indians playing in the wider world. It got him off the reserve, and he had the talent to go places, and it was recognized."
Often the wider world greeted Mr. POWLESS with racial slurs. The crowd and members of opposing teams called him blanket-ass and wagon-burner and squirted drinks on him.
"You'd get used it, it wouldn't bother you. They wouldn't be saying that if they were beating you. It's because you were beating them they were saying it," Mr. POWLESS told the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation.
Richard POWLESS said, "He didn't react to it, he didn't respond to it, it was just part of the burden he had to carry."
Still, Ross POWLESS credited lacrosse with helping him make white Friends across the country. Some of them stood up for him. Once during tryouts for the Timbermen, he entered a bar in Peterborough with some members of the team. Because he did not have a blue card indicating that he had given up his Indian status, he could not drink legally and was refused service.
The Timbermen left the bar saying, "If he's not good enough, we're not good enough neither," author Donald M. FISHER quotes Mr. POWLESS's recollection in Lacrosse: A History of the Game.
Mr. POWLESS was proud of his heritage and maintained its traditions.
However, he did not teach the Mohawk language to his children. Scarred by his experience in residential school, where he was punished for speaking his mother tongue, he and his wife decided not to pass it on. Instead, he told his children that it was a white man's world, and to live in it successfully, they needed to excel in English.
At times, Mr. POWLESS acted politically. In 1959, a group of Mohawks, including him, tried to reinstate the traditional native government. "He was a firm believer in our own system and our own way of doing things," Richard POWLESS said. "When he believed in something, it wasn't just talk and that's the way he raised us."
Mr. POWLESS had settled into carpentry after his return to Ohsweken in 1954, a trade he practised for the next 30 years.
Earning a reputation as a hard worker, he soon became a foreman and, among other projects, worked on the Burlington Skyway Bridge.
Always an avid hunter, fisherman and pool player, Mr. POWLESS worked as a building inspector on the Six Nations Reserve until his retirement in 1991, served as a band councillor for eight years and helped to start Six Nations minor lacrosse and hockey leagues. In 1997, the Ontario Municipal Recreation Association gave him a volunteer service award.
Like many players, Mr. POWLESS was buried with lacrosse sticks. He had told the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation of his intention, saying, "I want to play with my dad, my sons, my uncles and my nephews."
Mr. POWLESS died on May 26 in Paris, Ontario, of cancer. Sons Victor, Gaylord and Gregory predeceased him. He leaves Wilma, his wife of 55 years, 11 children, 27 grandchildren and seven great-grandchildren.

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KELLY o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-04-30 published
Maxine Verna HOFFMAN
In loving memory of Maxine Verna HOFFMAN who passed away peacefully at Wikwemikong Nursing Home on Saturday, April 26, 2003 at the age of 86 years.
Beloved mother of Gary and Marie HOFFMAN of South Baymouth. Cherished grandmother of Paula HOFFMAN (Dan) and Larry (Suzanne) HOFFMAN. Loved great grandmother of Kyle and Rachel. Will be missed by brothers and sisters, Ivy and Hugh KELLY, both predeceased. Pearl and Dave McLEAN, both predeceased, Gordon (predeceased) and Margaret HEMBRUFF, Freda and Robert (predeceased) SANDERS of Scarborough, Ken and Elaine (predeceased) HEMBRUFF of Beaumondville, Willard and Barb HEMBRUFF of Minden, Welland and Elizabeth HEMBRUFF of Scarborough, Dorothy and Wayne (predeceased) SMITH of Queensville and Ron and Marie HEMBRUFF of Toronto. Dear aunt of many nieces and nephews and great nieces and nephews.
A gathering of family and Friends for a grave side service will be held at 1: 00 p.m. Sunday, May 4, 2003 in Hilly Grove Cemetery. There will be no wake or funeral service. Arrangements in care of Island Funeral Home

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KELLY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-07 published
KELLY, Vivian Elizabeth (Betty)
In celebration of the life of Vivian Elizabeth (Betty) KELLY, née MacLEOD, predeceased by John Foy KELLY and mother of John (Jane), Bryan (Emily), David (Janet) and Grant, grandmother of Sharon, Stephen, Jessica, Jamie, sister to Bruce (Nancy) and Charles (predeceased) (Fran). Betty lived with quiet devotion to her husband, her sons and her church and passed with grace at 2 a.m., March 5, 2003. Special thanks to Friends and the kind staff at Extendicare and the Northumberland Health Care Centre for welcoming Betty. Visitation from 3 p.m. - 5 p.m. Saturday, March 8, 2003, and service at 2 p.m. Sunday, March 9, 2003, MacCoubrey Funeral Home, 30 King Street, E. Cobourg (905) 372-5132. In lieu of flowers, memorial donations to the Dystonia Research Foundation of Canada are appreciated. Condolences received at maccoubrey@sympatico.ca.

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KELLY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-05-03 published
Leafs trusted their doctor
Talented M.D. specialized in hand surgery. 'He had a unique technical approach. That's what made him different from other surgeons.'
By Carol COOPER Special to The Globe and Mail Saturday, May 3, 2003 - Page F10
Nothing about Jim MURRAY's hands indicated that he was a surgeon. Large and gnarled with undulating fingernails, those hands played bagpipes, patched up Toronto Maple Leafs and Team Canada players and restored form and function to other hands.
Dr. MURRAY, a plastic surgeon who was the first Canadian doctor to devote his practice to hand surgery, died last month at the age of 82.
"His hands looked more like those of a prize fighter than a surgeon. His fingers were bent, "said Robert McFARLANE, a retired plastic surgeon with a special interest in hands and a close friend of Dr. MURRAY. "It didn't seem to make a difference. He had tremendous skill."
In 1983, Dr. MURRAY brought together plastic and orthopedic surgeons to form a hand unit at Toronto's Sunnybrook Health Science Centre, the city's first. "His concept was to pull together the expertise of different surgeons, "said Paul BINHAMMER, once a student of Dr. MURRAY and now a plastic surgeon at the hospital, now part of the Sunnybrook and Women's College Health Sciences Centre.
Dr. MURRAY assembled a highly skilled team. Among them were orthopedic surgeon Robert McMURTRY, who went on to become dean of medicine at the University of Western Ontario, and plastic surgeon and nerve expert Susan MacKINNON, who is now a professor in the United States.
But before rising to prominence in the field of hand surgery, Dr. MURRAY gained fame in hockey circles. Serving as one of the Toronto Maple Leafs team doctors from 1948 to 1964, he was greatly trusted by players. When cut during games on the road, they left their wounds unstitched until he could tend to them at home.
"He'd come at you with those fingers and they were just so big, you'd wonder how he was ever able to stitch as neat as he did," said former Leaf defenceman Bobby BAUN, who played professional hockey for 17 years.
Mr. BAUN estimates that Dr. MURRAY put in half of his 143 career stitches.
Under instructions from Leaf owner Conn SMYTHE, injured players were not to be rushed back into the lineup, according to Hugh SMYTHE, another Leaf doctor and Mr. SMYTHE's son. "This was a heavy and not always popular role, "he said.
During the 1964 Stanley Cup finals, it became especially challenging.
Entering Game 6, the Detroit Red Wings led the series against the Leafs 3-2. Playing in Detroit on April 23, with the scored tied at 3-3 in the third period, Mr. BAUN first was hit on his right leg by a slapshot from Gordie HOWE and then, after a faceoff, spun on the leg, which gave way.
X-rays delayed at Mr. BAUN's insistence showed a small broken bone, just above the ankle. He spent six weeks in a cast.
But that came after the series ended. During its sixth game, Mr. BAUN was tended to by Dr. MURRAY and other team doctors. After being carried off the ice, he asked Dr. MURRAY if he could hurt his leg any more. The doctor replied no. "Having someone like Jim tell me that, I could believe him, "Mr. BAUN said.
With his leg taped and frozen, Mr. BAUN continued playing. Within the first two minutes of the first overtime period, he scored the winning goal and kept the Leafs in the series.
Mr. BAUN didn't miss a shift during Game 7, and neither did teammate Red KELLY, who had torn knee ligaments during the previous game. The Leafs won the seventh game 4-0 and the Stanley Cup, their third in a row and their fifth during Dr. MURRAY's time with the team.
That year, Dr. MURRAY resigned and 20 years later joked to The Toronto Star that it was he who had led them to the five Stanley Cups.
If he took the connection between his presence and the Leafs' wins lightly, Punch IMLACH, then the team's coach, did not. Mr. IMLACH had become convinced that Dr. MURRAY brought the team good luck, the doctor told the Star in a 1972 story.
The newspaper was interviewing Dr. MURRAY about his appointment as a doctor to Team Canada for the Canada-Russia hockey series. In the article headlined "Good luck charm for Team Canada, " he recalled how during the 1967 Stanley Cup playoffs, Mr. IMLACH invited him to a Leaf game in Chicago, believing that he would bring the team good luck.
"If it had been anybody else but Punch, I'd have dismissed it as a joke. But he really needed to win and he honestly believed my presence would make a difference, "Dr. MURRAY was quoted as saying.
The Leafs won not only that game, but, with Dr. MURRAY in attendance for the remainder of the series, the Stanley Cup. The Leafs haven't won a Stanley Cup since.
And the Star's headline proved prophetic. Team Canada won the Canada-Russia series when Paul HENDERSON scored with 34 seconds left in the eighth game.
Born in Toronto on May 14, 1920, James Findlay MURRAY was the youngest of three children. His father ran a store at Yonge and Queen Streets in downtown Toronto and died before the birth of his third child.
Dr. MURRAY attributed his curvy fingernails to his mother's malnutrition when she was pregnant with him, said his youngest son Hugh. Within a few years, she had remarried, and his stepfather helped to raise him.
An avid athlete, Dr. MURRAY played football during his high school and university days, so much so that once, when forbidden by his mother to play for his high-school team because he had had pneumonia, he practised and played in secret.
That lasted until his picture appeared in the Star running for a touchdown. He was immediately placed on the disabled list.
Awarded the George Biggs trophy for sportsmanship, leadership and scholarship, Dr. MURRAY graduated from medical school in 1943 and spent two years in the Royal Canadian Medical Corps, finishing as a captain.
After a year of general practice in Belleville, Ontario, he trained in plastic surgery at the Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto with A. W. FARMER, whom many consider to be the father of Canadian hand surgery.
A humble man, who drove less-than-fancy cars, Dr. MURRAY was known for his ability to relate to everyone. "He was a doctor and an esteemed member of society, but it didn't matter to him," Hugh MURRAY said. "He considered himself an everyday person. He was as comfortable, if not more comfortable, dealing with just working guys."
In 1953, Dr. MURRAY joined the Toronto East General and Orthopedic Hospital as head of plastic surgery and organized a specialized hand clinic, according to Bernd NEU, another former student of Dr. MURRAY and now a plastic surgeon at North York General Hospital.
"It's because the hand is such an important part of the body, not just physically, but aesthetically, "Dr. MURRAY, a specialist in soft tissue and the reconstruction of flexor tendons, said in 1984 to explain the dedication of hand surgeons.
In 1983, Dr. MURRAY left Toronto East General, where he had been surgeon-in-chief since 1976, to head the hand unit at Sunnybrook Medical Centre, taking a cut in pay to do so.
At the time, plastic surgeons could earn $2,000 for a face-lift and $106.50 for a carpal-tunnel release.
Dr. MURRAY derived great satisfaction from the help his hands gave others. Once in a clinic at Toronto East General, he and Dr. NEU came upon a patient with only a thumb and little finger on one hand.
"This is a wonderful hand, "he told Dr. NEU. " Look at how dirty and callused it is."
After several surgeries, Dr. MURRAY had restored the worker's hand to the point where the man could use it once again to earn a living.
"What to other people would look like a devastating loss, to Dr. MURRAY and the patient, this was a hand to be proud of, Dr. NEU said.
As a hand consultant beginning in 1974 at the Downsview Rehabilitation Centre of the Workers' Compensation Board, Dr. MURRAY treated those injured in industrial accidents, often surmounting language barriers to do so.
"He could speak to them [the patients] in basic English, so they could understand how seriously he took their problems, and how everything was being done that could be done for them, "Dr. NEU said.
In a 1996 letter to Dr. MURRAY, another of his former residents recalled how once on rounds, the doctor lifted the sheets to examine a paraplegic patient, only to find the man soiled. Instead of calling for hospital staff to clean the man, Dr. MURRAY performed the task himself.
"That little lesson reminded me that being a doctor is not just being a cutter, "the physician wrote.
Not only did he have a natural way with people, Dr. MURRAY was a gifted surgeon.
"He was a talented person with original ways of doing things," Dr. McFARLANE said. "He had a unique technical approach. That's what made him different from other surgeons."
Appointed a lecturer at the University of Toronto in 1953, Dr. MURRAY was first an assistant and associate professor, becoming a full professor in 1979. He developed the first hand surgery fellowship training program in Canada in 1981, Dr. NEU said.
As well as teaching at the university, Dr. MURRAY trained surgeons during two trips to Southeast Asia as a volunteer with Cooperative for American Relief Everywhere, Inc. Medico and led a group of hand surgeons to study techniques in micro-surgery in China during the late 1970s.
At the medical meetings Dr. MURRAY often attended, he impressed Dr. McFARLANE with his ability to discuss surgery. "He had a very common-sense approach to a surgical problem, and when everyone had something to say about a problem, he would get up and clarify it very nicely, "Dr. McFARLANE said.
A founder of MANUS Canada, a society of hand surgeons, once a president of the Canadian Society of Plastic Surgeons and the American Society for Surgery of the Hand, Dr. MURRAY was honoured by the U.S. society at "Murray Day" in 1990 with tributes from past presidents.
Stricken with Alzheimer's disease toward the end of his life, Dr. MURRAY died in Collingwood, Ontario, on April 4. He leaves his wife of 57 years, Shirley, and his children, John, Bill, Claire and Hugh.

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KELLY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-08-01 published
McCULLOCH, Peter Blair, M.D., Fellow of the Royal College of Physicians of Canada
On July 31, Dr. Peter McCULLOCH died peacefully at home in Hamilton, in his 65th year. Peter was the loving husband of Judith (Craig), devoted father of Peter and his financée Christine KELLY of Westport, Connecticut, Paul and his wife Daphne BONAR of Toronto, Colin and his wife Marie (Hooey) of Charlton, New York, and gentle ''Bwana'' of Ian McCULLOCH. In 1968, just after five years of marrige, he lost his first wife, Sally Ann MARSHALL, mother of Peter and Paul, in a car accident. Peter was the only and dearly loved son of the late Velma and Peter McCULLOCH, the much admired and appreciated son-in-law of the late Charlotte and William CRAIG of Cambridge (Galt) and the late Grace and Frank MARSHALL of Orillia, and dear brother-in-law of Patricia and Ross HUTCHINSON/HUTCHISON of Oakville. A graduate of the University of Toronto (1964), he did his residency in Internal Medicine and Clinical Haemotology at the Montreal General Hospital, earning his Fellowship in the Royal College of Physicians of Canada in 1969. This was followed by two years in Kenya where he was seconded to the University of Nairobi by McGill University for the Canadian International Development Agency/Kenya Medical Development Program. While in Kenya, he taught medical students, served as a medical consultant, undertook various study projects for the United Nations International Agency for Research on Cancer and climbed Mt. Kilimanjaro. Dr. McCULLOCH returned to his hometown in 1972, becoming the first medical oncologist and establishing his systemic treatment program at the Hamilton Regional Cancer Centre. He cared skilfully and compassionately for his patients, collaborated on research projects, coordinated provincial clinical trials, mentored colleagues and inspired students until April 2003 when his own cancer was diagnosed. He was a Professor of Medicine at McMaster University and over the years served on many committees locally and nationally. He was particularly proud of his work as Chair of the Research Ethics Board of McMaster University/Hamilton Health Sciences. Peter was an enthusiastic skier, fisherman, photographer and student of history, science and world affairs, and he travelled extensively in pursuit of these interests. He will be sorely missed by his family, Friends, colleagues and patients, and by people whose lives he touched around the world. A funeral service will be held at Central Presbyterian Church, 165 Charlton Avenue West (at Caroline), Hamilton on Tuesday, August 5 at 11 a.m. The family will receive visitors at Dodsworth and Brown Funeral Home, Robinson Chapel (King Street East at Wellington, Hamilton) on Monday, August 4 from 2-4 p.m. and 7-9 p.m. In lieu of flowers, memorial gifts to the Hamilton Regional Cancer Centre Foundation, Hamilton Community Foundation or charity of your choice would be appreciated.

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KELLY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-08-19 published
MYNARSKI's man FRIDAY
Knocked unconscious, the young bomb aimer was saved when his flight engineer pushed him out of their stricken Lancaster
By Tom HAWTHORN Special to The Globe and Mail Tuesday, August 19, 2003 - Page R7
Victoria -- A Second World War bomb aimer who survived an ill-fated mission during which his friend Andrew MYNARSKI was later awarded a posthumous Victoria Cross for trying the save a trapped fellow crewman has died. Jack FRIDAY, who spent his peacetime career with Air Canada, died in Thunder Bay.
Mr. MYNARSKI's sacrifice awed a generation of children who learned of it in their school readers. Mr. FRIDAY was often asked to recount what happened aboard his doomed Lancaster as it burned over France. What many did not realize was that Mr. FRIDAY only learned the details of Mr. MYNARSKI's heroism after the end of the war.
On June 12, 1944, his Royal Canadian Air Force crew was assigned to bomb the railroad marshalling yards at Cambrai. The mission was similar to others in recent days, as No. 419 (Moose) Squadron attacked German reinforcements being rushed forward to repel Allied forces in Normandy.
Six days earlier, the crew had bombed coastal guns at Longues in the early-morning hours before the invasion fleet landed on D-Day. The Cambrai target -- their 13th mission -- was to be attacked on in the early morning hours of June 13. Later, superstitious survivors would speak of that coincidence as a missed omen.
Their Lancaster lifted off the runway at Middleton St. George in Yorkshire at 9: 44 p.m. on June 12. After crossing the English Channel, the bomber was coned -- caught in searchlights -- but the pilot, Flying Officer Arthur DE BREYNE, managed to manoeuvre his craft out of the dreaded lights.
The reprieve did not last long.
Rear gunner Patrick BROPHY, who sat in an isolated compartment at the rear of the aircraft, spotted an enemy fighter below. "Bogey astern! Six o'clock!" he shouted into the intercom, just before a Junkers 88 attacked.
Mr. DE BREYNE threw the bomber into an evasive corkscrew. In an instant, though, his plane was rocked by three explosions. Both port engines were knocked out and the wing set afire. A hydraulic line in the fuselage had also been severed and the midsection of the plane was burning.
The pilot ordered the crew to evacuate as he struggled to prevent the Lancaster from going into a dive. Mr. FRIDAY's duty as bomb aimer was to release the escape hatch. As he did so, the rushing wind whipped the steel door open, striking him above the right eye.
Flight engineer Roy VIGARS was the first among the other crew to clamber to the hatch.
"I made my way down to the bomb-aimer's position and found Jack FRIDAY slumped on the floor, unconscious," Mr. VIGARS told Bette PAGE for her 1989 book, Mynarski's Lanc. "I rolled him over, clipped on his parachute pack, and slid him over to the escape hatch and dropped him through the opening while holding on to the ripcord."
The act was risky, as the parachute could have wrapped around the craft's tail wheel. Mr. VIGARS saw that Mr. FRIDAY's parachute had opened clear of the bomber. He then jumped, followed by wireless operator James KELLY, navigator Robert BODIE and the pilot, who had recovered control of the bomber and set it on a gentle descent.
Unknown to those men, a terrible drama was being played out at the rear of the flaming craft.
As Warrant Officer MYNARSKI prepared to jump, he looked back to see that Flying Officer Patrick BROPHY was still at his rear-gunner's position.
Mr. MYNARSKI, the mid-upper gunner, crawled through the burning fuselage, his uniform and parachute catching fire. Mr. BROPHY was trapped in his seat and the men struggled desperately to free him.
Finally, Mr. BROPHY told Mr. MYNARSKI to jump without him.
Mr. MYNARSKI crawled back through the fire, stood at the door, saluted his doomed comrade, and leapt into the inky sky with his uniform and parachute in flames.
Aboard the Lancaster, Mr. BROPHY prepared for certain death.
Some miles away, Mr. FRIDAY floated unconscious to earth by parachute, landing near a chateau at Hedauville. A pair of farm workers found him in a vineyard the next morning. He was taken to a local doctor who feared reprisals for treating an Allied airman. The injured man was turned over to the Germans.
Mr. FRIDAY finally regained consciousness on June 17, wakening in a prison cell in Amiens. He feared he had lost his eye. A fellow prisoner peeked beneath Mr. FRIDAY's bandages and saw that a flap of skin was blocking his vision. The wound had not been stitched.
Mr. FRIDAY was reunited with Mr. VIGARS as their captors prepared to transport prisoners to Germany.
The pair were sent to an interrogation centre near Frankfurt, before being transferred to Stalag Luft 7 at Bankau, outside Breslau (now Wroclaw), in Silesia near Poland.
The men were separated again on January 18, 1945, as the Germans marched prisoners out of the camp ahead of the advancing Soviet army. The forced march was arduous. Many died of disease, exposure and exhaustion. Mr. FRIDAY survived by stealing frozen beets and potatoes from farmer's fields. He would later remember the only warm night of the march was spent in a barn, where he snuggled overnight with a cow. Mr. FRIDAY was at last liberated by the Soviets in April.
He returned to England in May, where, as recounted in the 1992 book, The Evaders, he prepared a statement, the brevity of which perfectly captured his sense of the dramatic events. "Took off from Middleton St. George. Do not remember briefing or takeoff. First thing I remember is coming to in a hospital in Amiens."
Only later did he learn what happened aboard the Lancaster. As the bomber crashed, the port wing struck a tree, causing the plane to veer violently to the left. The force freed Mr. BROPHY from his turret prison and he landed against a tree, far away from the burning wreckage. He had survived.
Mr. MYNARSKI, the son of Polish immigrants and a leather worker in civilian life, was not as fortunate. He was found by the French, but was so badly burned that he soon died from his injuries. He was 27.
The other crewmen, including Mr. BROPHY, evaded capture with the assistance of French civilians.
John William FRIDAY was the third son born to a pharmacist in Port Arthur, Ontario, on December 21, 1921. He graduated from Port Arthur Collegiate Institute before joining the Royal Canadian Air Force in 1942. He was demobilized with the rank of flying officer. He worked as an Air Canada passenger agent for 31 years before retiring in 1985.
In 1988, he joined his former crew mates in ceremonies marking the dedication of a restored Lancaster at the Canadian Warplane Heritage Museum at Mount Hope, Ontario The aircraft, which was refurbished in the colours and markings of the crew's plane, has been designated the MYNARSKI Memorial Lancaster. MYNARSKI's name also graces a string of three lakes in Manitoba, as well as a park, a school and a civic ward in his hometown of Winnipeg.
Mr. FRIDAY died of cancer in Thunder Bay, Ontario, on June 22. He leaves Shirley (née BISSONNETTE,) his wife of 54 years, five children and four younger sisters. He was predeceased by two brothers.
Mr. BROPHY, whose life he tried to save, died at age 68 at St. Catharines, Ontario, in 1991. According to the second edition of MYNARSKI's Lanc, Mr. VIGARS, who saved Mr. FRIDAY's life, died in 1989 at Guildford, England; Mr. DE BREYNE died at St. Lambert, Quebec, in 1991; and, Mr. BODIE died in Vancouver in 1994. Mr. FRIDAY's death leaves James KELLY of Toronto as the only survivor.

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KELLY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-10-29 published
KELLY, Thomas Patrick " Tim" (1922 - 2003)
Tim KELLY of Bromley Avenue, Moncton, died peacefully at the Moncton Hospital on Monday October 27, 2003. He was born in Toronto on October 18, 1922 and was the son of the late Emmett and Barbara (DOLLY) KELLY. Tim worked as a senior executive with Canadian Marconi Company, Montreal, Quebec and a business owner of the electronics distributor Keldon Electronics Limited, Pointe Claire, Quebec. In 1979 he established the Moncton, New Brunswick based consumer electronics retailer, Sounds Fantastic Atlantic Limited. As a business leader Tim had a gift for marketing and financial management. He built a strong business that grew and flourished well after his retirement in 1986, which is a legacy to his sound planning and leadership. He was one of the original believers in the United Way and was an active member of the Elks Lodge of Moncton since 1979. As well Tim served with the Royal Canadian Air Force from 1943-1945. Tim is survived by his wife of 54 years, Ivy Anita (née TRUMBLEY) and seven children: Brian (Lynne ARSENEAULT) of Peterborough, Steve of Dieppe, Jeff (Lila DONOVAN) of Moncton, Brad (Sandra THORBURN) of Edmonton, Scott (Jamie PENFOLD) of Moncton, Jan KOSHYLANYK (Terry) of Ancaster and Jill SMITH (Gary) of Riverview. He will be dearly missed by his 17 grandchildren: Kevin, Autumn, Christopher, Patrick, Jessica, Ryan, Alison, Kieran, Nicholas, Regan, Tyler, Wesley, Stephen, Kaileigh, Brandon, Morgan and Talia, as well his 2 great grand_sons Carter and William. He is also survived by his sisters Bernie KELLY of Beaconsfield and Barbara MURPHY (Ted) Uxbridge, and a brother Paul of Ottawa. He was predeceased by brothers Fred and Jim. Visiting hours will be held at Cadman's Funeral Home, 114 Alma Street, Moncton on Thursday from 2-4 and 7-9 with parish prayers to be held at the funeral home Thursday evening at 8: 30 p.m. The Funeral Mass will be held from St. Bernard's Catholic Church on Friday October 31 at 11: 00 a.m. with Father Peter McKEE officiating. The interment will take place at Our Lady of Calvary Cemetery, Dieppe. Donations to the memorial of the donor's choice would be appreciated by the family. The family would like to thank the staff at both the Dr. George L. Dumont Hospital and the Moncton Hospital for the professional and loving care that they provided to Tim, as well to our family over the last few months. There are truly many angels at both our hospitals. www.cadmansfh.com

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KELMAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-03 published
BOIGON, Dede
On Thursday, February 27, 2003, at Toronto Western Hospital. Dede BOIGON, beloved wife of Irving. Loving mother and mother-in-law of Stanley BOIGON and Fern ROTSTEIN, Brian BOIGON and Susan SPEIGEL, Gary BOIGON and Michele SPANO, and Beth BOIGON and Gregor HUTCHINSON/HUTCHISON. Dear sister and sister-in-law of Ed and Sylvia HYDE, and Ruth and Albert KELMAN. Devoted grandmother of Michelle, Kayla, Ryan, Stella, Austin, Melissa, Molly, Sam, Matthew, and Zoe. Shiva 355 St. Clair Avenue West #1007. If desired, donations may be made to the Princess Margaret Hospital Foundation, 416-946-6560.

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KELOS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-06-28 published
COLQUHOUN, Stephen Murray
It is with great sadness that we announce that Stephen Murray COLQUHOUN died suddenly on Wednesday, June 18th, 2003 in Thunder Bay, Ontario. Steve will be sorely missed and always cherished by his wife Maria (née SALATINO,) sons Stevie and Jamie, his sisters Liz (Mike EVANS), Marg (Brian WEBSTER), Mary Louise (Paul RADDEN,) and brother Bob (Judy COLQUHOUN.) He died too young. First and foremost in Stevie's life was always Maria and his boys. He will also be missed by his in-laws Maria and Giacomo SALATINO, his wife's sisters Rosa (Cheslan CHOMYCZ,) Anna (Chris KELOS), Gina (Dan CHAMPAGNE), Aunt and Uncle Jim and Cappy COLQUHOUN. A funeral was held at St. Andrews Presbyterian Church on Monday, June 23, 2003. In lieu of flowers, a donation to a trust fund for his children, c/o any branch of the Bank of Nova Scotia, account #006870000485 would be greatly appreciated.

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